Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3651832 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateSep 24, 1970
Priority dateSep 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3651832 A, US 3651832A, US-A-3651832, US3651832 A, US3651832A
InventorsWilliam Meyer
Original AssigneeEmco Wheaton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus
US 3651832 A
Abstract
This application deals with a device for loading fluids such as oil into tank cars. It has an inboard and an outboard conduit pipe which are pivotally connected together. The inboard pipe connects with a supply strand pipe and the free end of the outboard conduit has a nozzle that connects with the tank car to be loaded. The invention is concerned with a balancing means for balancing the inboard and the outboard conduit members and includes a balancing spring in combination with an articulated linkage that splits the balancing force of the balancing spring between the inboard and the outboard conduits to balance both of them so that a user of the device can manipulate the nozzle on the free end of the outboard conduit member as if it is substantially weightless.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l/nited Mates Patent Meyer 14 1 Mar. 20, 1972 [54] ARTICULATED COUNTERBALANCEID 3,451,427 6/1969 Dollinger.. ..137/6l5 PIPING APPARATUS 3,489,174 1/1970 Cooley ..l37/6l5 Primary Examiner-Samuel B. Rothberg Assistant Examiner-William H. Wright Attorney-Arthur E. Dowell, ill

[5 7] ABSTRACT This application deals with a device for loading fluids such as oil into tank cars. it has an inboard and an outboard conduit pipe which are pivotally connected together. The inboard pipe connects with a supply strand pipe and the free end of the outboard conduit has a nozzle that connects with the tank car to be loaded. The invention is concerned with a balancing means for balancing the inboard and the outboard conduit members and includes a balancing spring in combination with an articulated linkage that splits the balancing force of the balancing spring between the inboard and the outboard conduits to balance both of them so that a user of the device can manipulate the nozzle on the free end of the outboard conduit member as if it is substantially weightless.

17 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures P'ATENTfm-mza I972 SHEET 1 OF 3 INVENTOR. WILLIAM MEYER ARTICULATED COUNTERBALANCED PIPING APPARATUS This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 866,540 filed on Oct. 15, 1969 now abandoned.

This invention relates to a counterbalanced piping apparatus of the type used to load liquids, such as oil, from a storage tank to a tank of an oil transport vehicle.

Liquid loaders of this general type comprise a base, an inboard conduit pivotally mounted on the base, an outboard conduit pivotally mounted to an end of the inboard conduit and a valve at the free end of the outboard member.

The conduit members of loaders of this type are relatively heavy, especially when they are filled with oil or the like, and it has been practice to counterbalance the weight of the conduit members about the pivotal mounting of the inboard member on the base. With this arrangement the outboard conduit is free to swing under its own weight and without balancing about its pivotal mounting with the inboard conduit, with the result that the handling of the valve at the free end of the outboard member is a relatively heavy task. Convenient balancing arrangements for the outboard conduit of small loaders have not been provided in the past.

This invention provides a convenient balancing arrangement for balancing the conduit members about the pivotal connection of the inboard member with the base, and also balancing the outboard conduit about its pivotal connection with the inboard conduit. The result is that the valve at the free end of the outboard conduit is relatively weightless and can be manipulated to and fro with respect to the base with 3 relative ease by a workman.

Generally speaking, counterbalanced piping apparatus according to this invention comprises a base, an inboard conduit swingably connected to said base, an outboard conduit swingably connected to said inboard conduit, an articulated linkage connecting said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit to said base, said articulated linkage including a counterbalancing spring loaded by the position of said inboard conduit with respect to said base and by the position of said outboard conduit with respect to inboard conduit, said articulated linkage being stressed by said counterbalancing spring to counterbalance said outboard conduit about said inboard conduit and to counter balance said inboard conduit and the parts of said apparatus carried thereby about said base.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings, wherein the reference numerals designate like parts:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a presently preferred embodiment of the present invention shown in an operating or extended position; and

FIG. 2 is a rear elevation of the apparatus of FIG. 1 shown in the stored position; and

FIG. 3 is a partial view of another embodiment of the invention drawn on an enlarged scale to show details of adjustment means; and

FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of the apparatus; and

FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of an alternative embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 6 is a schematic illustration of an alternative embodiment of the invention.

