Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3651610 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateApr 23, 1970
Priority dateApr 23, 1970
Publication numberUS 3651610 A, US 3651610A, US-A-3651610, US3651610 A, US3651610A
InventorsDonahue Patrick H
Original AssigneeBird & Son
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building corner unit
US 3651610 A
Abstract
A building corner unit (of plastic or metal) for overlappingly covering adjacent terminal exterior-corner ends of a course of rectangular siding elements (of plastic or metal), said corner unit providing an angularly formed member having a pair of sidewise extending wings with an inwardly offset portion at the bottom (butt) end of the unit, the top end thereof having an inwardly offset nailing bracket for nailing attachment to an exterior corner of opposing conventional wooden or wallboard house sheathing, with one end of the unit having vertical projecting means for telescopically connecting with an opposing end of an adjacent similar corner unit to hold the said units in vertical alignment with each other.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented March 28, 1972 3 She ets Sheet 1 sion devices, each said end portion circular element being characterized as being of toroidal shaped configuration and as having essentially all loads imposed thereon transferred transversely thereof into end portion tension devices bounding same.

6. An air inflated structure according to claim 5, wherein said end panels are characterized as possessing a substantially greater degree of extensibility in a direction transversely thereof then in a direction lengthwise thereof, and said panels forming each of said envelope elements being further characterized as having alengthwise dimension in excess of the spacing between said pair of adjacent tension devices.

7. An air inflated structure comprising in combination:

a generally cylindrical section and end means to air seal opposite ends of said cylindrical section, said cylindrical section including a generally cylindrical air inflated envelope, a series of generally parallel tension devices and attaching means for attaching said tension devices to said envelope, said envelope arching over a supporting surface and having lengthwise extending marginal edge portions thereof air sealed relative to said supporting surface and having hoopwise extending marginal edge portions thereof air sealed relative to said end means, said envelope comprising a plurality of relatively narrow horizontally elongated envelope panels extending lengthwise of said cylindrical section, said envelope panels being joined to vertically adjacent envelope panels, said flexible tension devices being anchored at their opposite ends to said supporting surface, said tension devices being relatively widely spaced apart lengthwise of said envelope so as to extend hoopwise of said envelope and transversely of said envelope panels, said panels cooperating to define between each pair of adjacent tension devices a generally toroidal shaped envelope element extending hoopwise of said envelope, said panels forming each of said envelope elements being characterized as transferring essentially all loads imposed on said envelope lengthwise thereof into said tension devices, at least one of said end means is in the form of a generally spherically shaped end section, said one end section including:

an air inflated envelope end portion attached to the first said envelope so as to close one end of said cylindrical section, said envelope end portion comprising a plurality of end panels;

a series of flexible end tension devices anchored at their opposite ends to said supporting surface at points spaced in a direction transversely of the first said envelope, said end tension devices lying substantially along great circles passing through a common center and having a curvature corresponding substantially to the radii of curvature of the first said tension devices such that adjacent end tension devices bound circular end section envelope elements extending between and tapering towards said opposite ends of said end tension devices, said end panels being arranged so as to extend transversely of said end section circular elements and joined to adjacent end panels within said circular elements each said end section envelope element being characterized as having a generally toroidal shaped configuration, and said end panels of each said end section envelope element being characterized as transferring essentially all loads imposed on their associated end section envelope element into end tension devices bounding same; and means for attaching said end tension devices to said end panels. I 8. An air inflated structure according to claim 7, wherein said end panels are characterized as possessing a substantially greater degree of extensibility in a direction transversely thereof than in a direction lengthwise thereof, and said end panels of each said end section envelope element being characterized as having a lengthwise dimension in excess of the spacing between boundin end tension devices in an area of attachment thereto, where y to permit said end envelope circular element to assume said configuration.

9. An air inflated structure according to claim 8, wherein at least some of said end panels are formed by end joined end panel segments extending between adjacent end tension devices.

10. An air inflated structure according to claim 7, wherein said end section envelope elements are characterized as having an increasing radius of curvature transversely thereof in directions towards said opposite ends of said adjacent end tension devices.

11. An air inflated structure according to claim 10, wherein at least some of said end panels are formed by end joined end panel segments extending between adjacent end tension devices.

