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Publication numberUS3653413 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateApr 2, 1970
Priority dateApr 2, 1970
Publication numberUS 3653413 A, US 3653413A, US-A-3653413, US3653413 A, US3653413A
InventorsSheya Fred
Original AssigneeSheya Fred
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump apparatus for bottled water
US 3653413 A
Abstract
The pump apparatus is an economic and trouble-free apparatus for pumping drinking water from a source bottle positioned on the floor, where it is delivered, to an elevated vessel from which it can gravitationally flow. The apparatus comprises a centrifugal or other non-selfpriming pump which can be set directly on the mouth of the source bottle on the floor. A pump suction pipe extends into the source bottle. An elastomeric spheroidal squeeze bulb is serially connected to the pump, directly in its output line. Check valves are positioned on opposite sides of the squeeze bulb, with the suction check valve preferably on the input side of the pump. Manual squeezing of the bulb primes the pump. A flexible hose from the squeeze bulb discharges the water to the elevated bottle.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Sheya 1451 Apr. 4, 1972 [72] Inventor: Fred Sheya, 5312 Cartwright, North Hollywood, Calif. 91601 [22] Filed: Apr. 2, 1970 [21] App1.No.: 25,180

52 us. or ..141/1, 141/18, 222/383, 417/390, 137/571 511 1111.01 ..B65b 1/16 [58} Field of Search ..417/33, 199 A, 200-202, 417/478, 390; 222/67, 146 C, 129, 730, 207, 383,

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 158,828 1/1940 Germany ..417/199 A Primary ExaminerRobert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner-Larry H. Martin Attorney-Allan M. Shapiro [57] ABSTRACT The pump apparatus is an economic and trouble-free apparatus for pumping drinking water from a source bottle positioned on the floor, where it is delivered, to an elevated vessel from which it can gravitationally flow. The apparatus comprises a centrifugal or other non-selfpriming pump which can be set directly on the mouth of the source bottle on the floor. A pump suction pipe extends into the source bottle. An elastomeric spheroidal squeeze bulb is serially connected to the pump, directly in its output line. Check valves are positioned on opposite sides of the squeeze bulb, with the suction check valve preferably on the input side of the pump. Manual squeezing of the bulb primes the pump. A flexible hose from the squeeze bulb discharges the water to the elevated bottle.

Since the elevated vessel has a filling opening in the top and a discharge opening in the bottom, means are provided to close the bottom opening during filling to prevent the water from running directly out. This is alternatively accomplished by means of a float valve or by means of a manually operated valve which is closed during the filling operation.

17 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures Patented April 4, 1972 7 3,653,413

2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. Fe E0 6 H E. 7A?

Patented April 4, 1972 2 Sheets-Sheet z TEA-:0 5 H5 vfl INVENTOR.

QTTOQJEY PUMP APPARATUS FOR BOTTLED WATER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention is directed to a drinking water system which includes a non-selfpriming pump directly serially coupled to a manually operable squeeze bulb, the system being especially equipped for pumping drinking water from a bottle on the floor to an elevated drinking water gravity-feed vessel.

2. Description of the Prior Art Most tap water is considered unsatisfactory for use as drinking water by many people for reasons of taste and health. For example, an estimated 2 million people with cardio-vascular disorders normally are required to drink distilled water or other purified water. Such water is available commercially in bottles. The most convenient and widely used method of distribution of bottled water is via 5-gallon bottles delivered to the user's location and disposed in supply relationship to a dispenser.

The conventional dispenser comprises an open-top reservoir having a gravitational flow bottom outlet terminated by a tap. The open top of the reservoir receives the shoulder of an inverted supply bottle. The mouth of the supply bottle extends into the reservoir so that water is discharged into the reservoir until the supply bottle mouth is underwater. Since the supply bottle is closed, except for this lower submerged open mouth, the discharge of water into the reservoir causes a partial vacuum in the closed space in the bottle above the water, creating the well known differential pressure effect for preventing the remainder of the water from discharging into the reservoir. When water is removed from the reservoir via the tap, the water level in the reservoir lowers until the supply bottle mouth is exposed. Air then enters the bottle through its mouth, bubbles up through the supply bottle water, and tends to relieve the partial vacuum so that additional water is discharged from the supply bottle into the reservoir until the reservoir water level again rises to the supply bottle mouth level.

