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Publication numberUS3651771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateAug 26, 1969
Priority dateAug 26, 1969
Publication numberUS 3651771 A, US 3651771A, US-A-3651771, US3651771 A, US3651771A
InventorsEberle Richard J
Original AssigneeStainless Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Incinerator
US 3651771 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[limited States Eberle [54] HNCHNERATOR [72] Inventor: Richard J. Eberle, Gwynedd Valley, Pa.

[73] Assignee: Stainless, Inc., North Wales, Pa.

[22] Filed: Aug. 26, 1969 [21] Appl.No.: 853,014

3,403,645 10/1968 Flowers, Jr ..ll0/8X Primary Examiner-Kenneth W. Sprague Attorney-Seidel, Gonda & Goldhammer [451 Mar. 2%, W12

[ 7] v aas'rmcr An incinerator including primary and secondary combustion chambers and at least one transistion passageway interconnecting the same. At least one primary and at least one secondary burner are utilized in the respective chambers. The secondary burner is tangentially fired with an aspirating action. Exit air is admitted through ports provided at the base of the stack to facilitate turbulence in a direction opposite to the direction of the tangentially fired secondary burner. Primary and overfire air are provided in the main combustion chamber. Secondary air is introduced in the transition passageway. The exit air is introduced immediately above the secondary chamber at the base of the stack. The temperature in the primary chamber is preferably at least l,l00 F. and the temperature in the secondary chamber is preferably at least 1,400 F.

a H Clairns,6Drawin g lFig ures PAIENTEDMAR28 I972 3.651.771

sum 1 [1F 3 IIVVENTOA? RICHARD '7'. EBERL E fl TTORNEVS.

PMENTEUMARZB I972 SHEET 3 OF 3 INVENTOR RICHARD J. EBERLE ATTORNEYS.

INCINERATOR The present invention is directed to an incinerator and more particularly to an incinerator having primary and secondary combustion chambers and at least one transition passageway interconnecting the chambers.

The problem of disposing of waste and preventing air pollution is difficult of resolution. The various states in the United States have enacted codes and regulations which are not uniform which regulate acceptable emissions from incinerators. in order to minimize air pollution, it is essential that incinerators operate within the most restrictive existing codes and, preferably, the emissions should be substantially less than that permitted under existing codes.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having primary and secondary combustion chambers and having a very high efficiency so that the emissions from the incinerator are substantially less than the emissions permissible under existing codes and regulations.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having primary and secondary combustion chambers wherein primary and overfire air are provided in the main combustion chamber and at least one transition passageway interconnects the chamber.

it is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having primary and secondary combustion chambers and ports for admission of air tangentially at the base of the stack of the incinerator to facilitate turbulence within the stack in a direction opposite to the direction of the tangentially fired secondary burner.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having primary and secondary combustion chambers wherein an auger feed of waste to the primary combustion chamber may be utilized.

it is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having a waste feed door and an ash removal door for the primary combustion chamber wherein both doors are coaxial.

lt is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having primary and secondary combustion chambers and ash removal doors for each ofthe chambers.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator having a tangentially fired secondary burner in a secondary chamber wherein the secondary burner is fired with an aspirating action to aid the flow of gases from the primary chamber.

it is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator wherein air is supplied in four distinct locations in order to provide for optimal combustion of waste.

it is another object of the present invention to provide an incinerator which will meet existing codes and regulations throughout the states of the United States with respect to emissions from incinerators.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

The above and other objects are accomplished by means of the present invention.

An incinerator is provided having primary and secondary combustion chambers. The secondary combustion chamber is located between the primary combustion chamber and the stack. Either one or two passageways may be provided for communication between the primary and secondary combustion chambers.

A suitable pump is provided for pumping primary and overfire air into the main combustion chamber. The main com bustion chamber is provided with both an ash removal door and a waste-charging door. The waste charging and the ash removal doors may be coaxial and the hinge for the waste charging door may be provided on the ash removal door. If desired, an auger feed of waste into the main combustion chamber may be provided. A spark arrestor may be provided at the terminal end of the stack.