12. An air inflated structure according to claim 1 1, wherein said end panels are characterized as possessing a substantially greater degree of extensibility in a direction transversely thereof than in a direction lengthwise thereof, and said end panels of each said end section envelope element being characterized as having a lengthwise dimension in excess of the spacing between bounding end tension devices in an area of attachment thereto, whereby to permit said end envelope circular element to assume said configuration.

Patented March 28, 1972 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 I Patented March 28, 1972} 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 BUILDING CORNER UNIT This invention relates generally to building siding, more particularly to comer units for use with multipanel external building siding.

Corner units are commonly used to cover the corners of wooden buildings sheathed with rectangular siding elements in the form of wood simulating shingles or clapboards. In the past, corner units have been individually attached, at the corners of a building, to opposite ends of terminal comer ends of siding courses, requiring careful, time-consuming alignment of the courses to achieve a proper weather seal and fit. Furthermore, commonly being individually fastened at both upper and lower ends to the siding, prior corner units proved difficult to align vertically and tended to buckle or malform upon weather-induced expansion and contraction of the siding elements. Also, the configurations of the prior corner units were structurally ill-suited to be formed by molding of organic plastic, (e.g., being commonly provided with reverse bent bottom tabs requiring an undercut).

Accordingly, it is a major object of this invention to provide an improved novel weather-protective corner unit for use with panels of exterior siding constructed to be independently and easily attached to wooden inner sheathing without buckling or popping, being easily aligned horizontally with adjacent courses to be jointed at the corner, and readily aligned vertically by telescopically engaging interlocking means, all for overlappingly and sealably holding the siding terminal ends in fixed relation to the underlying wooden sheathing.

A further object of the invention is to provide a corner unit for artificial siding having a wood-simulating exterior surface integrated with the siding, preferably consisting of molded organic plastic materials such as the vinyls though, alternatively, formed sheet metal may be employed for the corner units of the invention.

These and other objects of the invention are accomplished by providing angular corner units at the corners of a building for overlapping terminal ends of siding elements, each corner unit having a pair of wings at approximately right angles to each other with the wings tapering outwardly and downwardly from the top end to a horizontal angular shelf extending inwardly at the bottoms of the wings for cooperation with the tops of the wings of a subjacent like corner unit. Also, each corner unit has a bracket inwardly offset from the top ends of the wings of the corner unit for nailing said unit to opposing housing sheathing at the comers thereof, plus a prong preferably extending downwardly from said shelf for vertically, telescopically engaging a subjacent like corner unit effective to connect any two corner units in vertical alignment, with the shelf of an upper corner element held in fixed horizontal relationship with the top end of a subjacent like corner element. In preferred embodiments and uses of the invention, the corner elements are of like exterior finish and color as the artificial siding unit they overlap and thus cover the ends thereof. Being mounted directly at the corner portion of the housing sheathing, the corner elements may be attached thereto either before, as is normal, or even after the application of the siding. The comer units thus facilitate assembly of the siding, as desired. When attached before the siding elements, the shelf portion of the comer element can serve as an aid in horizontally aligning a given course of panels extending left and right from the comer unit.

As above indicated, the invention may employ an angular corner unit constructed of metal in essentially the same form, preferably with a surface to match that of the siding elements employed therewith.

For the purpose of more fully explaining the objects and features of the invention, reference is now made to the following description of preferred embodiments of the invention, together with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view of a corner portion of a completed wall structure showing a vertical series of interlocking corner units overlapping terminal ends of a course of siding elements at an exterior corner of a building;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view of two adjacent comer units in vertical interlocking engagement, with mid-portions of the wings of each unit broken away;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a modified embodiment consisting of a single, wide-width clapboard comer element;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of still another clapboard embodiment of a comer element for two-narrower course-simulating wooden clapboard siding;

FIG. 6 is a view illustrating modified comer units in telescopic interlocking engagement with mid-portions of the wings broken away, in which the modification involves a reversal of the position of the interlocking prong from the bottom of the corner unit (as shown in foregoing figures of the drawings) to to top of the modified corner unit;

FIG. 7 shows in plan a partially completed modified corner unit that readily can be made from sheet metal or other sheet materials by stamping and forming operations; and

FIG. 7a shows the partially completed corner unit of FIG. 7 in its completed right-angular conformation ready for use.

