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Publication numberUS3653348 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateJan 22, 1968
Priority dateJan 22, 1968
Publication numberUS 3653348 A, US 3653348A, US-A-3653348, US3653348 A, US3653348A
InventorsBaumhaft Irving
Original AssigneePennsylvania Sewing Res Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ruffling attachment for a stitching machine
US 3653348 A
Abstract
A ruffling attachment for a stitching machine of the type having a frame with front and side vertical walls, a needle plate mounted on the frame, and a drive shaft extending through side wall. The ruffling attachment is comprised of a rocker shaft mounted on the front wall, means for converting the rotary motion of the drive shaft to oscillating motion in the rocker shaft, and means for converting the oscillating motion in the rocker shaft to reciprocating motion of a ruffler blade above the needle plate.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Baumhaft 51 Apr. 4, 1972 [54] RUFFLING ATTACHMENT FOR A STITCHING MACHINE [72] Inventor: Irving Baumhaft, Wilkes Barre, Pa.

[73] Assignee: Pennsylvania Sewing Research Corporation [22] Filed: Jan. 22, 1968 211 Appl.No.: 699,598

[52] 11.8. CI. ..l12/l34, 308/65 [51] Int. Cl. ..D05b 35/08 [58] Field ofSearch ..112/134,135,132,133,131,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 986,652 3/1911 Strobeck ..1l2/l32 1,143,903 6/1915 Hanson ..112/132 1,156,695 10/1915 Kozub ..308/65 X 1,481,340 1/1924 Becker ....112/135 2,193,256 3/1940 Plamondow et a1. ....112/132 2,747,531 5/1956 Galkin ,...1 12/132 3,221,688 12/1965 Marforio ..l12/162 Primary Examiner-H. Hampton Hunter 7 Attorney-LeRoy Greenspan [57] ABSTRACT A ruffling attachment for a stitching machine of the type haying a frame with front and side vertical walls, a needle plate mounted on the frame, and a drive shaft extending through side wall. The ruffling attachment is comprised of a rocker shaft mounted on the front wall, means for converting the rotary motion of the drive shaft to oscillating motion in the rocker shaft, and means for converting the oscillating motion in the rocker shaft to reciprocating motion of a ruffler blade above the needle plate.

7 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PATENTEU APR 4 I973 SHEEI 1 [IF 2 7 w m w m/ WM M PATENTEDAPR 4 1912 SHEET 2 [1F 2 RUFFLING ATTACHMENT FOR A STITCI'IING MACHINE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Stitching machines of the type having a frame with front and side vertical walls, a needle plate mounted on the frame, and a drive shaft extending through and out of the side wall are widely used commercially. One family of such machines is known in the trade as the Rimoldi Class 29 or Rimoldi safety stitch machines. The basic mechanism of one such machine is described in detail in US. Pat. No. 3,221,688 to Nerino Marforio.

In order to appreciate fully the advantages of the adaption of the present rufiling attachment to the Rimoldi Class 29 Machine, the following aspects of this machine should be noted.

l. The Rimoldi machine is equipped with a knife for cutting the edge of the goods to a uniform width simultaneously with the stitching.

2. This machine is equipped with two needles and two loopers and can be used with either four or five threads.

These and other features of the machine are found within one small, congested area which makes the threading of the machine rather difficult. This is especially true after the machine has been used for awhile, because the knife, while cutting the edge of the material, creates a lot of lint, and the presence of this debris makes threading more difficult. Therefore, adding another function to the machine would be expected to compound these difficulties.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In spite of the aforementioned congestion and difficulties, it has been found possible to add the present mechanism to the machine for the purpose of providing a ruffling function in the machine. To this end, a rocker shaft is mounted on the front wall of the machine, and means are provided for converting the rotary motion of the main drive shaft of the machine to oscillatory motion of the rocker shaft. A blade arm extends from one end of the rocker shaft, and a springloaded ruffling blade is mounted on the extended end of the blade arm.

In operation, the rotation of the main drive shaft produces a reciprocal motion which, through the rocker shaft and the blade arm, causes the ruffling blade to advance and retract along the needle plate. The geometry is such that the angle of the blade with respect to the needle plate is large at the outset of each stroke and becomes progressively smaller as the blade advances. This motion produces regular and uniform pleats.

THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view, partly broken away, of a stitching machine provided with the novel ruffling attachment;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the machine ofFIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a broken away sectional view on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a broken away view of portions of the rocker shaft and blade arm of the machine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a broken away sectional view through the rocker shaft on the line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a broken away sectional view of the fabric-engaging blade of the novel attachment; and

FIG. 7 is a broken away sectional view illustrating the operation of this device.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The novel ruffling attachment is adapted for use with a stitching machine of the type designated at 10 in the drawings, which is similar in construction to that described in the cited US. Pat. No. 3,221,688 to N. Marfario. The machine 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 has a base or frame 12 for supporting the various mechanisms required to effect the stitching or sewing function, including a needle mechanism 14 mounted adjacent to a vertical wall 16 of the frame 12. A needle plate 18 is disposed beneath the needle mechanism 14. Beneath the needle plate 18 is machinery, not shown, for cooperating with the needle 20 of the machine for completing a locked stitch.

A presser foot 22 is supported by an arm 24 on a double axis hinge mechanism 26, so that the arm 24 may be swung out to remove the presser foot 22 from its normal operative position. Compare FIGS. 1 and 2. The machine 10 also has a cover plate 28, pivoted at 30, for supporting the fabric and for protecting the underlying mechanisms.

Beneath the plane of the needle plate 18 and the cover plate 28, the frame 12 has a front vertical wall 32 and a side vertical wall 34 which is parallel to the vertical wall 16. At the side of the machine 10 opposite to the side wall 34 is a vertical wall 36 which, together with the wall 34, provides bearing support for the main drive shaft of the machine, designated by the numeral 38. Rotating power is applied at the end of the drive shaft 38 adjacent to the wall 36 by means of a pulley 40, fixedly mounted on the shaft 38, and a drive belt 42 connected to a motor, not shown. The drive shaft 38 extends through the machine 10 and terminates at a location adjacent to the wall 34. Power for the present ruffling attachment is taken from the drive shaft 38 at this end.

The ruffling attachment, indicated generally by the numeral 44 in FIGS. 1 and 2, is mounted almost entirely beneath the needle plate 18 and the cover plate 28 so that it does not interfere in any way with the normal operation of the machine 10. The rulfling attachment 44 comprises a blade 46, having a fabric engaging toothed end 48, which is resiliently biased against the upper surface of the needle plate 18, as will appear more fully hereinafter. The blade 46 is reciprocated by power from the drive shaft 38 transmitted by a linkage including an eccentric mechanism 50, a link 52, a crank 54, and a rocker shaft 56.

The eccentric mechanism 50 is provided with means for varying the stroke of the link 52. Thus, as shown in FIG. 3, the drive shaft 38 carries a bushing 58 on which is concentrically mounted an anti-friction bearing 60 for supporting the end of the drive shaft in the wall 34. The bushing 58 has an eccentric cylindrical boss 62 and a second bushing 64, having a complementary cylindrical recess 66, is supported on this boss. The second bushing 64 has an outwardly extending tubular portion 68, which pivotally supports a sleeve 70, which is one end of the link 52, through antifriction bearing means 72.

The tubular portion 68 is eccentric with respect to the recess 66 in the bushing 64, and the combination of the eccentricities of the boss 62 and the tubular portion 68 allows the tubular portion 68 to be made more or less eccentric with respect to the drive shaft 38, by rotation of the bushing 64 with respect to the bushing 58. The adjustment is maintained, and the parts are held in assembled relation, by a washer 74 and a headed bolt 76, the threaded end 78 of which is received in a suitable tapped bore in the end of the drive shaft 38.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the link 52 has a first cylindrical portion 78 attached at one of its ends to the sleeve 70 and which carries for rotation at its other end a nut 80. A second cylindrical portion 82 of the link 52 has a coaxial threaded shaft 84 which is threadedly received in the nut and telescopes freely within the first cylindrical portion 78. The other end of the second cylindrical portion 82 is pivotally connected to a block 86 which engages the crank 54.

The crank 54 is comprised of a split sleeve 88, frictionally engaged with the rocker shaft 56 by means of a clamping screw 90, and a depending arcuate arm 92 which is received in a suitably shaped opening in the block 86 of the link 52. The position of the block 86 along the arm 92 may be changed in order to change the stroke of the blade 46. To accomplish this during operation of the machine, when adjustment of the mechanism 50 would not be possible, a lever 94 is provided which is pivotally mounted at 96 and which may be moved by the operator by means of a foot treadle, not shown, connected to the lever 94 by means of a chain 98.

