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Publication numberUS3653401 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateOct 24, 1969
Priority dateOct 24, 1969
Also published asCA939321A, CA939321A1
Publication numberUS 3653401 A, US 3653401A, US-A-3653401, US3653401 A, US3653401A
InventorsBeeler Allan E, Skowronski Steve J
Original AssigneeChemetron Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Utility outlet fixture with slack take-up
US 3653401 A
Abstract
A utility outlet fixture, which provides utility access at any position within a predetermined range of positions, is characterized by means for removing slack in elongated flexible utility conduits which are connected at opposite ends respectively to a fixed receptacle and to a carriage movable along a track.
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United States Patent Beeler et al.

1151 3,653,401 1451 Apr. 4, 1972 [541 UTILITY OUTLET FIXTURE WITH 2,935,080 /1960 Klimek ,15 7/344 SLACK TAKEUP 3,085,135 4/1963 Brandin ..191/12 3,511,263 5/1970 Emke ..l37/355.l7 [72] flm fi; gz fg gg 'h 5 2,896,659 7/1959 Erickson ..137/355.23 x

[73] Assignee: Chemetron Corporation, Chicago, 111. Primary Examiner-Henry T. Klinksiek [22] Filed: Oct 24 1969 Attorney-Nicholas M. Esser [21] Appl. No.: 869,301 [57] ABSTRACT I A utility outlet fixture, which provides utility access at any position within a predetermined range of positions, is charac 58] i g 19;? 339/9 {74/40 2 terized by means for removing slack in elongated flexible utilil74/45 1377344 17 ty conduits which are connected at opposite ends respectively to a fixed receptacle and to a carriage movable along a track. [56] References Cited 15 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures UNITED STATES PATENTS r r 2,201,954 5/1940 Flygare ..l9l/l2 T n I 1 1 I 5 l H Y-: 'T i r 6 sni -5 11 5 .15.

n 190 19,5 I 14a 1130 142 49,? 194 10 i 20 20 20---i "20 i i "20 1 24L. {:ljfl l 24 g41 l::: 4

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented April 4, 1972 Patented A ril '4, 1972 1 3,653,401

4 Sheats-Sheot 4 1 UTILITY OUTLET FIXTURE WITH SLACK TAKE-UP BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention pertains generally to utility outlet fixtures of the type used in supplying vacuum, oxygen, air, nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and other piped utilities, and electrical utilities where applicable, to operating rooms and other medical and surgical facilities, and more particularly to improved overhead utility outlet fixtures providing access to utilities at remote points of use within an enlarged room space yet substantially eliminating any need to have utility hoses trailing about the floor.

Presently, many operating rooms and other medical and surgical facilities have utility outlet fixtures in the form of wall-mounted outlet stations to which elongated flexible conduits in the form of hoses for piped utilities may be'connected as by means of quick-disconnect devices. The hoses are needed to bring the utilities to remote points of use within the room. Thus, in such an operating room, for example, it is not uncommon to find a clutter of utility hoses trailing about the floor.

However, in some more recently built or more recently remodeled medical and surgical facilities, wall-mounted outlet stations have been displaced in favor of overhead utility outlet fixtures. from which suitably connected hoses are suspended. In some overhead utility outlet fixtures, the hoses are wound on reel mechanisms permitting extension of the hoses to remote points of use within the room and retraction of the hoses for storage at a raised level. Such reel mechanisms are complicated and accommodate only one hose apiece. In other overhead utility outlet fixtures, the suspended hoses are fixed, and extension hoses are needed to bring the utilities to remote points of use within the room. With overhead utility outlet fixtures of the latter type, in order to provide access to utilities at remote points of use within the room, it is necessary either to have several fixtures or to use extension hoses of sufficient length to reach various portions of the room.

This invention is addressed to the problem of providing an overhead utility outlet fixture providing access to utilities within an enlarged room space while eliminating problems such as utility hoses trailing about the floor.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is -a general object of this invention to provide an improved utility outlet fixture useful in supplying vacuum, oxygen, air, anesthetic gases, and other piped utilities, and electrical utilities where applicable, to operating rooms and other medical and surgical facilities.

It is a more particular object of this invention to provide a utility outlet fixture improved over known utility outlet fixtures in that it provides utility access at points of use anywhere within an enlarged room space and eliminates a utility hose trailing about the floor.