Referring to the drawings, a corner unit 20 (FIGS. 1, 2 and 3) represents a preferred embodiment with an integral woodsimulating surface molded from vinyl plastic, having an exterior surface pattern of wood grain cedar shake shingles (as, for example, in the siding elements of Ser. No. 795,509, filed Jan. 31, 1969 now U.S. Pat. No. 3,593,479 of July 20, I971, assigned to the assignee of this application). FIG. 3 shows the comer unit 20 of FIGS. 1 and 2 as connected with an identical corner unit 20 therebelow in vertical alignment therewith for overlappingly joining terminal ends of generally rectangular, interlocking, like rectangular elements or panels 25 or 26 of matching exterior finish. The corner units 20 is advantageously constructed to interlock with a like subjacent unit 20 to form a continuously connected weatherproof vertical series of comer units. Interlocking is accomplished by the novel telescopic cooperation of prong 31 of unit 20 with the bracket 30 of unit 20, as hereinafter described.

As best seen in FIG. 3, a view taken from the inside, corner units 20 include two sidewise extending wings 22 and 23, perpendicularly intersecting along comer line 24, with the wings extending widthwise a substantial distance to overlap (for weather protection) the terminal ends of like siding panels 25 and 26, the wings having outwardly and downwardly tapering edges 27 and 28. Also included in each corner unit as seen in FIG. 3, a view taken from the inside, is a horizontal angular bottom shelf 29, a top-mounted nailing bracket shown generally at 30, and a bottom-mounted prong 31 projecting downwardly from the inner portion of the shelf 29. The top edges 32 and,33 of wings 23 and 22 are horizontally aligned for abutting the lower surface of an adjacent shelf 29 of an overlying unit, as shown in FIG. 3. The nailing bracket 30, preferably formed integrally at the top of wings 22 and 23, includes an inwardly offset support member 36 extending horizontally inwardly from adjacent top portions of wings 22 and 23 with mounting surface 37 in the same plane as the tops 32 and 33. Also included in bracket 30 are two spaced vertical walls 40 and 41 attached to opposite sides of support members 36, horizontal legs 42 and 43 extending inwardly from the respective upper edges of said walls to an angularly formed member 44 having vertically extending perpendicular walls provided with nail holes as shown for nails (see FIGS. 4 and 5) anchoring the comer element to the corner portion of the housing sheathing 45. Legs 42 and 43 are disposed in a plane parallel with and vertically spaced from the support member 36, and bracket 30 includes an opening 46 providing a socket of generally square shape as viewed from above in cross section (see FIG. 2), with edges 47 and 48 for receiving prong 3!, downwardly extending from the overlying unit as shown.

Being formed with shelf 29, prong 31 projects downwardly from the inner comer of said shelf with portions 50 and 51 disposed at right angles joined at corner 53 parallel with channel 44 and offset from wings 22 and 23 by shelf 29 for engaging said opening 46 (see especially FIG. 3), the prong guide portions 50 and 51 being provided for easy entry into the opening 46.

As seen in FIG. 4, corner unit 20a, of different surface conformation, is independently attached to the sheathing 45 by driving nails 60 and 61 through the holes provided in bracket 30 directly into the corner portion of the sheathing with shelf 29a in horizontal alignment with a given course of siding 26a already in place, for example. With a lower comer unit 20a thus secured, a second corner unit 20a (see FIGS. 3 and 4) may then be mounted above the lower unit 20a by first inserting prong 31 downwardly into opening 46 such that the bottom of shelf 29a surmounts support member 36 and top edges 32 and 33 (see FIG. 3) and the inner edges of shelf 29a engage walls 40 and 41 wedging the prong portions 50 and 51 into the opening 46 of the lower unit 20a, thereby telescopically connecting the comer upper unit 20a with the lower corner unit 200. By this construction, the upper corner unit 20a is prevented from moving downwardly or laterally and is aligned vertically with respect to a lower corner element 20a and the comer of the wooden sheathing 45. Also, such assembly positions shelf 29a adjacent tops 32 and 33 of the lower comer unit 20a in horizontal alignment therewith. Thereafter, the upper corner unit 20a is attached directly to the Sheathing by nailing its respective bracket 30 in place.

