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Publication numberUS3649427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1972
Filing dateMar 12, 1970
Priority dateMar 12, 1970
Publication numberUS 3649427 A, US 3649427A, US-A-3649427, US3649427 A, US3649427A
InventorsHughes George H
Original AssigneeBeacon Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stitched self-bonded nonwoven fabric
US 3649427 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1972 H HUGHES 3,649,421

STITCHED, SELF-BONDED, NONWOVEN FABRIC Filed March 12, 1970 INVENTOR.' GEORGE H- HUGHES www0/@Awww ATT( )RNEYS United States Patent C W 3,649,427 STITCHED, SELF-BONDED, NONWOVEN FABRIC George H. Hughes, Asheville, N.C., assignor to Beacon Manufacturing Company, Swannanoa, N.C. Filed Mar. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 18,852 Int. Cl. D04h 13/00; D04b 2]/00 U.S. Cl. 161-50 6 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, draperies, garments and the like and specifically characterized by superior strength, stability and durability. The fabric comprises a three-dimensional batt of self-bonding bers extending in random directions throughout the batt and being bonded to each other at the crossing points of the fibers to provide strength and stability to the fabric in all directions and elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches penetrating the batt of selfbonded fibers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of the batt. The rows of stitches extend in generally the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric for providing additional strength and stability to the fabric in the lengthwise direction.

This invention relates to a stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed covering, draperies, garments and the like and specically characterized by superior strength, stability and durability,

Heretofore, nonwoven fabrics produced for use as bed coverings, draperies, garments and the like have suffered from lack of suflicient strength, stability and durability -when subjected to wear and stresses during such uses. Various nonwoven fabric constructions have been proposed for such uses, but all such constructions have suffered from one or more of these disadvantages.

Accordingly, it is the object of this invention to produce a nonwoven fabric which has superior strength, stability and durability particularly adapting the same for use as bed covering, draperies, garments and the like.

It has been found by this invention that the above object may be accomplished by providing a stitched, selfbonded, nonwoven fabric comprising a three-dimensional batt of self-bonding iibers, preferably heat-reactive, synthetic, organic fibers, extending in random directions throughout the batt and being bonded to each other under the influence of heat at the crossing points of the bers in the batt. The fabric further comprises elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches penetrating the batt of self-bonded fibers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of the batt. The row of stitches extend in generally the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric.

Preferably, the rows of stitches include stitch components extending along the rows of stitches in generally the lengthwise direction of the fabric and stitch components extending between the rows of stitches in generally the widthwise direction of the fabric` The stitch components extending along the rows of stitches include chain stitch loop components disposed on one face of the fabric which may compress the one face of the fabric along the rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong, with the portions of the face of the fabric between the rows of chain stitch loop portions being substantially uncompressed and dening spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions therebetween may be provided on the one face of the fabric.

It may be seen from the above general description and from the more specific description given hereinafter that 3,649,427 Patented Mar. 14, 1972 ICC the stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric of this in'vention utilizes the features of a randomly disposed, selfbonded fibrous batt for providing improved and superior strength, durability and stability to the fabric in all directions, along with generally lengthwise extending roWS of stitches for providing strength, stability and durability to the fabric in the lengthwise direction. The rows of stitches may include components extending between the rows of stitches for increasing the widthwise strength and for producing a much stronger, more durable and more stable nonwoven fabric than has heretofore been contemplated.

Some of the features and objects of this invention halving been stated, other objects and features will appear as the description proceeds when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged, fragmentary, broken-away, perspective view of the obverse side of the stitched, selfbonded, nonwoven fabric of this invention illustrating the fabric in the two basic stages of its construction;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, perspective view of the reverse side of the stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric illustrated in FIG. l; and

FIG. 3 is a reduced, perspective view with one corner turned up of the nonwoven fabric of FIGS. 1 and 2 including a ribbed surface on one face thereof.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIG. l the stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric constructed according to this invention and generally indicated by the reference numeral 10. FIG. 1, as described above, is broken away and includes generally a portion on thet left-hand side of the figure illustrating the fabric 10 before stitching thereof and a portion on the righthand side of the figure illustrating the fabric 10 after stitching thereof.

The stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric 10 cornprises a three-dimensional batt 11 of self-bonding fibers 12 extending in random directions throughout the batt and being bonded to each other at the crossing points of the fibers. These self-bonding fibers are preferably heatseactive, synthetic, organic fibers which are capable of bonding to each other under the inuence of heat. Suitable fibers have been found to be isotactic polypropylene, linear polypropylene, polyethylene, terephthalate, polyhexamethylene, anipamid, polycapromide, copolyester of ethylene glycol, etc. `It has been found by this invention that suitable material for forming the batt 11 is of the "spun-bonded type commercially manufactured by E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company of Wilmington, Del., under the trademark Reemay and disclosed in their U.S. Pat. No. 3,276,944, issued Oct. 4, 1966. This type of self-bonding, randomly oriented fibrous material produces excellent strength and stability in all directions and has been found by this invention to be particularly suitable as the batt 11.

The fabric 10 further comprises elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches 20 penetrating the batt 11 for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers 12. The rows of stitches 20 extend in generally the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric 10 for providing strength and stability to the fabric 10 in the lengthwise direction.

Each of the rows of stitches 20 is formed from two cornposite yars Y-l and Y-2 and has chain stitch loop components 21 on one face of the fabric 10 and interconnected straight line stitch components 22 and diagonally extending stitch components 23 on the other face of the fabric 10. The stitch loop components 21 are formed from one of the yarns Y -1 only and the diagonally extending stitch components 23 are formed from the other of the yarns Y-2 only. This arrangement of stitch components, in addition to providing added strength to the fabric 10, provides an interlocked stitch construction which will not ravel or dislocate itself from the fabric 10.

The yarns Y-1 and Y-2 utilized to form the rows of stitches 20 and the stitch components 21, 22 and 23 may be of various natural or synthetic fibers or blends, but continuous filament synthetic yarns are advantageous to obtain relatively high strength and to prevent breakage in the manufacturing operation and to also give good tensile strength to the finished fabric 10.

The thus formed self-bonded and stitched non-woven fabric may include suitable outer treated surfaces on the outer faces of the fabric 10 for providing desired characteristics adapting the fabric for use as bed coverings, draperies, garments and the like.

As shown in FIG. 3, one of the faces of the fabric may be provided with a surface treatment consisting of a stitched, ribbed surface which provides bedspread or ribbed, corduroy garment-like or drapery characteristics to the face of the fabric. For providing this surface treatment characteristic, the rows of stitches are closely spaced apart and parallel and the chain stitch loop portions 21 on the one face of the fabric compress the one face of the fabric 10 along the rows of stitches 20 to form corresponding depressed areas therealong. The portions of the face of the fabric 10 between the rows of stitches 20 are substantially uncompressed and define spaced, parallel, raised ribs 31. Thus, a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions 21 therebetween is provided on one face of the fabric 10.

For a disclosure of suitable apparatus for forming the rows of stitches 20 including the stitch components 21, 22 and 23, reference may be had to applicants prior patent, U.S. No. 3,365,918, issued Jan. 30, 1968, for a disclosure of same.

Thus, this invention has provided a novel and improved self-bonded and stitched nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, draperies, garments and the like and which utilizes the features of a self-bonded fibrous batt with randomly oriented fibers for providing strength, stability and durability to the fabric in all directions, along with generally lengthwise extending rows of stitches for stitch-bonding the tibers together and providing additional strength in the lengthwise direction. The stitch construction may include stitch components extending between the rows of stitches for providing added strength in the widthwise direction and may be of a special non-raveling construction. One face of the fabric may be provided with raised ribs for providing a desired surface characteristic.

In the drawings and specification, there has been set forth preferred embodiments of the invention and, al-

though specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

What is claimed is:

1. A stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, draperies, garments and the like and specifically characterized by superior strength, stability and durability, said fabric comprising:

a three-dimensional batt of self-bonding, heat-reactive, synthetic, organic fibers bonded to each other under the influence of heat at the crossing points of the fibers in said batt and extending in random directions throughout said batt for providing strength and stability to said fabric in all directions, and

elongate, spaced-apart rows of stitches penetrating said batt for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of said batt, said rows of stitches extending generally in the lengthwise direction throughout the length of said fabric for providing strength and stability to said fabric in the lengthwise direction.

2. A non-woven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which said rows of stitches include stitch components extending along the rows of stitches in generally the lengthwise direction of said fabric and stitch components extending between the rows of stitches in generally the 4 widthwise direction of said fabric for providing strength and stability to said fabric in both the lengthwise and widthwise directions.

3. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which each of said rows of stitches is formed from at least two continuous yarns and comprises chain stitch loop components on one side of said batt and interconnected diagonally extending and straight line stitch components on the other side of said batt and in which said chain stitch loop components are formed from both of said yarns and in which said diagonally extending stitch components are formed from one of said yarns and said straight line stitch components are formed from the other of said yarns.

4. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which said rows of stitches include closely spaced apart, parallel, exposed rows of chain stitch loop components disposed on one face of said fabric and comp-ressing said one face of said fabric along said rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong, the portions of said face of said fabric between said rows of chain stitch loop components being substantially uncompressed and defining spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop components therebetween is provided on said one face of said fabric.

5. A stitched, self-bonded, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, draperies, garments and the like and specifically characterized by superior strength, stability and durability, said fabric comprising:

a three-dimensional batt of self-bonding, heat-reactive, synthetic, organic fibers bonded to each other under the influence of heat at the crossing points of the fibers in said batt and extending in random directions throughout said batt for providing strength and Istability to said fabric in all directions, and

elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches penetrating said batt for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of said batt, said rows of stitches extending generally in the lengthwise direction throughout the length of said fabric for providing strength and stability to said fabric in the lengthwise direction, each of said rows of stitches being formed from at least two continuous yarns and having chain stitch loop cornponents on one face of said fabric and interconnected diagonally extending and straight line stitch com.- ponents on the other face of said fabric and in which said chain stitch loop components are formed from both of said yarns and in which said diagonally extending stitch components are formed from one of said yarns and said straight line stitch components are formed from the other of said yarns.

6. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 5, in which said chain stitch loop components on said one face of said fabric compress said one face of said fabric along said rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong, the portions of said face of said fabric between said rows of chain stitch loop components being substantially uncompressed and defining spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop components therebetween is provided on said one face of said fabric.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,541,653 l1/l970 Stevenson 66-192 X 3,365,918 1/1968 Hughes 66-192 3,395,065 7/1968 Owen, Sr. 161-64 3,329,552 7/1967 Hughes 161-52 ROBERT F. BURNEIT, Primary Examiner R. O. LINKER, JR., Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

66-l92; i12-412; ll-123, l50, 157

1f ED STATES EATEN'E OEEECE CER'NFCATE OF CRREC'NN Patent N0. L 649, 427 Dated March 14, 1972 nventods) George H, Hughes It is certified that error appears in the above-dentfiec pei-ent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column l, line ,"I'OW" should be rows-- Column 2, line 32, "thet" should be -the'.`

line 41, "seactven shouldbe --reactVe--- line-:63, "yar's" should be yarns-- I line 67, .both of the yar-n Y-l and Y-2 and the straight line stitch components 22 are fior-med from This entire sentence was left out.

Signed and sealed this 18th day of' July 11.972a

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD MBFLETGHERN'R. HUBERT GOTTSCHALK Attestng Officer Commissioner of Patents

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4199639 *Jul 10, 1978Apr 22, 1980Walter RoncSandwich-structured double layer floor covering
US4629441 *May 16, 1984Dec 16, 1986Cahill Mary JFabric doll face with stuffed feature, and method
US4737394 *Jun 17, 1987Apr 12, 1988E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyArticle for absorbing oils
US4863777 *May 4, 1987Sep 5, 1989Milliken Research CorporationWallcovering
US5294479 *Aug 3, 1992Mar 15, 1994Precision Custom Coatings, Inc.Non-woven interlining
US5336562 *Aug 5, 1992Aug 9, 1994Pavco S.A.Polyolefin yarns with good performance for rugs and carpets and method of producing the same
US6423393Aug 18, 2000Jul 23, 2002Tietex International, Ltd.Abraded stitchbonded fabric and process for making same
US6521554Feb 22, 2000Feb 18, 2003Tietex International, Ltd.Stitchbonded upholstery fabric and process for making same
US20070270071 *May 18, 2006Nov 22, 2007Greer J TravisNonwoven fabric towel
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/102, 428/105, 428/163, 112/412, 442/405, 428/114, 66/192, 428/198, 442/409
International ClassificationD04H1/44, D04H1/52
Cooperative ClassificationD04H1/52
European ClassificationD04H1/52