Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3648698 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1972
Filing dateMay 23, 1969
Priority dateMay 23, 1969
Also published asCA955486A, CA955486A1
Publication numberUS 3648698 A, US 3648698A, US-A-3648698, US3648698 A, US3648698A
InventorsDoherty George O
Original AssigneeDoherty George O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical collection unit
US 3648698 A
Abstract
A surgical collection unit includes an inlet conduit, an outlet conduit, and an enclosed container. The inlet and outlet conduits have portions extending within and opening into the container. Means are associated with the outlet conduit for withdrawing air from the container to reduce the atmospheric pressure therein so that fluent material is forced through the inlet conduit into the container. A bypass conduit may be provided between the inlet conduit and the outlet conduit. A valve may be provided for directing the fluent material alternatively either through the bypass valve or into the container.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Doherty 1 1 Mar. 114, 11972 [54] SURGICAL COLLECTION UNIT [72] Inventor: George 0. Doherty, 2301 River Road,

Missoula, Mont. 59801 [22] Filed: May 23, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 827,429

[52] 11.5. CI ..l28/276 [51] ....A6lm 1/00 [58] Field of Search ..128/275-278 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,815,025 12/1957 Fenton et a1 128/275 2,886,036 5/1959 Price 3,000,492 9/ 1961 Miller 3,556,101 1/1971 Economou...

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 436,052 10/1935 Great Britain ..128/275 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum Attorney-John D. Pope,1l1

[57] ABSTRACT A surgical collection unit includes an inlet conduit, an outlet conduit, and an enclosed container. The inlet and outlet conduits have portions extending within and opening into the container. Means are associated with the outlet conduit for withdrawing air from the container to reduce the atmospheric pressure therein so that fluent material is forced through the inlet conduit into the container. A bypass conduit may be provided between the inlet conduit and the outlet conduit. A valve may be provided for directing the fluent material alternatively either through the bypass valve or into the container 15 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures Patenwd March 14, 1972 $648,698

2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR GEORGE O. OHERTY ATTORNEY Patented March 14, 1972 3 8,698

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR GEORGE 0. DOHERTY BY E ATTORNEY SURGICAL COLLECTION UNIT This invention relates to a surgical collection unit.

Surgical collection units are often used during surgery for evacuation of blood, pus, urine and other materials. These materials are collected so that they may be analyzed and measured after the operation. Suction apparatus has been used which includes devices mounted in the line of suction for collecting these materials, but the ones presently being used have many disadvantages. For example they are usually heavy and are not disposable. Because they are used for more than one patient, they must be sterilized in order to prevent contamination between patients. Physicians sometimes want to empty the collection units in the middle of the operation and begin collecting material anew. This is not usually possible with collection units presently known because they cannot be easily emptied in the middle of the operation. Many collection units are made of glass and hence are breakable, thereby creating a safety hazard in the operating room. Because of the great amount of equipment in operating rooms and because of the need for everything to be positioned efficiently, it is desirable to have a collection unit which may be suspended or mounted anywhere in the operating room.

Among the several objects of the present invention may be noted the provision of a surgical collection unit which is disposable; the provision of a surgical collection unit which may be sterilized at the time of manufacture and stored until use; the provision of a surgical collection unit which may be stored in a collapsed state so that it will occupy the smallest possible space; the provision of a surgical collection unit which is inexpensive to manufacture so that it will be economical to dispose of it after its first use; the provision of a surgical collection unit which can be replaced after being used for one patient, thereby eliminating the need for sterilization between patients to prevent cross-contamination; the provision of a surgical collection unit which is not breakable; the provision of a surgical collection unit which may be mounted along a suction conduit anywhere in the line of suction; the provision of a surgical collection unit which may be emptied periodically without being disconnected; and the provision of a surgical collection unit which accurately measures the evacuated materials. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which several of various possible embodiments of the invention are illustrated,

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the surgical collection unit of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the container for the collection unit;

FIG. 3 is aperspective exploded view of the receptacle for the collection unit;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a modification of the surgical collection unit shown in FIGS. 1-3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of another modification of the sur gical collection unit of this invention; and

