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Publication numberUS3651587 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateJul 17, 1969
Priority dateJul 26, 1968
Also published asDE1800100B1, DE6800084U
Publication numberUS 3651587 A, US 3651587A, US-A-3651587, US3651587 A, US3651587A
InventorsPlasser Franz, Theurer Josef
Original AssigneePlasser Bahnbaumasch Franz, Theurer Josef
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mobile ballast treating machine
US 3651587 A
Abstract
A mobile ballast treating machine carries a plow unit including two plows respectively associated with one of the track rails. The plow unit extends across the ballast bed and one of the plows is adjustable in relation to the other plow in the direction of elongation of the track.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Plasser et a1.

MOBILE BALLAST TREATING MACHINE Inventors: Franz Plasser; Josef Theurer, both of Johannesgasse 1010, Vienna, Austria Filed: July 17, 1969 Appl.No.: 842,564 7 Foreign Application Priority Data July 26, 1968 Austria ..-...A 7317/68 U.S. Cl ..37/105, 172/735, 172/742,

172/786, 172/802 Int. Cl ..E0lb 27/02 Field ofSearch ..37/104, 105,106, 107; 171/16;

References Cited UN1TED STATES PATENTS 3/1907 McMullin ..172/742X [451 Mar. 28, 1972 Monroe Greelhart....

Klima et al..

Tellis ..37/105 Walbridge ..37/104 X Sorensen ..172/802 MundelletaL. .....37/104 Kershaw ..37/104 Finger ..37/104 Coy ..37/104 Primary Examiner-Clyde 1. Coughenour Attorney-Kurt Kelman ABSTRACT A mobile ballast treating machine carries a plow unit including two plows respectively associated with one of the track rails. The plow unit extends across the ballast bed and one of the plows is adjustable in relation to the other plow in the direction of elongation of the track.

10 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures Patented March 28, 1972 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVEN'IURS FRAN Z PLMSER J 0 SE? H'GU REG 0 (ind.

Patented March 28, 1972 3,651,587

5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN'I we; =FRANZ U S E BY JOSGF TH0RER Mem- Patented arch 28, 1972 3,651,587

5 Sheets-Sheet T5 mam mum

I N VliN'l 'URS =FRM/z PLA'SSER By JOSE-F firemen MOBILE BALLAST TREATING MACHINE BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION each rail. Wing-like plow parts extend laterally from both.

edges of the carrier plate, which is mounted above the rail. The plow parts are also plate-shaped and are pivotally adjustable to sweep selected regions of the ballast and redistribute the same while imparting a desired profile to the ballast bed.

The adaptability-of such plows to various operating conditions has been limited, primarily because the plow carrier plates were fixed on the machine frame in a vertical plane extending'perpendicularly to the-track from which they could not be moved although they were vertically adjustable in this plane.

It is the primary object of this invention to improve ballast treating machines of this type and to increase their adaptability manifold-by making the two plows relatively adjustable in relation to each other in the'direction of track elongation. By such relative adjustment of the two plows, the plow parts may be positioned in a wide variety of ways to adapt the resultant plow unit to selected operating conditions, such adjustment being possible while the machine advances along the track during the ballast treating operation. In this manner, the ballast flow from one region of the bed to another region may be adjusted at will during the operation, as well as the amount of ballast moved by the plow unit from one region to another. At

least some of these adjustments of the laterally extending plow parts are obtained simply by moving one of the plows in relation to the other without interrupting the advance of the machine. In conventional machines of this type, it has not been possible to pivot the laterally extending plow parts while they remained under pressure of the plowed ballast.

The plow parts of the machine of the invention are readily adjustable to meet practically all requirements of ballast leveling and/or redistribution in a single pass of the machine, and may be operated in either direction on the track, depending on the adjustment of the plow parts and the desired ballast flow effectuated by the plow unit.

