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Publication numberUS3651927 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateOct 21, 1969
Priority dateOct 21, 1969
Publication numberUS 3651927 A, US 3651927A, US-A-3651927, US3651927 A, US3651927A
InventorsRichardson James E, Sherman Lawrence M
Original AssigneeCambridge Res & Dev Group
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tablet dispenser
US 3651927 A
Abstract
A dispenser for solid dosage form pharmaceutical preparations which are administered on a regular chronologic schedule. Typically, the dispenser is used for the storage and dispensing of oral contraceptive drugs. The dispenser comprises a base disk having a plurality of circumferentially spaced tablet dispenser apertures, an intermediate table disk, having a corresponding plurality of frangible tablet receptacles, and an overlying locator disk. The locator disk also has a corresponding plurality of apertures and, when the three disks are assembled in superposed, operative relation, each tablet receptacle extends upwardly through one of the apertures in the locator disk. Each tablet is oriented in a vertical position within its own tablet receptacle. Appropriate chronologic indicia are positioned on the base disk to permit alignment of the tablet and locator disks to the particular menstrual cycle of the user. Locking means are provided to secure the tablet and locator disks in the desired orientation and superposed relation with respect to the base disk.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Richardson et al.

[4 1 Mar. 28, E972 Primary Examiner-Leonard Summer Att0rney-Chittick, Pfund, Birch, Samuels & Gauthier A dispenser for solid dosage form pharmaceutical preparations which are administered on a regular chronologic schedule. Typically, the dispenser is used for the storage and dispensing of oral contraceptive drugs. The dispenser comprises a base disk having a plurality of circumferentially spaced tablet dispenser apertures, an intermediate table disk, having a corresponding plurality of frangible tablet receptacles, and an overlying locator disk. The locator disk also has a corresponding plurality of apertures and, when the three disks are assembled in superposed, operative relation, each tablet receptacle extends upwardly through one of the apertures in the locator disk. Each tablet is oriented in a vertical position within its own tablet receptacle. Appropriate chronologic indicia are positioned on the base disk to permit alignment of the tablet and locator disks to the particular menstrual cycle of the user. Locking means are provided to secure the tablet and locator disks in the desired orientation and superposed relation with respect to the base disk.

ABSTRACT 5 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures PATENTEDmaza I972 SHEET 1 [)F 5 IN VENTOR.

PATENTED m1 2 8 I972 SHEET 2 BF 5 INVENTOR.

PATENTmmzs m2 65 l ,927

SHEET 3 [IF 5 TURN HANDLE UNTIL THE FIRST DAY OF YOUR PERIOD APPEARS IN THE WINDOW INVENTOR.

m WM M M PM PATENTfmzaazaxerz 3.651.927

suw u 0F 5 v FIG. ll

FIG

PATENTEB m 3 2; I972 THE FIRST DAY OF YOUR PERIOD APPEARS IN THIS W WINDOW s INVENTOR.

Giza W mLL LMJL 39% TABLET DISPENSER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION must be taken in accordance with a predetermined chronological order has stimulated the dispensing industry to produce a wide variety of tablet dispensers. Representative examples of such dispensers are found in the US. Pats. No. to Wagner, 3,143,207, Ruoss et.al., 3,199,489, Kaufman et.al., 3,276,573, Finkelston, Jr., et.al., 3,302,775 and Ballard, 3,303,927.

Ideally, any dispenser for solid form oral contraceptives should conform to a number of easily defined, but collectively difficult to implement, parameters. For example, the dispenser should provide a chronological or calendar indication of the time cycle within which the drugs are to be taken. Means should be provided for adjusting the tablet container with respect to the chronological or calendar indicia to synchronize the drug regimen to the users particular menstrual cycle. In order to minimize the total cost to the consumer over a number of contraceptive drug administration cycles, the basic dispenser should be refillable and, preferably, refillable by the user. Suitable indexing means should be provided to insure correct positioning of a replacement tablet container. From an aesthetic standpoint, the overall size of the dispenser should be kept to a minimum and the configuration of the dispenser should resemble a ladies compact.

It is accordingly a basic object of present invention to provide a solid form oral contraceptive dispenser which generally fulfills the above-defined parameters.

It is a specific object of the invention to provide such a dispenser at a reasonable cost to the consumer.

It is another object of the invention to provide such a dispenser in which accidental or inadvertent dispensing of a tablet out of sequence is substantially precluded and, if it does occur, it readily apparent to the user.

