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Publication numberUS3650272 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 21, 1972
Filing dateSep 25, 1970
Priority dateSep 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3650272 A, US 3650272A, US-A-3650272, US3650272 A, US3650272A
InventorsEricson Richard E
Original AssigneeBard Inc C R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drainage bag
US 3650272 A
Abstract
A closed system urine collection bag having a rigid combined drip chamber and bifurcated inlet tubes having their ends communicating with the bag adjacent opposite upper corners thereof and firmly secured thereto, thereby acting as a spreader to stabilize the form of the bag, the drip chamber and tubes constituting a carrying handle, and the medial upper edge of the bag being further stabilized by a rigid bar extending horizontally between spaced points of fixation to the inlet tubes.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Ericson [451 Mar. 21, 1972 [54] DRAINAGE BAG [72] Inventor: Richard E. Ericson, Keene, NH.

[73] Assignee: C. R. Bard, Inc., Murray Hill, NJ.

[22] Filed: Sept. 25, 1970 211 Appl. No.: 75,506

[52] U.S. Cl ..128/275, 4/110 [51] int. Cl. ..A61i 5/44 [58] Field of Search ..128/D1G. 24, 275, 294, 295; 4/1 10 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,318,872 10/1919 Hofstetter ..128/295 2,815,025 12/1957 Fenton et al.... ..128/275 3,332,422 7/1967 Jinkens et a1. ..128/275 3,537,109 ll/1970 Spurrier et al. ..128/275 X 3,537,455 11/1970 Skyles et a]. 128/275 3,568,965 3/1971 Clark l28/275 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum Attorney-W. Saxton Seward [5 7] ABSTRACT A closed system urine collection bag having a rigid combined drip chamber and bifurcated inlet tubes having their ends communicating with the bag adjacent opposite upper corners thereof and firmly secured thereto, thereby acting as a spreader to stabilize the form of the bag, the drip chamber and tubes constituting a carrying handle, and the medial upper edge of the bag being further stabilized by a rigid bar extending horizontally between spaced points of fixation to the inlet tubes.

9 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEBHARZI m2 SHEET 2 [IF 4 INVENTOR RICHARD E. ER ICSON PAIENTEUMARm I972 SHEET 3 OF 4 FIG. 4

FIG. 6

INVENTOR ATTORNEY PAYENTEDHARZI I972 3.650.272

sum u or 4 INVENTOR RICHARD E. ERICS'ON BY v) f A Z11, m ATTORNEY DRAINAGE BAG This invention relates to the drip chamber and collection bag portion of a closed urinary drainage system, the remaining elements of such a system (i.e., the catheter and drainage tube) being of any normal and suitable type.

It is an object of the invention to provide an inlet assembly which is rigid, and which includes a drip chamber from the base of which integral inlet tubes extend laterally to points adjacent to, but spaced from, the upper corners of a flat bag, the inlet assembly constituting a carrying handle.

It is a further object to provide such a bag in which the wet path, along which bacteria could migrate, is not only interrupted at the drip chamber but is extended and tortuous between the drip chamber and the liquid level in the bag, to further discourage the communication of infection back to the patient.

It is another object to provide a drainage bag of exceptional strength and durability, yet of such simplicity that it is inexpensive to make and is fully disposable after a normal term of use by a single patient.

A practical embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 represents a front elevation of the bag;

FIG. 2 represents a rear elevation of the bag;

FIG. 3 represents a front perspective view of a modified form of bag;

FIG. 4 represents a side elevation of the bag with the outlet tube in closed position; 1

FIG. 5 represents a side elevation, opposite from FIG. 4, and with the outlet tube in open position;

FIG. 6 represents a bottom plan view of the bag as shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 represents a top plan view of the bag as shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 represents a section on the line VIII-VIII of FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 represents a vertical section on the line IXIX of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 10 represents a detail horizontal section on the line X-X of FIG. 1.

Referring to the drawings, the bag 10 is constituted by complementary front and back walls 11, 12 of plastic sheets, at least one of which is preferably transparent to permit ready observation of the liquid level in the bag. The inner surface of at least one wall is preferably roughened, as by calendering the surface or embossing the sheet, to ensure separation of the walls as liquid enters the bag. In the form shown, the bag has a wide somewhat kidney-shaped outline, the sheets being sealed together around their entire peripheries. The opposite side edges l3, 14 are substantially vertical or sloped slightly inward while the profile of the bottom edge 15 is convex downwardly to form a sump portion 16in certain bag positions, as later explained. The middle upper edge is horizontal and provided with a narrow tab 17 between seal lines 18' and 18, the tab having spaced elongated perforations 19 for engagement with a support bar. Each upper corner of the bag extends upward to form ears 20, 21.