A charge of waste is fed to the primary chamber. The charge is ignited by a primary burner which may be gas fired. The primary burner will remain on until the primary chamber reaches a temperature of 1100 F. A partial combustion takes place on the fire bed with the primary products of the combustion being carbon, combustible gases, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Primary air is introduced adjacent the fire bed to facilitate this first combustion.

Additional combustion takes place in the upper portion of the primary chamber. Overfire air is admitted which mixes with the combustible gases to facilitate this further combustion.

Combustion is also effected in the secondary combustion chamber as the gases flow through a transition passageway into the secondary chamber. Secondary air is admitted in the transition passageway to facilitate combustion in the secondary chamber. A secondary burner which may be gas fired is provided in the secondary chamber. The secondary burner will maintain the temperature of the secondary chamber at or about 1,400" F.

The secondary burner is tangentially fired across the transition passageway with an aspirating action. The aspirating action of the secondary burner facilitates the flow of gases from the primary chamber to the secondary chamber. The tangential firing of the secondary burner causes a spiral flow of gases in the secondary chamber which creates turbulence and assures proper dwell time in the secondary chamber. Turbulence is further promoted by the introduction of exit air through ports at the base of the stack tangentially in a direction opposite to the spiral flow in the secondary chamber.

The final combustion takes place during transition of the gases from the secondary chamber to the stack. The tangentially admitted exit air is introduced by natural draft to the base of the stack. Substantially all combustibles remaining in the flue gases exiting from the secondary chamber will be consumed in the final combustion.

Air is introduced at four distinct locations, i.e., primary air adjacent to the fire bed in the primary chamber, overfire air in the primary chamber, secondary air in the transition passageway, and exit air introduced at the base of the stack. Suitable gates may be provided to meter the amount of air introduced at the various locations. Varying the amount of air introduced at the various locations permits complete and efficient combustion of a wide variety of waste material. For example, highly volatile waste produces a substantial quantity of combustible gases, and large quantities of overfire and secondary air are required. A wet waste will normally produce minimal combustible gases and large quantities of primary air are required. Control of the amount of air introduced at each location is important to facilitate efficient and complete combustion.

At each location where air is introduced it is introduced in such a manner that turbulence is created so that the combustible gases are mixed thoroughly with the air. Primary air is introduced from numerous openings along each side of the lower part of the primary chamber. Overfire air is introduced from numerous openings along each side of the upper part of the primary chamber. Secondary air is introduced directly into the transition passageway. Exit air is introduced tangentially at the base of the stack.

The air which is introduced at the various locations to promote combustion may be preheated to prevent cooling of the combustion chambers. This may be accomplished by arranging the piping, which feeds air, like a heat exchanger beneath the shell of the primary unit, the air being preheated by the heat release of combustion. Preheating of the air contributes to efficient and complete combustion of the waste. It has been found that it is not necessary to heat the exit air which is introduced at the base of the stack of natural draft. Furthermore, when combustion is very rapid, it is desirable to admit cool air so that it has a cooling effect in the combustion chambers. Hence, the temperature of the air will be dependent upon the purpose for which it is introduced.

The incinerator of the present invention was tested by the U5. Testing Company, Inc. of Hoboken, New Jersey. The purposes of the test were:

1. To sample the particulate and gas emissions from the incinerator. The incinerator operates at a rated capacity of 500 lbs. per hour. Grade 1 Waste was used in the test.

2. To analyze total emissions by weight and calculate weight of emissions on basis ofweight and material processed.

3. To submit a written report of test operations and results on a weight/weight basis and on weight/volume basis.

The testing procedures were performed in accordance with methods set forth in Bulletin WPSO, 6th Edition, entitled Methods for Determination of Velocity, Volume, Dust and Mist Control of Gases, as published by the Western Precipitation Company, and Bulletin T-6 Incinerator Testing," published by The Incinerator Institute of America.

The results of analysis based on a 3-hour sampling run were as follows:

Pounds of emissions per hour 0.066 Pounds of emissions per 500 lbs. of Grade I waste 0.07 Grains per cubic foot correctcd l2; carbon dioxide 016 Average gas analysis of flue gas by volume Oxygen I592 Carbon dioxide 46 Combustibles less than 0.2%

It is of interest to note that the maximum pounds of emission for 500 lbs. of Grade 1 waste permitted by New York City Standards are 1 lb. to 500 lbs. of waste. Also, the maximum grains per cubic foot corrected to 12 percent carbon dioxide permitted by New Jersey Standards 0.2.

