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Publication numberUS3653667 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateJun 29, 1970
Priority dateJun 29, 1970
Publication numberUS 3653667 A, US 3653667A, US-A-3653667, US3653667 A, US3653667A
InventorsPrimoff Eugene H
Original AssigneeWorldwide Computer Services In
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus for familiarizing the user with the formation of computer flow charts
US 3653667 A
Abstract
A game apparatus useful for familiarizing the user with the formation of computer flow charts, said apparatus comprising a first plurality of playing pieces having positive or negative scoring values, a second plurality of playing pieces having directional indicia thereon, a third plurality of playing pieces having different indicia thereon positioned to indicate different directions, and a random selection die having on each face one of said different indicia. The pieces are assembled by the user in flow chart orientation, and his score is then computed as he advances a scoring piece over the chart, said score depending upon the user's skill in arrangement of the chart, and the function of the random selection die.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,653,667 Primoff 1 Apr. 4, 1972 [54] GAME APPARATUS FOR 694,880 7/1953 Great Britain ..273/l34 0 340,173 9/1959 Switzerland ..273/134 0 F AMILIARIZING THE USER WITH THE FORMATION OF COMPUTER FLOW CHARTS lnventor: Eugene H. Primoff, New Rochelle, NY.

Assignee: Worldwide Computer Services Inc., Hartsdale, N.Y.

Filed: June 29, 1970 Appl. No.2 50,600

US. Cl ..273/l34 D, 35/31 G, 35/70,

273/137 R, 273/153 R Int. Cl. ..A63f 3/02 Field of Search ..273/134, 137,153

References Cited FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS France ..273/l34 AD Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Au0rney-Charles E. Temko [5 7] ABSTRACT A game apparatus useful for familiarizing the user with the formation of computer flow charts, said apparatus comprising a first plurality of playing pieces having positive or negative scoring values, a second plurality of playing pieces having directional indicia thereon, a third plurality of playing pieces having different indicia thereon positioned to indicate different directions, and a random selection die having on each face one of said different indicia. The pieces are assembled by the user in flow chart orientation, and his score is then computed as he advances a scoring piece over the chart, said score depending upon the user's skill in arrangement of the chart, and the function of the random selection die.

1 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures GAME APPARATUS FOR FAMILIARIZING THE USER WITH THE FORMATION OF COMPUTER FLOW CHARTS This invention relates generally to amusement games, and more particularly, to an improved game particularly suitable for acquiring skill in computer programming.

It is among the principal objects of the invention to provide an amusement game incorporating some of the features of computer technology, whereby users of the game may be familiarized with this field of endeavor.

Another object of the invention lies in the provision of an amusement game related to the field of computer technology, in which only a knowledge of simple arithmetic, such as addition, subtraction, and multiplication, is required in order to play.

Yet another object of the invention lies in the provision of a game of the class described which may be played in relatively simple fashion by those of relatively tender years, or in more complex fashion by those possessed of greater sophistication.

A feature of the invention lies in the relatively low cost of manufacture of the structural components of the game.

These objects and feature, as well as other incidental ends and advantages, will more fully appear in the progress of the following disclosure, and be pointed out in the appended claim.

In the drawing, to which reference will be made in the specification:

FIG. 1 is a view in elevation of an embodiment of the invention in assembled form.

FIG. 2 is a view in perspective of a random selection means.

In accordance with the invention, the embodiment comprises broadly a first plurality of scoring pieces 10, a second plurality of direction indicating pieces 11, a third plurality of decision pieces 12, random selection means 13, and a scoring piece 14.

The first plurality of pieces are of varying types, including a starting piece 16, nominally assigned a value of 1, a no change" piece 17 of nil value, positive value pieces 18, and negative value pieces 19. Each of the pieces 10 is most conveniently formed to planar rectangular configuration indicated by reference character 20.

The second plurality of pieces are of similar size and configuration, and bear an indicia 21 indicating a single direction toward one rectilinear side.

The third plurality of pieces are provided with a pair of decision indices 22 and 23, including the character N (for no) and the character Y (for yes). In addition, each of these pieces bears a numerical positive value, the purpose of which will be indicated at a point later in the disclosure.

The random selection means 13 may be of any suitable type, as for example a die having three faces bearing the indicia N (for no) and three faces bearing the indicia Y (for yes), corresponding to the indices 22 and 23 of each of the pieces 12. If desired, other random selection means (not shown), capable of indicating either of two states, may be employed.

