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Publication numberUS3649428 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1972
Filing dateMar 12, 1970
Priority dateMar 12, 1970
Publication numberUS 3649428 A, US 3649428A, US-A-3649428, US3649428 A, US3649428A
InventorsGeorge H Hughes
Original AssigneeBeacon Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stitched composite nonwoven fabric having a self-bonded fibrous supporting layer and outer fibrous layers
US 3649428 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,649 BONDED i-nmous SUPPORTING LAYER AND OUTER FIBROUS LAYERS March 14, 1972 5111021151) comrosrra NONWOVEN FABRIC HAVING A SELF wa mgwww/ ATTORNEYS STITCHED COMPOSITE NONWOVEN FABRIC HAV- IN G A SELF-BONDED FIBROUS SUPPORTING LAYER AYD OUTER FIBROUS LAYERS George H. Hughes, Asheville, N.C., assignor to Beacon Manufacturing Company, Swannanoa, N.C. Filed Mar. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 18,853 Int. Cl. D04h 13/00; D04b 21/00 US. Cl. 161-50 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A stitched, composite, integrated, rnulti-layer, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and specifically characterized by improved strength and durability. The fabric comprises a supporting layer of self-bonding fibers, preferably synthetic organic fibers, extending in random directions throughout the layer and being bonded to each other at the crossing points of the fibers; upper and lower threedimensional, self-sustaining facing layers of nonwoven textile fibers superimposed on opposite sides of and being contiguous with the supporting layer to completely cover the supporting layer and form the multi-layer fabric; and elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches penetrating the superimposed layers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of the facing layers and for stitchbonding together the superimposed layers to form the composite fabric. The resulting composite nonwoven fabric may include napped and/or ribbed outer surfaces to provide desired characteristics.

This invention relates to a stitched, composite, integrated, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric.

Heretofore, in the manufacture of nonwoven fabrics for use as bed coverings, garments and the like, problems have been presented with respect to strength and durability when these end products are exposed to excessive wear, strain, etc. Accordingly, it is the object of the present invention to provide a nonwoven fabric would is particularly adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and which is specifically characterized by superior and improved strength and durability so as to overcome the above problems presented in prior nonwoven fabrics.

By this invention, it has been found that the above objeet may be accomplished by providing a fabric comprising a supporting layer of a three-dimensional batt of selfbonding fibers, preferably heat-reactive, synthetic, organic fibers, extending in random directions throughout the batt and being bonded to each other at the crossing points of the fibers. The fabric further comprises upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining (facing layers of nonwoven textile fibers superimposed on opposite sides of and being contigous with the supporting layer to completely cover the supporting layer and to form the multi-layer fabric. The fibers of the facing layers are oriented in the widthwise direction of the fabric. The fabric further comprises elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches penetrating the superimposed layers for stitchbonding together the individual fibers of each of the upper and lower facing layers and for stitch-bonding together the superimposed layers to form the composite, integrated, multi-layer fabric. The rows of stitches extend in generally the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric.

The above composite, integrated, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric with superior and improved strength and durability characteristics may include desirable surface treatments on one or both faces thereof. While two such comnited States Patent 'ice binations of surface treatments are illustrated in the drawings and will be described specifically hereinafter, it is to be understood that this invention is intended to cover various surface treatments of the novel nonwoven fabric defined herein.

These surface treatments may include napped, raised fibers of sufiicient height and density to cover the rows of stitches penetrating the superimposed layers and provide the desired finish on the fabric. These napped, raised fibers may be disposed on one or both faces of the composite fabric. A fabric with surface treatments of napped, raised fibers is particularly suitable for use as blankets and may be suitable for use as garments.

The composite fabric may also include a ribbed surface on one face thereof to provide a bedspread appearance thereon or a corduroy appearance when used as a garment. The other face thereof may include napped fibers or other surface treatments to provide a blanket-like appearance or a napped lining appearance.

It may be seen from the above general description and from the more specific description given hereinafter that the composite, nonwoven fabric of this invention utilizes the features of a self-bonded supporting layer for providing improved and superior strength and stability to the fabric in all directions, along with widthwise oriented fibrous facing layers for providing strength in the widthwise direction and lengthwise extending rows of stitches for providing strength in the lengthwise direction and for stitch-bonding all of the layers together along with the individual fibers of each layer.