FIG. 6 is a partial sectional view of a further modification of the surgical collection unit of this invention.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, numeral 10 designates a surgical collection unit. A receptacle I2 is formed from a cardboard box 13 having four walls I4, l6, 18, 20, and two open ends 22, 24. A pair of semi-circular notches 26 are provided in the top edges of opposite walls 16, 20. Adjacent the bottom corners of box 13 are four cutouts 28. A pair of longitudinal slots 30, 32, are provided in adjacent walls 18, 20, of box 13. A plurality of indicia are printed on the outer surface of walls 18, 20, adjacent slots 30, 32, to indicate the depth of the materials showing through slots 30, 32. A box bottom 34 includes a floor 36 with four upwardly extending walls 38 along the edges of its periphery.

Before assembly and during storage box I3 is folded to be flat so that it will occupy a minimum of space. To assemble receptacle 12, box 13 is unfolded so that it is in the rectangula: shape shown in the drawings. Bottom 34 is slidably inserted within the lower open end 24 of box l3 until its corners protrude outwardly through cutouts 28. The comers of box I3 below cutouts 28 are folded inwardly below the bottom of box bottom 34 so as to retain it in position within box 13. These comers also hold bottom 34 slightly above the floor on which box 13 is resting so that bottom 34 will not become damp if the floor is wet.

An elongated tube 40 rests on top of receptacle I2 with its opposite ends in notches 26. Tube 40 is preferably constructed from flexible plastic material. It has a divider 42 approximately midway along its length so as to divide itself into an inlet conduit 44 and an outlet conduit 46 which have no communication therebetween. The ends of tube 40 are shaped into two male connectors 48 for connecting tube 40 between a pair of suction hoses 50 so that it will be in the line of suction. Divider 42 may be formed in tube 40 by heating or by crushsealing. The function of divider 42 is prevent material from entering outlet conduit 46 from inlet conduit 44.

Surrounding tube 40 and suspended downwardly therefrom is a collection bag or container 52. Bag 52 is preferably made from a transparent material so that it is possible to see the contents therein. In its original form bag 52-is folded into a flat shape (FIG. 2), but as it fills with evacuated materials it bulges outwardly to conform to the shape of receptacle 12 (FIG. I). The upper end of bag 52 sealably surrounds tube 40 so that it encloses portions of both inlet conduit 44 and outlet conduit 46.

In communication with inlet conduit 44 and extending downwardly within bag 52 is an inlet duct 54. It extends downwardly within bag 52 so that its extreme lower end is adjacent but not in contact with the lower end of bag 52. Inlet duct 54 has an opening 56 at its extreme lower end and a plurality of apertures 58 along its entire length. An outlet duct 60 is in communication with outlet conduit 46 and extends downwardly therefrom to provide communication into the interior of bag 52. Outlet duct 60 is comparatively short compared to duct 54; it includes an opening 62 at its extreme lower end and a plurality of apertures 64 along its length. A mesh guard 66 surrounds a portion of the lower surface of tube 40 so that it provides a cage completely surrounding outlet duct 60 and further surrounding at least one of the uppermost apertures 58 of inlet duct 54. Mesh guard 66 is positioned within collection bag 52 so that it prevents bag 52 from closing off apertures 64 in outlet duct 60 and the uppermost apertures'58 within inlet duct 54.