During the test, there was no evidence of any smoke or solids emissions during the entire 3-hour testing period.

The efficiency ofgarbage reduction is as follows:

Weight of garbage discharged in 3 hours I392 lbs. Weight of ash developed in 3 hours I38 lbs. Percentage reduction ol'Grude l waste 98.08%

The following conclusions were made based upon the test performed by US. Testing Company, Inc.:

A. The emissions from the incinerator are well below the maximum established existing regulatory codes.

B. No visible emissions of smoke, particulates or solids can be detected.

C. The efficiency of Grade I waste reduction is very high (over 98 percent).

It is not known exactly why the incinerator of the present invention functions so efficiently, It is assumed that the following factors play an important part in the excellent results obtained by use of the incinerator of the present invention:

. Combustion occurs in multiple chambers and zones;

2. Air for combustion is added at each of four zones;

3. The amount of air introduced at each zone is controlled as required by the nature of the waste being consumed;

4. Air is turbulated with the combustible gases;

5. Proper temperatures are maintained in the primary and secondary chambers by use of burners and preheating of air; and

6. Gases are retained in the secondary chamber a sufficient time to allow complete combustion.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there are shown in the drawings forms which are presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIG. I is a front elevation view of the incinerator of the present invention showing an auger, partially in section, for delivering waste to the incinerator;

FIG. 2 is a section view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 3 is a section view taken along line 3-3 ofFiG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a section view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternative waste charging door and ash removal door which may be utilized on the primary combustion chamber; and

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 showing another alternative waste charging door and ash removal door which may be utilized on the primary combustion chamber.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like reference numerals indicate like structure throughout the several views, there is shown in FIGS. 1-4 an incinerator generally indicated by the reference numeral 10.

The incinerator 10 has a primary combustion chamber 12 and a secondary combustion chamber 14. Transition passageways l6 and 18 interconnect the primary combustion chamber 12 and the secondary combustion chamber 14. While two transition passageways are provided, it is to be understood that only a single passageway need be provided.

Primary burners 20 and 22 are provided for igniting a charge of waste received within the primary combustion chamber 12. If desired, only a single primary burner need be provided. Secondary burners 24 and 26 are provided for igniting waste and gases received in the secondary combustion chamber 14. Again, if desired, only a single secondary burner need be provided. A stack 28 is connected in any conventional manner to the uppermost end of the secondary combustion chamber 14.

The burners 20, 22, 24 and 26 may be conventional in construction. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the burners are gas-fired. The burner or burners in the primary chamber should maintain the temperature in the primary chamber at 1,100 F. or greater. The burner or burners in the secondary chamber should maintain the temperature in the secondary chamber at 1,400 F. or greater. It has been found that the most efficient incineration of waste can be obtained by maintaining said chambers at or above said temperatures.

An air pump 30 is provided for delivering air to the incinerator 10. The air which is fed to the pump 30 may be preheated to prevent cooling of the combustion chambers 12 and 14. This may be easily accomplished by arranging the piping, through which the air is fed, beneath the shell of the primary combustion chamber 12 so that the air will be preheated by the heat release of combustion. The heat exchange between the primary combustion chamber 12 and the piping will be sufficient to preheat the air. If desired, the piping could be imbedded in the refractory in the floor of the incinerator 10.

The air pump 30 feeds air to a conduit 32 connected thereto. The conduit 32 includes substantially Y-shaped branches 34 and 36. The branch 34 will admit primary air to the primary combustion chamber adjacent the primary burners 20 and 22. Suitable openings or entry ports 35 are provided in the branch 34 for the admission of air at spaced locations (see FIG. 2). The entry ports or openings 35 may be spaced along the branch 34 in any desired manner. Primary air facilitates initial combustion of waste in the incinerator 10.