A preferred embodiment of an articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus 10 of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 1 to 3. The piping apparatus 10 includes a stand pipe 12 of a loading conduit system which leads from a source of liquid or other fluid to be discharged, as for example from a storage tank for gasoline, oil or other fluid (not shown). The liquid or fluid may be delivered to and through the stand pipe 12 by gravity or by pump pressure according to the type of tank and its location relative to the stand pipe 12, and suitable shut-off valve means (not shown) may be provided for controlling delivery of liquid or fluid to and through the loading conduit system.

Connected to and in communication with the stand pipe 12 is a swing joint 14, the stationary receiving end portion 16 of which is preferably connected to the stand pipe 12 by a swivel joint 18. To the movable discharge end portion 20 of the swing joint 14, is connected an inboard elongated conduit member 22.

Connected to and in communication with the inboard member 22 is a swing joint 24. The swing joint 24 is connected to the inboard member at its stationary receiving end portion 26. The movable discharge end portion 28 of the swing joint 24 is connected to an outboard elongated conduit member 30.

Connected to and in communication with the outboard member 30 is a flexible coupling 32. The flexible coupling 32 is connected to the outboard member at its movable receiving end portion 34 and the movable discharge end portion 36 of the flexible coupling 32 is connected to the inlet of the faucet or control valve 38. The control valve 38 controls the flow of liquid or other fluid through the piping apparatus 10.

The device thus has an inboard conduit member 22 free to pivot in a vertical plane about joint 14 and an outboard conduit member 30 free to pivot in a vertical plane about its pivotal connection with the inboard conduit member. The objective of this invention is to provide a simple device for counterbalancing the combined weight of both conduits and their appurtenances about the pivot point 14 and at the same time for counterbalancing the outboard conduit 30 about its point of pivotal connection with the inboard conduit. It has been 4 found that the counterbalancing force of a single spring can be divided to perform both functions through the expedient of an articulated linkage.

A support bracket 40 is fixedly connected to the stationary receiving end portion 16 of the swing joint 14 by means such as welded joint or a nut and bolt arrangement. A spring biasing means 42 is supported by the support bracket 40. A preferred biasing means 42 is as disclosed and claimed in US. Pat. No. 2,739,778 to H. C. Krone et al.

A link bar 44 is pivotally connected to and biased by the biasing means 42. The length of the link bar 44 may be adjusted by an adjustment means 64. The adjustment means 64 may comprise a series of holes in one section of the link bar 44a adapted to register with holes in the other section of the link bar 44b with holding bolts or pins inserted in the holes, or any other suitable means such as a screw-adjustment means.

A first lug 46 is fixedly attached to the receiving end of the inboard member 22. The base of the lug 46 may have holes adapted to register with several of the holes of the flanges of the inboard member 22 and the discharge end portion 20 of the swing joint 14. The lug 46 may be fixedly attached to the inboard member 22 by inserting flange bolts through the holes in the base of lug 46 and through the holes in the flanges of the inboard member 22 and the discharge end portion 20 and suitably attaching nuts to the thus inserted bolts.

A spacing bracket 48 is pivotally connected to the lug 46 by means such as a pivoting pin at the point F. The spacing bracket 48 has a movable pivoting housing 50 adapted to move along the length of bracket 48 on a threaded member 52. The threaded member 52 is rotationally supported in the bracket 48 by bearings (not shown). The threaded member 52 is rotated, thereby moving the pivoting housing 50, by turning the knob 54, which is integral with said member 52 with a wrench or other similar tool.

The link bar 44 is pivotally connected to the spacing bracket 48 at the movable pivoting housing 50 by means such as a pivoting pin.

The spacing bracket 48 also has a pivoting housing 56 to which an elongated arm 58 is pivotally connected by means such as a pivoting pin at point E.