Alternatively, a comer unit to be installed may be fitted over one previously attached siding panel in horizontal alignment therewith, say a left one, said panel being previously attached to intersecting walls 67 and 68 of sheathing 45 (see FIGS. 1 and 2) with wings 22 and 23 overlying the terminal portions of panels 25 right and 26 left, and then a right comer panel of the same course of siding may be applied to one wall using such corner element for starting said right panel of the same course. Also, corner units may be installed prior to either of the left and right panels of the same course being attached to the sheathing.

In another embodiment of the invention of different surface conformation (FIG. the wing members 56 and 57 of comer unit 20b are formed to overlie terminal ends of adjacent unitary double course clapboard siding panels 25b and 26b.

In yet another embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 6, prong 31a is reversed to a top mounted position on modified corner unit 20c, projecting upwardly with corner 53a aligned with comer line 24. Shelf 29b, having inwardly offset bearing surfaces 70 and 72 is provided with angular slot 74 ofiset inwardly from corner line 24. The upper corner unit 20c, as viewed from the outside in FIG. 6, is telescopically connected to the lower unit by inserting prong 31a upwardly into slot 74 with walls 40 and 41 of bracket 30 being wedged against bearing surfaces 70 and 72 and shelf 29b surmounting top edges 32 and 33 of the subjacent like corner unit 20c.

In still a further embodiment of the invention, a corner cap 80, stamped from flat sheet metal stock as seen in FIG. 7, having two laterally extending wings 22a and 23a joined along corner line 24a, each wing before forming including an upwardly extending tab 81 and a downwardly extending shelf member 82 having a prong member 84 and slanted edge 85, is readily formed by bending into a corner cap of right angular conformation for covering terminal ends of siding as seen in FIG. 7a.

As seen in FIG. 7a the respective shelf members 82 are formed horizontally inward being joined along centrally abutting edges 85 with respective adjacent prong members 84 bent downwardly perpendicularly thereto and joined to provide a unitary prong of right angular conformation. Also respective tab members 81 are formed by bending to provide horizontal inwardly projecting portions 86 and perpendicular vertically extending portions 88. A corner cap to be installed is fitted over a previously attached subjacent like comer cap 80 with respective shelf members 82 resting on respective horizontal portions 86 of said subjacent comer cap and respective vertical portions 88 of tabs 81 extending beneath the inner portions of Wings 220 and 23a of said subjacent corner cap 80 immediately adjacent comer line 240.

What is claimed is: 1. In a building comer unit for overlappingly covering adjacent terminal ends of a course of generally rectangular multiple-panel interlocked siding elements, said corner unit comprising an angularly formed piece of material having a pair of wings at approximately right angles to each other and outwardly tapering towards the bottoms of said wings and having an inwardly projecting shelf at the wider end thereof adapted to overlie and abut the top of a subjacent similar comer unit when assembled in place therewith, said corner unit also having at the top end thereof an inwardly offset nailing bracket for nailing to house sheathing near the corner thereof, said comer unit also having on its opposite ends vertical telescopic engaging means including socket and projecting socket engaging portions, respectively, for overlapping and interlocking with adjacent similar comer units to hold adjacent ends thereof both in fixed relation to each other and to said sheathing to which an overlapped inner upper end thereof is affixed.

2. A corner unit of claim 1 wherein said means for telescopically vertically connecting said comer unit with said adjacent similar corner unit is a projection extending downwardly from said inwardly offset bottom portion for connection with an inwardly offset top portion of a subjacent similar corner unit.

3. A corner unit of claim 1 wherein said means for telescopically vertically connecting said corner unit with an adjacent similar corner unit is adapted to cooperate with a projection extending upwardly from a subjacent similar comer unit.

