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Publication numberUS3653860 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateMay 25, 1970
Priority dateMay 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3653860 A, US 3653860A, US-A-3653860, US3653860 A, US3653860A
InventorsRoy E Smith, John W Dunn
Original AssigneeOwens Corning Fiberglass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for processing a plurality of strand-like materials
US 3653860 A
Abstract
Apparatus for processing a plurality of strands including means for supplying a group of side-by-side strands along given paths and a member having side-by-side extensions projecting in nonintersecting relationship with the group of strands where the extremities of the extensions have guide surfaces oriented in a direction oblique to the axes of the extensions and facing generally toward the group. The apparatus further including means for moving the member to engage and move the strands over the guide surfaces and into the spaces between the extensions.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I United States Patent [151 3,653,860

Smith et al. Apr. 4, 1972 541 APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING A 3,361,375 1/1968 Klink et al. "242/42 PLlURALITY OF STRAND-LIKE 3,506,420 4/1970 Jackson et al ..65/ll W X T MA ERIALS Primary Examiner-S. Leon Bashore [72] inventors: Roy E. Smith, Toledo; John W. Dunn, Syl- A i ta t E i -Robe t L, Lindsay, Jr.

vania, both of Ohio Attorney-Staelin & Overman and Ronald C. Hudgens [73] Assignee: Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: May 1970 Apparatus for processing a plurality of strands including [21] Appl. No.: 40,027 means for supplying a group of side-by-side strands alon 8 given paths and a member having side-by-side extensions projecting in nonintersecting relationship with the group of "65/11 252: strands where the extremities of the extensions have guide sur. 58] i 65/2 H w faces oriented in a direction oblique to the axes of the extensions and facing generally toward the group. The apparatus further including means for moving the member to engage and [56] References Cited move the strands over the guide surfaces and into the spaces UNITED STATES PATENTS between the extensions.

2,623,701 12/1952 Nuttle ..242/42 10 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures Patented April 4., 1972 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS 5M/7H 6 JOHN M fluA/A/ wydtm Patented A ril 4, 1972 3,653,860

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS For i 5M/7H & Jay/v M flu/v/v APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING A PLURALITY OJF STRAND-LIKE MATERIALS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It has been the practice to protect glass filaments in continuous glass filament forming operations by applying a sizing liquid or other protective liquid to individual glass filaments prior to combining them into a strand bundle or bundles for collection into a wound package of wet glass strand. While this practice of wet processing glass filaments in glass filament forming operations causes long subsequent drying steps, the very nature of glass filaments demands application of a protective liquid before combining them into a stand bundle. Unprotected glass filaments tend to abrade each other upon contact. Consequently, processes of forming continuous glass filaments must form a protective coating on the glass filaments before combining them into a strand.

Subsequent drying of wet wound strand packages is a long process that causes migration of solids in the sizing or coating in strand packages as liquid moves for evaporation at the periphery of packages. Such movement of the solids tends to concentrate these solids in the strand portions located near the periphery of the package. Because strands from these packages possess varying amounts of solids along their length, strand properties are not uniform along their length; accordingly, such strands are not wholly satisfactory.

Upon drying, wound packages of glass strand are ready for additional processing. The type of processing depends upon the end use of the strand, which is generally determined by such things as the size of the filament diameter and the number of filaments in a bundle. Glass strands suitable for textile application may pass through a twisting and plying operation. Glass strands suitable for use as a reinforcement for material such as plastics may be made into roving; subsequently, the roving may be chopped into short lengths. Each of these processes is an operation occurring after package drying. Each of the strand processing operations is time consuming and expensive. For example, in roving a number of creels hold the packages of dry strand and winding apparatus combines the strands and winds the combined strands into a wound package, i.e., a roving ball. Because the cohesive force of the sizing adheres the individual filaments of a strand together, the filaments in the strands are somewhat held together. Accordingly, glass roving is a bundle of strands that are made up of glass filaments held together by sizing applied to the glass in the glass filament forming operation.

As one can appreciate, conventional processing including drying operations is slow and cumbersome. Even with these drawbacks the strand product manufactured by prior methods is less than wholly satisfactory because migration of solids within a drying strand package provides a strand product that does not have a uniform amount of sizing solids along its length. Then too, when wet strand collected into a package is subsequently dried, the cohesive force of the sizing tends to cohere adjacent strands together to cause strand breaks during subsequent processing.

Further, it has been necessary to have operators thread strands by hand into the slots of strand traversing devices employed on winding machines such as the winders used in glass filament forming operations. The slow hand threading process is not compatible with the high speed winding machines employing the traverse devices.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is improved apparatus for and method of processing filamentary strand-like units.

Another object of the invention is apparatus for and method of advancing towards a collection zone separated wet strands thathave a tendency to effect a coherence between themselves upon contact with each other and subjecting them to conditions promoting drying of the strands to a noncoherent condition before accumulating them at the collection zone.

Another object of the invention is apparatus for and method of advancing towards a collection zone separated wet strands that have a tendency to effect a coherence between themselves upon contact with each other and subjecting them to conditions promoting drying of the strands to a noncoherent condition before gathering the strands together.

