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Publication numberUS3653668 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateFeb 2, 1970
Priority dateFeb 2, 1970
Publication numberUS 3653668 A, US 3653668A, US-A-3653668, US3653668 A, US3653668A
InventorsSantianni Blaise F
Original AssigneeSantianni Blaise F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3653668 A
Abstract
Indicia on a playing surface represent a geographic area divided into a plurality of similarly shaped units. Correspondingly shaped pieces are provided for each unit having thereon indicia relating said pieces to said area by a place, event or the like having historical, geographical or like interest in a precise manner so that each of said pieces has a predetermined position on said surface. Preferably some of said pieces have geographical indicia thereon which coact with the indicia of adjacent pieces to define geographic boundaries, at least one group of adjoining pieces having portions of a continuous line thereon, said line serving to check the accuracy of the positioning of said last mentioned pieces.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Santianni [54] BOARD GAME APPARATUS Blaise F. Santianni, 807 Glenview St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19111 [22] Filed: Feb. 2, 1970 [21] Appl.No.: 7,563

[72] Inventor:

52 11.5.0... ..273/l35AE,273/135 AB 51 1111.0. ..A63f3/00 581 Field ofSearch ..273/135,137,130,131,134;

France ..273/135 AB Switzerland ..273/l35 AB Primary ExaminerDelbert B. Lowe Attorney-F rank J. Benasutti [57] ABSTRACT Indicia on a playing surface represent a geographic area divided into a plurality of similarly shaped units. Correspondingly shaped pieces are provided for each unit having thereon indicia relating said pieces to said area by a place, event or the like having historical, geographical or like interest in a precise manner so that each of said pieces has a predetermined position on said surface. Preferably some of said pieces have geographical indicia thereon which coact with the indicia of adjacent pieces to define geographic boundaries, at least one group of adjoining pieces having portions ofa continuous line thereon, said line serving to check the accuracy of the positioning of said last mentioned pieces.

11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures BOARD GAME APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the prior art, geographic areas have often been divided into a number of pieces for purposes of making a game, such as a jigsaw puzzle. There is in such games a definite relationship between adjacent parts; determined, normally, by shape.

In games where the parts are similar in shape and are to be placed on a grid playing surface, the parts will, normally, have indicia thereon relating one to another, or lacking this, will have no definite fixed relationship.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION I have invented a game, played most preferably with uniformly shaped pieces, wherein the pieces have indicia thereon relating them to a predetermined precise fixed position on the playing surface by their historical and geographical significance. The playing surface is most preferably a grid of uniform indistinguishable areas bounded by a defined geographic perimeter.

In the preferred embodiment, the perimeters of known subdivisions of the geographic area are represented by indicia on at least some of the pieces. Thus some of the pieces may have cooperating indicia.

Accordingly, an object of my invention is to combine history and geography into a competitive game that is both interesting and educational for most age groups.

This and other objects will become apparent from the following description with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view of a portion of a playing surface showing a grid on a geographical area; and

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a playing piece corresponding in shape to a square on the grid of FIG. 1, enlarged for the sake of clarity.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Although specific forms of the invention have been selected for illustration in the drawings, and the following description is drawn in specific terms for the purpose of describing these forms of the invention, this description is not intended to limit the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

In FIG. 1 I have shown a plan view of a playing surface 10. This surface is preferably on cardboard or the like, but can be on metal, wood, ceramic or any desired material.

On the surface there is indicia of a geographical outline or perimeter. In this embodiment it is the printed outline or partial perimeter 12 of the United States of America. The area roughly defined by this perimeter is divided into a plurality of uniformly shaped indistinguishable units (squares) by the grid designated generally 14. At some places, the squares overlap and obliterate the perimeter.

Other geographical areas could have been used within the scope of this invention. Likewise shapes other than squares could be used. For example, rectangles or circles. Where circles are used, the effect would be to polka-dot the geographic area. Furthermore, various groups of similar shapes could be used, such as 10 rectangles, eight squares, and 90 circles; or large squares, intermediate squares, and small squares in equal numbers. There are, thus, many combinations which could be used, but I shall describe the grouping shown as the preferred embodiment.