The rocker shaft 56 is supported for oscillation by a pair of spaced bearing assemblies 100 which are part of a bearing block 102 mounted on the front wall 32 of the machine 10. Each of the bearing assemblies 100 contains a sleeve bearing 104 which is made of a metal which is relatively soft and which is porous in order to retain a quantity of lubricating oil.

The outer periphery of the bearing 104 is clamped within a correspondingly shaped opening in each of the assemblies 100. A slot 106 in each of the assemblies defines a weakened portion 108 which acts as a pivot for clamping portion 110 of the bearing assembly 100. A bolt 112 extends freely through the portion 110 and is threadedly engaged in the block 102 so that it may be used to draw the sides of the slot 106 toward each other and thereby clamp the bearing sleeve 104 in place.

One of the unique features of the novel device is the sleeve bearing 104. In order to compensate for wear, this hearing is made, as stated above, of relatively soft metal. This is in contrast to prior structures in which hard metal is used for its wear resistant qualities, and wear take-up is accomplished by providing one or more radial slits in the bearing to allow its inner diameter to be changed. Here, the bearing is a complete annulus and the entire bearing is compressed by means of the force exerted by the screw 112. In further contrast to prior split sleeve bearings, the bearing 104 provides for ease of assembly, since the sleeve may be oriented in any way; and, in addition, the bearing 104 provides an unexpected advantage in that it may be rotated in the assembly 100 over a period of use to reposition the points of maximum wear. That is, because of the fact that the shaft 56 oscillates, its angular velocity is cyclical, and it has two points of zero velocity and two points of maximum velocity during each cycle. Maximum wear will occur at the points of maximum velocity and the present unique bearing may be rotated from time to time to position other points on the bearing at these points. Thus, even though the material of the bearing 104 may be softer than prior bearing metals, the bearing has a longer life because wear may be evenly distributed.

As shown in FIG. 4, the shaft 56 has a terminal end in which is slidably mounted a blade arm 114, the axis of which is normal to the axis of the rocker shaft 56. A set screw 115 serves to retain the adjustment of the arm 114. At its upper end, as best seen in FIG. 6, the blade arm 114 has a right angled portion 116 extending parallel to the rocker shaft 56. Loosening of the set screw 115 and sliding adjustment of the blade arm 114 with respect to the rocker shaft 56 varies the distance between the axis of the shaft 56 and the blade arm portion 116 to vary the general angle of the blade 46 with respect to the needle plate l8. It will be apparent that during operation, the arm portion 116 will oscillate through a circular are about the axis of the bearing assemblies 100.

The arm portion 116 rotatably carries the blade 46, as best illustrated in FIG. 6. As shown there, the blade 46 has a rectangular frame 118 provided with a pair of coaxial apertures 120 for accommodating the arm portion 116. To prevent axial movement of the blade 46 and to retain one end of a spring 122, the arm portion 116 carries a collar 124 disposed within the frame 118. A set screw 125 retains the collar 124 in any desired position with respect to the arm portion 116. An aperture 126 in the collar 124 receives one end of the spring 122, and the other end of the spring is received in an aperture 128 in the frame 118. The spring 122 forces the fabric-engaging end 48 of the blade 46 down against the needle plate 18 and against the fabric when the machine is operated.

OPERATION In operation, the main drive shaft 38 is rotated by the motor, not shown, through the belt 42 and the pulley 40. Rotation of the drive shaft 38 is converted to reciprocating motion by shown in FIG. 2, the block 86 lies a greater distance from the center of the rocker shaft 56 so that there is substantial movement of the rocker shaft 56. Hence, the lever 94 remains up while the fabric is positioned. Then, after positioning the fabric, the lever 94 is moved to the down position.

Oscillation of the rocker shaft 56, with the lever 94 in the down position, causes the fabric-engaging end 48 of the blade 46 to reciprocate slidingly along the upper surface of the needle plate 18. Inasmuch as the fabric is frictionally held between the pressor foot 22 and the fabric-advancing dog of the machine (shown at 130), motion of the blade 46 (from the full line position of FIG. 7 to the dotted line position thereof) forces the fabric into a reversed fold indicated at 132. This fold is then drawn under the presser foot by the dog 130 and the resulting three layers of fabric are sewn together to form the finished ruffle. Every rotation of the drive shaft 38 repeats this operation.

The size of the finished ruffle is determined by the length of the stroke of the ruffler blade 46. Several adjustments are available which affect the length of the stroke of the blade 46. The adjustments include adjustment of the eccentricity of the eccentric mechanism 50, radial adjustment of the blade arm 1 14 with respect to the rocker shaft 56, and, during operation of the machine, adjustment of the position of the block 86 along the arm 92 by means of the lever 94.