As will be apparent later the point of pivotal connection of spacing bracket 48 with link bar 44 is a factor in the determination of the division of the total counterbalancing effect of the spring 42 about swing joint 14 and about the pivotal interconnection of the two conduit members.

A lug is fixedly connected to the movable discharge end portion 28 or the swing joint 24, the base of the lug 60 having holes adapted to register with threaded holes in the end portion 28. The other end of the lug 60 is pivotally connected to the elongated arm 58 at the point D.

The link bar 44 is biased by the biasing means 42 so that it applies a counterbalancing force through the movable pivoting housing 50 to the threaded member 52 and its bearing to the spacing bracket 48 and thence to the inboard member 22 through the first lug 46. The biasing force tends to return or swing the inboard member 22 to an equilibrium position counterbalancing a substantial amount of the downward force exerted by the weight of the piping apparatus and any liquid contained therein about the pivotal connection of the inboard conduit member with the base or standpipe 12.

The link bar 44 is biased by the biasing means 42 so that it also applies a counterbalancing force to the outboard elongated conduit member 30.

The counterbalancing force is applied to the spacing bracket 48, as referred to above, and then to the stationary pivoting housing 56, to the pivotally attached elongated arm 58 to the second lug 60, to the end portion 28 and thence to the outboard member 30. This biasing force tends to swing the outboard member 30 outward and upward toward its extended or operating position and counterbalances substantially all of the remaining downward force exerted by the weight of the piping apparatus and any liquid contained therein about the pivotal connection between the inboard and the outboard conduit members.

By properly selecting (a) the relative pivoting positions of the link bar 44 to divide the total force between the two counterbalancing functions and the elongated arm 58 on the spacing bracket 48 to apply the correct total counterbalancing force; and/or (b) the pivoting position of the elongated arm 58 on the second lug 60; and/or (c) the length of the link bar 44; and/or (d) the biasing force exerted by the biasing means 42, a resultant counterbalancing force can be thereby obtained to counterbalance the weight of the inboard and outboard members 22 and 30 as the nozzle is moved to and fro with respect to the base structure of the standpipe 12. By so balancing the weight of the members 22 and 30 the attached control valve 38 will be in a state of balance throughout its range of operation. From the operator's viewpoint the valve 38 will seem to "hang" in the air and it will enable him to manipulate it from the stored position to an infinite variety of operating positions and back again with very little effort.

All that is required of the operator to manipulate the piping apparatus and thereby position the valve 38 is that he manually apply a small offsetting force to the valve 38.

The weight of valve 38 may additionally be counterbalanced about joint 32 by means such as weights 62 fixedly attached thereto. The weights 62 are disposed with respect to the flexible coupling so that they counterbalance the weight of the heavy end of the valve 38. This will further aid the operator in positioning the valve 38 particularly when he is confronted with a bottom" load configuration. In such a configuration the receiving coupling (not shown) on the tank truck, railroad tank car or the like is positioned on the bottom of the tank to be filled. The operator must manipulate the piping apparatus 10 to the tank and then position the discharge end of the valve 38 upward to mate with the receiving coupling. There is typically very little space for the operator to maneuver on bottom load configurations and the present invention enables the operator to effortlessly manipulate the piping system 10 in such confined quarters and further aids him in effecting the coupling of the discharge end of the valve 38 with the receiving coupling.

It will be observed that the axis A-A of the outboard conduit member 30 intersects the axis 8-8 of the inboard conduit member at a point C, which is the center of the swing joint 24. The pivot point of elongated arm 58 with lug 60 of portion 28 of swing joint 24 is labeled point D. The pivot point of arm 58 with pivoting housing 56 on spacing bracket 48 is point E.

The pivot point of spacing arm 48 with lug 46 fixedly connected to the inboard conduit is point F. It will be seen, therefore, that inboard conduit 22, swing joint 24, lug 60, arm 58, housing 56, bracket 48 and lug 46 form a parallelogram having comers at pivot points C, D, E and F.