When the supply bottle is emptied, it is conventional practice to remove the empty supply bottle and hoist a new full one in its place. As the mouth of the full supply bottle is tilted over into the reservoir, water is discharged, often with spilling. More importantly, the lifting and handling of this bottle with its 5 gallons of water, weighing about 53 pounds, requires a strong and able person. Such task is impossible for many women and people with either back problems or the aforementioned cardio-vascular disorders, resulting in little or no use of bottled water by many people having great need therefor.

The bottled water industry has long recognized the need for a solution to the foregoing situation and has directed its efforts toward providing means for pumping the water into the supply bottle. However, prior attempts to provide such means have been unsuccessful for many reasons. For example, considering that the user may be negligent or have no mechanical skill or ability, the means must be foolproof, maintenance free, trouble-free,'and economical to manufacture and use. It is to be noted that available self-priming pumps are not satisfactory for reasons of either size, expense or, more importantly, their characteristic of having various engaging members which tend to disintegrate when inadvertently operated without the presence of water in the pump.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In order to aid in the understanding of this invention, it can be stated in essentially summary form that it is directed to a pump apparatus for bottled water. The pump apparatus comprises a non-selfpriming pump with an elastomeric squeeze bulb in series therewith. Check valves are positioned on opposite sides of the squeeze bulb. The pump is arranged to take suction from an upright source bottle of drinking water, and to discharge the water to an elevated supply bottle or vessel therefor.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a pump apparatus for bottled water so that bottled water can be conveniently pumped from a lower, full bottle to an elevated supply bottle. It is another object to provide a pump apparatus for bottled water where a pump is of non-selfpriming characteristics, and is supplied with an in-line priming device so that the water flow is through the priming device both when the priming device is employed and when the pump is pumping. It is another object to provide an in-line priming device for a bottled water pump which comprises a squeeze bulb having check valves at both ends thereof to control the direction of water flow therethrough. It is a further object to provide a pump apparatus for bottled water which is of economic construction so that it can be marketed to a wide variety of users who otherwise would have to lift bottles full of water to an elevated reservoir position. It is still another object to provide a bottled water pump having foolproof and maintenance-free characteristics so that it can be used in the home without the exercise of mechanical skills. It is another object to provide a bottled water pump of such nature that it is a long life, to

satisfy the economic requirements. It is a further object to provide a bottled water system including an elevated supply bottle which has openings both top and bottom, with the top opening being arranged so that the supply bottle can be filled therethrough, the bottom opening in the supply bottle being closable for control of water outlet therethrough.

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may be understood best by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 shows a preferred embodiment of the pump apparatus for bottled water of this invention in operative association with the water cooler having a supply bottle thereon, and taking suction from a source bottle.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view, partly broken away and sectioned, of the apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged partial section, showing a solid plug in the top opening of the supply bottle.

FIG. 4 is a further enlarged view, similar to FIG. 3, showing a vented plug.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary vertical section, partly in elevation, of a combination valve structure which is associated with both the top and bottom openings of the supply bottle.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the structure shown in FIG. 5, showing the top opening in the open condition.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged partial section of the structure in the center of the rod of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is similar to FIG. 7, but taken on another plane.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIGS. 1 and 2, the pump apparatus for bottled water is generally indicated at 10. As is seen in FIG. 1, drinking water dispenser 12 has a reservoir 14 therein. The reservoir is open on the bottom to outlet valve 16 from which water can be drawn for use. Supply bottle 18 is inverted and positioned so that its mouth 20 extends into the reservoir. In the conventional prior art, the supply bottle 18 has a mouth 20 as the only opening. Thus, as the water gravitationally runs from supply bottle 18 into reservoir 14, the reservoir fills up to the mouth 20. This seals the mouth against air going into the bottle and prevents the discharge of more water therefrom. Accordingly, the reservoir level in the prior art is self-regulating.

In accordance with the present invention, the pump apparatus takes water from source bottle 22, which is conveniently resting on the floor nearby at a lower level than supply bottle 18. Pump apparatus 10 rests on top of the mouth of the source bottle 22, as is seen in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Pump apparatus has a non-selfpriming pump 24, which is preferably a centrifugal pump. The pump contains an impeller chamber 26 in which is located rotatable impeller 28. Impeller 28 is mounted upon the shaft of electric motor 30 so that, upon motor rotation, impeller 28 rotates. Motor 30 is supplied with electric power through cord 32, which is plugged into any convenient source such as a wall outlet. In order to maintain the simplicity of the device, no electric switch is supplied.

