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Publication numberUS3652007 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateDec 8, 1969
Priority dateDec 8, 1969
Publication numberUS 3652007 A, US 3652007A, US-A-3652007, US3652007 A, US3652007A
InventorsMacdougall Bruce A
Original AssigneeDominion Envelope Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Two-way mailing envelope
US 3652007 A
Abstract
A two-way mailing envelope and a continuous envelope assembly which consists of a plurality of collated two-way mailing envelopes. The two-way mailing envelope comprises a front wall panel and a back wall panel which are secured to one another to form a mailing pouch and a closure flap for closing the envelope. The front wall panel has a greater height than the back wall panel so as to provide a permanent record panel which projects beyond the upper edge of the back panel. The closure flap means includes flap means for closing the envelope for first mailing and flap means for closing the envelope for second mailing. The continuous assembly consists of a plurality of envelopes serially connected to one another with the permanent record panels thereof exposed in the same plane for printing purposes.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

llie States Patent acougall [451 Mar. 28, 1972 s41 TWO-WAY MAILING ENVELOPE 2,910,222 10/1959 Bermingham ..229/73 [72] Inventor: Bruce A. Macnougau cla-rksom Ontario, 7 2,016,063 l0/l935 White ..229/73 X Canada Primary Examiner-Donald F. Norton [73] Assignee: Dominion Envelope Company Limited, AnomeyFetherstonhaugh and Don Mills, Ontario, Canada [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Dec. 8, 1969 A two-way mailing envelope and a continuous envelope as- PP No: 882,889 sembly which consists of a plurality of collated two-way mailing'envelopes. The two-way mailing envelope comprises a [52] us. (:1 ..229/73, 229/69 mm Panel and a back Pane which m [51] IMCL W865! 27/0636 27/10 one another to form a mailing pouch and a closure flap for [58] Field of Search ..229/73 closing the envelope- The from Wall Panel has a greater height than the back wall panel so as to provide a permanent record 56] References Cited panel which projects bevond the upper edge of the back panel. The closure flap means includes flap means for closing the en- UNITED STATES PATENTS velope for first mailing and flap means for closing the envelope for second mailing. The continuous assembly consists 3,086,695 4/1963 Lllllbrldge ..229/73 f a plurality f envelopes serially connected to one another 2,759,658 8/1956 Sawdon ..229/73 with-the Permanent record panels thereof exposed in the Same 3,547,343 12/1970, Alton ..229/69 plane forpriming pmposes. 3,152,751 10/1964 Hrersteiner ....229/73 3,131,854 5/1964 Deutschmeister ..229/73 2 Claims, 27 Drawing Figures PATENTED RQB I972 sum 1 0F '6 INVEN'IUR. BRUCE A. MACDOUGALL WMZZW/fl ATTORNEYS PATENTEDMRzemz Y 3.652.007

SHEET 2 UF6 INVEN'IOR. BRUCE A. MACDOUGALL ATTORNEYS PAT'ENTEBMARzs I912 3, 652,007

SHEET 3 OF 6 INVEN'IOR. BRUCE A. MACDOUGALL ATTORNEYS PATENTEnmzamz 3,652,007

SHEET u 0F 6 INVEN'TOR. BRUCE A. M ACDOUGALL ywalfivza7/w ATTORN EYS PATENTED MR 2 8 I972 SHEET S []F 6 I N VEN I ()R BRUCE A. MACDOUGALL BY' mZ/M AZ ATTORNEYS PATENTED MR 2 8 i912 SHEET 6 BF 6 INVENTOR. BRUCE A. MACDOUGALL ATTORNEYS TWO-WAY MAILING ENVELOPE FIELD OF INVENTION This invention relates to mailing envelopes. In particular, the invention relates to a two-way mailing envelope and a continuous envelope assembly formed from a plurality of two-way mailing envelopes.