As the nozzle on the end of outboard arm 30 is extended to the right as viewed in FIG. 1, the weight to be counterbalanced by the torsion spring unit increases. There is a limit to the amount of counterbalancing force that can be supplied by a given torsion spring and care must be taken not to exceed this limit to avoid collapse of the unit. This can be done by an appropriate selection of the angle 0.

A limiting position for the line G-G is one in which it substantially aligns with the line D-E. If the angle 0 were, say, equal to 0, one would move the nozzle 32 farther to the right to achieve the limiting position than one would if the angle 0 were, say, 30 for a given height of the nozzle above the ground. Thus, the distance that the nozzle 32 can be extended to the right as viewed in FIG. 1 can be controlled by the size of the angle 0. As indicated above, it must not be permitted to move to a point beyond which the torsion unit can counterbalance its load. Angles of 0 between 30 and 60 have been found practical for limiting outward extent of the nozzle.

Essentially 0 must have a value and the outboard arm extension 60 must have a length and angular disposition such that the component of the total counterbalance force of the spring 42 that acts along the axis of outboard arm 58 will counterbalance arm 30 about its pivotal connection with ann 22 as arm 30 is moved between its various operative positions.

Other stop means between the moving parts for preventing the outward extension of the nozzle 32 to a point beyond which the torsion unit can balance the weights are possible.

While the inboard conduit member 22, lug 60, outboard arm link 58, arm 48 and inboard conduit member 22 have been indicated as being pivotally connected to form an articulated parallelogram, the parallelogram arrangement is not essential. The essential thing is that there be an articulated link means that includes a counterbalance spring that interconnects the base, outboard conduit and the inboard conduit and that is responsive to pivotal movement of the two conduit members to load the spring and counterbalance the conduit members about their respective pivot points.

In FIG. 4 there is indicated an equivalent schematic illustration for a loader similar to the one shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, but in which the force splitting arm 48 is lengthened so that the parallelogram configuration does not exist. The operation of the loader is essentially the same. In this drawing the outboard conduit member and the valve on the free end thereof is represented by the numeral 130. Its weight acting through its center of gravity is indicated by the letter W,. The inboard conduit is indicated by the numeral 122 and its weight acting through its center of gravity is indicated by the letter W the outboard link arm is indicated by the numeral 158 and its weight acting through its center of gravity is indicated by the letter W Force splitting arm and spring connecting arm are indicated by numerals 148 and 164 respectively. The coil spring 142 is loaded and arm 144 adjusted in length to exert a force f in the direction indicated on the free end of link member 164. A component P of the force f acts along the axis of the arm 158 as indicated.

When the system is in equilibrium and the weight of the conduit members is counterbalanced about their pivot points as explained above, it will be apparent that P X e= L, W, where the distances d and L L L and L, are as indicated on FIG. 4.

Essentially the linkage connects each of the conduit arms to the base through the spring and splits the balancing force of the spring to counterbalance both the inboard and the outboard conduit members.

With this invention it is possible to load the spring so that this mechanical balance is achieved as the free end of the outboard member 130 is moved in a horizontal direction to and from the base 118, and while the free end of the outboard conduit is maintained at substantially a constant height from the ground whereby a workman can take the valve at the free end of the outboard member in a relatively weightless condition.

There is a certain amount of friction in the swing joints which in practice is not a disadvantage. As a workman moves the nozzle 38 to and fro with respect to the base 18 of the unit, the inboard and outboard conduit members pivot about their pivotal connections. The system will balance such that, at the height the workman carries the nozzle, the weight of the nozzle and the weight of the conduit members is counterbalanced by the force of the spring 42 through the linkages. The height from the ground at which perfect balance is achieved does vary slightly as the nozzle is moved to and fro with respect to the base, but not an amount to affect the utility. Balance is achieved within a practical height for a workman to engage the nozzle.