Another object of the invention is apparatus and method of collecting dry glass strand as a wound package in a glass fiber forming operation.

Still another object of the invention is to collect a dry glass roving product as a wound package in a glass fiber forming operation.

Still another object of the invention is to process glass strand into a roving product by advancing separated wet glass strands into a drying zone and totally drying the glass strands prior to combining them.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the invention is described hereinafter in more detail with reference made to the accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevation view of apparatus operating according to the principles of the invention for forming and processing continuous glass filaments into a roving product collected as a package on a winder;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the microwave drying unit shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view in section of the microwave drying unit shown in FIGS. 1-3;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of another microwave drying unit suitable for use with the apparatus shown in FIGS. 1 and FIG. 6 is another side elevation view of the microwave drying unit shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a somewhat diagrammatic front elevation of chopping apparatus severing the glass roving product into short lengths. One may use the apparatus at a glass filament forming operation or locate the apparatus as a separate processing operation.

FIG. 8 is a side elevation view of modified apparatus operating according to the principles of the invention forming continuous glass filaments into individual glass strands and collecting these glass strands dry into a wound package on a winder;

FIG. 9 is a front elevation view of the drying and winding apparatus shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a comb-like strand traversing member for a plurality of strands used with the apparatus shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 where the strand traverse member is out of engagement with separated strands advancing to the winder;

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the strand traversing member shown in FIG. 10 where the strands are held in divided relation between the projections of the member;

FIG. 12 is a somewhat diagrammatic front elevation view showing the wound package formed using the apparatus of FIGS. 8 and 9 to supply glass strand to several bobbins in a twisting operation.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS While the apparatus and method of the invention are particularly valuable in processes of forming filaments from heat softened fiber forming mineral material such as molten glass where apparatus attenuates individual molten glass streams into glass filaments, combines individual glass filaments into a strand bundle and collects the strand as a wound package, one may use the apparatus and method to process other types of linear units such as monofilaments and multifilament linear strand-like units of other fiber forming materials, e.g., nylons, polyesters and the like. Accordingly, the use of glass strands and glass strand bundles in a glass filament forming operation is only an example to explain the operation of the invention; the invention has utility in other textile operations including rocessing other multifilament linear strand-like units such as yarns, cords and the like.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show apparatus for producing a glass roving product in a glass filament forming operation. The apparatus processes continuous glass filaments from molten glass streams and combines the continuous glass filaments wet with sizing liquid into a selected number of filament bundles or strands prior to combining the strands into a strand bundle. Because the sizing on the strands tends to effect a coherence between the wet strands upon contact with each other and tends to increase such coherence as the strands dry, the apparatus of the invention subjects the separated advancing glass strands to conditions promoting drying to a noncoherent state before gathering the strands together into a bundle of strands or roving for collection by a winder. As illustrated a container holds a supply of molten glass. The container 10 may connect to a forehearth that supplies molten glass from a furnace or may connect to a means for supplying glass such as glass marbles that a melter or other means associated with the container 10 reduces to a molten condition. At the ends of the container 10 are terminals 12 that connect to a source of electrical energy to supply heat by conventional resistance heating to the molten glass held in the container 10 to maintain such molten glass at proper fiber forming temperatures and viscosities. The container 10 has a bottom 14 with a plurality of orifices or passageways for delivering streams 16 of molten glass from the container 10. As shown, the openings comprise a plurality of depending orificed projections or tubular members 18.

The molten glass stream 16 are attenuated into individual continuous glass filaments 20 that are combined into a selected number of bundles or strands 22 by a comb-like gather shoe 23 located below the container 10. As shown the gathering shoe 23 combines the filaments 20 into four strands 22 and includes a base support 24 and fingers 25 that project from the support 24. In forming each of the bundles of filaments or strands 22, a selected number of filaments 20 advance along converging paths to merge and to turn on the lengthwise surface of one of the fingers 25. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 the strands 22 advance from the fingers 25 along converging paths extending generally from 10 to 30 from the vertical.

While the filaments 20 may be protected only by application of water to them, it is desirable in most instances to apply a conventional sizing liquid or other coating liquid to the filaments 20. The arrangement shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 locates nozzle 26 and 27 near the bottom 14. The nozzles spray water onto the newly formed filaments 20 before the gathering shoe 23 combines the filaments 20 into the individual strands 22.

An applicator 28 supported within a housing 30 just above the comb-like gathering unit 23 applies a sizing liquid or other coating liquid to the advancing individual filaments 20. The applicator 28 may be any suitable means known to the art such as an endless belt that moves to pass through sizing liquid or other coating liquid held in the housing 30. As the individual filaments 20 advance to pass across the surface of the applicator 28, some of the liquid on the applicator transfers to them. Consequently the filaments 20 advancing to the shoe 23 are wet and have a tendency to effect a coherence between themselves upon contact. The tendency to effect such coherence increases as the filaments dry.

While the arrangement normally applies a sizing liquid to the filaments 20, it is possible to apply special liquid coating compositions to the advancing filaments. For example, one could apply an aqueous dispersion of a resorcinol formaldehyde resin.