Upon rotation of motor 30, impeller 28 rotates within its chamber 26. The chamber is fitted with an inlet nozzle 34 and an outlet nozzle 36. The impeller and chamber are shaped and related in such a manner that, when operating on water, impeller rotation causes water to be thrown out through outlet nozzle 36 and drawn in from inlet nozzle 34, as in conventional centrifugal pump practice. A centrifugal pump is the preferred structure, although other non-selfpriming pumps which do not have mechanical parts in sliding contact are useful.

Suction line 38 extends to the bottom of source bottle 22 so that its lower end is submerged below the water level therein. The upper end of suction line 38 is connected to check valve 40 which contains ball 42. Ball 42 rests downward on its seat, to prevent flow from chamber 26 down through suction line 38. Cross-shaped stop 44 pressed into the larger diameter end of check valve body 40, prevents upward escape of ball 42.

Outlet nozzle 36 is fitted with elbow 46 which, in turn, carries fitting 48. Fitting 48 may be a straight tube but, as an alternative construction, check valve 40 can be positioned in fitting 48 rather than on the suction side of chamber 26. However, check valve 40 is preferably positioned on the suction side of chamber 26, as shown, to prevent emptying of the chamber 26 downwardly into source bottle 22.

Squeeze ball 50 is made of elastomeric material, and is of sufficiently resilient character that it can be manually squeezed. The walls are fairly thin, but are free of openings which permit the escape of air and liquids. The walls are of such strength and elastomeric memory that that it returns substantially to its unsqueezed condition when internally subjected to a subatmospheric pressure of at least 1 psi. Squeeze ball 50 is preferably an elongate spheroid. The lower end of squeeze ball 50 is secured to fitting 48.

Outlet check valve 52 is secured to the top of squeeze ball 50. It contains a ball 54 which rests downwardly on a seat to prevent downward flow of liquid. Ball 54 is held captive by stop 56, which is cross-shaped to permit fluid flow but prevent upward passage of ball 54 thereby, and is preferably pressed into the body of outlet check valve 52. Flexible outlet line 58 is secured to the top of outlet check valve 52 so that the liquid discharged through the check valve body enters the flexible outlet line.

Stabilizing clamp 60 extends from frame 62, which is secured to the housing of motor 30. Frame 62 carries winding loops 64 and 66 about which the flexible outlet line 58 and electrical cord 32 can be wound when not in use. Spring 68 is positioned around flexible outlet line 58 adjacent the outlet check valve 52, and is secured in place by stabilizing clamp 60. Spring 68 prevents the outlet line from bending in too tight a curve to eliminate creasing or kinking of the outlet line with consequent shutoff. Frame 62 constitutes a carrying handle for the apparatus.

Supply bottle 18 is provided with a hole 70 opposite its mouth 20. The end of the flexible outlet line 58 is passed into the supply bottle through hole 70 for filling of the supply bottle from source bottle 22.

In use, when the supply bottle 18 becomes empty, or close to empty, it is necessary to fill it. Source bottle 22 has been delivered to a convenient location but, instead of taking down supply bottle 18 with the lifting of source bottle 22 into the former place of bottle 18, pump apparatus 10 is employed. The pump is set in place on top of source bottle 22, with its suction line 38 extending to the bottom thereof. Flexible outlet line 58 is unwound from its winding loops, and its outlet end is placed into supply bottle 18 through the top hole 70. Next, cord 32 is plugged in to start the pump. Since the pump is of non-selfpriming characteristic, no water will be pumped.

Manual compression of squeeze ball 50 pumps its contained air upwards through outlet check valve 52. Release thereof draws air upwards through impeller chamber 26 and suction line 38. This draws water up from source bottle 22 through suction line 38 into chamber 26 to permit the pump to start pumping. The volumetric capacity of squeeze ball 50 illustrated is such that one full squeezeand-release is sufficient to draw water into the pump and thus complete the priming operation; however, it will be understood that repeated operation of the squeeze ball 50 may be employed if necessary. Of course, as soon as impeller chamber 36 is water-filled, the pump develops a pressure differential through the chamber, followed by continuous water pumping providing the head or lift is within the limits of pump capability. However, the pump is chosen so that its available pressure differential is satisfactory for the usual lift required, usually not over 6 feet.