The preceding objects may be attained in an overhead utility outlet fixture comprising, in combination, a carriage, from which a plurality of elongated flexible conduits may be suspended, an elongated overhead track, along which the carriage is movable, a plurality of elongated flexible utility conduits which are connected at opposite ends to fixed inlets and to the carriage, and means for removing slack in the conduits at any position of the carriage 'along the track. The slack removing means holds the carriage at any position along the track. The track may be extended to any practicable length, for example, ten or more feet, to span an enlarged work area. Thus, utility access is provided within an enlarged room space.

These and other objects, features, and advantages of this invention are evident from the following description, with the aid of the attached drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment of this invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view, partly broken away and in section, showing a typical installation of a utility outlet fixture embodying the principles of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the fixture of FIG. 1 with the top plate removed,

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view, partly broken away, taken substantially along line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 Ba cross-sectional view, taken substantially along line 44 of FIG. 3, omitting background portions for clarity;

FIG. 5 is a detail section view taken substantially along line 55 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a horizontal sectional view showing a modified form of slack removing means for the fixture of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 7 is a view, similar to FIG. 1, showing a simplified utility outlet fixture also embodying the principles of this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. 1, an overhead utility outlet fixture 10, which constitutes a preferred embodiment of this invention, is shown in a typical installation in a room having a ceiling l2 and a dropped ceiling 14. The room represents an operating room or other medical or surgical facility. Piping for utilities, such as vacuum, oxygen, air, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide, is concealed between the true ceiling l2 and the dropped ceiling 14. As shown an upper mounting plate 16 of the fixture 10 is held firmly against the underside of the dropped ceiling 14 as by means of tie rods (not shown) anchored in the true ceiling 12. Alternatively, the fixture 10 may be recessed between the dropped ceiling 14 and the true ceiling 12. The fixture 10 has a plurality of elongated flexible utility conduits 20, six in number as shown, which are suspended to reach to a level approximately from 6 to 7 feet above the floor of the room. Thus, the conduits 20 remain out of the way yet may be reached easily by persons working beneath the fixture 10. Within the fixture l0, suitable connections are made between the concealed piping and the conduits 20, each conduit 20 being supplied with a particular utility from the concealed piping. Of course, the same utility may be supplied to more than one of the conduits 20. In accordance with the principles of this invention, the conduits 20 may be moved, as a group, to any position along an elongated path, preferably 10 or more feet along, in order to provide utility access within a greatly enlarged room area. The range of movement of the group of conduits 20 is suggested in phantom lines in FIG. 1.

The upper end 22 of each conduit 20 is supported in a manner to be described hereinafter. Each conduit 20 carries a conventional valved fitting 24, which is adapted for connection to a conventional connector fitting (not shown) on an infeed conduit of apparatus (not shown) utilizing the utility to be supplied. Preferably each fitting is indexed fora particular utility. Such fittings are conventional in utility piping systems and are outside the scope of this invention.

The upper ends 22 of the conduits 20 are supported from a wheeled carriage 30. The carriage 30 is supported by an elongated track 32 (FIG. 3) for movement along the track 32. A pair of utility inlet receptacles 34 are mounted fixedly to the plate 16 intermediate the ends of the track 32 and in spaced relation to the track 32.

The carriage 30 comprises a generally oblong manifold block 36, through which a plurality of internal passages 38 are drilled, a bracket 40, which is bolted or otherwise mounted rigidly to the manifold block 36, and opposite pairs of carriage wheels 42, which are joumalled to the bracket 40. Lead-in portions of the drilled passages 38 are closed by means of suitable plugs 44. Preferably, the wheels 42 have O-ring tires and anti-static bearings made of conductive nylon or other suitable material. Each passage 38 is used to supply a utility to one of the conduits 20. Conventional DISS (Diameter-Index- Safety-System) couplings 46 are used to connect the conduits 20 to the passages 38. A male portion of each DISS coupling 46 has a threaded stem and is mounted in a suitably threaded socket in the manifold block 36. A female portion of each DISS coupling 46 is suitably carried on the upper end 22 of one of the conduits 20. The respective DISS couplings 46 are aligned longitudinally and extend beneath the manifold block 36. Such DISS couplings and similar DISS couplings used elsewhere in the fixture are of types conventionally used in utility piping systems for operating rooms and other medical and surgical facilities and are outside the scope of this invention.