PRIOR ART Two-way mailing envelopes are particularly suitable for use in a mail order business or in the distribution and collection of accounts. The problems with the known two-way Ienvelopes are that they are generally made from a very complicated structure and are, therefore, expensive to manufacture. The complex structure also makes the envelopes rather unreliable due to the fact that the public is not willing to take the time to follow the return mailing instructions. As a result of the difficulties which have been encountered with the present twoway mailing envelopes, the common practice today in mailing accounts for utility services is to employ three separate components. The first component is an envelope which has a front panel formed with a viewing window. The second component is a punched card containing the address of the account and the statement of account. The third component is an envelope bearing the address of the utility. The punched cardand the self-addressed envelope are located within the first mentioned envelope and they are mailed to the address on the account. Upon receipt of the account after first mailing, a first envelope is opened and discarded. The account is then examined and by following the instructions on the punched card, the card is torn along a weakened tear line to separate the statement of account portion of the punched card from the account portion. Generally, the instructions which are presented on the account ask the person receiving the account to return the account portion of the punched card, together with the check in payment of the account in the self-addressed return envelope. A very high percentage of the people who receive accounts such as this utilize the self-addressed return envelope when forwarding the check in payment of their account. However, a substantial number of people fail to return the account portion of the punched card with their check. If the check and the account portion of the punched card are returned together, the account can be processed efficiently utilizing the automatic processing equipment. If, on the other hand, the return envelope is returned with a check but withoutthe punched card, it cannot be processed by use of the automatic accounting equipment. In these circumstances, it is necessaryto have a clerk examine the check, and identify the sender. In many instances, this is extremely difficult to do due to the fact that many signatures are illegible and many checks are not otherwise identifiable. It follows that if the punched card portion of the account is omitted in the return mailing, the processing of the account is costly and time-consuming. It will also be apparent that the manufacture and manipulation of the three components prior to the first mailing is very costly.

The preparation of the conventional punched card account statement is carried out in two stages. In the first stage, the card is punched with the coded information. The card is then transferred to a printing device and the pacticulars of the account and the address are printed onto the card. In view of the fact that this operation is carried out in two stages, it is possible that an error could occur in the sequence in which the cards are fed into the printer which would cause the punched card to be printed with particulars which do not correspond to the punched code. An error such as this can be extremely difficult to correct and it can be very costly to the distributor.

In the printing of envelopes with the address to which the envelope is to be mailed, it has been known to collate a plurality of envelopes to provide a continuous assembly suitable for printing. This has been done by forming a plurality of punched holes at spaced intervals along the side edges of the envelopes and securing one envelope to another envelope with the punched holes in alignment with one another. However, in the known structures this closure flap is remotely disposed relative to the front panel such that it does not interfere with the printing process. This arrangement is possible because the printing of the address is the only printing which is carried out.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The present invention overcomes the difficulties of the prior art described above by providing a two-way mailing envelope which is inexpensive to manufacture and print and which is designed to ensure that a check enclosed in the return envelope can be related to the appropriate account without difficulty.

According to an embodiment of this invention, a two-way mailing envelope comprises a front wall panel and a back wall panel which are secured together to form a mailing pouch. The front wall panel has a greater height than the back wall panel to provide a permanent record panel projecting beyond the upper edge of the back panel such that the inner surface of the permanent record panel is visible when the envelope is open. The envelope also includes first closure means for closing the mailing pouch for first mailing of the envelope and second closure means for closing a mailing pouch for the return mailing of the envelope.

A further feature of the present invention is the structure which permits the panel onto which the permanent record is to be printed and the panel onto which the first mailing address is to be printed to be disposed in the same planes such that both must be printed simultaneously in one pass through a printing machine.

According to a still further embodiment of this invention a two-way mailing envelope may be made from a unitary blank which s cut froma continuous web and scored to provide six distinct panels. The blank consists of a first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth panel which are hingedly connected to one another along transverse hinge lines and foldable one upon the other to form a mailing pouch having a permanent record panel. The first panel is a disconnectable panel used for the first mailing and the sixth panel is a disconnectable panel used to provide a retainable statement. The fourth and fifth panels cooperate to form the closure means for the second mailing.

A still further feature of this invention lies in the fact that the envelopes according to the invention may be collated to form a continuous assembly suitable for simultaneously printing the address to which it is to be mailed and the particulars of the account, including the particulars required on the permanent record panel.