In the accomplishment of these objects, we provide a dispenser comprising a base disk having a plurality of circumferentially spaced tablet dispensing apertures, a replaceable overlying tablet disk, and a locator disk positioned above the tablet disk. The tablet disk has a plurality of circumferentially spaced, upstanding, frangible tablet receptacles each containing one tablet dosage of the oral contraceptive. Each tablet is placed within the receptacle in a vertical position to minimize the size of the dispenser and to facilitate ejection of the tablet through the frangible material of the tablet disk. A rotatable locator disk having a corresponding plurality of apertures is positioned over the tablet disk so that the tablet receptacles extend upwardly through and beyond the locator disk apertures. The locator disk and tablet disk can be rotated together as a unit to orient a beginning of cycle index on the locator disk to the appropriate chronologic or calendar indicia on the face disk. The rotatable orientation operation is necessary to adjust the dispenser to the users particular menstrual cycle. Locking means are provided to lock the base tablet and locator disks in superposed relation after the correct orientation has been obtained for the user's current menstrual cycle.

These objects and other objects and features of the present invention will best be understood from a detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof, selected for purposes of illustration, and shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a tablet dispenser constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the dispenser base and cover shown in the open position;

FIG. 3 is a view in cross-section taken along line 3-3 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the tablet disk for a 20-day regimen;

FIG. 5 is a view in cross-section of the tablet disk taken along line 5-5 in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a 20-day regimen locator disk and associated disk locking mechanisms;

FIG. 7 is a view in cross-section of the locking mechanism taken along line 7-7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the tablet disk for a 2 1-day regimen;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the locator disk and associated locking mechanism for a 21-day regimen;

FIGS. 10 through 12 are views in cross-section showing the ejection of a tablet from the tablet disk by depressing the locking mechanism;

FIG. 13 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the dispenser base;

FIG. 14 is a view in cross-section taken along line 1414 in FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a plan view of a 20-day regimen tablet disk for use in the dispenser base shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 16 is a plan view of a locator disk and locking mechanism for use in the dispenser base shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 17 is a view in cross-section taken along line 17-17 in FIG. 16 showing the locking mechanism;

FIGS. 18 and 19 show in cross-section the operation of the locator disk locking mechanism;

FIG. 20 is a side elevation of a portion of the dispenser base showing the relationship of the locator disk locking mechanism to the base disk apertures; and

FIG. 21 is a view in partial section showing the locking mechanism in the locked position.

Turning now to the drawings and more particularly to FIG. 1 thereof, there is shown in perspective view a compact styled tablet dispenser constructed in accordance with the present invention and indicated generally by the reference numeral 10. For aesthetic reasons, the tablet dispenser 10 is constructed to resemble a ladies cosmetic compact with a generally circular base member 12 and a correspondingly shaped hinged cover 14. Although a separate hinge can be used to join the base and cover, in the preferred embodiment the base and cover are molded as a single unit from plastic with an integral plastic living hinge 16. A frictionally fitted mirror 18 is located within the cover 14 so the dispenser can serve both as a makeup mirror and a tablet dispenser. Since the dispenser is approximately 2% inches in diameter, the users hand will hide the tablets so that the dispenser can be used as a hand mirror without causing embarrassment.

The relatively small size of the dispenser 10, compared to many other oral contraceptive dispensers, is made possible by the novel vertical positioning of the tablets within the dispenser. This feature of the invention also produces other significant advantages which will be discussed below in connection with the description of the major operative components of the tablet dispenser.

The tablet dispenser 10 can be divided into three major operative components. Looking at FIGS. 2 through 7, the first component is the previously mentioned base member or disk 12 (FIGS. 2 and 3), the second major component is a tablet disk 20 which contains a plurality of ejectable tablets 22 (FIGS. 4 and 5) and, finally, the third major component is a locator disk 24 (FIGS. 6 and 7). The base member 12 has a generally round shape with a circular central recess 26. Within the recess 26 are at least 21 circumferentially spaced tablet dispensing apertures 28. If more than 21 tablet dispensing apertures are used, the total number of apertures should be divisible by seven to provide proper administration of the oral contraceptive dosage cycle.