Water is discharged through squeeze ball 50, since it is serially located in the line. The water passes through outlet check valve 52 and through flexible outlet line 58 into supply bottle 18. The pump runs as long as electric cord 32 is plugged in. Preferably, the supply bottle 18 has sufficient capacity so that the entire source bottle 22 can be emptied. If the pump is permitted to run dry after the source bottle 22 is emptied, the character of pump 24 is such that it will not be damaged. This is one of the most important reasons for employing a non-selfpriming pump.

Water transfer occurs until pump chamber 26 runs out of water. The positioning of check valves 40 and 52 is such that, when the pump is shut off, the water in squeeze bulb 50 and the flexible outlet line 58 does not run back into source bottle 12. Instead, manual operation of squeeze bulb 50, for several operations, discharges the water out of the end of outlet line 58, to empty the line and eliminate spillage. The pump then can be removed and stored for further use.

As previously described, the prior conventional systems employ a supply bottle which only has the one opening at its mouth 20. Thus, flow of water from the supply bottle into reservoir 14 is automatically accomplished. In the present case, since supply bottle 18 has an opening 70 in the top to permit the pumping of water into the supply bottle, the simple submergence of mouth 20 into water in reservoir 14 is not enough to prevent the dumping of the entire contents of supply bottle 18 into conventional reservoir 14. This reservoir is not sufficient to handle such a quantity.

It should be understood that the dispenser 12 could be redesigned so that there is a closed flow path from mouth 20 to outlet valve 16, but such would not be compatible with present systems. In the future, since the supply bottle 18 will not have to be physically moved into place as in the pertinent prior art, design evolvement may make such an integral connection. Furthermore, the volume and shape of supply bottle 18 may evolve from that which is presently considered convenient for transport, because the supply bottle 18 would then be built as an integral and permanent part of dispenser 12. However, in the meantime, means is required to prevent undesirable downflow of water out of supply bottle 18 into the unpressurized but open-topped reservoir 14.

In order to prevent this downflow, a float valve can be employed. A float valve is generally indicated at 72 in the lower left of FIG. 2. Float valve 72 illustrated is the preferred structure. Float valve 72 has resilient hollow plug 74 which fits into the neck of bottle 18 interiorly of its mouth 20. Tube 76 is retained within resilient plug 74 by clamping nuts and washers threadedly engaged with tube 76 on each end, which press against resilient plug 74. In this way, resilient plug 74 can be longitudinally compressed and circumferentially expanded to form a tight fit within the neck of bottle 18. The lower end of tube 76 is provided with conical valve seat 78.

Valve stem 80 loosely extends through tube 76. On its lower end, it carries float 82, which is responsive to the water level in reservoir 14. Rising water level causes upward movement of float 82. Valve stem 80 carries a resilient valve disc, such as a ring 84, in a suitable groove for engagement on seat 78. Thus, upward motion of the float closes off the downward water flow passage through tube 76. The buoyancy due to the relatively large size of float 82 provides sufficient upward force, when applied to the small seat area, to cause adequate sealing pressure before reservoir 14 overflows. As the water level in reser- .voir 14 is lowered, float 82 is lowered therewith to move the valve disc comprised of O-ring 84 away from the valve seat to permit downward flow of water. Nut 86, adjustably engaged on valve stem 80, controls the lowermost position and, thus, maximum valve opening, while a plurality of side passages such as at 88 in tube 76 permits water flow when the nut 86 is down on the top of tube 76.

The opening 70 in supply bottle 18 is shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4. Usually, that surface of conventional supply bottles which is upper when the bottles are inverted, as shown in FIG. 1, is upwardly concave. Thus, any spillage on that top surface around opening 70 would normally run into bottle 18 through opening 70. When there is dust and debris on such a surface, such an inflow of spilled water would be objectionable. Accordingly, extension tube 90 is provided to project upwardly above the bottle surface. This extension tube is preferably made of somewhat resilient synthetic polymer composition -material and is pressed into the opening 70 to form an adequate seal. Accordingly, any spillage would not run through hole 70 into the interior of bottle 18.