Furthermore, the two plows of the present invention may be readily combined into a single plow unit extending across the track, with the inwardly extending plow parts of the plow means forming a center portion of the unit between the track rails. Such a plow unit is, of course, very efiicient, making it possible for the first time to move ballast from the region of one rail or flank to that of the opposite rail or flank in a single pass. Such an operation has conventionally required at least two successive passes.

According to one feature of this invention, the center portion of the plow unit is formed by two laterally extending plow parts of the respective plows, the plow parts being preferably in overlapping relationship. Most effectively, the two parts are interconnected to form a center portion whose length may be adjusted. This center portion may be a separate element insertable between the two plows or it may be formed by the two interconnected laterally extending parts of the two plows.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING The above and other objects, advantages and features of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of certain preferred embodiments thereof, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing wherein FIG. I is a side view of one half of an embodiment of the ballast treating machine of this invention, taken along line I-I of FIG. 2;

FIG. 2 is a top view of both halves of the machine;

FIG. 3 is a front view of the entire machine, taken in the direction of arrow lll OF FIG. 2;

FIGS. 4 to 6 are perspective views of three modifications of the center portions of the ballast plow unit;

FIG. 7 is a schematic top view of another embodiment of a ballast treating machine according to the invention; and

FIGS. 8a to, 17 are schematic top views showing a variety of adjusted positions of a ballast plow unit built in accordance with the principles of .the invention, the illustrated positions being merely indicative of.the great adaptability of such unit without exhausting all possibilities.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to FIGS. lto 2, there is shown a machine frame I mounted for mobility on the track rails 3, 3 with the running gears moving in the direction of elongation of the track, front running gear 2 being illustrated. The track rails are fixed to ties 4 which rest on the ballast to be treated. The machineframe 1 may be part ofa mobile ballast cleaning machine, a .ballast redistributing machine, such as described and claimed, forinstance, in our application Ser. No. 803,570, filed Mar. 3, 1969, a track tamper, a track leveling machine or any suitable track maintenance machine which may be used in conjunction with a ballast plow.

The illustrated ballast plow unit is shown to be mounted at the front end of frame 1. A pair of vertically extending guides 5, 5 are fixedly mounted on the front end of the frame above each track rail and hold lifting means illustrated as hydraulic motors-9, 9 from which project forwardly extending carrier means 6, 6 in the direction of track elongation. Each carrier arm 6 defines a horizontal guide 7 for a respective ballast plow whereby the same may be adjusted in relation to each other in the direction of track elongation, each ballast plow being associated with a respective one of the track rails. The lifting means for the ballast plows are usually actuatedsimultaneously and in unison but they are separately controllable so that, if desired, the entire unit may be transversely inclined in relation to the track plane, as shown in chain-dotted lines in FIG. 3, by raising one of the plows higher than the other one.

Each ballast plow associated with a respective rail includes a rail 8 glidably engaged by longitudinally extending guide 7. The rail projects from the upper face of a cover plate 10 from whose lower face projects a carrier 11 extending transversely of the track. The carrier plate Ll may extend perpendicularly to the cover plate which is generally parallel to the track plane or it may be obliquely inclined to this plane, as shown in phantom lines in FIG. 1, being either fixed in, or adjustable into, this oblique position on the cover plate. Such oblique positioning of the plow will reduce the resistance of the ballast as the machine advances during the ballast treating operation.

Plow parts 12 and 13 extend laterally from respective edges of the carrier plate generally transversely of the track. As most clearly seen FIGS. 4 to 6, the plow parts 12 and 13 are adjustably connected to the carrier plate 11, being hinged to the carrier plate edges in the illustrated embodiments for pivoting in a generally horizontal plane about generally vertically extending pivots. The plow parts 13, 13 of the two ballast plows constitute connecting means therebetween and extend transversely of the track, thus forming a ballast plow unit extending across the entire width of the track. These plow parts constitute a center portion of the ballast plow unit extending between the track rails.