A corresponding plurality of chronologically arranged daily indicia 30 are located around the periphery of the dispensing apertures on the shoulder 32 of the base disk. Each daily indicia 30 is radially aligned with one of the tablet dispensing apertures 28, as shown in FIG. 2. The chronologically arranged daily indicia 30 cover at least 21 consecutive days of the week which are identified by standard abbreviations e.g. MON, TUE, etc. Various methods can be employed for placing the daily indicia 30 on the base disk shoulder 32. For instance, suitable methods include printing, screening, embossing, hot stamping, engraving, and molded raised or depressed letters.

The remaining elements of the base member 12 can best be understood by relating them to the tablet disk 20 and the locator disk 24. Accordingly, we will now described in detail the second and third major components of our tablet dispenser. Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, the tablet disk 20 is depicted in plan view and cross-section, respectively. The tablet disk comprises a planar circular closure member 34, a plurality of tablet receptacle defining, deformable blisters 36, and a corresponding plurality of tablets 22 positioned within the blisters. In the preferred configuration, the tablet disk 20 is manufactured as a conventional blister package having a thermo or vacuum formed blister sheet 38 and a frangible closure layer 40, such as, thin aluminum foil sealed thereto. Prior to sealing the closure layer to the blister sheet, the pharmaceutical preparation tablets are machine loaded into the blister formed tablet receptacles 42. Although conventional blister packaging is preferred for obvious economic reasons, the invention is not limited to this particular form of packaging.

Conceptually, the tablet disk 20 can have a plurality of individual, erect, deformable blisters which are secured to the planar, circular closure member 34. The closure member must be frangible at least under the areas covered by the deformable blisters to permit ejection of the tablet from the blister. Given these requirements, separate blisters and separate frangible closure layer areas can be used, but a single blister sheet and a single frangible closure layer are certainly much more desirable.

The blisters 36 are arranged in a spaced, circumferential configuration with the axis of each blister aligned with a radius of the tablet disk. The erect, deformable blisters define the previously mentioned tablet receptacles 42. Looking at FIGS. 1, 4 and 5, it can be seen that the tablets are positioned vertically on edge within the blisters. The plane of each tablet is radially aligned and normal to the plane of the closure member 34. The vertical positioning of the tablets produces a number of significant advantages. I

It has already been mentioned that this arrangement permits a reduction in the overall size of the tablet dispenser. The size reduction is particularly effective with respect to the diameter" of the generally round dispenser. Another important advantage of the vertical positioning of the tablets is that much less force is required to rupture the frangible, blister closure material. With the tablet positioned vertically on edge, the force exerted by the users finger in deforming the blister is transmitted to the edge of the tablet. Since the area of the tablet in contact with the frangible closure material is considerably smaller than if the tablet were lying flat in a horizontal position, substantially greater pressure is applied to the frangible material. Thus, for a given closure material rupture pressure, less force has to be exerted upon the blister and tablet to eject the tablet if the tablet is positioned vertically on edge in the blister.

A concomitant advantage of this relationship is the reduction in accidental cracking of the tablet during ejection. It has been found that tablets are more susceptible to cracking if they are pressed on the generally flat surface of the tablet than if they are pressed on the narrow edge. This difference is attributable to the shape of the tablet and to a certain extent to the manufacturing processes employed in forming the tablet. However, regardless of the cause, the differential directional strength of the tablet is a factor to be considered in designing an effective dispenser. The tablet dispenser as an invention utilizes the greater tablet strength in the plane of the tablet by blister packing the tablets in a vertical on-edge position, as shown in FIGS. 1, 4 and 5.

The particular vertically mounted, side profile of the tablets is not especially significant. For instance, the tablets shown in FIGS. 1, 4 and 5 are circular. However, this configuration is merely illustrative and other tablet shapes can be employed. At the present time, some oral contraceptive tablets have relatively straight sides, and when viewed in the plan, resemble a pentagon or hexagon. Such tablets, if mounted vertically on edge, can be used with equal benefit in the tablet disk of the present invention.

Referring back now to the drawings and specifically to FIGS. 6 and 7, the locator disk 24 is depicted in plan view and cross-section, respectively. Preferably, the locator disk is molded from plastic although other materials can, of course, be used to construct the disk. Arranged around the circumference of the locator disk are radially aligned apertures 44 which are designed to receive the tablet disk blisters 36 when the two disks are assembled in superposed relation, as shown in FIG. 1. Looking at FIG. 1, it can be seen that the blisters 36 extend upwardly through and beyond the locator disk apertures 44 and with a snug fit therein. Thus, in the assembled position, the two disks will rotate as a single unit.