A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The invention will be more clearly understood after reference to the following detailed specification read in conjunction with the drawings wherein:

FIG. I is a pictorial view of a blank according to an embodiment of the present invention; FIG. la is a diagrammatic illustration of the apparatus used for printing and cutting the blank from a continuous web;

FIG. 2 is a pictorial view illustrating the manner in which the blank of FIG. 1 is folded to form an open envelope;

FIG. 3 is a pictorial illustration of the manner in which a plurality of the envelopes of FIG. 2 are collated for further printing;

FIG. 4 is a pictorial view illustrating the manner in which the envelope of the first embodiment is closed for first mailing;

FIG. 5 is a pictorial view illustrating the manner in which the envelope is manipulated prior to second mailing;

FIG. 6 is a pictorial view illustrating the manner in which the envelope of the first embodiment is closed for second mailing;

FIG. 7 is a pictorial view similar to FIG. 1 of a blank according to a further embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 8 is a pictorial view similar to FIG 2 of an open envelope prepared from the blank of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a pictorial view of the collated envelopes of FIG. 8;

FIG. 9a is a diagrammatic illustration of the manner in which the envelopes are printed after collating;

FIG. 10 is a pictorial view of the envelope of FIG. 8 closed for first mailing;

FIG. 11 is a pictorial view illustrating the manner in which the envelope of FIG. 10 is opened and manipulated for second mailing;

FIG. 12 is a pictorial view illustrating the manner in which the envelope of FIG. 11 is closed for second mailing;

FIG. 13 is a pictorial view illustrating the blank according to FIG. 1 having a pair of flaps mounted thereon to form a check receiving pouch;

FIG. 14 is a more detailed view of the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a view taken along the line 15l5 of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a pictorial view similar to FIG. 1 and FIG. 7 showing a blank according to a further embodiment of this inventron;

FIG. 17 is a pictorial view of an open envelope prepared from the blank of FIG. 16;

FIG. 18 is a pictorial view of the envelope of FIG. 17 closed for first mailing;

FIG. 19 is a pictorial view of the envelope of FIG. 18 illustrating the manner in which the envelope is opened and adapted for second mailing;

FIG. 20 is a pictorial view of the envelope of FIG. 19 closed for second mailing; and

FIGS. 21 through 25 corresponding to FIGS. 16 through 20 and illustrate a further embodiment of this invention.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and In of the drawings, a plurality of blanks generally illustrated by the reference numeral 10 are cut from a continuous web 12 of paper of the type commonly used in the production of mailing envelopes. The web 12 may be continuously unwound from a roll 14 to pass through a printing device diagrammatically illustrated at 16 and a punch and knife assembly diagrammatically illustrated at 18. The printing device I6 is used to print information and advertising messages which are required on each envelope, regardless of the person to whom it is going to be mailed.

A further printing device (not shown) may be used to print additional information such as the return address on the underside ofthe web.

The punch and blanking device 18 may be used to punch out an out-look or window and to form the various fold lines and score lines which will be described hereinafter. It will be noted that the stock material used in the preparation of this envelope is a very simple continuous web.

Referring particularly to FIG. I of the drawings, it will be seen that the blank 10 comprises a first panel 1, a second panel 2, a third panel 3, a fourth panel 4, a fifth panel 5 and a sixth panel 6, all of which are connected to one another after the blank 10 has been removed from the web 12. The panel 1 is connected to the panel 2 along a transversely extending first tear line 20, the second panel 2 is connected to the third panel 3 along a transversely extending first fold line 22, the third panel 3 is connected to the fourth panel 4 along a transversely extending second fold line 23, the fourth panel 4 is connected to the fifth panel 5 along a transversely extending third fold line 24 and the fifth panel 5 is connected to the sixth panel 6 along a transversely extending second tear line 25. Seethrough means in the form of an out-look or window 26 is formed in the first panel 1 such that on folding the address of the person to whom the envelope is to be mailed may be viewed. It will be understood that there are processes for treating paper to form see-through means other than by forming an out-look and these processes may be used if required. It will also be apparent that the opening 26 may be covered with transparent paper in the conventional manner. An adhesive glue or gum is applied at the areas 28 adjacent the top transverse edge ofthe panel 1. The adhesive may be a remoistening gum such as that commonly used on the seal flap of envelopes or it may be a latex type of gum. If a latex gum is used, a further latex coated area would be provided on the surface to which it is to be secured, as shown in FIG. 4. Additional glue is applied to the panel 5 in the area 30 to form a second sealing means as will be described hereinafter. Glue is also applied adjacent the longitudinal side edges of the panels 2 and 3 in the glue areas indicated by the reference numeral 32.