After the shoe 23 combines the wet filaments 20 into the individual strands 22, the arrangement of FIGS. 1 and 2 subjects the advancing separated wet glass strands 22 to conditions promoting drying of the strands to a noncoherent condition prior to gathering them into a strand bundle for collection on a winder 40. Normally, a drying means completely dries the strands 22 before the apparatus combines the strands 22 into a bundle of strands. As shown, the wet and separated glass strands 22 advance to a strand drying unit that may be a high frequency drying means such as a microwave unit 42 operating to dry the strands 22 before the apparatus gathers them into a bundle of dry strands or roving 44. As more clearly seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, the unit 42 gathers the strands 22 at its exit outlet into a continuous linear bundle 44 of completely dry strands 22 for accumulation on the winder 40. The unit 42 receives its microwave energy from a microwave generator such as a magnetron 45 through a wave guide 46.

The strand bundle or roving 44 of dry strands 22 collects as a wound package 47 on the winding machine 40, which normally advances the strands 22 (strand bundle 44) at a linear speed of from 5,000 to 15,000 feet-per-minute. A traversing member 48 mounted for reciprocating motion on a support 50 of the winder 40 moves the advancing bundle 44 back and forth lengthwise of the package 47 as the bundle 44 winds on a collector such as a tube 52 telescoped over a spindle or collet 54 that is driven in rotation on the winder. Because each strand 22 winds on the package 47 as part of a common bundle 44, the length of each of the strands of the strand bundle 44 in the package 47 tend to be generally equal.

The support 50 is an assembly that provides substantially infinite adjustment for the traverse 48 and that includes a rearward unit 56, a forward unit 58 and a cam housing 60. Each of the units 56 and 58 moves about a separate axis spaced from the collet 54 and package 47.

The rearward unit 56 pivotally mounts on a support tube 62 extending from within the winder 40. Reference letter A in FIG. 2 indicates the axis about which the rearward unit 56 moves for proper positioning. The forward unit 58 mounts on the forward portion of the rearward unit 56 and moves about an axis indicated by the reference letter B" in FIG. 2. The axes A and B are in spaced relation and extend in parallel directions lengthwise of the collet 54.

The cam housing 60 is on the forward portion of the forward unit 58 and extends in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of rotation of the collet or spindle 54. The traverse 48 slideably mounts on the cam housing 60. A motor and drive arrangement within the winder 40 and support 50 reciprocates the traverse 48 lengthwise of the collecting package 47.

The traversing arrangement of the winder 40 moves the advancing bundle 44 back and forth lengthwise of the collecting tube 52 to distribute the advancing bundle 44 as the winder 40 builds the package 47. The motion given to the linear group 44 by the traversing arrangement is lateral of the bundles direction of travel to the package 47 and is a combination of movement provided to the bundle 44 by both rapidly reciprocating the traverse 48 and more slowly reciprocating the support 50. As shown, the winder 40 reciprocates the support 50 by moving the support tube 62 back and forth along the axis A".

The winder 40 is an example of collection means useful in packaging the roving 44. It may be advantageous to use a winder such as disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,367,587, such winder forming a cylindrical wound package. Moreover, one may use other collection means for accumulating the roving 44.

FIG. 3 and 4 show enlarged views of the microwave unit 42. As shown, the unit 42 is a tubular housing 70 that is made of electrically conductive material and that is closed at both ends to provide a cylindrical resonant cavity 72 excited by the magnetron 45 through the wave guide 46. The tubular housing 70 has a closed entrance end 78 with a strand entrance slot 80 of sufficient size to admit the wet and spaced apart strands 22, which are advancing along converging paths, into the resonant cavity 72. At the closed exit end 82 of the tubular housing 70 is a strand exit slot 84 smaller than the opening 80. The closed end 85 of the exit slot 84 gathers the dried strands 22 into the larger strand bundle 44. The housing 70 has a strand lacing slot 86 communicating with the slots 80 and 84 and the resonant cavity 72. The slot 86 extends axially in the side wall of the tubular housing 70 and partially across the ends 78 and 82 in alignment with the slots 80 and 84. The width of the lacing slot is shown to be the same width as the entrance slot 80 and exit slot 84. An operator can swiftly position the strands 22 for travel through the unit 42 by introducing the strands into the slots 80 and 84 through the lacing slot 86.

The position of the closed end 85 of the exit slot 84 presents a surface that pushes strands 22 closer to the surface into the strands further away from the surface. As shown, the closed end 85 is on the longitudinal axis of the housing 70. Such a position locates the advancing converging strands more centrally in the resonant cavity in addition to gathering the strands.

Because the strands 22 travel over the surface of the closed end 85 of the exit slot 84, the microwave unit 42 uses an insert 88 to assist in defining the surface of the exit opening 84. This arrangement is more clearly seen in FIG. 4. The insert provides the exit opening 84 with a smooth rounded surface that does not abrade the glass filaments traveling across it. Because portions 90 in the end 82 conform to the body of the insert 88, only the rounded surface of the insert 88 defining the narrowest portion of the exit slot 84 exposes itself to the resonant cavity. Accordingly, the material of the exit end 82 effectively shields the cavity 72 from the material of the insert 88.