The effect of friction in the counterbalancing operation is that the nozzle will remain static within a range of heights above and below the point where perfect balance would be achieved without friction. Thus, if the nozzle is moved up or down from the point of perfect counterbalance, it would tend to return to this point of perfect counterbalance disregarding friction. However, the effects of friction tend to prevent it from returning at locations within a matter of a foot up or down from the height of perfect balance. Thus, there is apparent perfect balance at a range of heights within which the nozzle will remain static and within which it is very easy to manipulate the nozzle.

The position of the spring in the articulated link means is not critical. It is only necessary that the spring be responsive to the pivotal movement of the inboard and outboard conduits to load the spring to counterbalance both members about their respective pivot points.

In FIG. the force diagram for an alternative arrangement wherein the spring 242 is included in the arm 58 of FIGS. 1 to 3. A spring incorporated in this way and connected as indicated in that drawing works very well. In this case the outboard conduit member 230 pivotally connects with the inboard member 222 as before and it has a stub shaft as indicated that connects pivotally with an end of the spring 242. Tensioned spring 242 connects at its other end with a link member 248, which in turn pivotally connects with the inboard conduit member 222. A link 264 pivotally connects with link 266 which in turn pivotally connects with rigid base 218. Thus there is provided an articulated link means that includes a counterbalancing spring and that connects the base, the inboard conduit and the outboard conduit. The spring is responsive to pivotal movement of the inboard and the outboard members which load the spring and provide the counterbalancing forces. A counterbalancing force f acts along arm 264 as indicated and a counterbalancing force P along axis of the spring arm 242. In this case the weight of the outboard and the inboard members and of the spring link member 242 have been indicated as W,, W and W respectively, and for the balance condition the same provisions hold as in the case of FIG. 4, that is:

Thus, it is apparent that the location of the balancing spring is not critical. Moreover, the type of balancing spring is not critical. It is also true that the location of the force splitting link 48 is not critical.

In FIG. 6 there is indicated an equivalent schematic illustration for a loader similar to the one of FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 but in which a force splitting arm 348 pivots about the inboard conduit member. The pivot point can be adjusted along the length of the force splitting member to vary the length thereof that is disposed on either side of the pivot point, to change the position of the articulated linkage relative to the conduit members and vary the application of the force of the counterbalancing spring as between the two pivot points. In this drawing the outboard conduit member is indicated by the numeral 330 and the inboard conduit member is indicated by the numeral 322. The force splitting arm 348 pivots about a pivot point on the inboard conduit member 322. One free end of the force splitting member 348 pivotably connects with a link 364. The other end of the link 364 pivotably connects with one free end of a coil spring 342. The other end of the coil spring 342 connects with the base member 318.

The figure illustrates an articulated linkage including a counterbalancing spring that splits the counterbalancing force of the spring between the inboard and outboard conduit members. The spring is responsive to pivotal movement of the inboard and outboard members to load the spring and provide counterbalancing forces. A reaction force f acts along am 364 and a reaction force P acts along the axis of the link 358. The weights of the components are indicated as before and under the balanced condition of adjustment:

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A counterbalanced piping apparatus comprising a base, an inboard conduit swingably connected to said base, an outboard conduit swingably connected to said inboard conduit, an articulated linkage connecting said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit to said base, said articulated linkage including a counterbalancing spring loaded by the position of said inboard conduit with respect to said base and by the position of said outboard conduit with respect to inboard conduit, said articulated linkage being stressed by said counterbalancing spring to counterbalance said outboard conduit about said inboard conduit and to counterbalance said inboard conduit and the parts of said apparatus carried thereby about said base.

2. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 1 in which said counterbalancing spring includes a first link stressed by said counterbalancing spring and spaced from the pivotal connection of the said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit to counterbalance said outboard conduit about said inboard conduit as aforesaid and which includes a second link stressed by said counterbalancing spring and spaced from the pivotal connection of said first conduit and said base to counterbalance said first conduit and the parts of said apparatus carried thereby about said base as aforesaid.

3. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 1 having means for changing the position of said articulated linkage with respect to said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit for a given relative disposition of said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit.

4. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 2 having means for changing the position of said articulated linkage with respect to said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit for a given relative disposition of said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit.

5. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 2 having means for changing the position of said first link and of second link with respect to said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit for a given relative disposition of said inboard conduit and said outboard conduit.

6. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 2 in which said outboard conduit has an extension that extends beyond said pivotal connection of said inboard and said outboard conduit, said first link pivotally connecting to said extension of said outboard conduit, a third link pivotally connecting with said first link and with said inboard conduit, said second link connecting with said third link, said third link connecting through said counterbalancing spring with said base.

7. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 6 in which the interconnection of said second link with said third link is variable in position along the length of said third link.

8. A counterbalanced piping apparatus as claimed in claim 6 in which the length of said second link is adjustable.

9. in an articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus comprising articulated inboard and outboard conduit members and support means therefor including means to apply a counterbalancing force to the inboard conduit member, the improvement which comprises: means for applying a rotational moment to the inlet end of said outboard conduit member in a direction tending to lift the outlet end of said outboard conduit member, said means for applying the rotational moment comprising a lug fixedly connected to the inlet end of said outboard conduit member, and an elongated arm pivotally connected to said lug', said elongated arm extending along said inboard conduit member and being connected to a spacing bracket pivotally connected to said inboard conduit member, said lug, elongated arm, spacing bracket and inboard conduit member forming an articulated parallelogram.

10. In an articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus comprising articulated inboard and outboard conduit members and support means therefor including means to apply a counterbalancing force to the inboard conduit member, the improvement with comprises: means for applying a rotational moment to the inlet end of said outboard conduit member in a direction tending to lift the outlet end of said outboard conduit member, said means for applying counterbalancing force to the inboard conduit member comprising a first lug fixedly connected to the inlet end of said inboard conduit member, a spacing bracket pivotally connected to said first lug, a spring biasing means mounted on said support means, and a link bar connecting said spring biasing means with said spacing bracket, whereby biasing force from said biasing means tends to counterbalance said inboard conduit member, and said means for applying a rotational moment to the inlet end of said outboard conduit member in a direction tending to lift the outlet end of said outboard conduit member comprising a second lug fixedly connected to the inlet end of said outboard conduit, and an elongated arm, one end of said elongated arm being pivotally connected to said second lug and the other end being pivotally connected to said spacing bracket, whereby a parallelogram is formed by said inboard conduit, second lug, elongated arm and spacing bracket; said spring biasing means applying a rotational moment to said second lug and outboard conduit member through said link bar, spacing bracket and elongated arm.

11. Apparatus according to claim 10 wherein the force applied by said spring biasing means to the outboard conduit member is sufiicient to maintain an angle 6 between the axis A-A of said outboard conduit member and a line GG passing through said axis AA at point C and the pivot point D of said second lug and elongated arm, said angle 0 being greater than 0 but less than the angle at which an extension of the axis of the elongated arm would pass through point C.

12. An articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus comprising a stationary riser, swiveling means connected to said riser and to a first pivoting means, said first pivoting means connected to an elongated inboard conduit member, a second pivoting means connected to said inboard conduit member and to an elongated outboard conduit member wherein the improvement-comprises a spacing bracket pivotally connected to said inboard conduit member, said spacing bracket having a stationary and a movable pivoting housing, an adjustable force biasing means being fixedly supported by said first pivoting means, a variable length link bar being pivotally connected to said biasing means and to said spacing bracket at said movable housing, an elongated arm pivotally connected to said spacing bracket at said stationary pivoting housing and to the end of the second pivoting means connected to said outboard conduit member, said link bar being biased by said biasing means whereby said bar applies a counterbalancing force to the inboard and outboard conduit members substantially countermember, said threaded member being rotationally mounted by said bracket, said movable pivoting housing being adapted to move along the length of said bracket when said threaded member is rotated.

14. An articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus according to claim 13, wherein the length of the link bar is adjustable.