Referring now to FIG. 2 of the drawings, it will be seen that in the assembly of the envelope to the open configuration the blank 10 is folded along the fold line 22 which connects the panels 2 and 3 to locate the panels 2 and 3 in a position with their inner faces disposed in a face-to-face relationship. The glue surfaces 32 of each panel are adhesively secured to one another to form a mailing pouch which is open at its upper end at 34 and sealed along the side and bottom edges thereof. The blank is folded along the line 23 which connects the panel 3 to the panel 4 such that the outer faces of the panels 4, 5 and 6 are disposed in a face-to-face relationship with the outer surface of the panel 3. When this initial assembly has been completed by the manufacturer of the envelopes, they are shipped to the persons who will be using the envelopes for the first mailing or they will be collated and then shipped.

It will be noted from FIG. 2 of the drawings that the panel 2 is of greater height than the panel 3 such that a portion of the panel 2 which is located adjacent the upper edge thereof projects beyond the edge of the panel 3. This projecting portion will hereinafter be referred to as the permanent record panel 2a. It will be understood that the permanent record panel 20 is an integral part of the panel 2. It is also important to note that the inner surfaces of panels 1, 2a, 4, 5 and 6 may all be disposed so as to face in the same direction when they are in the configuration shown in FIG. 2. In FIG. 3 of the drawings, the advantage of being able to locate the inner surfaces of panels 1, 2a, 4, 5 and 6 facing in the same direction will become clear. FIG. 3 illustrates the manner in which a plurality of envelopes are collated by locating the pouch portion of one envelope in an overlying relationship with respect to the first panel of an adjacent envelope. A plurality of control punch holes 40 are formed at the longitudinally extending edges of each of the envelopes and the punched holes of one envelope are aligned with the overlapping punched holes of the adjacent envelope. The plurality of envelopes are connected to one another as shown in FIG. 3 to provide a continuous envelope assembly wherein the permanent record panel 2a and the panel 6 are exposed for printing. Particulars of the account to be paid may be printed onto the permanent record panel 2a while the address of the person to whom the account is being mailed together with particulars of the account may be printed simultaneously onto the panel 6. The collated continuous envelope assembly may pass through a printing machine which is computer controlled to simultaneously print the particulars required in panel 2a and panel 6. Preferably the'particulars which are printed on the permanent record panel 2a are printed in such a manner that when the envelope is returned and opened, the particulars may be optically scanned. It will be apparent that due to the relatively thin nature of the web it is possible to print on both the four-ply thickness area and a single ply thickness area of the continuous assembly. It will also be noted that the manner in which the envelopes are collated serves to ensure that the permanent record panel will be exposed for printing. In prior collated assemblies, the closure flaps have not been secured and if this were done in the present method of collating, the permanent record panel could be covered by the closure flap. In addition, the manner in which the envelopes are collated is such that the total length of the continuous envelope assembly is no greater than that required to ensure that the permanent record panels and statement panels are exposed for printing. After the continuous envelope assembly has been printed, the selvage edge containing the control punched holes is trimmed off in a well known manner and the envelopes are ready for mailing. By trimming off the selvage edge, the adhesive used to secure the envelopes in the continuous assembly is also removed and the envelopes are disconnected from one another. Any additional looseleaf advertising material which the first mailer wishes to enclose may be inserted within the mailing pouch prior to closing the envelope. It will be understood that for the purposes of the first mailing the pouch itself may be empty.

The closing of the envelope for first mailing is clearly illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4 of the drawings. It will be understood that if the combined height of the panels 4, 5 and 6 is less than the height of the panel 3, the panel I may be folded along the fold line and the adhesive coated portions 28 may be secured adjacent the lower edge of the panel 3. If, on the other hand, the combined height of the panels 4, 5 and 6 is greater than the height of the panel 3, it may be convenient to fold the blank along the third fold line 24 prior to closing the envelope. If this latter fold is made, the inner surface of the panel 4 will overlie the inner surface of the panel 2a and the panel 1 will be adhesively secured by the glue patches 28 to the panel 3.

FIG. 4 shows the relative positions of the various panels. FIG. 4 also illustrates the manner in which the address of the person to whom the first mailing is made may be viewed through the window 26 formed in panel 1. As previously indicated, the address of the person to whom the first mailing is addressed will appear on the inner surface of the panel 6 and will, therefore, form part of the detachable statement.