Referring to FIG. I in the drawing, the pieces 10 to 12, inclusive, are assembled by the user to make a flow chart, generally indicated by reference character 27. Play is commenced by separating the different types of pieces into separate locations, and concealing the indicia on the pieces 10 and 12. Each player selects, without examining the indicia, sevenof the pieces 10 and 12, which are preferably intermixed, and is provided with a starting piece and as many pieces 11 as may be required to make the flow chart. After creating a flow chart, each player counts his score by playing the flow chart. If more than one is playing, the winner is the player with the highest score at the end of a given number of turns.

In the making of the flow chart, the starting piece 16 is employed first, and the scoring piece 14 is placed thereon. The scoring piece serves as an aid to compute score from piece to piece, and enable the player to keep his place. As has been mentioned, the starting piece 16 has a score of 1. Each piece 11 is without scoring value. Each iece 10 has a value indicated thereon wh1c may change t e total score. Moving the scoring piece in the direction of the arrow, the same lands on an equal two (=2) piece 10. The score is now set equal to 2. Continuing to move the pawn, the next scoring piece is a plus three (+3) piece. The score is now 2 3 or 5. Again continuing the move of the scoring piece 14, the next piece 10 is a minus one (l) piece. The score now equals 5 l or 4. Continuing movement of the scoring piece 14, the next piece 10 reached is no change." This piece does not change the score. The next piece is a times two (X2) piece. The score is now 4X2 or 8. The next piece reached is a decision piece 12 having a Y and N thereon indicating two possible directions at right angles to each other.

At this point, the random selection means 13 is employed to decide upon which path to take. If N comes up, the player moves along the arrows to the times two (X2) piece again. The score is now 8 X 2 or 16. Again moving the scoring piece 16 to the decision piece, the die is again thrown to determine which path will now be taken. If a Y comes up on this throw, the scoring piece 16 is moved to the plus four (+4) piece. The score is now equal to 16 4 or 20. The next move brings the player to the end of his turn or game, since there are no more pieces 10 or 12 upon which to land. The score is therefore 20 for this turn.

The numeric value carried by the decision piece 12 indicates the maximum number of times a player can throw the die when he has reached the decision piece. If he had thrown an N instead of a Y, he would have come to the decision piece a third time. The score would now be l6 X 2 or 32. If he again throws an N, he moves over the times two (X2) piece and lands on the decision piece a fourth time with a new score of 64. Since the decision piece has a 3 value, and he has already thrown the die three times, his turn is finished and his score is 64.

From a consideration of the above, it will be apparent that a players score will be determined only partially by the throw of the die, and more by the number of pieces 12 which the player is fortunate enough to select, and his ability to arrange them in a flow chart, such that maximum additional score is accumulated with each loop 28 that the player can form. If the loop illustrated in the drawing were caused to communicate with the piece designated +3, the score could be still further increased.

Each player creates during play a separate flow chart with the playing pieces which he selects. With regard to scoring, points are earned as the flow chart is constructed to be subsequently scored as the playing piece passes over the previously constructed chart. Thus, scoring depends both upon the players ability to construct a profitable flow chart, as well as the chance aspects of the game, as distinguished from other Parchesi type games in which the flow chart is predetermined.

I wish it to be understood that I do not consider the invention limited to the precise details of structure shown and set forth in this specification, for obvious modifications will occur to those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for playing a game comprising: a first plurality of scoring pieces, each having a quantitative indicia; a plurality of direction-indicating pieces, each having a single direction indicia thereon; a plurality of decision pieces, each having plural indicia thereon, said plural indicia being visually distinguishable and disposed adjacent angularly related sides of the piece, said pieces being selectively assemblable to form a flow chart; a scoring piece selectively movable over such flow chart; and means for randomly selecting one of a plurality of indicia each identical with one of said plural indicia on said decision pieces.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
CH340173A * Title not available
FR1283180A * Title not available
GB694880A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3863926 *Sep 8, 1972Feb 4, 1975Beverly A WhiteGame apparatus
US5607309 *Apr 18, 1994Mar 4, 1997Joiner Associates, Inc.Instructional method and apparatus for teaching data collection and analysis
US6239800 *Dec 15, 1997May 29, 2001International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for leading a user through a software installation procedure via interaction with displayed graphs
US20130084999 *Oct 4, 2012Apr 4, 2013Jason Churchill CostaGame centered on building nontrivial computer programs
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/243, 434/118, 273/153.00R
International ClassificationA63F9/00, G09B19/00, A63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationG09B19/0053, A63F3/0457, A63F9/0076
European ClassificationA63F3/04K, G09B19/00G, A63F9/00K