The branch 36 has suitable openings or entry ports 37 for admitting overtire air into the primary combustion chamber 12. The entry ports 37 may likewise be located along the branch 36 in any desired manner. Overflre air facilitates combustion in the upper portion of the incinerator 10. A conduit 38 communicates with the conduit 32 for admitting secondary air into the transition passageway 16. The conduit 38 is provided with an entry port 39 located in the passageway 16. When two transition passageways are provided, a suitable branch conduit will be provided to admit air into the transition passageway 18. Secondary air is admitted immediately beneath the secondary burner 24 and facilitates combustion in the secondary chamber 14. Suitable gates may be provided to meter the amount ofair introduced at the various locations.

Exit air is introduced at the base of the stack 28 through suitable tangential ports 39 (See, FIG. 4). Introducing exit air through the tangential ports 39 facilitates turbulence at the base of the stack. The secondary burners 24 and 26 are tangentially fired across the transition passageways 16 and 18 with an aspirating action. The tangential firing of the secondary burners causes a spiral flow of gases in the secondary chamber which creates turbulence and assures proper dwell time of the gases in the chamber 14. The exit air is introduced into the stack in a direction opposite to the firing of the secondary burners. Air is admitted through the ports 39 by natural draft and suitable gates may be provided to control the quantity of air admitted through the ports 39. Exit air need not be preheated.

Suitable caps 41 having varying size openings therein may be provided for controlling the amount of air admitted through the ports 39 into the base of the stack 28. Final combustion takes place during the transition of gases from the secondary chamber to the stack. The tangentially admitted exit air facilitates such final combustion.

The interior of the incinerator 10 is provided with suitable castable refractory 40 which has insulation 42 adjacent thereto. Any suitable conventional insulation may be provided. A steel shell 44 is provided for the incinerator 10.

A suitable waste-charging door 46 may be utilized for admitting waste into the primary combustion chamber 12. An ash removal door 48 may be provided for removal of ash from the primary combustion chamber 12. The waste-charging door 46 and the ash removal door 48 may have a common axis as shown. Hinges 50 are provided for mounting of the wastecharging door 46. Hinges 54 may be provided for hinging the ash removal door 48 to the framework 52 of the incinerator 10. Suitable latching means 56 and 58 may be provided for maintaining the doors 46 and 48, respectively, closed during operation of the incinerator 10.

If desired, waste may be fed to the incinerator l automatically. To this end, a hopper 60 communicating with an auger 62 may be provided. Waste 64 in the hopper 60 may be fed to the incinerator by rotating the auger 62 by means ofa motor 66. The waste 64 will be fed through a conduit 68 and an inlet port 70 into the main primary combustion chamber 12. Accordingly, waste may be admitted in the primary combustion chamber 12 through either the port 70 or the waste-charging door 46. The framework 52 is provided with a straight horizontal section 72 immediately adjacent the waste-charging door 46. An inclined section 74 is provided to facilitate movement of waste into the primary combustion chamber 12. The primary combustion chamber has a substantially horizontal base 76.

The stack 28 may be composed of several sections with suitable couplings 84 interconnecting various sections. A conventional spark arrestor 86 may be provided at the top of the stack 28.

An ash removal door 88 may be provided for removing ash from the secondary chamber 14.

FIGS. and 6 show alternative waste-charging and ash removal doors. In FIG. 5, the waste-charging door 90 is hinged to the ash removal door 92. It is to be noted that the ash removal door 92 and the waste-charging door 90 are coaxial. As shown, suitable latch means may be provided for maintaining the doors 90 and 92 in their closed position.

FIG. 6 discloses a further alternative waste-charging door and ash removal door for the primary combustion chamber 12. The waste-charging door 94 may be circular, as shown. The ash removal door 96 may be rectangular as shown. Again, the ash removal and waste-charging doors may be coaxial as shown. Suitable latching means may be provided for maintaining the doors in their closed position. Any other various types ofdoors may be utilized.

in the incinerator of the present invention, the primary chamber 12 should be maintained at a temperature of at least l,l00 F. The secondary chamber 14 should be maintained at a temperature of at least 1,400 F. Air is admitted at four locations Primary air is admitted adjacent the primary burners and 22 whereat initial combustion takes place.

Overfire air is admitted into the primary chamber at the upper portion thereof. Additional combustion takes place in the upper portion of the primary chamber 12.