In order to prevent the entry of dust or debris into supply bottle 18, when it is not being filled, the provision of a plug for extension tube 90 and, thus, for hole 70 is desirable. In FIG. 4, plug 92 is of rubberlike elastomeric material, and is provided with a vent hole 94. The vent hole may have a hat thereover to prevent the entry of dust, but normally the vent hole is sufficiently small that such a hat is not necessary in the usual location. When the vented plug 92 is employed, air inlet into supply bottle 18 to permit the release of water goes through vent hole 94. As previously described, the water height in reservoir 14 is controlled by float valve 72.

When it is desirable to require entry of air into the supply bottle 18 by passing upward through the mouth 20, to obtain the conventional upward bubbling of air in bottle 18, extension tube 90 and vessel hole 70 are solidly plugged by employment of a resilient solid plug, as at 96 in FIG. 3. When plug 96 is employed, and the water level in reservoir 14 becomes sufficiently low that float valve 72 opens, air goes upward through the valve and bubbles up through the water in supply bottle 18 to-increase the pressure in the bottle to permit downward flow of a corresponding amount of water. By this means, the bubbling effect of the present conventional type of structure is maintained.

It is clear that a float valve, such as float valve 72, need not be employed so long as only one or the other of the top and bottom openings in supply bottle 18 is open at one time. This arrangement can be accomplished by the alternative novel structure illustrated in FIGS. 5 through 8. Supply bottle 98 has a top opening 100 in which is located extension tube 102, for the reasons previously described. Top plug 104 is sealingly engageable in the top of extension tube 102, as shown at the top of FIG. 5. Adjustment rod 106 extends through top plug 104 and, on its threaded upper end, carries adjustment nut 108, together with its associated washer. Adjustment of the nut 108 controls the position of loop 110 on the lower end of adjustment rod 106 relative to top plug 104.

Mouth 112 of supply bottle 98 has an insert 114 sealed therein. Insert 114 carries tube 116 which has a valve seat 1 18 at its lower end. Valve disc 120 is mounted on the lower end of a rod means indicated generally at 122. Rod 122 is divided into a lower. rod portion 124 and an upper rod portion 126. The lower rod portion 124 carries valve disc 120, while the upper rod portion 126 .carries hook-loop 128, which is engaged with loop 110. Tension extension spring 130 is closewound about rod 122 and is secured to both the lower and upper rod portions via respective washers 132 and 134, as best i including the lower part of adjustment rod 106, has a minimum length. When in its minimum length configuration, rod 122 and spring 130 function together, when subjected to an axial or longitudinal compression force, as though they were a single solid rod. This minimum length, between top plug 104 and valve disc 120, is adjusted by nut 108. The minimum length is such that, when top plug 104 is in sealing relationship with extension tube 102, valve disc is away from its seat 1 18. Similarly, when top plug 104 is pulled out of its extension tube 102, valve disc 120 engages with its valve seat 118 before sealing is lost at tube 102 by upward motion of top plug 104. Thus, as viewed generally, the bottom opening is closed when the top one is opened, and vice versa. However, it should be noted that during the transition period from topopen-bottom-closed to top-closed-bottom-open, they both are closed for, as plug 104 is pressed into extension tube 102, top sealing is accomplished by plug 104 in tube 102 before valve disc 120 moves away from its seat 118; then, further pressing of the top plug 104 into place opens the bottom valve. In the converse direction, withdrawal of plug 104 causes valve disc 120 to seat before plug 104 is withdrawn sufficiently to break its seal with tube 102.

Accordingly, when it is desired to fill supply bottle 98, top plug 104 is lifted to close the bottom valve and further raised to a point where hook 128 can be engaged over the top edge of extension tube 102, as is shown in FIG. 6. In this condition, the bottom valve is closed and the extension tube is open to receive flexible outlet line 58, as illustrated in FIG. 6. As previously described, the pump apparatus 10 is operated to fill supply bottle 98. When the pump draws air, and ceases pumping, the water in the bulb and outlet line 58 are expelled by operation of squeeze bulb 50. Of course, the squeeze bulb 50 acts as a pump by itself and, theoretically, it is possible to operate it a sufficient number of times to transfer the water from the source bottle to the supply bottle. However, such is impractical because the bulb becomes relatively firm and difficult to squeeze when it is filled with water, especially to force a continual stream of water up through line 58.