The locator disk 24 has an integrally formed, downwardly depending shaft 46 that is aligned with the axis of the locator disk. The shaft axis is the center of rotation for both the locator and tablet disks when the disks are assembled in superposed relationship and fitted within the central recess 26 of the base member, as shown in FIG. 1.

Looking at FIGS. 4 and 5, the tablet disk 20 has a central, axially aligned aperture 48. The diameter of the tablet disk aperture 48 is slightly greater than the normal outside diameter of the locator disk shaft 46 and slightly smaller than the outside diameter of the shaft shoulders 50. Thus, the tablet disk can be force-fitted over the shaft shoulders 50 and then will be free to rotate with the locator disk. The now assembled locator and tablet disks are placed within the central recess of the base member and the shoulders of the locator disk shaft 46 are forced through a central aperture 52 in the base member. After being forced through the base member aperture 52, the locator disk shaft shoulders 50 spring back to their normal diameter and hold the tablet and locator disks in rotatable, superposed relation with respect to the base member. The assembled relationship of the three major components of the tablet dispenser 10 can best be seen in the tablet ejection sequence depicted in FIGS. 10 through 12.

With the two disks assembled in rotatable, superposed relation within the base member central recess, the tablet and locator disks can be rotated to set the dispenser for the users particular menstrual cycle. Cycle synchronization is achieved by referencing the rotatable disks to the day on which the current menstrual cycle began. In the preferred embodiment depicted in FIGS. 1 through 7, the disks are rotated until the correct beginning of cycle daily indicia 54 is visible through the aligned windows 56 and 58 in the tablet and locator disks, respectively. When this is done, a first tablet indicator 60 locates the first tablet to be taken and the base member daily indicia 30 identifies the particular day of the week upon which the first tablet is to be taken.

The presently used oral contraceptive regimens call for medication to begin on the 5th day of the cycle, counting the day the cycle began as day 1. Looking at FIG. 1, it can be seen that the beginning of cycle indicia FRI" appears in the windows and the first tablet indicator points to TUE" which is day 5 of the cycle.

Two additionalfeatures are provided in the tablet dispenser to facilitate setting the dispenser in synchronism with the user's particular cycle and to prevent accidental rotation of the disks once they have been set to the correct position. Referring to FIGS. 1, 6 and 7, the locator disk is provided with a handle 62 which is curved to conform to the shape of the users finger. The curved shape of handle 62 indicates to the user that the disk should be rotated in a clockwise direction. However, unlike many existing contraceptive tablet dispensers, the disks can be turned backwards if the user goes too far in rotating the disk to set the dispenser to her particular menstrual cycle.

Once the dispenser has been set, it is desirable to prevent subsequent rotation of the disks. A suitable tablet-locator disk locking mechanism is provided in each embodiment of the invention to prevent such rotation. Looking at FIGS. 1, 6 and 7, it can be seen that a locking lever 64 extends outwardly from the upper extension of the locator disk shaft 46. The junction between the locking lever and the shaft permits downward deflection of the locking lever during the locking operation.

Sufficient flexibility at the junction can be obtained by undercutting a portion of the locking lever as shown in FIGS. 1, 7 and 1042. In the preferred embodiment, the locking lever is molded from plastic as an integral unit with the locator disk 24 and handle 62. With this type of construction, sufficient flexibility and resiliency can be achieved to allow downward deflection of the locking lever to the locked position while providing an upward force to maintain the lever in the locked position. The locking operation is accomplished by means of a downwardly depending latch 66 located near the distal end of the locking lever. The latch extends downwardly through apertures 68 and 70 in the locator and tablet disks, respectively. In the unlocked position, the latch does not engage the base member and the two disks are free to rotate about the common axis of the base member tablet disk and locator disk. The operation of the latch can best be understood from the sequential views of the latching movement shown in FIGS. 10-12. It should be noted that although FIGS. 10-12 illustrate another embodiment of the tablet and locator disks, the latch construction and latching operation are the same as for the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-7. When the disks have been positioned to synchronize the dispenser to the users menstrual cycle, the disks are locked by pushing down on the locking lever which in turn causes the latch to project downwardly through the latch aperture in the base member. The release of the downward pressure causes the lever and latch to spring back in an upwardly direction thereby locking the latch shoulder 74 against the bottom surface of the base member.