When the envelope is received after first mailing, it is opened by disconnecting the adhesively secured panels 1 and 3. The panel 1 is disconnected from the panel 2 by tearing along the first tear line 20 in the manner shown in FIG. 5. Similarly the statement panel 6 is disconnected from the panel 5 by tearing along the second tear line 25. By this procedure, the panel I which may bear advertising on its inner surface is removed and may be retained together with the panel 6 which bears the address of the person to whom the account was mailed and the statement of account. The portions of the envelope which remain secured to one another include the permanent record panel 2a which again bears the information required to identify the person or persons to whom the account was mailed. To reuse the envelope, the receiver merely places a check in the mailing pouch, folds flap 5 over the upper edge of the panel 2 and adhesively secures the flap 5 to the outer surface of the panel 2 by the adhesive coating provided.

FIG. 6 shows the manner in which the envelope is disposed for the return mailing. It will be understood that the return address was printed onto the outer surface of the panel 3 when the envelope was in the blank form as shown in FIG. 1. When the envelope is returned to the return address, it is opened and the permanent record panel 2a is examined. The permanent record panel 2a may be examined visually or by means of optical scanning apparatus. This permanent record serves to quickly and efficiently relate the enclosed check to the account to which it is to be applied. By employing a structure such as this, the person using the return envelope is no longer required to enclose any other material other than the payment check, money order or the like.

A further embodiment of this invention is illustrated in FIG. 7 of the drawings. Again, the two-way mailing envelope is formed from a blank which is cut from a continuous web. The blank is formed to provide a plurality of panels la, 1b, 1c, 2 and 3. The panel la is connected to the panel lb along a horizontally extending fold line 50, the panel lb is connected to the panel 10 along a horizontally extending weakened tear line 52, the panel 1c is connected to the panel 2 along the horizontally extending fold line 54, and the panel 2 is connected to the panel 3 along the horizontally extending fold line 56. Again, the panels 2 and 3 have glue patches58 printed thereon such that when the panels 2 and 3 are folded into a face-to-face relationship by folding along the line 56, they may be secured to one another adjacent the side edges thereof to form a mailing pouch, as shown in FIG. 8.

Referring to FIG. 8 of the drawings, it will be seen that the panel 2 is of a greater height than the panel 3 to provide a permanent record panel 2a as previously shown in the embodiing gum is also applied to the portion 30 of the panel lc. Again, the envelopes may be collated to form a continuous mailing assembly as shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings. In this instance, however, a separate web 66 must be used for supporting the envelopes in the intermediate printing position. The web is necessary, in this instance, in order to ensure that the inner surfaces of the panels In, lb and 2a, together with the outer surface of the panel 3, may be exposed in the same plane for printing. A plurality of control punch holes 40 are formed in the side edges of the web 66. A continuous assembly of envelopes is passed through a printing machine in the manner diagrammatically illustrated in FIG. 9a of the drawings. Again, the printing may be controlled by a computer such that the particulars of the account are printed onto panels la, lb, lo and 2a and the post office address of the addressee may be printed onto the outer surface of panel 3. Referring now to FIG. 8 and 10 of the drawings, the envelope is closed for first mailing by folding along the fold line 54 such that the panels lb, 1c are disposed in a face-to-face relationship with the panels 3 and the address appearing on the panels 3 is visible through the window 26. The blank is then folded along fold line 50 and the glue tabs 62 are adhesively secured to the outer surface of panel 2. The manner in which the blank is assembled and folded for the first mailing is shown in FIG. 10 of the drawings.

When the envelope is received, it is opened by destroying the bond between the panel 1a and the panel 2 so that the envelope may be opened to the configuration shown in FIG. 8. The panels 1a and lb are then disconnected from the panel 1c by tearing along the weakened tear line 52, as shown in FIG. 11. By this operation, the panel 1a which bears the particulars of the account to be retained by the person to whom the account is mailed is free to be used by that person for record purposes. Again, the record portion 2a remains as an integral part of the mailing envelope such that, if the self-addressed envelope portion is returned, full particulars of the account will be available from this envelope. To return the envelope, it is sealed by moistening the gummed portion 30 and folding along the fold line 54 such that the gummed portion 30 is secured to the back panel 3 as shown in FIG. 12. When the panel lb is removed, the word From becomes visible on the back panel 3 so that it is clear that this is the address from which the second mailing originates rather than the address to which it is to be delivered. Again, it will be apparent that when the envelope is returned with the enclosed check, the particulars of the account to which the check relates can be readily determined either visually or by means of optical scanning equipment from the permanent record panel 2a.