Some of the features and objects of this invention having been stated, other objects and features will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged, fragmentary, partially-exploded, broken-away, perspective view of the obverse side of the stitched, composite, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric of this invention illustrating the fabric in the two basic stages of its construction;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, partially-exploded, broken-away, perspective view of the reverse side of the composite, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric of FIG. 1 illustrating the fabric in the two basic stages of its construction;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged top plan view of a portion of the supporting layer utilized in the nonwoven fabric of FIG. 1 illustrating the random orientation of the fibers and the crossings of the fibers;

FIG. 4 is a reduced, perspective view with one corner turned up of the nonwoven fabric of FIGS. 1 and 2 and having napped, raised fibrous surfaces on each of the outer faces thereof; and

FIG. 5 is a reduced, perspective view with one corner turned up of the nonwoven fabric of FIGS. 1 and 2 and having a ribbed, stitched surface on one face thereof and a napped, raised fibrous surface on the other face thereof.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 the obverse side or upper face and the reverse side or lower face, respectively, of the stitched, composite, nonwoven fabric constructed according to this invention and generally indicated by reference numeral 10. FIGS. 1 and 2, as described above, are broken away and include generally exploded portions on the left-hand side of the figures illustrating the various layers of the composite fabric and portions on the right-hand side of the figures illustrating the obverse and reverse sides of the various layers of the composite fabric after the same have been stitch-bonded together.

The composite, nonwoven fabric 10 comprises a supporting layer 11 of a batt of self-bonding fibers 12 extending in random directions throughout the batt and being bonded to each other at the crossing points of the fibers,

as more clearly illustrated in FIG. 3. These self-bonding fibers are preferably heat-reactive, snythetic, organic fibers which are capable of bonding to each other under the influence of heat. Suitable fibers 12 have been found to be isotactic polypropylene, linear polypropylene, polyethylene, terephthalate, polyhexamethylene adipamid, polycapromide, copolyester of ethylene glycol, etc. It has been found by this invention that suitable material for forming this supporting layer is of the spun-bonded type commercially manufactured by the E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company of Wimington, Del., under their trademark Reemay and disclosed in their U. S. Pat. No. 3,276,944, issued Oct. 4, 1966. This type of self-bonding, randomly oriented fibrous material provides excellent strength and stability in all directions and has been found by this invention to be particularly suitable for use as a supporting layer 11.

The composite, non-woven fabric 10 further comprises upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining, facing layers of non-woven fibers 13 and 14, respectively. These upper and lower facing layers 13 and 14 are superimposed on opposite sides and are contiguous with the supporting layer 11 to completely cover the supporting layer and to form a multi-layer fabric 10 which has outer faces with textile fiber characteristics. The individual fibers of the outer facing layers 13 and 14 are oriented in the widthwise direction of the fabric 10 to provide strength and stability to the fabric 10 in the widthwise direction.

The nonwoven fibers utilized in the upper and lower facing layers 13 and 14 may be any suitable synthetic fibers including viscose, acrylic, polyester and polyamide fibers, or natural fibers including cotton and wool, or other textile fibers, or blends thereof.

The composite, nonwoven fabric 10 further includes elongate, spaced apart rows of stitches 20 penetrating the superimposed layers 11, 13 and 14 for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of the upper and lower facing layers 13 and 14 and for stitch-bonding together all of the superimposed layers 11, 13 and 14 to form the composite, integrated, multi-layer fabric 10. The rows of stitches 20 extend in generally the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric 10 for providing strength and stability to the fabric 10 in the lengthwise direction.

The rows of stitches 20 are preferably spaced apart a distance less than the length of the fibers in the outer facing layers 13 and 14 to insure the desired stitch-bonding of the fibers and to provide strength and stability to the fabric 10. Each of the rows of stitches 20 are formed from two continuous yarns Y-1 and Y2 and have chain stitch loop components 21 on one face of the fabric and interconnected straight line stitch components 22 and diagonally extending stitch components 23 on the other face of the fabric 10. The stitch loop components 21 are formed from both of the yarns Y-l and Y-2 and the straight line stitch components 22 are formed from one of the yarns Y-l only and the diagonally extending stitch components 23 are formed from the other of the yarns Y-2 only. This arrangement of stitch components, in addition to providing added strength to the composite fabric 10, provides an interlocked stitch construction which will not ravel or dislocate itself from the composite fabric 10.