Combustion is also effected in the secondary combustion chamber 14 as the gases and the particles of waste flow through transition passageways 16 and 18 into the secondary chamber. Secondary air is admitted into the transition passageways l6 and 18 to facilitate combustion in the secondary chamber 14. The secondary burners 24 and 26 are tangentially fired with an aspirating action. The tangential firing of the secondary burners 24 and 26 causes a spiral fiow of gases in the secondary chamber 14 which creates turbulence and assures proper dwell time of the gases in the secondary chamber. Turbulence is further promoted by the introduction of exit air through ports at the base of the stack 28, in a tangential direction, opposite to the spiral flow in the secondary chamber 14.

The final combustion takes place during transition of the gases from the secondary chamber 14 to the stack 28. Tangentially admitted exit air is introduced by natural draft at the base of the stack 28. Substantially all combustible gases remaining in the flue gases exiting from the secondary chamber will be consumed in the final combustion.

The admission of primary air, overfire air, secondary air and exit air may be controlled by suitable gating. The primary air, overfire air and air introduced into the transition passageways may be heated. It has been found that it is not necessary to heat the exit air which is introduced at the base of the stack by natural draft. The primary overfire and air introduced into the transition passageways may be preheated when such air is primarily required to promote combustion. However, in instances where combustion is very rapid the air should not be preheated so that it will have a cooling effect. The temperature of the air introduced will depend upon the purpose for which it is required.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof.

1 claim:

1. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, at least one transition passageway interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, at least one primary burner in said primary combustion chamber, at least one secondary burner in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, said secondary burner being tangentially fired with an aspirating action to cause a spiral flow in said secondary chamber, means for introducing air into said secondary chamber to facilitate combustion therein, and a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber.

2. An incinerator asset forth in claim 1 wherein said primary burner maintains said primary combustion chamber at a temperature of at least l,l00 F. and said secondary burner maintains said secondary combustion chamber at a temperature of at least l,400 F. in order to facilitate substantially complete combustion of waste within said incinerator, means for introducing overfire air into said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing exit air at the base of said stack adjacent said secondary combustion chamber to facilitate final combustion of gases which exit from said secondary combustion chamber into said stack.

3. An incinerator as set forth in claim 1 including means for automatically feeding waste to said incinerator, said means including a hopper communicating with an auger, said auger being within a conduit, said conduit communicating with the interior of said incinerator so that waste may be fed by said auger through said conduit into said incinerator.

4. An incinerator as set forth in claim 1 wherein said incinerator includes a waste-charging door and an ash removal door for said primary chamber, said waste-charging door and said ash removal door being coaxial, and ash removal door for removal of ash from said secondary chamber, said incinerator including a steel shell, said incinerator being lined with refractory.

5. An incinerator as set forth in claim 2 wherein said exit air is introduced through tangential ports in a direction opposite to the tangential firing of the secondary burner to facilitate turbulence in the secondary chamber.

6. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, at least one transition passageway interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, at least one primary burner in said primary combustion chamber, at least one secondary burner in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing over-fire air into said primary combustion chamber to facilitate combustion in the upper portion of said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said transition passageway to facilitate combustion in said secondary combustion chamber, a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber, said stack, said transition passageway, said primary and secondary combustion chambers being coaxial, and means for introducing air at the base of said stack adjacent said secondary combustion chamber to facilitate final combustion of gases which exit from said secondary combustion chamber into said stack.

7. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, at least one transition passageway interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, at least one primary burner in said primary combustion chamber, at least one secondary burner in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing over-fire air into said primary combustion chamber to facilitate combustion in the upper portion of said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said transition passageway to facilitate combustion in said secondary combustion chamber, a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber, and means for firing said secondary burner tangentially with an aspirating action in order to facilitate turbulence of gases and particles of waste within said secondary chamber.

8. An incinerator as set forth in claim 7 wherein said primary burner maintains said primary combustion chamber at a temperature of at least l,l F. and said secondary burner maintains said secondary combustion chamber at a temperature of at least 1,400 F. in order to facilitate substantially complete combustion of waste within said incinerator, and said primary and secondary combustion chambers are aligned in a vertical direction.

9. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, at least one transition passageway interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, at least one primary burner in said primary combustion chamber, at least one secondary burner in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing over-fire air into said primary combustion chamber to facilitate combustion in the upper portion of said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said transition passageway to facilitate combustion in said secondary combustion chamber, a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber, and means for automatically feeding waste to said incinerator, said means includ ing a hopper communicating with an auger, said auger being within a conduit, said conduit communicating with the interior of said incinerator so that waste may be fed by said auger through said conduit into said incinerator.

10. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, at least one transition passageway interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, at least one primary burner in said primary combustion chamber, at least one secondary burner in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing over-fire air into said primary combustion chamber to facilitate combustion in the upper portion of said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said transition passageway to facilitate combustion in said secondary combustion chamber, a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber, said incinerator including a waste-charging door and an ash removal door for said primary chamber, said waste-charging door and said ash removal door being coaxial, and an ash removal door for removal of ash from said secondary chamber.

11. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, at least one transition passageway interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, at least one primary burner in said primary combustion chamber, at least one secondary burner in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing over-fire air into said primary combustion chamber to facilitate combustion in the upper portion of said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said transition passageway to facilitate combustion in said secondary combustion chamber, a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber, said incinerator including a steel shell, said incinerator being lined with refractory, said incinerator including an ash removal door communicating with said secondary chamber.

12. An incinerator for incinerating waste comprising a primary combustion chamber and a secondary combustion chamber, two transition passageways interconnecting said primary and secondary combustion chambers, two primary burners in said primary combustion chamber, two secondary burners in said secondary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said primary combustion chamber adjacent said primary burner to facilitate combustion of waste in said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing over-fire air into said primary combustion chamber to facilitate combustion in the upper portion of said primary combustion chamber, means for introducing air into said transition passageway to facilitate combustion in said secondary combustion chamber, a stack communicating with said secondary combustion chamber.

13. A method of incinerating waste comprising the steps of providing a primary combustion chamber, providing a secondary combustion chamber, providing a transition passageway interconnecting the primary and secondary combustion chambers, providing a primary burner in the primary combustion chamber, introducing primary air adjacent the primary burner for facilitating combustion of waste, introducing over-fire air in the upper portion of the primary combustion chamber to provide a second zone for the incineration of waste, providing a stack connected to the uppermost end of the secondary combustion chamber, introducing air into the transition passageway to facilitate incineration of waste in the secondary combustion chamber, providing a secondary burner in the secondary combustion chamber, and firing the burner in the secondary combustion chamber with an aspirating action in a tangential direction in order to promote turbulence within the secondary combustion chamber.

14. A method as set forth in claim 13 including the step of introducing exit air at the base of the stack in a tangential direction opposite to the direction of firing of the secondary burner to promote turbulence immediately adjacent the secondary combustion chamber.

15. A method as set forth in claim 13 including the steps of maintaining a temperature within the primary combustion chamber at approximately 1,100" F. during incineration of waste in the primary combustion chamber, and maintaining a temperature in the secondary combustion chamber at approximately l,400 F. in order to facilitate incineration of waste in the secondary combustion chamber.

lOlO29 0166 and secondary combustion chambers and the stack.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3837302 *Jul 5, 1973Sep 24, 1974Surtec SaInstallation for the incineration of household refuse and industrial waste
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US7832342 *Mar 3, 2006Nov 16, 2010Martin GmbH für Umwelt-und EnergietechnikProcess for combusting fuels, in particular waste
US20120012038 *Jul 19, 2010Jan 19, 2012Dylan SmutsDual Chamber Combustor
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Classifications
U.S. Classification110/213
International ClassificationF23G5/16, F23G5/14, F23G5/18
Cooperative ClassificationF23G5/18, F23G5/165
European ClassificationF23G5/16B, F23G5/18
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 19, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: JOHN ZINK COMPANY OF TULSA, OK., A DE CORP.
Owner name: SUNBEAM EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
Effective date: 19840201
Jul 19, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: JOHN ZINK COMPANY OF TULSA, OK., A DE CORP.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SUNBEAM EQUIPMENT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004284/0235
Effective date: 19840201