As best seen in FIGS. 4 to 6, the center portion parts l3, 13 are adjustably associated in overlapping relationship, the length of the center portion being variable by adjustment of the center portion parts. If desired, these parts may be taken off their hinges so that the center portion constitutes a separate component of the ballast plow unit insertable between the separate plows associated with each rail.

The carrier plate 11 of each plow is positioned above a respective rail and the center portion parts 13, 13 extend laterally therefrom towards each other. In the modification of FIG. 4, one of the plate parts 13 defines a groove wherein the other plate part 13 glides for varying the length of the center portion of the unit when the two plows are adjusted in relation to each other in the direction of track elongation. The modification of FIG. 5 functions in an equivalent manner, the plate parts 13a, 131: each defining registering, longitudinally extending slots 18 holding guide pins 19 for slidably interconnecting the two parts. In the equivalent modifications of FIG. 6, the two center portion parts l3, 13" are telescopingly interconnected for adjustment of the length of the center portion.

The additional laterally extending plow part 12 is similarly hinged to a side edge of each carrier 1 1 and extends outwardly of a respective track rail over the flanks or sides of the ballast bed, as best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. These plate parts, too, are pivotal in a generally horizontal plane.

The cover plate defines an at least partially covered ballast plowing space above each track rail and extends laterally beyond the carrier 11 on which it is mounted. The laterallyextending cover plate portions have means for fixing the center portion part 13 and the additional laterally extending plow part 12 in selected positions. For this purpose, these circumferential portions define a series of bores 14 engageable by stop pins 15 for limiting the back movement of the pivoting plow parts under pressure of the plowed ballast when the machine advances along the track.

Finally, each ballast plow also comprises a channeled bottom plate 16 mounted on carrier plate 11 and having a longitudinally extending tunnel section covering the rail 3, rollers 16' mounted inside the tunnel section for rolling engagement with the underlying rail so that the plow glidingly moves on the track rail during advancement of the machine. This type of bottom plate for ballast plows is conventional and extends laterally from the rail it covers on both sides thereof.

Also, outwardly extending wing parts 12' may be mounted on the additional plow parts 12 and are pivotal in their plane for swinging the wing parts into selected positions indicated in broken lines in FIG. 3. In this manner, the wing parts of the plow may be adjusted to the angle of slope of the ballast bed flanks, suitable pins 17 being provided to fix the wing parts in a selected position on the additional plow parts 12.

If desired, the plow parts 12 and/or 13 may be vertically adjustably mounted independently of each other, the parts forming the center portion of the low unit being preferably vertically adjusted in unison. For instance, a common carrier means for the plow parts 12 and 13 of both plow means may be rotatably mounted on each cover plate 10, the length of this carrier means being adjustable.

A lifting means for each of the plow parts may be mounted on this common carrier means and is connected to an associated one of the plow parts for independent operation, a single lifting means being provided for the parts of the portion, if desired. In this manner, the two outside plow parts and the center plow parts may be lifted to any desired extent, the structure of such lifting means, preferably hydraulic motors, taking any suitable form and not being shown so as not unnecessarily to encumber the illustration of the essential features ofthe ballast plow unit.

Of paramount importance according to the present invention is the relative mobility of one of the ballast plows in relation to the other ballast plow in the direction of track elongation. While both plows have been shown and described as so movable in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 3, the structure will be considerably simplified and accordingly less expensive to manufacture if only one of the plows is longitudinally adjustably mounted on the frame 1, as shown in FIG. 7. I

In this embodiment, one of the plows ll, l2 13 is mounted on a carrier rod 6a of fixed length which projects from the front end of the machine frame and has a carrier extension 8a on which the plow means is mounted. Ifdesired, this plow may be vertically adjustably mounted, for instance by mounting the carrier rod 6a for vertical movement in the same manner as the carrier means 6 of the previously described embodiment. The plow and/or its parts may also be pivotal in a horizontal plane in the manner of the previously described embodiment, some of the selected positions of the plow parts being indicated in FIG. 7 in broken lines.