The collection unit illustrated in FlGS. 1-3 is operated by mounting male connectors 48 to suction hose 50 so that the unit is in the line of suction between a source of evacuated materials and a suction apparatus (not shown). When the suction apparatus is activated air is drawn out of bag 52 through outlet duct 60 into outlet conduit 46 towards the suction unit. This reduces the pressure within collection bag 52. The atmospheric pressure outside bag 52 forces material to be evacuated into inlet conduit 44, through inlet duct 54, and out of apertures 58 and opening 56 into collection bag 52. Since the uppermost apertures 58 of inlet duct 54 are within mesh guard 66, they are not blocked by the walls of bag 52 even though the walls may be collapsed by the atmospheric pres sure outside bag 52. As evacuated materials come out of the extreme upper apertures 58, they flow downwardly into bag 52, thereby causing it to spread open and conform to the walls of receptacle 12. The indicia along longitudinal slots 32 provide means for measuring the materials within bag 52. If for some reason it is desirable to empty the contents of bag 52 during an operation, the bag is inverted by pivoting it around and in unison with tube 40 so that it is positioned above tube 40. This will cause the evacuated materials within bag 52 to flow outwardly through outlet duct 60, thereby emptying bag 52. Bag 52 may then be returned to its original position and it will begin collecting materials anew.

After the operation is over collection unit is removed from the line of suction by disconnecting suction hoses 50 and lifting bag 52 out of receptacle 12. If desired, collection bag 52 may be left within the receptacle and the entire collection unit transported to the laboratory for analysis. If it is necessary to preserve the evacuated materials for later study, the collection unit may be used as a storage container. When analysis is completed the collection unit may be thrown away. Because of the inexpensive nature of the materials from which the collection unit is constructed, a new collection unit may be used for each operation, thereby eliminating the possibility of cross-contamination from one patient to another.

Referring to FIG. 4, a modified form of the invention is illustrated which includes a collection bag 68, inlet conduit 70, inlet duct 72, outlet duct 74, and outlet conduit 76, all of which are identical in construction to the corresponding parts illustrated in FIGS. 1-3. Extending between inlet conduit 70 and outlet conduit 76 and forming a communication passage therebetween is a bypass conduit 78. Mounted within inlet conduit 70 is a valve 80 which may be moved from a first position providing exclusive communication from inlet conduit 70 into inlet duct 72 to a second position providing exclusive communication from inlet conduit 70 to bypass conduit 78. Valve 80 may be kept in its first position in order to fill bag 68, and when it is no longer desired to collect materials within bag 68, valve 80 is moved to its second position, thereby causing the materials to move through bypass conduit 78 into outlet conduit 76. Bypass conduit 78 is shaped like an inverted U, thereby forming a handle for carrying or hanging collection bag 68.

An additional modification of this invention is illustrated in FIG. 5 wherein a receptacle is formed from a jar 82 having indicia marked on its side. A stopper 84 is fitted within the neck of jar 82 and includes an inlet conduit 86 extending therethrough and terminating in an inlet duct 88 within jar 82. Also extending through stopper 84 is an outlet conduit 90 which terminates in an outlet duct 92 within jar 82. A collapsible balloon-like collection bag 94 surrounds the lower end of stopper 84 and encloses inlet duct 88 and outlet duct 92. A wire mesh guard 96 also surrounds the upper portion of inlet duct 88 and all of outlet duct .92 to prevent bag 94 from blocking the apertures therein. A bleeder duct 98 extends through stopper 84 and provides communication between the atmosphere outside jar 82 and the space between bag 94 and the interior surface of jar 82. When suction is applied to outlet conduit 90 it draws evacuated materials through inlet conduit 86 and inlet duct 88, thereby filling collection bag 94. As collection bag 94 expands within jar 82 the air occupying the space between bag 94 and jar 82 escapes through bleeder duct 98 so that no air is trapped therein.

A further modification of the collection unit of this invention is illustrated in FIG. 6. A jar and stopper unit 99 such as illustrated in H0. 5 is additionally provided with a bypass valve 100 and a bypass conduit 102 between an inlet conduit 104 and an outlet conduit 106. inlet conduit 104, bypass conduit 102, and outlet conduit 106 together comprise a longitudinal tube 107. An inlet duct 108 and an outlet duct 110 extend downwardly from inlet conduit 104 and outlet conduit 106, respectively. Bypass valve 100 is situated in inlet conduit 104 at the point where it joins inlet duct 108 and bypass conduit 102. Bypass valve 100 is movable from a first position wherein it permits exclusive communication between inlet conduit 104 and inlet duct 108 to a second position wherein it permits exclusive communication between inlet conduit 104 and bypass conduit 102. Bypass valve 100, when in its second position, permits the evacuated materials to pass into outlet conduit 106 without entering the jar and stopper unit 99.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained. I