As FIG. 4 shows, an insert 92 generally defines the entrance slot 80 with a rounded surface. Like the exit opening 84, portions 94 of the end 78 conform to the insert 92 to shield the resonant cavity from the material of the insert 92.

While the inserts 88 and 92 are normally made of nonelectrically conducting material compatible with glass such as micarta or a suitable ceramic, it is possible to use electrically conducting material, e.g., brass and graphite.

While it is possible to use microwave drying units operating in higher modes, the microwave arrangement of FIGS. 1-4 normally operates the cylindrical resonant cavity 72 in its fundamental mode to couple microwave energy into the liquid on the strands 22. More specifically, the apparatus operates in the TM mode where the electric field components or lines extend in a direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of the resonant cavity and where the electrical field increases from substantially zero along the internal wall surface of the tubular housing 70 to a maximum along the longitudinal axis of the cavity 72. The increase in electrical field intensity is a curved line function providing a substantially higher electrical field intensity in the central region of the cavity 72 than the outer regions of the cavity; the transverse electrical field intensity profile is uniform throughout the length of the cavity 72. According to field orientation in the TM mode in a cylindrical resonant cavity, the magnetic field orients itself transverse of the cavity 72. Magnetic field components or lines extend circumferentially about the cavity's longitudinal axis. The magnetic field lines, in any one transverse plane, are arranged in concentric circles that are centered on the longitudinal axis of the cavity 72. The intensity of the magnetic field increases from substantially zero at the longitudinal axis of the cavity to a maximum at the interior wall surface of the tubular housing 70.

When using most sizing liquids and other coatings, it is useful to operate the microwave heating unit 42 generally in a range of from 2.400 to 5,000 megacycles to remove liquid from traveling strands advancing at a linear strand speed of from 5,000 to l5,000 feet-per-minute. One can vary frequencies and speeds as necessary under differing conditions and different coatings.

A suitable arrangement supplies air to the resonant cavity 7 2. As shown, a source of air under appropriate pressure connects at one end to a tube 96, the other end of the tube 86 communicates with the resonant cavity 72. The air purges the resonant cavity 72 to insure that the cavity does not become saturated with moisture; moreover, because power dissipated in the unit 42 generates heat in the walls of the tubular housing 70, the moving air cools the interior surfaces of the tubular housing 70. It may be useful at times to supply air to the resonant cavity 72 through the wave guide 47 together with the microwave energy.

While the microwave arrangement of FIGS. l-4 uses a wave guide 46 to couple microwave energy from the magnetron 45 to the resonant cavity 72, one can use other means to transmit the microwave energy from the magnetron 45 to the unit 42. For example, one can employ a co-axial cable with a loop coupling arrangement.

In usual operation the microwave unit 42 completely dries the strands 22 prior to gathering them into the strand bundle 44. In the arrangement shown the wet strands 22 advance along converging paths into the tubular housing 70 through the strand entrance opening 80. The side-by-side strands 22 advance lengthwise through the tubular housing 70 in the higher intensity electrical field zone located centrally in the region around the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical resonant cavity 72. The energy in the electrical field heats the liquid on the advancing strands to vaporize it as the strands move toward the exit opening 84. The completely dry strands 22 come together as the strand bundle 44 at the exit opening 34.

Because the wet strands 22 have a liquid sizing or other coating liquid on them, the filaments 20 of the dried strands I 22 are joined or adhered together by the solids of the sizing or coating. Consequently while the winder 40 collects a single strand bundle 44, the strands 22 of the bundle 44 are not joined together.

Although it is normally desirable to completely dry the strands 22 prior to combining them into a bundle 44, it is only necessary to dry the strands 22 to a noncohesive condition with each other. Strands wet with water even have a tendency to effect a coherence or cohesiveness between themselves on contact. Accordingly, the strands 22 must be dried to a noncoherent condition prior to gathering them together.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a modified strand drying and gathering arrangement using a microwave unit 142 having a cylindrical resonant cavity 172 excited by a magnetron through a wave guide 146. The wet strands 22 advance through the drying unit 142 along converging paths focusing on a point beyond (below as seen in FIGS. 5 and 6) the exit opening of the unit 142. As shown, a pigtail 188 spaced from the exit opening of the drying unit 142 gathers the strands 22 into the strand bundle 44. As in the case of the unit 42, a tube 186 supplies air under pressure to the resonant cavity 172.

As in the case of the microwave unit 42, unit 142 can employ a coaxial arrangement in place of the wave guide arrangement shown.

While the embodiments of the invention shown in FIGS. 1-6 use a microwave arrangement for drying strands, one can use other means for drying. For example, one may use other high frequency heating means such as arrangements employing infrared and dielectric energies. It is possible to use other heating means including thermal ovens, even where such ovens employ open flame. Electromagnetic wave energy in the microwave range is usually preferred in most cases.