As previously indicated, one of the most common applications of the envelope of the present invention is in the mailing of statements and the returning of payments relating to accounts. Generally, the accounts are paid by check. To facilitate the handling of this type of mail, it is particularly convenient to be able to employ automatic letter openers. One

of the problems encountered with automatic letter openers is located at the free transverse edge of the panel la. Remoistenthat where a check is enclosed, there is the possibility that the opener may damage the check if it is not centrally located within the envelope. To overcome this problem, in the present invention there is provided a pair of check locating lugs or flaps which are secured to the inner surface of the panel 2 of either of the embodiments previously described. FIG. 13 of the drawings illustrate the manner in which flaps 70 are secured to the panel 2 of a blank according to the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawings. The flaps 70 are made from a flexible material, preferably an inexpensive paper, and are adhesively secured at their outer side edges and at their bottom edges to the panel 2. It will be apparent that the flaps 70 could just as easily be secured to the inner surface of the panel 3. As shown in FIG. 14 of the drawings, a check shown in broken lines at 72 may be located with the lower corner portions thereof disposed between the panel 2 and the flaps 70. The location of the check relative to the flaps 70 and panel 2 is shown in cross section 15. When the check is located in this position, the envelope may be opened by an automatic letter opener without the risk of damaging the check. By employing two separate flaps rather than one continuous flap, the removal of the check is much easier. When one reaches into the envelope to grip the check, this is done in the center area of the check and, consequently, both sides of the check can be gripped between the fingers. If the flaps 70 were continuous across the full width of the panel 2, difficulty could be experienced in attempting to separate the body of the check from the body of the flap due to the fact that one would tend to engage two thicknesses of material.

A still further embodiment of this invention is illustrated in FIGS. 16 through 20. In FIG. 16, blank includes a first panel 81, a second panel 82, a third panel 83 and a fourth panel 84. The first panel 81 is divided into a detachable subpanel 810 and a permanent sub-panel 81!; by means of a weakened tear line 86. The first panel 81 is connected to the second panel 82 along a horizontally extending fold line 90 and the second panel 82 is connected to the third panel 83 along a horizontally extending fold line 92. The panel 83 is connected to the panel 84 along a horizontally extending weakened tear line 94. As in the case of the blanks illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 7, the unitary blank is struck from a continuous web 12. Glue patches 96 are applied to the inner faces of the panels 82 and 83 and the glue patch 98 is applied to the inner surface of the panel 81b. In addition, glue patches 97 are applied adjacent to the free transverse edge of the panel 81. To form an open pouch the panels 82 and 83 are folded into a face-to-face relationship as shown in FIG. 17 by folding along the fold line 92. As in the previous embodiments described, the back wall panel 82 is ofa greater length than the front wall panel 83 such that it projects beyond the upper edge of the front wall panel 83 to provide a permanent record section 82a. Again, this envelope may be collated for printing in the manner shown in FIG. 3 leaving the permanent record panel 82a exposed for printing. The envelope is closed for a first mailing by folding along the fold line 90 and adhesively securing the glue patches 97 of the panel 81 adjacent the lower edge of the front panel 83, as shown in FIG. 18. When the envelope is disposed in the configuration shown in FIG. 18 of the drawings, it is ready for first mailing. The address of the person to whom it is to be mailed is visible through the window 26 formed in the panel 81. After first mailing, the envelope is opened by breaking the seals formed by the glue tabs 97, and panels 81a and 84 are detached by tearing along the weakened tear lines 86 and 94 respectively. By detaching the panel 84, the address of the person to whom the envelope was mailed is removed, together with a statement of account. The panel 81a is removed as it is no longer required. After the panels 81 a and 84 have been removed, the envelope is in condition for second mailing. As shown in FIG. 20, the second closure is effected by folding the panel 81b along the fold line 90 and securing the glue patch 98 to the outer surface of the front panel 83.

Yet another embodiment of this invention is illustrated in FIGS. 21 through 25. The structure illustrated in these figures is very similar to that shown in FIGS. 16 through and like numerals have been used to identify like components. The basic difference between this structure and that shown in FIGS. 16 through 20 is that this structure does not include a panel 83. This structure is quite suitable where either a removable statement is not required or the statement is printed on panel 81, in which case the collated pattern used for printing would be that shown in FIG. 9. One of the disadvantages of this structure is that the address to which the first mailing is directed is not removed prior to second mailing and consequently the word From" must be employed to distinguish between the two addresses. The word From will, of course, be covered by flap 81 during first mailing. To prevent another envelope becoming entrapped with the present envelope during first mailing, additional glue patches may be applied adjacent the side edges of panel 81a which will on assembly serve to close the side edges of the envelope.