As now should be clear, the purpose of the spring 130 is to permit elastic stretching of the effective length of rod 122 when plug 104 is withdrawn, and to provide a resilient upward force on valve disc 120 to hold it in sealing engagement with seat 118 to prevent water discharge from the supply bottle during the filling operation. The lifting of top plug 104 to permit the insertion of outlet line 58, as illustrated in FIG. 6, may cause permanent strain of tension spring 130. Since the solid winding of this spring is necessary to establish the minimum length, such permanent strain would not permit proper operation. Accordingly, a strain-limiting device is provided as illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8.

Washers 132 and 134 are respectively secured to the rod portions 124 and 126, and the spring 130 is secured to both of these washers. However, the rod portions extend through the washers interiorly of the spring. A bar 136 having a longitudinal slot 138 is secured to the end of rod portion 124, while rod portion 126 has a right angle bend at its end to form an L- shape. The foot of the L extends through the slot 138, and head 140 is formed on the foot of the L. When the foot of the L is in the upper part of the slot, as shown, the rod halves are in maximum separation, to limit the extension of tension spring 130. Thus, tension spring 130 is protected from overstrain. Of course, the slot 138 is sufficiently long to permit this spring to extend to a point where the parts can get into the position shown in FIG. 6, but no further extension is necessary.

When the structure employed in FIGS. 5 through 8 is employed on the supply bottle, it is clear that the top opening 100 is closed when the bottom is open. Thus, air entry from the reservoir into bottle 98 is necessary to permit water to descend into the reservoir. Reservoir level is maintained, in accordance with the conventional prior art teaching, described above. Bubbles pass upwardly through the supply bottle, which is conventionally visible. These bubbles often are considered as providing visual enhancement of the operation.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects, and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A water pump apparatus in combination with a water source bottle and water supply bottle, said pump apparatus comprising:

a non-selfpriming pump, and motor means connected to said pump for running said pump, said pump having an inlet and an outlet for water passage through said pump, a bottom on said pump, a suction line extending from the bottom of said pump and connected to said pump inlet;

a source bottle having an opening in the top thereof and being closed at the bottom, said pump resting on said source bottle adjacent said opening in the top thereof and said suction line extending into said source bottle for withdrawal of water from said source bottle, an inlet check valve in said pump inlet to prevent water in said pump from entering said source bottle;

a squeeze bulb having an inlet and an outlet, said squeeze bulb inlet being directly connected to said pump outlet, said squeeze bulb being manually squeezable to change the internal volume thereof and having sufficient resiliency to return to substantially its undeflected position when subjected to a negative head, an outlet check valve connected to said squeeze bulb outlet;

a flexible outlet line connected to said bulb outlet, said supply bottle being positioned above said source bottle and having an opening in the top thereof for entry of said outlet line;

said supply bottle having an opening in the bottom thereof, said opening being directable into a reservoir in a water dispenser, a valve in said bottom opening, said valve being closable to prevent the dumping of excessive water from said supply bottle into the reservoir to prevent overflowing of the reservoir.

2. The pump apparatus of claim 1 wherein said valve is a float valve, with a float in the reservoir so that, upon rising of water level in the reservoir, said float closes said float valve.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said valve in said bottom opening is connected to rod means so that manual operation of said rod means closes said valve in said bottom opening.

4. The pump apparatus of claim 1 wherein a plug is positionable in said top opening.

5. The pump apparatus of claim 4 wherein said plug has a vent hole therethrough.

6. The pump apparatus of claim 1 wherein said upper opening in said supply bottle has a tube positioned therein, said tube being an extension tube extending upwardly at least as high as the highest part of said supply bottle to prevent spilled water from running into said top opening.

7. The pump apparatus of claim 6 wherein a plug is positioned within said extension tube to close said top opening.

8. A portable pump apparatus for pumping bottled water from a source water bottle on the floor to a supply bottle at higher elevation on a water dispenser, said pump apparatus comprising:

a portable non-selfpriming pump having an inlet and an outlet, and motor means connected to said pump to drive said pump;

a bottom face for supporting said pump, said bottom face being directly mountable upon the upwardly directed neck of a source bottle;

a manually operable resilient squeeze bulb having an inlet and an outlet and having its inlet directly connected to the outlet of said pump, said squeeze bulb being manually squeezable to reduce the internal volume thereof, and being sufficiently resilient to substantially return to its unsqueezed shape when subjected to a negative head;