The linear strand bundle 44 of dried strands 22 is especially useful in processes employing short lengths of glass strands such as processes for manufacturing glass fiber reinforced plastics. FIG. 7 illustrates a chopper arrangement for severing the bundle 44 into short lengths. As shown, the chopper arrangement includes cooperating cutter roll 192 with blades 194 and a cot roll 196 having an outer surface 197 of resilient material such as a polyurethane composition. Suitable means drive the rolls 192 and 196 in rotation. The chopping arrangement cooperates to advance the linear bundle 44 into a cutting zone between the rolls 192 and 196. As shown, the apparatus advances the strand bundle 44 between the cot roll 196 and a first roll 198 in contact with the cot roll. Because the strand bundle 44 is dry or substantially dry, it is useful to use a second roll such as tuck roll 199 spaced from the first roll 198 towards the cutting zone. The tuck roll 199 cooperates to keep the strand bundle 44 against the resilient surface 197 of the cot roll 196. The blades I94 engage the advancing strand bundle 44 against the resilient surface 197 to sever the strand bundle 44 into short lengths. Because the strands 22 are noncoherent with respect to each other, they are individual within the strand bundle 44; consequently, the severed lengths of the strand bundle 44 separate themselves into short lengths 200 of strands 22 as they fall onto a moving surface 201. One may use the cutter arrangement in other processes, which may include advancing the short lengths from the rolls directly into a body of liquid plastic for mixing and subsequent processing into glass filament reinforced plastic articles.

One may either locate the chopping arrangement in a glass fiber forming operation or in a separate operation accomplished after collection of the strand bundle 44 into the wound package 47. If one uses the chopping arrangement in a glass fiber forming operation, it may be useful to use the arrangement in place of the winder 40. Accordingly, such a modification to the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2 would produce short lengths of glass strand rather than forming a wound package 47. Altemately, the wound package 47 would supply the linear strand bundle 44 to the chopping arrangement in a separate and subsequent operation.

FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate another process of forming continuous glass filaments from molten glass that combines the continuous glass filaments wet with sizing liquid into a selected number of filament bundles or strands and dries the strands in separated relation prior to collecting them into a wound package. Unlike the apparatus shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 that gathers the strands 22, the apparatus of FIGS. 8 and 9 keeps the dried strands separated. As illustrated, a container 210 holds a supply of molten glass. The container 210 may con nect to a forehearth that supplies molten glass from a furnace or may connect to a means for supplying glass such as glass marbles that a melter or other means associated with the container 210 reduces to a molten condition. At the ends of the container 210 are terminals 212 that connect to a source of electrical energy to supply heat by conventional resistance heating to the glass held in the container 210 to maintain such molten glass at proper fiber forming temperatures and viscosities. The container 210 has a bottom 214 with a plurality of orifices or passageways for delivering streams 216 of molten glass from the container 210. As shown, the openings comprise a plurality of depending orificed projections or tubular members 218.

The molten streams 216 are attenuated into individual continuous glass filaments 220 that are combined into a selected number of bundles or strands 222 by a comb-like gathering shoe 223 located below the container 210. Like the gathering shoe 23, the gathering shoe 223 combines the continuous glass filaments 220 into four strands 222 and includes a base support 224 and fingers 225. In forming each of the bundles of filaments or strands 222 a selected number of filaments 220 advance along converging paths to merge and to turn on the lengthwise surface of one of the fingers 225. The strands 222 as shown advance from the fingers 225 along somewhat converging paths generally from 10 to 30 from the vertical.

While the filaments 220 may be protected only by application of water to them, it is desirable in most instances, as in the case of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, to apply a conventional sizing liquid or other coating liquid to the filaments 220. The arrangement shown in FIG. 7 locates nozzles 226 and 227 near the bottom 214 to spray water onto the newly formed filaments 220 prior to combining them into the strands 222.

An applicator 228 supported within a housing 230 just about the comb-like gathering shoe 224 applies a sizing liquid or other coating liquid to the advancing individual filaments 220. The applicator 228 may be any suitable means known to the art such as an endless belt that moves to pass through the sizing liquid or other coating liquid held in the housing 230. As the individual filaments 220 advance across the surface of the applicator 228, some of the liquid on the applicator transfers to them.

The arrangement of FIGS. 8 and 9 normally operates to completely dry the individual strands 222 prior to collecting them on a winder 240 as a wound package 247. As shown, the apparatus advances the wet strands 222 in side-by-side separated relation through a high frequency driving means such as microwave unit 242 to dry them. The apparatus keeps the dried strands 222 in side-by-side separated relation as the strands advance to form the wound package 247 on the winder 240. Because the strands 222 advance through the drying unit 242 in spaced apart relationship, the unit 242 dries the strands 222 individually. As shown, the unit 242 receives its microwave energy from a microwave generator such as a magnetron 245 through a wave guide 246.

The side-by-side strands 222 collect as a wound package 247 on the winder 240, which normally advances the strands at a linear strand speed of from 5,000 to 15,000 feet-perminute. A traversing member 248 mounted on a support 250 on the winder 240 engages the advancing strands 222 to move them back and forth lengthwise of the package 247 in separated side-by-side relationship as the strands wind on a collector such as a tube 252 telescoped over a spindle or collect 254 that is driven in rotation on the winder 240. The support 250 is like the support 50 shown in the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2. As in the case of the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2, the traversing member 248 slideably mounts in a slot 259 of a cam housing 260 forming a part of the support arrangement 250. The traversing member 248 connects in the housing 260 to a cam 261 that reciprocates it lengthwise of the collet 254.