What is claimed is:

1. A surgical trap comprising container means having flexible side walls, the outer portions of which are exposed to ambient air, said container means further including container inlet duct means and container outlet duct means each having at least one duct opening in communication with the interior of said container means, said inlet duct means adapted to be placed in communication with a source of substantially fluent material, said container means adapted to be placed in communication with suction means for drawing said fluent material into said container means, said trap further including a resilient protective member disposed in said container means across said inlet duct means to shield said inlet duct opening from blockage by the flexible side walls of said container means, such that said side walls remain spaced from said inlet duct opening.

2. A surgical trap as claimed in claim 1 wherein said resilient protective member is porous and extends dependingly across said inlet duct opening, such that fluent material passes from said inlet duct opening through said resilient porous member of said container means.

3. A surgical trap as claimed in claim 1 wherein said resilient protective member extends across said outlet duct opening to shield said outlet duct opening from blockage by the flexible side walls of said container means, such that said side walls remain spaced from said outlet duct opening.

4.- A surgical trap as claimed in claim 1 wherein said resilient protective member is formed of a screen-like materia].

5. A surgical trap as claimed in claim 4 wherein said protective member is also disposed across said outlet duct opening, said screen-like material being of a mesh that permits passage of said fluent material through said screen.

6. A surgical trap as claimed in claim 1 wherein said container means are collapsible into a flattened condition, entry of said fluent material into said container through said inlet duct opening causing said container to expand from said collapsed flattened condition, said expansion correpsonding to the volume of said fluent material entering the interior of said container means.

7. The surgical trap of claim 1 wherein said container means is suspended from said inlet and outlet duct means, said trap further including a box having upper edges, said inlet and outlet duct means resting on said upper edges such that said container means hangs from said duct means within said box.

8. The surgical trap of claim 7 wherein said box includes vertical slots therein for permitting observation of the level of fluent material within said container means.

9. The surgical trap of claim 8 wherein said slots include indicia means for indicating the volume of fluent material within said container means.

10. The surgical trap of claim 7 wherein said box is collapsible.

11. The surgical trap of claim 9 wherein said box is open, said upper edges defining the border of said opening.

12. The surgical trap of claim 1 wherein said outlet duct means opens into the upper end of said container means, and said protective member extends across said outlet duct means, said container means and said outlet duct means being rotatable to an inverted position wherein a substantial portion of said container means is placed over said outlet conduit, said protective member shielding said outlet duct opening from blockage by the flexible side walls of said container means, thereby permitting fluent material in said container means to exit through said outlet duct means.

13. The surgical trap of claim 1 wherein bypass duct means extend between said inletand outlet duct means providing communication therebetween, said trap further including valve means between said inlet and-bypass duct means for making and breaking the communication between said inlet and outlet duct means.

14. The surgical trap of claim 1 wherein said inlet and outlet duct means are joined by bypass duct means, and valve means are provided between said bypass and inlet duct means for opening and closing the communication therebetween.