The other plow is longitudinally adjustably mounted on the machine frame, the carrier means 8a of this plow being movable in the direction of track elongation by a hydraulic motor 20 mounted on the front end of the machine frame. As shown in FIG. 7 by the broken line position of the plow in one selected end position, the range of longitudinal movement of this plow is preferably symmetrical in respect of the longitudinally fixed plow. This simplified embodiment will enable a sufiicient variety of plow positions for most operating conditions.

A variety of such plow positions is shown by way of example in FIGS. 8a to 17 without in any way exhausting the possibilities which will be obvious to those skilled in the art-. In all of these figures, the machine advances downwardly, as seen on the drawing, as indicated by the full line arrows in the figures, an alternative opposite operating direction being indicated by arrows in broken lines. Furthermore, the flow of plowed ballast is indicated by transversely directed arrows for the operating direction indicated by the full line arrows. In the schematic showings of these figures, the inwardly directed plow parts 13, 13 are shown in adjacent, overlapping relationship, it being understood that they are interconnected to form a center portion in the previously described manner.

In the adjusted positions of FIGS. 8a and 8b, the plow parts 12, 13 are so positioned that the plow unit moves ballast from one side of the track to the other side in a single pass. Simultaneously, the plow levels the ballast bed and imparts to it a desired profile. When the operating direction is reversed, as shown by the broken arrows, the identical position of the plow unit will reverse the transverse flow of the ballast.

The plow part positioning of FIGS. 9a and 9b produces the same flow of ballast but, in this position, the angle enclosed by the plow parts 12, 13 and the track rails is more acute, i.e., smaller, than in the positions of FIGS. 8a and 8b. This produces less resistance by the ballast as it is swept by the plow means, thus facilitating the advance of the machine and making it more efficient.

It is obvious from a consideration of these adjusted positions of the plow parts that it enables not only any selected ballast treatment and movement to be effected by the plow unit but also makes it possible to adapt the machine to different degrees of resistance encountered by the ballast, i.e., whether only a little of the ballast is to be moved or whether considerably amounts of ballast are to be relocated.

It is particularly advantageous if the angular position of the center portion of the plow unit is adjustable during advancement of the machine if the unit is used in conjunction with a ballast redistributing apparatus of the type disclosed and claimed in our above-mentioned copending application. Thus, if the amount of ballast changes on the left or right side of the track during the forward movement of the machine, the angular positioning of the plow parts may be suitably adjusted to such changing conditions. This may be done very sensitively if both plow means are longitudinally movable in respect of machine frame 1.

The positions shown in FIGS. 10a and 10b are basically similar to those of FIGS. 8a and 8b, i.e., the plow parts are adjusted for moving ballast from one side of the track to the other side. However, the foremost plow part 12 has been pivoted inwardly so that only a limited, selected amount of the ballast is swept up on one side of the track for movement to the other side thereof. In the illustrated position of the foremost plow part 12, only the ballast immediately adjacent one track rail is moved by the plow, and if the other plow part 12 is also adjusted into the position shown in broken lines, this ballast is moved only to the region immediately adjacent the other track rail.

In the positions of FIGS. 11a and 11b, the plow unit operates to move ballast from one ballast bed flank to the region of the track rail on the opposite side of the track.

In the position of FIG. 12, the plow parts move the ballast from the ballast bed flanks to the center of the bed along the center line of the track. The plow part positioning of FIG. 13 moves ballast from the center of the track towards the two flanks, the center portion parts being so adjusted that the left side, in the operating direction, receives more ballast than the right side, for instance in a superelevated curve section. The asymmetrical adjustment of the plow center portion partspermits the amount of ballast conveyed to respective sides of the track to be selected at will. This asymmetrical adjustment is possible because of the glidable adjustment of the two center portion parts in respect of each other.