The traverse 248 is a comb-like member with varying length projecting extensions or side-by-side fingers 262 forming slots 264 of different depths. The fingers 262 extend in nonintersecting relationship with the strands 222 and terminate at their free end extremities (at the open end of the slots 264) with guide surfaces oriented in a direction oblique to the axes of projection of the fingers 262. Each of the guide surfaces has a base side b" and a termination or end side I. Guide surfaces 266 engage the strands to force them into the slots 264. As shown, the guide surfaces 266 terminate in a plane 266a oriented at an angle 0 with the dashed line 268, which is parallel to the axis of rotation of the collector. Angle 0 is normally from 15 to 50.

Capture of strands in the slots 264 between the fingers 262 occurs through cooperation between strand and traversing member orientation and through design of the member-248. As indicated in FIGS. 10 and 11 the location of the apparatus of FIGS. 8 and 9 arranges the strands 222 to advance as a group in spaced apart side-by-side relation along given paths toward the collet 254 before the member 248 engages them. While it is not necessary to orient the non-traversing strands in a plane, planar orientation is normally used where the planar orientation is disposed in a nonparallel relationship with the axis of rotation of the collet 254. Accordingly, before the member 248 engages the strands 222, the strands 222 advance along given paths having separated points of tangency at the collector angularly spaced around the axis of rotation of the collector (tube 252 on the collet 254). FIG. 10 shows the strands 222 laterally of the traverse 248 in a first or nontraversing strand plane that is perpendicular or substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the collet 254 and essentially parallel to the slots 264 during times the strands 222 are out of engagement with the member 248. The cam 261 moves the member 248 laterally of the fingers 262 through the strand paths to engage and move the strands over the guide surfaces 266 to divide the strands between the fingers 262.

Because the fingers 262 extend to locate the guide surfaces 266 with their end sides t" no further than the base side b of the adjacent finger guide surface located away from the strands (i.e., the direction away from movement of the traverse 248 to the strands 222), the strands freely move into engagement with the guide surfaces. Further, the terminating relationship between the fingers ensures confining surfaces holding the strands 222 between the fingers 262 during traversing movement of the member 248.

As the member 248 moves into contact with the strand 222 along paths indicated by the dashed lines in FIG. 10, the guide surfaces 266 individually engage the strands 222. As the guide surfaces 266 move through the strand paths, the strands 222 move over the guide surfaces 266 toward the end sides I. The surfaces 266 push or deflect the strand paths and accordingly, increase tension in the strands. As each strand 222 moves over an end side 2, the force of increased tension along the strands moves the strands into the slots 264. Each of the strands thus becomes captured in a slot 264; thereafter the laterally moving member 248 reciprocates the captured strands 222 with it lengthwise of the collet 254.

While FIGS. 10 and 11 indicate guide surfaces 266 in their preferred form as flat, it is possible to use curved guide surfaces, e.g., convex or concave.

As indicated in FIG. 10, the fingers 262 orient the captured strands 222 in a plane extending in a direction oblique to the axes of projection of the fingers 262. As the strands 222 travel from the traverse 248 to enter the winding package 247, the strand orientation vis-a-vis the winding package changes. The strands enter the package in spaced apart relation in a plane following the surface of the package 247.

The length of the slots 264 extend in a direction away from the collector 252 for a distance greater than the movement of the strands 222 along the length of the slots during buildup of the package 247. Thus, the slots 264 are long enough to keep the strands 222 advancing to the collector therethrough from contacting their closed ends.

The strand drying unit 242 is like the unit 42 shown in FIGS. 1 through 6. As illustrated, the unit 242 provides a cylindrical resonant cavity 272 that receives its microwave energy from the magnetron 245 through the wave guide 246.

While it is possible to use higher modes in the operation of the microwave unit 242, the strand drying apparatus shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 normally operates the cylindrical resonant cavity 272 in its fundamental mode, TM as explained in relation to the microwave unit 42.

A suitable arrangement supplies air to the resonant cavity 272. In FIGS. 8 and 9 a source of air under pressure connects with one end of a tube 286; the other end of tube 286 communicates with the resonant cavity 272. The air purges the cavity 272 as does the air passing through the cavity of the strand drying unit 42.

In usual operation the microwave unit 242 completely dries the strands 222 prior to their engagement with the traverse 248. The strands 222 advance lengthwise in the strand drying unit 242 through the high intensity electrical field located centrally in the region around the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical resonant cavity 272. The energy in the electric field heats the liquid on the strands to vaporize the liquid. The dry strands advance to the traversing member 248. Because the wet strands 222 have a liquid sizing or other coating liquid on them, the filaments 220 of the dried strands 222 are joined or adhered together by the solids of the sizing.

Although it is normally desirable to completely dry the strands 222 prior to their entry onto the package 247, it is only necessary to dry the strands 222 to a noncohesive condition with respect to each other.