It will be apparent that the punch holes 40, which are formed in the collated assemblies formed from the envelopes illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 6 and FIGS. 13 to 25, may be formed in the continuous web 12 before the blanks are cut therefrom. This has the advantage that it removes the necessity of punching a collated assembly which is by nature more difficult to handle than a single thickness web. It will be understood that in these circumstances, the punch holes would be formed a sufficient distance from the inner edge of the glue patches 32 to ensure that all of the glue is not removed with the punched selvage.

Various modifications of the illustrated embodiments of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, referring to FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, the panel 1 could be used for the purposes of providing a record panel in which case the panel 6 could be dispensed with. This modification would result in an envelope similar to that illustrated in FIGS. 21 through 25. This would again require the address of the person to whom the envelope is to be mailed to be printed onto the outer surface of the panels 3 much in the same manner as it is printed onto the outer surface of the panels 3 or 81 in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 to 12 and 21 to 25. The advantage of avoiding the use of the panel 1 for printed information relating to a specific account is that this panel may be used in an overlapping relationship in the formation of the continuous assembly, thereby eliminating the need for the web 66 shown in FIG. 9.

In a further modification, an adhesively coated lip may be formed at the free edge of the panel 1 such that it is folded over the lower edge 22 when the envelope is closed to be secured to the back panel 2. In addition, the blank shown in FIG. 7 may be modified by forming a window in panel 10. With this modification, panel 1a may be folded over pane 1b, with both windows aligned and the assembly continued as per FIGS. 21 through 25. In certain circumstances, it may be possible to omit the window 26 from the first panel as, for example, in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 21 to 25. This would require the address to which the first mailing is to be directed to be typed or otherwise printed on the outside surface of panel 81. In certain operations, this would be quite satisfactory.

While various modifications of the illustrated embodiment are possible, it will be understood that the mailing pouch having the permanent record panel 2a and closure means for closing the pouch for first mailing and closure means for closing the pouch for second mailing are important features of the invention.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that the provision of the permanent record panel provides a means whereby the returned check or correspondence may be related to the records of the person from whom the envelope is returned. The permanent record panel 2a may bear particulars which are readable by an optical scanning device such that the labor costs involved in the handling of the mail when it is returned are substantially reduced. In addition, the present invention provides a two-way mailing envelope which is extremely simple in its construction and which may be manipulated very easily by the person or persons receiving the first mailing. A further feature of the envelope described herein is that it provides additional surfaces suitable for the printing of advertising material which is then distributed in the mail without requiring the advertising material to be located within the mailing pouch. By forming the panel such that the inner surfaces of the panels which are to be printed with particulars of the account may be disposed in one plane, it is possible to collate a plurality of the envelopes into a continuous series such that they may have all of the required information printed in the course of one pass through the printing machine.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A two-way mailing envelope comprising a blank having an inner surface and outer surface, said blank having a pair of longitudinally extending side edges and a pair of transversely extending top and bottom edges, said blank being formed to provide a first panel, a second panel connected to said first panel along a horizontally extending fold line, a third panel integrally connected to said second panel along a horizontally extending fold line, a fourth panel integrally connected to said third panel along a horizontally extending tear line, said first panel being divided into an outer detachable sub-panel and a permanent inner sub-panel by a horizontally extending tear line, said detachable sub-panel having a viewing window formed therein, said second and third panels being secured to one another in a face-to-face relationship to define a mailing pouch therebetween, said second panel being of a greater height than said third panel whereby a portion of said second panel projects beyond the upper edge of said third panel to form a permanent record panel, said blank being foldable along the fold line connecting said first and second panels whereby said first panel may be adhesively secured relative to said third panel to close said mailing pouch for first mailing, and outer detachable sub-panel and fourth panels being detachable after said first mailing by tearing along said tear lines to facilitate second mailing, said mailing pouch being closed-for second mailing by folding along the fold line connecting said first panel and said second panel and adhesively securing said second sub-panel to said third panel.

2. A two-way mailing envelope as claimed in claim 1 formed from a continuous web having a plurality of control punched holes formed adjacent oppositely disposed longitudinal side edges thereof.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/304, 229/69
International ClassificationB42D5/02, B42D5/00, B42D15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB42D15/08, B42D5/025
European ClassificationB42D5/02C2, B42D15/08