4. A corner unit of claim 1 including means for aligning siding to be nailed to said sheathing.

5. A corner element of claim 1 adapted for attachment to said sheathing before adjacent terminal ends of said siding elements are attached to the sheathing and, optionally, adapted for attachment to said sheathing after adjacent terminal ends of siding elements are applied to the sheathing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US720892 *Jul 7, 1902Feb 17, 1903Edwin G CharleboisSheet-metal angle-section.
US1487155 *Jun 9, 1922Mar 18, 1924Compo Tile Mfg CoBuilding construction
US1664463 *Nov 30, 1925Apr 3, 1928Muryn John JMetal-building construction
US2607449 *Nov 5, 1947Aug 19, 1952Sheldon Blocker HSheet metal siding
US2849757 *Nov 9, 1953Sep 2, 1958Meldrum Roy WMetal corner for construction panels
US2991592 *Dec 31, 1956Jul 11, 1961Rauen Math WMetal siding with integral nailing tabs
US3248835 *Sep 18, 1962May 3, 1966Wesstop CompanyBevel siding
US3284967 *Mar 18, 1964Nov 15, 1966Us Plywood CorpLaminated cover elements and flashing and sealing means therefor
US3420021 *Oct 10, 1967Jan 7, 1969Formica CorpKnock-down shower unit enclosure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3918227 *Dec 10, 1973Nov 11, 1975Armstrong Cork CoClip means for mounting plastic or metal facing material on building block structures
US4015374 *Mar 6, 1974Apr 5, 1977Alside, Inc.Angled cap member for simulated cedar shake construction
US5517794 *Mar 10, 1995May 21, 1996James Michael WagnerApparatus for forming vinyl siding corners extending over walls intersecting at obtuse angles
US5575131 *Jun 6, 1995Nov 19, 1996National Gypsum CompanyMultiple use corner clip
US5644883 *Dec 15, 1995Jul 8, 1997National Gypsum CompanyMultiple use corner clip
US5724784 *Feb 8, 1995Mar 10, 1998National Gypsum CompanyShaft wall and horizontal metal stud therefor
US5740644 *Jan 28, 1997Apr 21, 1998National Gypsum CompanyWall with horizontal metal stud and reinforcement channel therefor
US5749192 *Sep 13, 1996May 12, 1998National Gypsum CompanyCorner clips for horizonal framing
US5836123 *May 24, 1996Nov 17, 1998Gulino; FrancescoFor use in the building of houses
US6405503 *Jun 27, 2000Jun 18, 2002Ronnie E. ReedDecorative corner trim and mounting system for sheet siding used on wood and steel frame structures
US6684587Jun 20, 2002Feb 3, 2004Certainteed CorporationCedar impression siding corner
US6854239 *Dec 6, 2002Feb 15, 2005Douglas E. WhiteUnitized corner brace
US7127869 *Jun 5, 2002Oct 31, 2006Nailite InternationalWall covering with improved corner molding and method of installation
US7228665 *Aug 5, 2004Jun 12, 2007Nailite International, Inc.Roof and wall covering with improved corner construction
US7654050May 25, 2004Feb 2, 2010Brett C JusticeCorner trim piece for siding
US7735286 *Feb 5, 2007Jun 15, 2010Exteria Building ProductsRoof and wall covering with improved corner construction
US8136316 *Jul 29, 2009Mar 20, 2012Exteria Building Products, LlcRoof and wall covering with improved corner construction
US8584419 *Sep 25, 2012Nov 19, 2013Dodge Solutions LlcWall sheathing, siding and roof decking hangers
US8661751 *Apr 6, 2011Mar 4, 2014James Robert LawrieAlignment spacer for siding outside corner
US8763343 *Oct 10, 2013Jul 1, 2014Dodge Solutions LlcWall sheathing, siding and roof decking hangers
US20130019550 *Sep 25, 2012Jan 24, 2013Dodge Sr Monty WayneWall sheathing, siding and roof decking hangers
WO2002070341A2 *Mar 1, 2002Sep 12, 2002Certain Teed CorpCedar impression siding corner
WO2003104579A1 *Apr 22, 2003Dec 18, 2003Nailite InternatWall covering with improved corner molding and method of installation
WO2006017582A2 *Aug 2, 2005Feb 16, 2006Nailite Internat IncRoof and wall covering with improved corner construction
WO2009047594A2 *May 31, 2008Apr 16, 2009JusteSurface covering device
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/278, 52/288.1, 52/546, 52/532, 52/544
International ClassificationE04F13/18, E04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0864, E04F13/18
European ClassificationE04F13/08D, E04F13/18
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 14, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE, MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BIRD INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:005024/0979
Effective date: 19880812
Dec 19, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: BIRD INCORPORATED
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:BIRD & SON, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004209/0513
Effective date: 19830707
Dec 19, 1983AS01Change of name
Owner name: BIRD & SON, INC.
Owner name: BIRD INCORPORATED
Effective date: 19830707