The track 32 comprises a pair of elongated parallel track rails, 50 and 52 respectively, mounted fixedly to the plate 16 by means of a plurality of longitudinally spaced brackets 54. The track rails 50 and 52 are generally channelled in crosssection to support the opposed pairs of wheels 42 of the carriage 30 for movement of the carriage 30 along the track 32. Each bracket 54 is fabricated from a strip to a box-like configuration with a lower slot 56 providing clearance for the conduits 20.

The inlet receptacles 34 specifically comprise first and second longitudinally spaced receptacle boxes, 60 and 62 respectively, mounted fixedly to the plate 16. Suitable openings (not shown) are provided above the respective receptacles 60 and 62, both in the dropped ceiling 14 and in the plate 16, for access to the concealed piping. Tubing 64 (FIG. 2) extending into the first receptacle 60 is used to connect the concealed piping to conventional DISS couplings 66. Male portions of the DISS couplings 66 extend downwardly from the first receptacle box 60. Female portions of the DISS couplings 66 are carried on the shorter legs 70 of generally L- shaped tubular stems 72. The longer legs 74 of the stems 72 are parallel and are pointed generally toward the second receptacle box 62. Tubing 76 (FIG. 2) extending into the second receptacle box 62 is usedto connect the concealed piping to similar DISS couplings 78. Male portions of the DISS couplings 78 extend downwardly from the second receptacle box 62. Female portions of the DISS couplings 78 are carried on the shorter legs 82 of similar generally L-shaped stems 84. The longer legs 86 of the stems 84 are parallel and are pointed generally toward the first receptacle box 60.

A first group of elongated flexible conduits 90, three in number as shown, are connected at opposite ends respectively to the first receptacle 60 and to the carriage 30. A second group of elongated flexible conduits 92, similar to the conduits 90 and also three in number as shown, are connected at opposite ends respectively to the second receptacle 62 and to the carriage 30. The upper end 94 of each conduit 90 is suitably connected to the longer leg 74 of one of the stems 72, as by means of barbs (not shown) on the leg 74, and accidental disassociation thereof is prevented by means of a conventional ferrule-type coupling 96. The lower end 98 of each conduit 90 is connected to one of the passages 38 in the manifold block 36 by means of a conventional DISS coupling 100. A male portion of each DISS coupling 100 has a threaded stem and is mounted in a suitably threaded socket 102 at a first end 104 of the manifold block 36. A female portion of each DISS coupling 100 is carried on the lower end 98 of each conduit 90. The upper end 106 of each conduit 92 is suitably connected to the longer leg 86 of one of the stems 84, as by means of barbs (not shown) on the leg 74, and accidental disassociation thereof is prevented by means of a similar ferrule-type coupling 108. The lower end 110 of each conduit 92 is connected to one of the passages 38 in the manifold block 36 by means of a similar DISS coupling 112. A male portion of each DISS coupling 112 has a threaded stem and is mounted in a suitably threaded socket 114 at a second end 116 of the manifold block 36. A female portion of each DISS coupling 112 is carried on the lower end 110 of each conduit 92. The conduits 90 and 92 are crossed intermediate the ends of the track 32, as shown, and are sufiiciently long to permit movement of the carriage 30 over substantially the entire length of the track 32. Thus, at any position of the carriage 30 along the track 32, slack ordinarily would occur in the conduits 90 and 92. However, such slack is taken up in a manner next to be described.

Means are provided for removing slack in the conduits 90 and 92 at any position of the carriage 30 along the track 32. This means, which is indicated generally at 130, generally comprises means 132 for engaging slack in the conduits 90 and 92 and means 134 for biasing the slack engaging means 132 and the carriage 30 apart along the track 32.