15. A surgical trap comprising an inlet conduit and an outlet conduit; an enclosed container; said inlet and outlet conduits container causes the atmospheric pressure outside said container to force said fluent material through said inlet conduit into said container wherein said container is a collapsible bag suspended within a receptacle, said receptacle having at least one opening extending from its interior to the atmosphere.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2815025 *Feb 16, 1956Dec 3, 1957FentonLiver bile pouch
US2886036 *Feb 24, 1956May 12, 1959Russell W PriceHospital drain bag
US3000492 *Aug 1, 1958Sep 19, 1961Owens Illinois Glass CoCarton for fragile jug-like articles
US3537109 *Apr 15, 1968Nov 3, 1970American Hospital Supply CorpHanger structure for medical liquid collection container
US3556101 *Feb 7, 1969Jan 19, 1971Hollister IncSurgical suction assembly
GB436052A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3745999 *Dec 8, 1971Jul 17, 1973Deaton Medical CoMedical suction method and apparatus
US3773211 *Jun 1, 1971Nov 20, 1973Bridgman HUterine aspiration collection bag
US3774613 *Dec 30, 1971Nov 27, 1973Scitron CorpSuction curettage
US3780738 *Dec 8, 1971Dec 25, 1973Deaton Medical CoMethod and apparatus of medical suction
US3873727 *Nov 8, 1973Mar 25, 1975Parke Davis & CoStabilization of molded sublingual nitroglycerin tablets
US3965889 *Jan 3, 1975Jun 29, 1976Commissariat A L'energie AtomiqueApparatus for the sampling of blood and the separation of plasma under anaerobic conditions
US4245637 *Jul 10, 1978Jan 20, 1981Nichols Robert LShutoff valve sleeve
US4256109 *Jul 10, 1978Mar 17, 1981Nichols Robert LShut off valve for medical suction apparatus
US4275731 *Jul 10, 1978Jun 30, 1981Nichols Robert LSuction canister with vortex flow deflector
US4332560 *Mar 10, 1980Jun 1, 1982Rait Joseph MParticle collector for use with dental suction apparatus
US4416772 *Jul 24, 1981Nov 22, 1983Kuraray Co., Ltd.Apparatus for concentrating and filtering body cavity fluids
US4455140 *Dec 18, 1981Jun 19, 1984Sherwood Medical CompanyBody fluid collection device
US4795448 *Dec 30, 1987Jan 3, 1989Haemonetics CorporationSuction collection system
US4857042 *Mar 16, 1988Aug 15, 1989Sherwood Medical CompanyBody fluid collection device
US4930997 *Aug 19, 1987Jun 5, 1990Bennett Alan NPortable medical suction device
US4955391 *Apr 5, 1989Sep 11, 1990Invenomed, Inc.Fluid monitoring apparatus
US5002529 *Jul 10, 1987Mar 26, 1991Solco Basle, Inc.Postoperative wound drainage
US5347991 *Oct 20, 1992Sep 20, 1994Nakao Naomi LEndoscope suction trap and associated method
US5363860 *Aug 13, 1993Nov 15, 1994Nakao Naomi LSuction trap and associated method
US5386735 *Dec 15, 1992Feb 7, 1995Langdon Medical, Inc.Apparatus for collecting a fluid sample from a patient and container for storing the same
US6319221Dec 3, 1999Nov 20, 2001Ethicon, Inc.System for fluid retention management
US6890323 *Dec 3, 2002May 10, 2005University Of FloridaSmall volume effusion trap
US6935270Aug 29, 2003Aug 30, 2005Delaval, Inc.Milking and application teat cup, system, and method
US7207966May 10, 2001Apr 24, 2007Ethicon, Inc.System for fluid retention management
US7329250 *Dec 8, 2003Feb 12, 2008Medindica - Pak, Inc.Method and apparatus for converting supplies and reducing waste
US7635359 *Jun 8, 2004Dec 22, 2009Daiken Iki Kabushiki KaishaReceptacle for use with a medical suction device
US20040122383 *Dec 8, 2003Jun 24, 2004Romano Jack W.Method and apparatus for converting supplies and reducing waste
US20060276762 *Jun 8, 2004Dec 7, 2006Daiken Iki Kabushiki KaishaStorage container and medical sucking tool having the same
US20100241091 *Sep 23, 2010Mr. Tan Wu (Owners in common 1/2)Sputum collecting device
EP0092313A2 *Mar 11, 1983Oct 26, 1983Jerome Maurice HauerBlood collection and transfer apparatus
WO2004052730A2 *Dec 8, 2003Jun 24, 2004Medindica-Pak, IncMethod and apparatus for converting supplies and reducing waste
WO2004052730A3 *Dec 8, 2003May 19, 2005Medindica Pak IncMethod and apparatus for converting supplies and reducing waste
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/319
International ClassificationA61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/0001
European ClassificationA61M1/00A