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Publication numberUS3652830 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1972
Filing dateSep 17, 1969
Priority dateSep 17, 1969
Publication numberUS 3652830 A, US 3652830A, US-A-3652830, US3652830 A, US3652830A
InventorsHenry F Kessler
Original AssigneeHenry F Kessler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetically or electrosensitive inked numerals in place of standard postage stamps
US 3652830 A
Abstract
Stamps with a machine readable numeral component of the zip code are provided. Purchased and used as postage, these stamps are applied to the mail in plurality for optimum machine sorting by the combinations thus made. The sender in this way provides for complete machine handling at the post office.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Kessler [4 1 Mar. 28, 1972 54] MAGNETICALLY 0R 306,674 10/1884 Cooke ..1s0/41 x ELECTROSENSITIVE INKED 401,961 4/1889 McCalmont.... ..150/41 U ERAL I LA 0 STANDARD 2,709,001 5/1955 Stahl ...235/6l.l2 C 3,083,904 4/1963 Brenner et a]. ..235/61 .12

POSTAGE STAMPS 3,092,402 6/1943 Reed ..235/6l.12 N

[72] inventor: Henry F. Kessler, 1125 Sulphur Spring Road, Baltimore, Md. 21227 [22] Filed: Sept. 17, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 858,752

[52] U.S. Cl. ..235/61.12 N

[51] Int. Cl. ..G06k 19/06 [58] Field of Search... 150/41; 283/22; 93/73; 235/6l.l2, 61.l2 N, 61.12 C, 61.114, 61.11

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Re25,998 3/1966 Silverschotz ..209/l1l. 8 V i 1 Primary Examiner-Daryl W. Cook Attorney-Walter G. Finch ABSTRACT Stamps with a machine readable numeral component of the zip code are provided. Purchased and used as postage, these stamps are applied to the mail in plurality for optimum machine sorting by the combinations thus made. The sender in this way provides for complete machine handling at the post MR ./0H/V DOE 345 SOMEOTHEI? PLACE cm, STATE 5 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEnmza m2 3,652 830 sum 1 OF 2 MR JOHN 005 545 SOMEOTHER PLACE 0/, STATE HE/VR) F KESSLE'R INVENTOR ATTORNEY BY my: 7%

MAGNETICALLY OR ELECTROSENSITIV E INKED NUMERALS IN PLACE OF STANDARD POSTAGE STAMPS This invention relates generally to envelopes for mailing, and more particularly it pertains to machine readable postagedestination coupons.

Mail sorting systems have been proposed in the past which include machine handling. One factor which prevented complete automation, however, was the difficulty of machine recognition of the widely differing individual character of the addressing and the placement of same on the envelope. The public has become conditioned to correctly placing postage on envelopes for cancellation whereas the zip code as now appended has poor cognizance and is not so localized as to be readily machine readable nor is it ever likely to be with present practice.

With these factors in mind, it is an object of this invention to provide a combined postage stamp and zip code indicating arrangement whereby the act of placement of postage by the sender also codifies the letter for automatic sorting by destination.

Another object of this invention is to provide general destination code coupons having postage payment value when affixed to mail.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent and understood from the detailed specification and accompanying drawings in which:

F IG. 1 is a depiction of the face of an envelope prepared for mailing with the novel postage-destination code coupons incorporating features of this invention;

H68. 2, 3 and 4 illustrate booklets of postage-destination coupons provided respectively in groups of the same denomination, of the most used prefix denominations, and of an assortment of denominations of the zip code.

Referring now to the details of the drawing as shown in FIG. 1, reference numeral indicates generally an addressed envelope. In place of the usual postage stamp or stamps at the upper right hand edge of the envelope, the sender has applied a plurality of coupons 12, generally five, having, say, a postage payment value of 1 cent each. These coupons 12 differ from conventional postage stamps in carrying a single numeral 14 which is machine readable by being of standardized characprefix denominations, or assorted for the casual user.

As an incentive, the use of these coupons 12 as postage could be the combined five zip code denominations costing 5 cents whereas a 6 cent postage stamp would otherwise be required.

Where overweight, special delivery, or airmail postage is required, the difference would be paid by affixing a regular postage stamp 22 adjacent the coupons 12 as shown in FIG. 1.

In a modern mail sorting post office arrangement as shown 0 in FIG. 5, the operations are indicated by eight well-known teristic, i.e.: shape of character, or of material composition. Of

identified steps. Namely step 1 of incoming mail, step 2 of culler of the mail, step 3 of stacking and cancelling the mail, step 4 of operator encoding of the mail, step 5 of optical scanning and encoding of the mail, step 6 of stacking the mail,

step 7 of sorting the mail, and finally step 8 of sequencing of the mail.