15. An articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus according to claim 14, wherein said spacing bracket is pivotally connected to the end of said inboard conduit member connected to said first pivoting means.

16. An articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus according to claim 15, wherein said elongated arm is connected to said second pivoting means by means of a bracket fixedly attached to said second pivoting means, said bracket including means whereby the position of the joint of the pivotal connection between said elongated arm and said bracket can be varied.

17. An articulated counterbalanced piping apparatus according to claim 16, wherein a counterbalanced control valve is flexibly connected to the discharge end of said outboard conduit member by means of a flexible coupling means, said control valve having weights fixedly attached thereto, said weights being positionally affixed with respect to said flexible coupling means whereby they counterbalance the weight of the heavy end of said valve.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3085593 *May 19, 1960Apr 16, 1963Harry E SorensenCargo transfer apparatus
US3217748 *Jun 26, 1963Nov 16, 1965John D HarperFlexible insulated fluid transfer apparatus
US3378033 *May 7, 1965Apr 16, 1968Fmc CorpBalancing mechanism
US3451427 *Aug 26, 1965Jun 24, 1969Mississippi Valley StructuralArticulated pipe boom structure
US3489174 *May 9, 1967Jan 13, 1970Fmc CorpPosition lockable,torsion spring-balanced fluid loading arm
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3896841 *Mar 21, 1974Jul 29, 1975Fmc CorpConstant weight-constant dimension coupling assembly for marine loading arms
US3906974 *Jun 6, 1974Sep 23, 1975Tech Et Commercial D InstallatMarine loading arm
US3927691 *Oct 10, 1974Dec 23, 1975Bennett David FFluid conductor
US4050585 *Nov 7, 1975Sep 27, 1977Ameron, Inc.Hydraulically balanced marine loading arm
US4109681 *Mar 22, 1976Aug 29, 1978Tornborg & Lundberg AbHoisting crane for building purposes
US6732770Apr 21, 2003May 11, 2004Joseph M. NusbaumerLow maintenance balanced fueling crane, sealed counterbalance therefor, fuel drip collector and environmental drain therefor
US6913041 *Oct 15, 2002Jul 5, 2005Construction Forms, Inc.Tapered boom hose
US6948538May 5, 2004Sep 27, 2005Nusbaumer Joseph MLow maintenance balanced fueling crane, sealed counterbalance therefor, fuel drip collector and environmental drain therefor
US7185685Dec 10, 2004Mar 6, 2007Wolfgang Von MeyerinckHead piece for refueling systems
US7415990Sep 29, 2004Aug 26, 2008Wolfgang Von MeyerinckHeadpiece for fueling systems
US7850659 *Aug 18, 2004Dec 14, 2010Medrad, Inc.Fluid container holding device, fluid delivery system and method of use therefor
US8539970 *Mar 31, 2008Sep 24, 2013Technip FranceDevice for transferring a fluid to a ship, ship, transfer system and associated method
US20100147398 *Mar 31, 2008Jun 17, 2010Pierre-Armand ThomasDevice for transferring a fluid to a ship, ship, transfer system and associated method
US20100206410 *Feb 11, 2010Aug 19, 2010Patten James WArticulated conduit linkage system
CN101628702BOct 7, 2008Mar 6, 2013中国人民解放军总后勤部油料研究所Integrally-lifting oil receiving and feeding dual-purpose loading arm and field oil receiving and feeding platform
EP1616789A1 *Jul 13, 2004Jan 18, 2006von Meyerinck, Wolfgang, Dipl.-Ing.Head assembly for refuelling systems
EP1630100A1 *Nov 24, 2004Mar 1, 2006von Meyerinck, Wolfgang, Dipl.-Ing.Head assembly for refuelling systems
WO2014004389A1 *Jun 24, 2013Jan 3, 2014Opw-Engineered Systems, Inc.Loading arm counterbalance adjustment mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/615, 248/590
International ClassificationB67D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/002
European ClassificationB67D7/00B