With the dispenser set to the correct position for the users cycle and locked in this position, the dispenser is now ready to dispense the first sequential tablet. The user presses down on the blister containing the first tablet i.e., the blister aligned with the first tablet indicia 60 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 6. Further deformation of the blister forces the tablet 22 down against the closure material 34 until the material ruptures thereby releasing the tablet which drops out of the dispenser through the base member tablet dispensing aperture 28. On the following day the user ejects the next tablet and, thereafter, proceeds in a clockwise direction until all 20 tablets in the tablet disk have been used.

One feature of the present invention is that it is extremely difficult for a woman to eject a single tablet in the wrong sequence. This feature is a concomitant of the close tablet spacing that is obtained by vertically mounting the tablets on their edges. The spacing of the tablets around the circumference of the tablet disk is such that a woman's forefinger normally covers at least two of the blisters. It is therefore only possible to eject one tablet if that tablet is positioned immediately adjacent to a deformed, empty blister or is adjacent to the locking lever 64. Thus, if the woman ejects the first tablet, the spacing of the tablets will thereafter force her to eject tablets in the correct clockwise sequence.

The preceding description has been directed to a 20-day regimen for the oral contraceptive tablets. However, other regimens can be used with the tablet dispenser of the present invention. Currently, oral contraceptive regimens include a 21 day administration cycle. The dispenser 10 can be adapted for a 21 day regimen by changing the tablet disk 20 and the instructions on the locator disk 24.

Referring to FIG. 3, there is shown in plan view a tablet disk 76 having 21 tablets 22 positioned within the blisters 36. The 21 day tablet disk 76 has the same locking lever aperture 70 as the 20 day tablet disk 20, but without the beginning of cycle indicia window 56. Synchronization of the assembled 21 day tablet disk 76 and the locator disk 24 is accomplished by rotating the disks until a beginning of cycle index 78 on the locator disk is aligned with the base member daily indicia 30 which corresponds to the beginning day of the womans menstrual cycle. The beginning of cycle index 78 is positioned 4 days counterclockwise from the first tablet indicator 30, in this case, located on the locking lever 64. Thus, the first tablet will be taken on day 5 of the cycle, counting the beginning day of the cycle as day 1.

In the embodiment depicted in FIGS. 8 through 12, the locking lever 64 performs a dual function upon depression: first, it ejects the first day tablet located under the lever; and, second, it locks the tablet and locator disks with respect to the base member. The tablet ejection and locking sequence is depicted in cross-section in FIGS. 10 through 12.

FIGS. 13 through 18 illustrate another embodiment of the invention for a 20 day regimen. This embodiment utilizes a different locking mechanism and provides a click" stop rotation for the tablet and locator disks. Referring to FIG. 13, the base member 12 is the same as the base member shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, with the omission of the locking latch apertures 72. Similarly, the tablet disk 82 shown in FIG. 15 resembles the tablet disk Zil'illustrated in FIG. 3 with certain exceptions. In particular, the tablet disk 82 has an inwardly extending slot 84 located in the position formerly occupied by one of the tables 22. A beginning of cycle indicia window 86 is oriented on the tablet disk to display one of the beginning of cycle indicia 54 printed on the underlying base member 12.

A slightly different locator disk 88 is used in conjunction with the 20 day tablet disk 82. Looking at FIG. 16, the locator disk 88 has a beginning of cycle indicia window 90 and a first tablet indicator 92. The angular disposition of the window 90 with respect to the first tablet indicator 92 is selected to position the first tablet indicator four days after the beginning of the cycle day shown through window 90. Thus, the first tablet indicator will indicate medication to be taken on day 5 of the users cycle.

The locking mechanism for this particular embodiment of the tablet dispenser is depicted in FIGS. 16 through 21. The locking mechanism comprises a flexible stop member 94 which is preferably formed as an integral part of the locator disk 88. Flexibility of the stop member 94 with respect to the plane of the locator disk 88 is achieved by removing some of the material at the junction of the stop member and disk, as shown in FIGS. 17, 18 and 19. The stop member 94 has a downwardly depending latch 96 with an outwardly extending latch shoulder 98 located at the distal end thereof. When the stop member is depressed, the latch 96 extends downwardly through the slot 84 in the underlying tablet disk 82 and into the base disk tablet dispensing aperture 28. Further downward travel of the stop member causes the latch shoulder 98 to clear the bottom surface of the base member. At this point, the latch springs outwardly locking the latch shoulder 98 against the base member 12.