The squares 14 are in horizontal rows and are staggered from row to row.

In FIG. 2 I have shown a plan view of the face of a square playing piece. This piece can be made of cardboard, wood, or other desirable material. It could even be a magnet for use on a metallic playing surface. The square playing piece is the exact same size as a single square on the grid in FIG. 1. However, it is enlarged in FIG. 2 for the sake of clarity. A plurality of such playing pieces are provided.

On the face of each playing piece there is indicia of historical interest and significance. In the case of the piece 20in FIG. 2, it is Custers Last Stand. This event in history took place at the Little Big Horn in Montana. There is indicia on the piece identifying this place without giving its location as to state. This place is represented by the circle and dot 22 in FIG. 2.

If the playing piece 20 were properly positioned on the playing surface 10, the Little Big Horn 22 would have to be in its correct geographical location with respect to the United States as represented by the perimeter 12. The proper positioning of the piece 20 and the place 22 is shown in FIG. 1 by the dotted arrows. Thus the historical and geographical indicia on the piece determine its precise fixed position by relation to the indicia on the playing surface.

In the preferred form some of the pieces have additional indicia on them representing portions of the perimeters of subdivisions of the geographic perimeter on the playing surface. For example, on piece 20 there is indicia representing a portion 26 of the perimeter or state boundary between Montana and Wyoming. This boundary would run through a number of squares and thus would appear on adjacent playing pieces (see FIG. 1 wherein the boundaries of Montana and a portion of Wyoming are shown superimposed on the grid for purposes of explanation only). Thus there would be coaction between the indicia of adjacent pieces having parts of the same state boundary lines thereon, in the sense that these pieces would have a geographic relation to one another in addition to their relationship to the indicia on the playing surface.

However, not all pieces will have such additional indicia, as for example, the piece to be placed on the square 30 in FIG. 1.

Additional indicia of perimeters or boundaries are also provided across the faces of pieces to be positioned along certain coastal areas or other national boundaries, such as the boundary between Mexico and the United States.

Additional geographic indicia can be provided on the pieces to make the game simpler for children, such as portions of the Mississippi River, although this is not necessary for the most preferred embodiment of my invention.

METHOD AND PLAY The above described structure can be assembled in accordance with a preferred method. In assembling it, a number of mistakes can be made, particularly in judgement in positioning the pieces, and from this evolves a game.

The method of assembly comprises placing the pieces in their correct position on the playing surface; their correct position being determined by the grid and the relationship of the historical and geographical data contained in the indicia on the pieces to the indicia representing the geographical area on the playing surface.

Since there is only the barest outline of a geographic area, the placing of pieces, particularly of the first dozen or so pieces, will be very difficult and will often be fraught with errors. Thus while the pieces have a very definite and precise fixed position on the playing surface, their initial placement may involve a rather educated guess.

I have invented a game which takes advantage of this method of assembly. First, I attribute a score valve to each of the pieces and mark the pieces with the value. Inland pieces without boundary indicia are rated among the highest values; with those having the least familiar events and places on them being given the highest scores of the group. Likewise, coastal pieces and those with well known historical and geographical indicia are given lower values.

To make the game even more interesting, more pieces can be provided than the total places on the grid. Thus duplicate pieces can be provided or pieces having the same position, but different indicia. For instance, the locations of the Liberty Bell and the signing of the Declaration of Independence are both Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The indicia of each could be on separate pieces.

The game can be played by a number of players selecting at random a number of pieces without being able to tell in advance which pieces they are taking. The players in turn attempt to place one or perhaps two pieces in their correct position on the playing surface. If a player were to place a piece having a representation of, say, the Liberty Bell thereon in its correct position on the playing surface, then one who had an alternate piece for that position would be precluded from using that piece.