Other variations in the construction of the machine l0\may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, the lever 94 and the block 86 may be omitted and the link 52 connected directly to a fixed position on the crank 92 through a pivot pin.

What is claimed is:

l. A ruffling attachment for a stitching machine of the type having a frame including a front vertical wall and a side vertical wall, a needle plate adjacent to said front vertical wall, a presser foot, and a rotating drive shaft extending through said side vertical wall and terminating in a plane adjacent thereto, said attachment comprising a rocker shaft mounted on said front vertical wall for oscillating motion about an axis substantially parallel to the plane of said front vertical wall,

means for converting the rotating motion of said drive shaft to oscillating motion of said rocker shaft, said means connecting said drive shaft with said rocker shaft,

a blade arm connected to and extending radially of said rocker shaft and having a terminal portion extending parallel to said rocker shaft,

a ruffler blade pivotally mounted on said terminal portion of said blade arm, said ruffler blade having a fabric-engaging end thereon, and

resilient means acting between said ruffler blade and said terminal portion of said blade arm for biasing said fabricengaging end of said ruffler blade into contact with a fabric on said needle plate,

said ruffler blade cooperating with said presser foot to produce a double fold in said fabric on each reciprocation of said ruffler blade, said double fold constituting a ruffle in said fabric.

2. A ruffling attachment as defined in claim 1 wherein said means for converting rotating motion of said drive shaft to oscillating motion of said rocker shaft comprises an eccentric mechanism mounted on the end of said drive shaft adjacent to said side vertical wall, a crank attached to said rocker shaft and having a crank arm extending generally radially of said rocker shaft, and a link connected at one of its ends to said eccentric mechanism and at the other of its ends to said crank.

3. A ruffling attachment as defined in claim 2 wherein said crank arm has a block slidably carried thereon, said link being pivotally attached to said block.

4. A ruffling attachment as defined in claim 3 further comprising means for changing the position of said block on said arm while said stitching machine is operating.

5. A ruffling attachment as defined in claim 4 wherein said block position changing means includes a lever pivotally mounted on said side vertical wall, said lever engaging said block on said crank arm to move said block along said crank arm,

6. A ruffling attachment as defined in claim 1, wherein said said blade arm terminal portion.

7. A ruffling attachment as defined in claim 6 further comprising a collar rotatably mounted on said blade arm terminal portion and a set screw for fixedly attaching said collar to said resilient means is a coil spring surrounding said blade arm ter- 5 blade arm terminal Portion, Said other end of Said Spring minal portion, one end of said spring being fixed to said blade and the other end of said spring being adjustably attached to being fixedly attached to said collar.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US986652 *Jun 17, 1908Mar 14, 1911Singer Mfg CoSewing-machine.
US1143903 *Jul 8, 1908Jun 22, 1915Union Special Machine CoRuffling and sewing machine.
US1156695 *Mar 2, 1911Oct 12, 1915Louis J KozubBearing.
US1481340 *Sep 29, 1921Jan 22, 1924Singer Mfg CoRuffling mechanism for sewing machines
US2193256 *Nov 25, 1939Mar 12, 1940Iversen Owen KRuffling mechanism for sewing machines
US2747531 *Aug 28, 1953May 29, 1956Joseph GalkinDouble ruffling mechanism for sewing machines
US3221688 *Apr 4, 1963Dec 7, 1965Rimoldi C Spa VirginioOverlock sewing machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4108094 *Apr 29, 1977Aug 22, 1978Reliable Attachment CompanyRuffling attachment
US6575307Oct 10, 2001Jun 10, 2003Rain Bird CorporationSelf-cleaning water filter
US8360250Dec 2, 2008Jan 29, 2013The Toro CompanySelf-cleaning valve
US8505566Nov 14, 2007Aug 13, 2013The Toro CompanyValve glue diverter
US8740177Sep 30, 2011Jun 3, 2014Rain Bird CorporationEccentric diaphragm valve
CN101314895BMay 29, 2007Nov 2, 2011高国兴Novel pleating apparatus
CN101315116BMay 29, 2007Jul 20, 2011高国兴Dual spindle transmission box
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/134, 384/263
International ClassificationD05B35/00, D05B35/08
Cooperative ClassificationD05B35/085
European ClassificationD05B35/08B