Like the strand drying arrangement of FIGS. 1-6, one can use other means for drying the strands. For example, one can use other high frequency heating means such as those using infrared and dielectric arrangements. Moreover, it is possible to use other heating means such as thermal ovens, even ovens employing open flame. Electromagnetic wave energy in the microwave range is usually preferred.

Because the traverse 248 maintains the advancing strands 222 in separated relationship, the dry strands 222 tend to keep their individual and separated relationship throughout the package 247, even at the ends of the package.

While the apparatus shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 can operate with other strand traversing members functioning to reciprocate the advancing strands 222 together in separated relationship, the member 248 is especially useful because of its automatic capture of a plurality of strands. The member can be used with apparatus other than the apparatus of FIGS. 8 and 9. Moreover, one can use strand traversing members like the member 248 in glass filament forming operations collecting wet glass strand into wound packages.

FIG. 8 shows the individual strands 222 from the package 247 supplying a number of bobbins 290 on a twist frame. A suitable means drives the package 247 in rotation to provide strands to the bobbins 290. Each of the strands 222 passes through a pigtail guide 292 to a traveler 294 on a ring rail 296 and thence onto a bobbin 290.

In both the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2 and 8 and 9 it is possible to use drying means in tandem. In the arrangement of Figures 1 and 2 strands would travel through multiple drying means prior to combining them into a strand bundle, i.e., roving 44. In such an arrangement one can apply more than one type of coating liquid to all of the advancing strands or multiple applications of the same coating liquid. Such drying means can be high frequency drying means using the same or different frequencies. One might also use drying combinations such as a unit employing microwave energy with a unit using dielectric energy.

In the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2 and 8 and 9 it is possible to reciprocate the collet of the winders and keep the traversing members stationary. Moreover, the drying units can be moved in conjunction with their traversing members to keep substantially fixed the length of the linear bundle (s) traveling from the outlet of drying units to the packages.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for handling a plurality of strands being wound into a package comprising:

means for supplying a group of side-by-side strands;

a rotatably mounted collector upon which the group of strands are advanced to be wound as a package;

means for rotating the collector;

a strand traversing member having side-by-side spaced apart extensions projecting in a direction generally towards the collector, the extremities of the extensions having guide surfaces oriented in a direction oblique to the axes of projection of the extensions and facing generally toward the group; and

means for moving the member laterally of the projections to engage and to move the strands individually over separate guide surfaces to divide the strands into the spaces between the extensions and for reciprocating the member laterally of the extensions to distribute the strands onto the package.

2. Apparatus for handling a plurality of strands being wound into a package comprising:

means for supplying a group of side-by-side strands extending along given separated paths;

a rotatably mounted collector upon which the group of strands are collected as a wound package;

means for rotating the collector;

a strand traversing member having spaced apart side-byside projections extending in a direction generally towards the collector, the extremities of the projections having guide surfaces extending from a base guide side to a termination side in a direction oblique to the axes of the projections, the guide surfaces generally facing toward the group;

means for moving the member laterally of the projections toward the group, the projections extending to locate the termination sides of the guide surfaces no further than the base side of the adjacent projection located in a direction away from the movement of the member, the means for moving the member advancing the guide surfaces through the paths of the linear materials to engage and move the strands over the guide surfaces to divide the group between the projections; and

means for reciprocating the member laterally of the extensions to distribute the strands onto the package.

3. Apparatus for producing and packaging glass strand comprising:

means for supplying streams of molten glass for attenuating into continuous glass filaments;

means for gathering the filaments into glass strands;

a rotatable collector for attenuating the molten glass streams and upon which the linear materials wind as a single package;

means for rotating the collector;

means for disposing the strands to advance side-by-side to the collector along predetermined paths extending to points of tangency at the collector angularly separated around the axis of rotation of the collector;

a comb-like strand traverse member adjacent the collector, such member including side-by-side spaced apart teeth extending generally toward the axis of rotation of the collector with the extremities of the teeth having guide surfaces, the guide surfaces extending from a base side to an end side in a direction oblique to the axis of rotation of the collector, the guide surfaces generally facing toward a the strands; and

means for moving the traverse member toward the strands lengthwise of the axis of rotation of the collector, the teeth extending to position the end sides of the guide surfaces no further than the base side of the adjacent tooth located in a direction away from the movement of the traverse member, the means for moving the traverse being positioned to advance the guide surfaces through the paths of the strands to engage and move the strands along the guide surfaces to divide the groups between the teeth, the means for moving the traverse member reciprocating the traverse member lengthwise of the axis of rotation of the collector to distribute the strands on the collector.

4. Apparatus recited in claim 3 where the means for disposing the strands includes means for orienting the strand pathsin a plane.

5. Apparatus in claim 3 where the means for disposing the strands includes means for orienting the strand paths in a plane extending substantially normal to the axis of rotation of the collector.

6. Apparatus recited in claim 3 where the guide surfaces are curved.

7. Apparatus recited in claim 3 where guide surfaces are the same size.

8. Apparatus recited in claim 3 where guide surfaces are oriented at the same oblique angle with the axis of rotation of the collector.