a check valve on said pump inlet and a suction line connected to said pump inlet, said suction line extending downwardly into the neck of a source bottle of water; and

a check valve on the outlet of said squeeze bulb and a flexible outlet line connected to said check valve, winding means mounted upon said pump for carrying said flexible outlet line when said outlet line is not positioned to discharge water, said outlet line being placeable in a supply bottle having a top fill inlet and a bottom discharge in a water dispenser so that, upon placement of said suction line in a source bottle and operation of said pump and squeezing of said squeeze bulb, water is drawn from said source bottle into said pump so that said pump pumps water through said squeeze bulb into said supply bottle through the top opening thereof.

9. The pump apparatus of claim 8 wherein said non-selfpriming pump is a centrifugal pump.

10. The pump apparatus of claim 9 wherein said supply bottle has an opening in the bottom thereof, said opening being directable into a reservoir in a water dispenser, a valve in said bottom opening, said valve being closable to prevent the dumping of excessive water from said supply bottle into the reservoir to prevent overflowing of the reservoir.

11. The pump apparatus of claim 9 wherein said valve is a float valve, with a float in the reservoir so that, upon rising of water level in the reservoir, said float closes said float valve.

12. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein said valve in said bottom opening is connected to a rod means so that manual operation of said rod means closes said valve in said bottom opening.

13. The pump apparatus of claim 12 wherein a top plug is secured to said rod means, said top plug being engageable in said top opening, said rod means being of such length that, when said top plug is engaged in said top opening, said bottom valve is open and, when said top plug is removed from said top opening, said bottom valve is closed.

14. The pump apparatus of claim 9 wherein said upper opening in said supply bottle has a tube positioned therein, said tube being an extension tube extending upwardly at least as high as the highest part of said supply bottle to prevent spilled water from running into said top opening.

15. The pump apparatus of claim 14 wherein a plug is positionable within said extension tube to close said top opening.

16. A pump apparatus for bottled water in combination with a source bottle and a supply bottle, said pump apparatus comprising:

a non-selfpriming pump, and motor means connected to said pump for running said pump, said pump having an inlet and an outlet for water passage through said pump;

a squeeze bulb having an inlet and an outlet, said bulb inlet being directly connected to said pump outlet, said squeeze bulb being manuallysqueezable to change the internal volume thereof and having sufficient resiliency to return to substantially its undeflected position when subjected to a negative head;

an inlet check valve in said pump inlet, an outlet check valve in said squeeze bulb outlet, a suction line connected to said pump inlet and adapted to extend into a source bottle of water, a flexible outlet line connected to said bulb outlet;

said supply bottle having an opening in the top thereof for entry of said flexible outlet line, said supply bottle having an opening in the bottom thereof, said opening being directable into a reservoir in a water dispenser, a valve in said bottom opening, said valve being closable to prevent the dumping of excessive water from said supply bottle into the reservoir to prevent overflowing of the reservoir, rod means connected to said valve in said bottom opening, said rod means being manually operable so that manual operation of said rod means closes said valve in said bottom opening, a top plug secured to said rod means, said top plug being engageable in said top opening, said rod means being of such length that, when said top plug is engaged in said top opening, said bottom valve is open and, when said top plug is removed from said top opening, said bottom valve is closed so that water can be pumped from the source bottle to the supply bottle when it is elevated and can be dispensed from the supply bottle.

17. The process of pumping bottled water from a source bottle to an elevated supply bottle on a bottled water reservoir comprising the steps of:

inserting a suction line from a non-selfpriming pump having a squeeze bulb directly in series therewith, together with inlet and outlet check valves, into a source bottle of water;

operating said pump and concurrently repeatedly squeezing and releasing said squeeze bulb until water is drawn from said source bottle into said pump and pumped through said squeeze bulb; and

delivering the pumped water through a discharge line into an elevated supply bottle.

i n i w

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4852621 *Aug 10, 1987Aug 1, 1989Bear Don EBottled water pressurization system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/1, 141/18, 417/390, 137/571, 222/207
International ClassificationF04B45/00, E03B9/00, F04D9/04, F04D9/00, F04B45/02
Cooperative ClassificationE03B9/00, F04B45/02, F04D9/043
European ClassificationF04B45/02, F04D9/04C, E03B9/00