It has already been mentioned that click stop rotation of the tablet and locator disks is provided in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 13 through 21. This type of incremental rotation is achieved by having the stop member 94 ride upwardly and over the base member web 100 between each tablet dispensing aperture 28. Looking at FIG. 20, it can be seen that the rounded bottom of the stop member extends below the upper surface of the base member central recess 26 in the unlocked position. Thus, as the two disks are rotated, the user will feel some rotational resistance as the rounded portion of the stop member rides up and over the base member web 100. When the stop member moves over and beyond the web, it will drop back down into the next tablet dispensing aperture 28 thereby causing a click. It should also be noted that the seating of the stop member, within the base member aperture 28, accurately aligns both the locator and tablet disks to the base member.

Having described in detail a number of preferred embodiments of our invention, what we desire to claim and secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A dispenser for dispensing tablets in a predetermined chronological sequence comprising:

A base member having at least 21 circumferentially spaced tablet dispensing apertures; and a corresponding plurality of chronological daily indicia located around the periphery of and aligned with the tablet dispensing apertures, said indicia covering at least 2l consecutive days of the week; A tablet disk comprising:

a planar circular closure member having a plurality of frangible, circumferentially spaced portions therein,

a plurality of circumferentially spaced, radially aligned, erect, deformable blisters positioned over and secured to the frangible portions of the closure member, said blisters each defining a tablet receptacle, and,

a corresponding plurality of tablets positioned vertically on edge within the tablet receptacles with the plane of each tablet being radially aligned and normal to the plane of said circular closure member;

A locator disk having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apertures which are of a sufficient size to permit the tablet disk blisters to extend upwardly through the apertures when the tablet and locator disks are assembled in superposed relation; 7

Means for holding the tablet and locator disks in rotatable, superposed relation on said base member so that said disks can be rotated to position the tablet containing blisters over the base member tablet dispensing apertures and in radial alignment with the chronological daily indicia; and,

Means for releasably locking the tablet and locator disks to prevent rotation with respect to the base member, said locking means cooperating with said tablet disk to eject one tablet from the dispenser when the locking means is actuated.

2. The dispenser of claim 1 further characterized by said locking means being carried on and rotatable with said locator disk.

3. The dispenser of claim 1 further characterized by said locking means being carried on and rotatable with said locator disk and, a beginning of menstrual cycle index positioned on said locator disk with respect to said locking means so that when the index is aligned with the daily indicia representing the day of the week on which the menstrual cycle began, the locking means will eject the tablet that is aligned with the daily indicia which occurs four consecutive days later.

4. The dispenser of claim 1 further characterized by said tablet disk blisters being circumferentially spaced apart by a distance such that the user's forefinger normally covers at least two of the blisters.

5. A dispenser for dispensing tablets in a predetermined chronological sequence comprising: 1

A base member having at least 21 circumferentially spaced tablet dispensing apertures, a corresponding plurality of chronological daily indicia located around the periphery of and aligned with the tablet dispensing apertures, said indicia covering at least 21 consecutive days of the week; and at least 21 circumferentially spaced daily beginning of menstrual cycle indicia positioned inwardly from said tablet dispensing apertures;

A tablet disk comprising a planar circular closure member having a plurality of frangible, circumferentially spaced portions therein,

a plurality of circumferentially spaced, radially aligned, erect, deformable blisters positioned over and secured to the frangible portions of the closure member, said blisters each defining a tablet receptacle, and,

a corresponding plurality of tablets positioned vertically on edge within the tablet receptacles with the plane of each tablet being radially aligned and normal to the plane of said circular closure member;

A locator disk having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apertures which are of a sufficient size to permit the tablet disk blisters to extend upwardly through the apertures when the tablet and locator disks are assembled in superposed relation;

Means for holding the tablet and locator disks in rotatable, superposed relation on said base member so that said disks can be rotated to osition the tablet containing bllsters over the base mem er tablet dispensing apertures and in radial alignment with the chronological daily in dicia; and, said tablet and locator disks each having an aperture through which one of the beginning of cycle daily indicia is visible when the disks are assembled in superposed relation on said base member.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification221/5, 221/4, 206/531, 221/302, 116/308, 206/534
International ClassificationB65D83/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2583/0409, B65D83/0463
European ClassificationB65D83/04C2