The yarns Y-1 and Y-2 utilized to form the rows of stitches 20 and the stitch components 21, 22 and 23 may be of various natural or synthetic fibers or blends, but continuous filament synthetic yarns are advantageous to obtain relatively high strength and to prevent breakage in the manufacturing operation and to also give good tensile strength to the finished fabric.

The thus formed composite, nonwoven fabric may include suitable outer treated surfaces on the outer faces of the fabric 10 for providing desired characteristics adapting the fabric for use as bed coverings, garments and the like. As illustrated in FIG. 4, both faces of the composite, nonwoven fabric 10 may include surfaces of napped, raised fibers 30 which have been napped and raised to a sufficient height and density to cover the rows of stitches 20 and the stitch components 21, 22 and 23 on both faces of the fabric to provide a desired blanket-like or napped textile fibrous surface.

As shown in FIG. 5, one of the faces of the fabric may be provided with a surface treatment consisting of a sttched, ribbed surface which provides bedspread or ribbed garment-like characteristics to that face of the fabric. For providing this surface treatment characteristic, the rows of stitches 20 are closely spaced apart and parallel with the chain stitch loop portions 21 for compressing the face of the fibrous outer layer 13 along the rows 20 to form corresponding depressed areas 34 therealong. The portions of the face of the outer facing layer 13 of nonwoven fibers between the rows of stitches 20 are substantially uncompressed and define spaced, parallel, raised ribs 36. Thus, a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions 21 therebetween is provided on one face of the fabric 10. The other face of the fabric 10 of FIG. 5 may include napped, raised fibers 30 of the type utilized to form both faces of the fabric 10 of FIG. 4.

For preparing the outer layers of nonwoven fibers 13 and 14 with the fibers thereof oriented in generally a widthwise direction, reference may be had to applicants prior patent, US. No. 3,329,552, issued July 4, 1967, wherein suitable carding or garnetting apparatus, crosslapping and conveying apparatus are illustrated. Also, for a disclosure of suitable apparatus for forming the rows of stitches 20 including the stitch components 21, 22 and 23, reference may be had to applicants prior patent, US. No. 3,365,918, issued Jan. 30, 1968, for a disclosure of same.

Thus, this invention has provided a novel and improved composite, integrated, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and which utilizes the features of a self-bonded nonwoven supporting layer, widthwise oriented fibrous facing layers and lengthwise oriented rows of stitches for providing improved and superior strength and durability to the fabric. This improved fabric also utilizes various surface treatments for providing the desired finish on the fabric.

In the drawings and specification, there have been set forth preferred embodiments of the invention and, although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

What is claimed is:

1. A stitched, composite, integrated, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and specifically characterized by improved strength and durability, said fabric comprising:

a supporting layer comprising a three-dimensional batt ofself-bonding, heat-reactive, synthetic, organic fibers extending in random directions throughout said batt and being bonded to each other under the influence of heat at crossing points of the fibers to provide strength and stability to said fabric in all directions;

upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining, facing layers comprising nonwoven textile fibers and being superimposed on opposite sides of and being contiguous with said supporting layer to completely cover said supporting layer and to form said multilayer fabric; and

elongate, spaced-apart rows of stitches penetrating said superimposed layers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of said upper and lower facing layers and for stitch-bonding together said superimposed layers to form said composite, integrated, multi-layer fabric, said rows of stitches extending in the lengthwise direction throughout the length of said fabric for providing strength and stability to said fabric in the lengthwise direction.

2. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, including at least one outer treated surface on at least one of said outer faces comprising napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density as to cover substantially said rows of stitches penetrating said superimposed layers and provide a desired finish on said fabric.

3. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which said fabric includes outer treated surfaces on each of said outer faces comprising napped, raised fibers of suflicient height and density to cover said rows of stitches.

4. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which said rows of stitches comprise closely spaced apart, parallel, exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions disposed on one of said faces of said fabric and compressing said one face of said fabric along said rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong, the portions of said face of said fabric between said rows of stitch loop portions being substantially uncompressed and defining spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions therebetween is provided on said one face of said fabric.

5. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 4, in which said other face of said fabric includes napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover said stitches on said other face.

6. A stitched, composite, integrated, multi-layer, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and specifically characterized by improved strength and durability, said fabric comprising:

a supporting layer comprising a three-dimensional batt of self bonding, heat-reactive, synthetic, organic fibers capable of bonding to each other under the influence of heat and extending in random directions throughout said batt and being bonded to each other at the crossing points of the fibers to provide strength and stability to said fabric in all directions;

upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining, facing layers comprising nonwoven textile fibers and being superimposed on opposite sides of and being contiguous with said supporting layer to completely cover said supporting layer and to form said multilayer fabric, said fibers of said facing layers being oriented in generally the widthwise direction of said fabric to provide strength and stability to said fabric in the widthwise direction; and

elongated, spaced apart rows of stitches penetrating said superimposed layers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of said upper and lower facing layers and for stitch-bonding together said superimposed layers to form said composite, integrated, multi-layer fabric, said rows of stitches extending in generally the lengthwise direction throughout the length of said fabric for providing strength and stability to said fabric in the lengthwise direction, each of said rows of stitches being formed from at least two continuous yarns and having chain stitch loop components on one of said faces of said fabric and interconnected diagonally extending an straight line stitch components on the other of said faces of said fabric and in which said chain stitch loop components are formed from both of said yarns and in which said diagonally extending stitch components are formed from one of said yarns and said straight line stitch components are formed from the other of said yarns.

7. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 6, in which said fabric includes outer treated surfaces on each of said faces comprising napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover said stitches.

8. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 6, in which said rows of stitches comprise closely spaced apart, par allel, exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions disposed on one of said faces of said fabric and compressing said one face of said fabric along said rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong, the portions of said face of said fabric between said rows of chain stitch loop portions being substantially uncompressed and defining spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions therebetween is provided on said one face of said fabric; and in which said other face of said fabric includes napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover said stitches on said other face.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,044,146 7/1962 Thomas et al. 161-50 3,365,918 1/1968 Hughes 66-192 2,610,337 9/1952 McMillin et al 161-152 3,260,640 7/1966 Owen 161-80 3,329,552 7/1967 Hughes 161-52 3,337,387 8/1967 Owen 161-50 3,395,065 7/1968 Owen 161-64 X ROBERT F. BURNETT, Primary Examiner R. O. LINKER, JR., Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFF ICE CETIFECATE 0F coRREcTIoN Patent No- 3, 649, 428 I Dated March 14, 1972 Inventor(s) George H. Hughes It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1, line 42, after "a" insert --suchline 42, "would" should be -whlch line 55, delete Column 4, line 17, "34" should be. 35-

Signed and sealed this 27th day of June 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M,FLEICHER,J'R ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents F ORM PO-lOSO (\o-ss) USCOMM'DC 60875-F'69 I ll. GOVRINNINT PRINTING OIIICI "II 0-3.."1

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3782137 *Jun 2, 1972Jan 1, 1974Nat Distillers Chem CorpStitched non-woven textile fabric having varied pattern of raised ribs on one face
US3837021 *May 23, 1972Sep 24, 1974Mackness R & Co LtdSleeping quilt
US3837943 *Oct 5, 1972Sep 24, 1974Textiltech ForschMethod of producing compound fabrics
US3871850 *Mar 20, 1973Mar 18, 1975Ethyl CorpFilter element
US3954074 *May 16, 1974May 4, 1976Arno Edgar WildemanTextile
US4039711 *May 21, 1973Aug 2, 1977The Kendall CompanyNon-woven fabrics
US4096701 *Feb 2, 1977Jun 27, 1978Imperial Chemical Industries LimitedMattresses for subaqueous structures
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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/91, 112/412, 112/420, 428/102, 28/162, 66/192
International ClassificationD04H1/52
Cooperative ClassificationD04B21/14, D04H1/52
European ClassificationD04B21/14, D04H1/52