The slack engaging means 132 comprises a first gang of pulleys 140, each of which engages slack in one of the conduits 90, in combination with a first wheeled pulley truck 142, which guides the first gang of pulleys 140 for movement along the track 32 between the carriage 30 and a first end 144 of the track 32. The slack engaging means 132 further comprises a second gang of pulleys 146 each of which engages slack in one of the conduits 92, in combination with a second wheeled pulley truck 148, which guides the second gang of pulleys 146 for movement along the track 32 between the carriage 30 and a second end 150 of the track 32. Each gang of pulleys 140 or 146 may be fabricated as a single part 154 having plural grooves 156 and is joumalled to a shaft 158. Each pulley truck 142 or 148 comprises a generally U-shaped bracket 160, which supports the shaft 158 in transverse relation to the track 32, as shown, and opposed pairs of wheels 162, which are joumalled to the bracket 160. Preferably, O-ring tires for the wheels 162 and bearings for the pulleys 140 and 146 are made of conductive nylon or other suitable material. A bracket, which is suitably attached to the bracket of the second pulley truck 148, provides a horizontal platform 164 extended toward the second end 150 of the track 32.

The biasing means 134 comprises an elongated flexible wire 170, which is attached at a first end to the first gang of pulleys 140 and at a second end to the second gang of pulleys 146, and means for tensioning the wire to bias the first gang of pulleys 140 toward the first end 144 of the track 32 and the second gang of pulleys 146 toward the second end 150 of the track 32. The wire 170 passes over a first pulley or guide 178 adjacent the first end 144 of the track 32 and over a second pulley or guide 180 adjacent the second end 150 of the track 32 and is generally taut therebetween. As shown, the wire tensioning means is in the form of a conventional negator-spring cartridge 182 having an external take-up reel 184 for the wire 170 and applying a predetermined amount of tension to the wire 170. A simple helical spring may be substituted for the negator-spring cartridge 182 if desired. The negator-spring cartridge 182 is suitably mounted on the platform 164 of the first gang of pulleys 140. The first end of the wire 170 is attached to the take-up reel 184. The second end of the wire 170 is attached to the bracket 160 of the second wheeled truck 148. Thus, the biasing means 134 biases the first gang of pulleys 140 toward the first end 144 of the track 32 and biases the second gang of pulleys 146 toward the second end 150 of the track 32. Likewise, the biasing means 134 retains the carriage 30 in any position along the track 32. Such negatorspring cartridge is of a well known type and is outside the scope of this invention.

A housing substantially encloses the parts of the fixture 10 other than the suspended conduits 20. The housing 190 comprises a pair of side panels 192 and a pair of end covers 194. The side panels 192 are suitably attached at upper flanged portions 196 to the plate 16 and extend at lower flanged portions 200 beneath and generally against the brackets 54. The lower flanged portions 200 are spaced to define a slot 202 generally coinciding with the slots 56 in the brackets 54 and providing clearance for the conduits 20. Preferably, the edges of the slot 202 are finished to remove sharp edges that would tend to cut the conduits 20. The end covers 194 are flanged to permit attachment to the side panels 192 as by means of self-threading screws. At least one of the side panels 192 may be hinged longitudinally, as at 206, for access to the enclosed parts upon removal of the end covers 194.

In FIG. 6, a modified form of biasing means is shown for use in the fixture 10 in place of the biasing means 134 of FIGS. 1 through 5. The biasing means comprises an elongated rod 292, which clears the carriage 30 to permit movement of the carriage 30 relative thereto, and means for resiliently connecting the rod 292 between inwardly facing end brackets 294 and 296 on the respective pulley trucks 142 and 148. A first end portion of the rod 292 passes through a suitable opening 298 in the end bracket 294 and is retained by snap rings 300a and 300b seated in suitable grooves (not shown) in the first end portion of the rod 292. The snap rings 300a and 30017 are positioned to rigidly hold the rod 292. A second end portion of the rod 292 passes through a suitable opening 302 in the end bracket 296 and is retained by snap rings 304a and 304b spaced apart to permit limited movement of the rod 292 relative to the end bracket 296. A coiled spring 306, which is piloted over the rod 292 between the inner snap ring 304b and the end bracket 296, biases the pulley trucks 142 and 148 apart along the track 32 (FIG. 3 etc.

In FIG. 7, in which primed reference numerals are used to .indicate parts similar to like-numbered parts in FIGS. 1

through 5, a simplified overhead utility outlet fixture is shown in a typical installation on a dropped ceiling 14. Except as noted, the fixture 10 is similar in construction and operation to the fixture 10.

Since only two suspended conduits are provided, only two conduits 92' are provided between the fixed receptacle 60 and the movable carriage The slack engaging means 132 comprises a single gang of pulleys 146, each of which engages slack in one of the conduits 92', and a single wheeled pulley truck 148' which guides the gang of pulleys 146 for movement along the track (not shown).