In the embodiment shown in the drawings there are one hundred squares on the grid and the game would be played most preferably with more than 100 square playing pieces. The square pieces are stored in a playable pool or covered container.

Each player chooses at random four square playing pieces.

The player choosing the piece with the lowest score value goes first.

In case of ties, the next lowest in the tie starts the game. The play rotates clockwise. The first player places one or two pieces on what he believes to be their proper spaces on the outline map of the USA. and records the appropriate score values. After each play he replaces his pieces by drawing additional pieces from the playable pool.

The second player similarly places one or two squares in position on the outline map and selects new squares from the playable pool.

The placement of any piece (5) may be challenged before the next player starts his turn. In this case the player may withdraw his piece (s) at no penalty except to lose his turn, or he may choose to ignore the challenge. In this event, if, as the game progresses, it is determined that the piece (s) was placed incorrectly the player shall then be penalized three times the score value ofthe piece.

Additional floating" pieces are provided with state names only. These floating pieces may be placed anywhere in the state and the score value recorded.

Since the playable pool contains extra historic sites for some of the squares on the outline map, a player may have no open space for his piece. In this event, he may exchange up to a maximum of two pieces with the playable pool. The unplayable pieces are taken out of the game. He is then allowed an opportunity to try to position the new pieces without losing a turn. if he does not succeed, the player must await his next turn, whereupon the procedure is repeated.

lfat any time a player has pieces having indicia thereon that are unfamiliar to him, he may exchange two pieces, but must await his next turn to place a piece on the playing surface.

The object of the game is to fill all the spaces on the map layout with the proper historic site squares or pieces. The person who has the highest score when the grid is completely covered with properly placed pieces wins.

The determination of who made an incorrect play can be made easier by placing an identification number on the back of each playing piece and marking the number down next to the score on a score sheet under the player's name.

It will be understood that various changes in the details, materials and arrangement of parts which have been herein described and illustrated, in order to explain the nature of this invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A game board with a surface having indicia thereon representing a geographical area and a plurality of intersecting lines forming a grid-like network of similarly shaped abutting units of area within'said geographical area; and pieces each of the same shape as and no larger than the corresponding one of said units for placement on said units, said pieces having indicia thereon relating said pieces to said geographical area in a precise manner, such that each of said pieces has a predetermined position on a unit of said surface; at least one group of adjoining pieces having different portions of a continuous line thereon relating one to the other in a precise predetermined manner, whereby correct positioningof said pieces can be confirmed by noting whether the line 15 contmuous when the pieces have been positioned on the surface.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein the indicia representing the geographical area comprises at least a portion of a perimeter of said area.

3. The invention of claim 1 wherein said units are of a uniform size.

4. The invention of claim 1 wherein said units are of a uniform shape.

5. The invention of claim 1 wherein the indicia on at least some of said pieces designate historical events.

6. The invention of claim 1 wherein the indicia on at least some of said pieces designate places.

7. The invention of claim 1 wherein the indicia on at least some of said pieces represent portions of geographic boundaries.

8. The invention of claim 1 wherein the indicia on said surface also represents additional similarly shaped units of area which are not entirely within said geographical area.

9. The invention of claim 8 wherein the boundaries are those of subdivisions of the geographic area represented on said surface.

10. The invention of claim 1 wherein said board and said pieces are made of different materials magnetically attracted to one another.

11. The invention of claim 8 wherein the indicia on at least some of said pieces represent portions of the boundaries of said geographical area.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1605703 *Feb 18, 1925Nov 2, 1926Brown StewartChecker game
CH341421A * Title not available
FR921870A * Title not available
FR1319461A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4023807 *Mar 1, 1976May 17, 1977Santianni Blaise FElectric game set
US5009430 *Sep 10, 1990Apr 23, 1991Yuhasz Donald EMethod of playing a geographical map game
US6702586Dec 6, 2002Mar 9, 2004Sharmac Designs LlcTeaching puzzle
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/239, 273/236
International ClassificationA63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/04
European ClassificationA63F3/04