The liquid inlet assembly comprises a cylindrical drip chamber 22 conveniently made in two parts, the upper part 23 being cylindrical with a top wall 24 traversed by the downwardly extending inlet sleeve 25, and the lower part 26 being tapered (FIG. 9) and formed integrally with the laterally and downwardly extending inlet tubes 27, 28. The parts 23, 26 are securely cemented together at 29 and a flexible drainage tube 30 is cemented in the sleeve 25 centrally of the compartment formed by the parts 23, 26 to constitute a drip chamber, adapted most effectively to interrupt the liquid path from the bag to the drainage tube. For a further discussion of the function of a drip chamber in a closed system, see applicants US. Pat. No. 3,343,542.

In each of the ears 20, 21, there is an opening 31, 32 and side spouts 33, 34 are affixed to the front wall 11 by means of the flat base portions 35, 36, so disposed that the spout openings are alined with the tubes 27, 28, the ends of which are inserted in and cemented to the respective spouts.

While the tubes 27, 28 are rigid and their attachment to the spouts 33, 34 and ears 20, 21 is secure enough to support the bag without more, as indicated in FIG. 3, it is preferable to add the flat rigid support bar 37 (FIG. 2) which extends horizontally adjacent the tab 17, is connected integrally at its ends to the tubes 27, 28 through extensions 38, 39, and is provided with elongated projections 40 of a size and location such as to engage tightly in the perforations 19. The extensions 38, 39 may conveniently be provided with holes 38', 39 for cooperation with certain types of bag hangers.

For emptying the bag, there is provided a drawoff tube 46 mounted on a spout 41 which communicates with the bag interior through the wall 11 in the region of the sump 16. The spout 41 extends perpendicularly from the annular base 42 cemented to the wall 11. In its non-draining (closed) position, the free end of the tube 40 is snugly housed in the downwardly open pocket 43, which is fixed on the front wall 11 of the bag at a point directly above the sump 16. When the tube 40 is turned up to the closed position, it turns the spout 41, base 42 and sump portion 16 of the bag through around a horizontal fold line 1l-12, thus tending to close off the sump from communication with the remaining interior of the bag. This closing tendency disappears when the drawoff tube 40 is lowered to or below the emptying position shown in FIG. 5, and the bag can be emptied and reclosed without interruption of its functioning as part of a closed drainage system.

In use, the tube 30 is normally connected to a catheter having its distal end retained in a body cavity, particularly the bladder. The tube 30 is initially capped in a customary manner, and the drawoff tube 40 is in closed position, so that the system can be supplied with its interior sterile and adapted to be kept closed during operation. Undesirable suction effects in the descending drainage tube can be most simply avoided by using a tube which has a large enough internal diameter (e.g., one-half inch or more) to allow free flow of liquid without formation of a hung-up column or slugs.

As actually constructed, this bag has a maximum capacity of 2,000 cc. as indicated by the scale 44. The wide shape of the bag is such that a lower corner can be provided with a supplementary scale 45 for fine measurement up to I00 cc. by tipping the bag sidewise about 45.

What is claimed is:

1. A urine collection bag for operative association with a drainage tube, comprising front and back flexible plastic walls peripherally sealed together to form a closed receptacle, inlets extending through one of said walls at horizontally spaced points adjacent the upper edge of the bag, relatively stiff inlet tubes extending from said inlets to a point midway between and higher than said inlets and a chamber at said last named point integral with and in communication with each said inlet tube and with a drainage tube.

2. A bag according to claim 1 wherein the upper edge of the bag includes a middle straight horizontal portion and upwardly extending comer portions, each inlet extending through the bag wall substantially in one of said corner portrons.

3. A bag according to claim 2 wherein said straight portion is spaced below said inlet tubes and chamber sufficiently to permit said tubes and chamber to be used as a carrying handle.

4. A bag according to claim 2 which includes a support bar having its ends connected to said tubes, respectively, and being provided with means for engaging the bag adjacent said straight portion at one or more points.

5. A bag according to claim 1 wherein the lower edge of the bag has a downwardly convex profile, the middle portion being adapted to constitute a sump, and which includes outlet means associated with said sump.

6. A bag according to claim 5 wherein the outlet means includes a drawoff tube having one end fixed to a wall of the bag and movable from a closed position wherein the walls of the bag are folded adjacent the sump to an open position wherein said walls are unfolded and the bag contents can flow out through said drawoff tube.