As shown, a biasing force is applied to the second end of carriage 30 by means of a first wire 210, which is attached at a first end to a fixed bracket 212 adjacent the first end of the track and at a second end to means 214 for tensioning the wire 210 to bias the carriage 30' toward the first end of the track, and a biasing force is applied to the gang of pulleys 146 by means of a second wire 216, which is attached at a first end to the pulley truck 148' supporting the first gang of pulleys 146' and at a second end to means 218 for tensioning the wire 216 to bias the gang of pulleys 146 toward the second end of the track 32. As shown, the wire tensioning means,214 is in the form of a conventional negator-spring mechanism 220, which is suitably mounted on the carriage 30, and the wire tensioning means 218 is in the form of a similar negator-spring mechanism 222, which is suitably mounted on a fixed bracket 224 adjacent the second end of the track. Such negator-spring mechanisms are of a well known type and are outside the scope of this invention.

In order to compensate for the force-dividing effect of the gang of pulleys 146, the biasing force on the gang of pulleys 146 should be approximately twice that on the carriage 30, and the wire tensioning means 214 and 218 should be selected accordingly. For example, the negator-spring cartridge 220 may be selected to apply a 3-pound tensioning force on the carriage 30' whereupon the negator-spring mechanism 222 should be selected to apply a 6-pound tensioning force on the gang of pulleys 146'. Alternatively, two or more wires, each tensioned by means of a separate negator-spring cartridge, may be connected in parallel to the gang of pulleys 146', such negator-spring cartridges being selected to apply the gang of pulleys 146' through the parallel wires cumulative tension equal to the tension which the negator-spring cartridge 220 applies to the carriage 30' through the wire 210. In either instance, negator-spring cartridges are preferred over simple springs by reason of the fact that the tension applied by a negator-spring cartridge remains essentially constant no matter how much wire has been taken up by the take-up reel of the negator-spring cartridge.

Thus, it may be seen that the objects of this invention may be attained in overhead utility outlet fixtures that are simple in construction and efficient in operation.

l-lereinbefore and in the claims which follow, the term wire is intended to encompass tapes and other elongated flexible elements capable of passing over a pulley or the like.

We claim:

l. A utility outlet fixture comprising an elongated track adapted to be fixedly supported, a utility inlet adapted to be supported in spaced relation to said track and adapted to be connected to at least one utility source, a carriage supported by said track for movement in opposite directions, conduit means connected at opposite ends respectively to said utility inlet and to said carriage, and means for removing slack in said conduit means at any position of said carriage relative to said track, said means for removing'slack comprising means movable along said track for engaging slack in said conduit means and biasing means connected to said means for engaging slack biasing said means for engaging slack and said carriage apart along said track.

2. The fixture of claim 1 wherein said means for engaging slack comprises a pulley engaging slack in said conduit means and means supported by said track for guiding said pulley for movement along said track.

3. The fixture of claim 1 wherein said conduit means comprises plural elongated flexible conduits connected at opposite ends respectively to said inlet and to said carriage.

4. The fixture of claim 3 wherein said means for engaging slack comprises a gang of pulleys, each pulley engaging slack in one of said conduits, and means supported by said track for guiding said gang of pulleys for movement along said track between said carriage and an end of said track.

5. The fixture of claim 4 wherein said biasing means biases said gang of pulleys and said carriage toward opposite ends of said track.

6. A utility outlet fixture comprising: an elongated track adapted to be fixedly supported; a utility inlet adapted to be supported in spaced relation to said track and adapted to be connected to at least one utility source; a carriage supported by said track for movement in opposite directions; conduit means comprising plural elongated flexible conduits connected at opposite ends respectively to said utility inlet and to said carriage; and means for removing slack in said conduit means at any position of said carriage relative to said track; said means for removing slack comprising a first pulley engaging slack in a first of said conduits, means supported by said track for guiding said first pulley for movement along said track between said carriage and one end of said track, a second pulley engaging slack in a second of said conduits, means supported by said track for guiding said second pulley for movement along said track between said carriage and another end of said track, and biasing means connecting said pulleys for biasing said pulleys apart along said track.

7. The fixture of claim 6 wherein said biasing means biases said first pulley toward the first end of said track and said second pulley toward the second end of said track.