In the position of FIG. 14, the ballast will be moved uniformly across the bed, thus assuring a desired profile thereof and leveling the bed. FIG. 15 shows an alternative positioning of the plow parts for moving ballast from the flanks into the center of the bed. FIG. 16 illustrates the possibility of operating the machine only with a single plow means associated with one of the rails while the other plow means (shown in broken lines) is inoperative although there is no need for lifting it from the track. Its parts are simply pivoted backwardly into an inoperative position while the other plow means shown in full lines moves ballast from a flank to the adjacent rail region or, if the outwardly extending part is pivoted back, as shown in broken lines, from the rail region to the adjacent flank. FIG. 17, finally, shows an adjustment wherein the two inwardly extending plow part overlap transversely of the track but are not connected. With this positioning, the central part of the bed is swept successively by two plow parts in a single pass, thus assuring effective leveling.

While the present invention has been illustrated and described hereinabove in'connection with certain preferred embodiment, it will be readily understood that many variations and modifications may occur to those skilled in the art, particularly after benefiting from this teaching, without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

We claim: I

I. In a mobile machine for treating ballast, which comprises a frame mounted for mobility on track rails for moving in the direction of elongation of the track, a separate ballast plow associated with each track rail, and a carrier for each of said ballast plows, each carrier being positioned above a respective one of said track rails and being mounted on said frame: means for moving at least one of the plow carriers relative to the other plow carrier in said direction of elongation of the track; and connecting means extending transversely of the track and centrally between the ballast plows to form a ballast plow unit extending across the entire width of the track, the connecting means consisting of two parts connected to respective ones of the ballast plows and being adjustably mounted on a respective one of the plow carriers, the connecting means parts extending laterally therefrom towards each other into adjustable association with each other.

2. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 1, the other plow carrier being fixedly mounted on the frame.

3. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 1, the connecting means parts being adjustably associated in overlapping relationship.

4. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 1, the length of the connecting means being variable by adjustment of said parts, and the connecting means constituting a separate component of the ballast plow unit insertable between said .ballast plows.

5. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 1, said connecting means parts being adjacent each other and being interconnected for gliding movement in relation to each other by longitudinally extending groove means engaging guide pins of said parts.

6. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 1, wherein said ballast plow carriers are positionable inclined to the track plane.

7. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 1, the ballast plow unit further comprising additional laterally extending parts adjustably mounted on the carriers and extending outwardly of the respective track rails over the flanks of the ballast bed.

8. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 7, means for pivotally mounting the additional laterally extending parts on said carriers.

9. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 7, a cover plate mounted on each carrier to define an at least partially covered ballast plowing space above each track rail.

10. In the mobile ballast treating machine of claim 9, each cover plate extending laterally beyond the carrier on which it is mounted, the laterally extending cover plate portions having means for fixing the connecting means parts and the additional laterally extending parts in selected positions.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4266352 *Oct 11, 1979May 12, 1981Canron CorporationBallast side plow
US4282663 *Dec 17, 1979Aug 11, 1981Franz Plasser Bahnbaumaschinen-Industriegesellschaft M.B.H.Track working machine with a ballast plow arrangement
US4356645 *May 19, 1980Nov 2, 1982De Lorean Manufacturing CompanyVariable wing plow blade and mounting structure therefor
US4370819 *Mar 24, 1981Feb 1, 1983Ingram Robert EApparatus for depositing and spreading ballast
US4953467 *Apr 26, 1989Sep 4, 1990Franz Plasser Bahnbaumaschinen-Industriegesellschaft M.B.H.Track surfacing machine with track stabilization
US5084989 *Mar 8, 1991Feb 4, 1992Franz Plasser Bahnbaumaschinen-Industriegesellschaft M.B.H.Railroad
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Classifications
U.S. Classification37/105, 172/735, 172/815, 172/742, 172/786
International ClassificationE01B27/00, E01B27/02
Cooperative ClassificationE01B27/025
European ClassificationE01B27/02D2