7. A bag according to claim 6 which includes means for 9. A bag according to claim 6 wherein the point of fixation releasably holding the drawoff tube in its closed position f the d fi tube is so spaced f the lowest part f the 8. A bag according to claim 6 wherein the drawoff tube is l ower edge that the wall fold lme m closed position has a fixed to said bag wall by means of an annular base attached to length less than half the width of the bag the wall and a tubular spout projecting from said base at substantiallyaright angle. s r w 1: :u

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1318872 *May 16, 1919Oct 14, 1919 Surgical
US2815025 *Feb 16, 1956Dec 3, 1957FentonLiver bile pouch
US3332422 *Sep 24, 1963Jul 25, 1967Medex IncIsolating connector for drainage bag
US3537109 *Apr 15, 1968Nov 3, 1970American Hospital Supply CorpHanger structure for medical liquid collection container
US3537455 *Jun 8, 1967Nov 3, 1970Baxter Laboratories IncDrainage apparatus
US3568965 *Feb 12, 1969Mar 9, 1971Plastronics IncSupport apparatus for a bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3831453 *Feb 10, 1972Aug 27, 1974Kendall & CoUrine meter and collection receptacle
US3865165 *Oct 25, 1973Feb 11, 1975Glass Daniel SUniversal faced body fluid drainage bag with universal drainage means
US3943929 *Nov 15, 1974Mar 16, 1976The Kendall CompanyMulti-chamber container and method
US4317550 *Sep 17, 1979Mar 2, 1982Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Apparatus for suspending a drainage bag
US4496354 *Nov 22, 1982Jan 29, 1985Craig Medical Products LimitedDrainage bag assembly with drip tray
US4943288 *Oct 13, 1989Jul 24, 1990Bioresearch, Inc.Liquid reinfusion bag system
US5374257 *Jun 7, 1993Dec 20, 1994C. R. Bard, Inc.Fluid collection chamber
US6070275 *Dec 24, 1997Jun 6, 2000Med-Assist Technology, Inc.Portable urine holding system
US6849066Sep 1, 2000Feb 1, 2005Coloplast A/SCollecting bag having an accommodating means for a closure device
US6849070Sep 23, 1999Feb 1, 2005Coloplast A/SCatheter set
US7462171Feb 24, 2006Dec 9, 2008Tyco Healthcare Group LpUrine collection bag with angled valve support
US7645968Jun 30, 2006Jan 12, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpMethod for securing a urine meter to a urine bag
US7931630Jul 5, 2005Apr 26, 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-functional and modular urine collection system
US8328734Dec 11, 2012Covidien LpUrine meter with improved drain construction
US8337476 *Dec 25, 2012Greenwald Technologies, LlcReal time urine monitoring system
US8357105Aug 7, 2008Jan 22, 2013Covidien LpAnti-reflux mechanism for urine collection systems
US8790277Jan 17, 2013Jul 29, 2014Covidien LpAnti-reflux mechanism for urine collection systems
US9017303 *Apr 2, 2012Apr 28, 2015J. Daniell RackleySelective-capacity bodily fluids collection and drainage device
US9050046Jun 19, 2014Jun 9, 2015Covidien LpAnti-reflux mechanism for urine collection systems
US9216242Mar 30, 2011Dec 22, 2015C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-functional and modular urine collection system
US20070010797 *Jul 5, 2005Jan 11, 2007C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-functional and modular urine collection system
US20070203464 *Feb 24, 2006Aug 30, 2007Green Kurt EUrine collection bag with integral anti-reflux valve
US20070203465 *Feb 24, 2006Aug 30, 2007Larry SalvadoriUrine collection bag with angled valve support
US20080312550 *Jun 29, 2006Dec 18, 2008Vasu NishtalaMulti-Functional and Modular Urine Collection System
US20100036283 *Aug 7, 2008Feb 11, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpAnti-reflux mechanism for urine collection sytems
US20100137743 *Jan 19, 2010Jun 3, 2010C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-functional and modular urine collection system
US20110046514 *Aug 20, 2009Feb 24, 2011Greenwald Technologies, LlcReal Time Urine Monitoring System
US20110178425 *Jul 21, 2011C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-functional and modular urine collection system
US20130232680 *Mar 7, 2013Sep 12, 2013Kazuo TACHIKAWAFecal bag
US20130261573 *Apr 2, 2012Oct 3, 2013J. Daniell RackleySelective-Capacity Bodily Fluids Collection and Drainage Device
EP0013109A1 *Dec 17, 1979Jul 9, 1980Howmedica Inc.Collection appliance for body eliminations
EP0080364A1 *Nov 23, 1982Jun 1, 1983Craig Medical Products LimitedDrainage bag and manufacture of same
EP0147048A2 *Nov 15, 1984Jul 3, 1985E.R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Urine drainage bag
EP0367307A1 *May 3, 1989May 9, 1990C.R. Bard, Inc.Aseptic drainage outlet
WO2001021115A1 *Sep 1, 2000Mar 29, 2001Coloplast A/SA collecting bag having an accommodating means for a closure device
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/325, 4/144.3, 604/130
International ClassificationA61F5/44
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/44
European ClassificationA61F5/44