9. Apparatus for producing and packaging strand comprismg:

means for supplying streams of molten glass for attenuating into continuous glass filaments;

means for gathering the filaments into glass strands;

a rotatable collector for attenuating the molten glass streams and upon which the glass strands wind as a single package;

means for rotating the collector;

means for disposing the strands to advance side-by-side to the collector along predetermined paths extending in a plane disposed substantially normal to the axis of rotation of the collector; v

a comb-like strand traverse member adjacent the collector, such member including side-by-side spaced apart teeth extending generally toward the collector in a direction substantially normal to the axis of rotation of the collector, the guide surfaces generally facing toward the strands and extending from a base side to an end side; and

means for moving the traverse member toward the strands lengthwise of the axis of rotation of the collector, the teeth extending to position the guide surfaces with their end sides no further than the base side of the adjacent tooth located in a direction away from the movement of the traverse member, the means for moving the traverse being positioned to advance the guide surfaces through the paths of the strands to engage and move the strands along the guide surfaces to divide the strands between the teeth, the means for movmg the traverse member reciprocating the traverse member lengthwise of the axis of rotation of the collector todistribute the strands on the collector.

10. Apparatus for packaging linear elements comprising:

means for supplying linear elements;

a rotatable collector upon which the linear elements wind as a single package;

means for rotating the collector;

means for disposing the linear elements to advance side-byside to the collector along predetennined paths extending in a plane disposed substantially normal to the axis of rotation of the collector;

a comb-like strand traverse member adjacent the collector, such member including side-by-side spaced apart teeth extending generally toward the collector in a direction substantially normal to the axis of rotation of the collector, the guide surfaces generally facing toward the linear elements and extending from a base side to an end side; and

means for moving the traverse member toward the linear elements lengthwise of the axis of rotation of the collector, the teeth extending to position the guide surfaces with their end sides no further than the base side of the adjacent tooth located in a direction away from the movement of the traverse member, the means for moving the traverse being positioned to advance the guide surfaces through the paths of the linear elements to engage and move the linear elements along the guide surfaces to divide the linear elements between the teeth, the means for moving the traverse member reciprocating the traverse member lengthwise of the axis of rotation of the collector to distribute the linear elements on the collector.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2623701 *Sep 27, 1949Dec 30, 1952Western Electric CoApparatus for winding filaments
US3361375 *Apr 18, 1966Jan 2, 1968Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpMethod and apparatus for packaging strand material
US3506420 *Apr 5, 1967Apr 14, 1970American Air Filter CoMethod and apparatus for making filamentous products
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3998404 *Sep 25, 1975Dec 21, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Transverse mechanism for winding fiber glass
US4013435 *Mar 12, 1975Mar 22, 1977Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationProduction of organic fibers with inorganic cores
US4042360 *Oct 29, 1975Aug 16, 1977Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationProduction of inorganic fibers with inorganic cores
US4130248 *May 20, 1977Dec 19, 1978Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationMethod and apparatus for packaging multistrand roving
US4309202 *Apr 7, 1980Jan 5, 1982Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationSeparating or segregating into linear groups or strands, then winding
US4693429 *Nov 14, 1985Sep 15, 1987Vetrotex Saint GobainDevice and process for simultaneously winding several separate fibers on a rotating support
US4899944 *Dec 15, 1988Feb 13, 1990E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyYarn winding apparatus and process
US4973006 *Jan 22, 1990Nov 27, 1990James Billy RTrap guide process for high speed spinning
US5840370 *May 2, 1996Nov 24, 1998Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.In-line processing of continous glass fibers with thermoset solution epoxy
US5916679 *Aug 3, 1998Jun 29, 1999Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.In-line processing of continuous glass fibers with thermoset solution epoxy
US6185962May 23, 1997Feb 13, 2001Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Method for forming pre-impregnated fibers suitable for processing into a composite article
USB557721 *Mar 12, 1975Mar 23, 1976 Title not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification65/500, 242/472.8, 242/920, 65/539, 65/529
International ClassificationD02G3/18, B65H57/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65H57/006, Y10S242/92, B65H57/16, B65H2701/3122
European ClassificationB65H57/00B, B65H57/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 31, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION, FIBERGLAS TOW
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY AGREEMENT RECORDED NOV. 13, 1986. REEL 4652 FRAMES 351-420;ASSIGNORS:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, A DE. BANKING CORPORATION;WADE, WILLIAM J. (TRUSTEES);REEL/FRAME:004903/0501
Effective date: 19870730
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY AGREEMENT RECORDED NOV. 13, 1986. REEL 4652 FRAMES 351-420;ASSIGNORS:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, A DE. BANKING CORPORATION;WADE, WILLIAM J. (TRUSTEES);REEL/FRAME:4903/501
Nov 13, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J., ONE RODNEY SQUARE NORTH, WILMIN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004652/0351
Effective date: 19861103
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, ONE RODNEY SQUARE NORTH,
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY,DELAWARE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:4652/351
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J.,DELAWARE
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, DELAWARE
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J., DELAWARE