8. The fixture of claim 7 wherein said biasing means comprises a wire connected at a first end to said first pulley and at a second end to said second pulley, means supported adjacent the opposite ends of said track for guiding said wire intermediate its ends, and means connected between one end of said wire and one of said first and second pulleys for tensioning said wire.

9. The fixture of claim 7 wherein said biasing means comprises an elongated rod, means for connecting one end of said rod to one of said first and second pulleys, and means for resiliently connecting the other end of said rod to the other of said first and second pulleys.

10. A utility outlet fixture comprising: an elongated track adapted to be fixedly supported; a utility inlet adapted to be supported in spaced relation to said track and adapted to be connected to at least one utility source; a carriage supported by said track for movement in opposite directions; conduit means comprising plural elongated flexible conduits connected at opposite ends respectively to said utility inlet and to said carriage; and means for removing slack in said conduit means at any position of said carriage relative to said track; said means for removing slack comprising a first gang of pulleys, each pulley engaging slack in one of said conduits, means supported by said track for guiding said first gang of pulleys for movement along said track between said carriage and one end of said track, a second gang of pulleys, each pulley engaging slack in one of said conduits, means supported by said track for guiding said second gang of pulleys for movement along said track between said carriage and another end of said track, and biasing means connecting said gangs of pulleys for biasing said gangs of pulleys apart along said track.

11. The fixture of claim 10 wherein said biasing means biases said first gang of pulleys toward the first end of the track and said second gang of pulleys toward the second end of said track.

12. The fixture of claim 10 wherein said biasing means comprises a wire connected at a first end to said first gang of pulleys and at a second end to said second gang of pulleys, means supported adjacent the opposite ends of said track for guiding said wire intermediate its ends, and means connected between one end of said wire and one of said first and second gangs of pulleys for tensioning said wire.

13. The fixture of claim 10 wherein said biasing means comprises an elongated rod, means for connecting one end of said rod to one of said first and second gangs of pulleys, and means for resiliently connecting the other end of said rod to the other of said first and second gangs of pulleys.

14. A utility outlet fixture comprising: an elongated track adapted to be fixedly supported; a utility inlet located in spaced relation to said track and adapted to be connected to at least one utility source; a carriage supported by said track for movement in opposite directions, conduit means connected at opposite ends respectively to said utility inlet and to said carriage; and means for removing slack in said conduit means at any position of said carriage relative to said track, said means for removing slack comprising means movable along said track for engaging slack in said conduit means and biasing means connected to said means for engaging slack biasing said means for engaging slack and said carriage apart along said track; said biasing means comprising a first wire connected at a first end to said carriage and at a second end to structure adjacent a first end of said track, means connected between one end of said first wire and that to which said end of said wire is connected for tensioning said first wire, a second wire connected at a first end to said gang of pulleys and at a second end to structure adjacent a second end of said track, and means connected between one end of said second wire and that to which said end of said second wire is connected for tensioning said second wire.

15. The fixture of claim 14 wherein the tensioning force on said gang of pulleys is approximately twice the tensioning force on said carriage.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3994373 *Dec 16, 1974Nov 30, 1976Kabelschlepp Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungArrangement for guiding energy conveying means
US4519657 *Feb 19, 1981May 28, 1985Common Sense Products Pty. Ltd.Multiple service unit
US4928889 *Dec 30, 1988May 29, 1990Integrated Tech Systems, Inc.Watering system for greenhouse
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US6142147 *Apr 21, 1998Nov 7, 2000The General Hospital CorporationNasal delivery system for inhaled nitric oxide
US20130014985 *Jul 12, 2011Jan 17, 2013Ferrara Vincent MCeiling Deployable Electric and Data Ports Module
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Classifications
U.S. Classification137/355.17, 174/40.00R, 191/12.00R
International ClassificationF16L3/01
Cooperative ClassificationF16L3/01
European ClassificationF16L3/01
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 25, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC.
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANE BOSTON FINANCIAL COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:006329/0348
Effective date: 19920831
Aug 26, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: BANCBOSTON FINANCIAL COMPANY (THE LENDER)
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC. A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004444/0863
Effective date: 19850612
Mar 27, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:CHEMETRON-MEDICAL PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:003925/0807
Effective date: 19810227