As the proposed use of the novel coupons 12 of this invention become uniformly used, as related, the step 4 of operator encoding of the mail which involves human operations would become superfluous and a speed-up with accompanying lower cost would result.

Large or mass mailers could use the magnetically or electrosensitive stamp system with the use of a postage meter machine. This machine would have five columns of 10 digits with buttons with which the zip code would be printed on the envelopes in the same position, shape, size, spacing and material composition as the magnetically or electrosensitive stamp.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. it is, therefore, to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. An envelope mailing system, comprising, structure defining an envelope having an area therein for receiving an address, five coupons corresponding to a zip code applied at the upper right hand edge of said envelope, with each said coupons carrying a single standardized characteristic designation thereon, with each said designation being of standardized characteristic as to shape of character and material composition of said designation, with said coupons corresponding to a zip code being machine readable, and at least one conventional stamp positioned adjacent said coupons.

2. An envelope mailing system as recited in claim 1, wherein said material composition is magnetic.

3. An envelope mailing system as recited in claim 1, wherein said material composition is fluorescent.

4. An envelope mailing system as recited in claim 1, wherein said material composition is radioactive.

5. An envelope mailing system as recited in claim 1, wherein said material composition is of electro-conductive ink.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US25998 *Nov 1, 1859 Improved cast-metal pulley
US306674 *Oct 14, 1884 Book for holding postage and other stamps
US401961 *Mar 7, 1889Apr 23, 1889F OneHiram r
US2709001 *Oct 10, 1952May 24, 1955Walter A StahlSorting stamp
US3083904 *Sep 9, 1960Apr 2, 1963Brenner WilliamMagnetic envelope means
US3092402 *Nov 5, 1957Jun 4, 1963American Scient CorpMedia of exchange
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3870867 *Apr 9, 1973Mar 11, 1975Monarch Marking Systems IncWeb of record members
US3895220 *Sep 7, 1973Jul 15, 1975Docutronix IncSelectively encodable envelope insert and related apparatus
US3995741 *Jun 17, 1975Dec 7, 1976Henderson Joseph P WMethod of sorting mail using a coded postage stamp
US4201339 *Jun 27, 1973May 6, 1980Gunn Damon MArticle sorting apparatus and method
US4204639 *Mar 9, 1977May 27, 1980Datafile LimitedCoded label
US4828104 *Dec 2, 1988May 9, 1989Ribellino Jr James VPersonalized mailing envelope or carrier and method of enclosing a personalized letter in a personalized mailing envelope or carrier
US4872706 *Mar 2, 1988Oct 10, 1989American Stamp, Inc.Postage ad labels
US5036984 *Sep 21, 1989Aug 6, 1991Electrocom Automation, Inc.Method for enabling prioritized processing of envelopes according to encoded indicia of potentially enclosed checks
US5659163 *Feb 1, 1995Aug 19, 1997Publisher's Clearing HouseMethod for processing mail
US5848810 *Dec 4, 1995Dec 15, 1998Moore Business Forms, Inc.Printed labels for postal indicia
US6168080 *Apr 14, 1998Jan 2, 2001Translucent Technologies, LlcCapacitive method and apparatus for accessing contents of envelopes and other similarly concealed information
US6527170 *Nov 16, 2000Mar 4, 2003United States Postal ServiceElectromagnetic postal indicia and method of applying same
US6692033Mar 16, 2001Feb 17, 2004Stamps.ComFluorescent stripe window envelopes
US8125667Sep 15, 2006Feb 28, 2012Avery LevySystem and method for enabling transactions by means of print media that incorporate electronic recording and transmission means
US8970864Jan 11, 2012Mar 3, 2015Avery LevySystem and method for enabling transactions by means of print media that incorporate electronic recording and transmission means
US20080068637 *Sep 15, 2006Mar 20, 2008Avery LevySystem and method for enabling transactions by means of print media that incorporate electronic recording and transmission means
WO2001078999A1 *Apr 16, 2001Oct 25, 2001Stamps.ComFluorescent stripe window envelopes
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/487, 428/900, 235/493, 229/68.1, 283/71, 235/491, 209/584, 235/492, 209/900, 283/74
International ClassificationB07C3/18
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/90, Y10S209/90, B07C3/18
European ClassificationB07C3/18