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Publication numberUS3654380 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1972
Filing dateSep 1, 1970
Priority dateSep 1, 1970
Publication numberUS 3654380 A, US 3654380A, US-A-3654380, US3654380 A, US3654380A
InventorsRoss Edgar A, Tatum Odes D
Original AssigneeSouthern Weaving Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Woven cable with oppositely-twisted conductor groups and fluid tubes
US 3654380 A
Abstract
A woven cable including two bundles of twisted insulated wires. The wires in the two bundles are twisted in opposite directions. The bundles are bound together in side-by-side relationship by means of warp and weft threads. Two hollow flexible plastic tubes are bound together with the wire bundles in order to form a cable which carries both electrical signals and fluids for use in fluid-pressure controlled systems. The reverse twisting of the wires in the bundles prevents the cable from curling or becoming distorted into other undesirable shapes.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Tatum et a1.

[54] WDVEN CABLE WITH OPPOSITELY- TWISTED CONDUCTOR GROUPS AND FLUID TUBES [72] Inventors: Odes D. Tatum; Edgar A. Ross, both of Greenville, SC.

Southern Weaving Company, Greenville, S.C.

22] Filed: Sept. 1,1970 [21] Appl.No.: 68,612

[73] Assignee:

[52] US. Cl ..l74/47, 174/27, 174/34, 174/117 F [51] Int.Cl ..lFl6l 11/12, HOlb 7/08, HOlb 11/02 [58] Field ofSearch ..174/l5 C, 27, 32, 34, 47, 72 TR, 174/103, 113 R, 117 R, 117 F, 117 M [5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 297,177 4/1884 Shelbourne ..l74/34 989,532 4/1911 Macduffee.... ..174/47 1,776,903 9/1930 Hart ..l74/l17 M [is] 3,654,380 [451 Apr,4,1972

2,167,098 7/1939 Wells ..l74/103 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 315,227 2/1934 Italy ..174/l17F OTHER PUBLICATIONS Advertising Brochure Entitled F-R-C Computer Woven Ribbon Cables Published by The Zippertubing Co., 6 pages.

Primary Examiner-Laramie E. Askin Attorney-Curtis, Morris & Safford [5 7] ABSTRACT A woven cable including two bundles of twisted insulated wires. The wires in the two bundles are twisted in opposite directions. The bundles are bound together in side-by-side relationship by means of warp and weft threads. Two hollow flexible plastic tubes are bound together with the wire bundles in order to form a cable which carries both electrical signals and fluids for use in fluid-pressure controlled systems. The reverse twisting of the wires in the bundles prevents the cable from curling or becoming distorted into other undesirable shapes.

10 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEUAPR 4 I972 IN VEN TORS:

ODES D. TATUM EDGAR A. ROSS Curtis. Morris& Safford. Attorneys WOVEN CABLE WITH OPPOSITELY-TWISTED CONDUCTOR GROUPS AND FLUID TUBES The present invention relates to electrical cables, and particularly to woven electrical cables.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a highly flexible electrical cable with a relatively large number of conductors. Another object of the invention is to provide such a cable which has a relatively flat configuration and retains that configuration without curling or distortion. A further object is to provide a relatively flat, flexible electrical and fluidic cable for carrying electrical signals and fluids.

The foregoing objects are met, in accordance with the present invention, by the provision of an electrical cable with a plurality of bundles of conductors aligned side-by-side with one another. The conductors in one bundle are twisted in one direction, and the conductors in the other bundle are twisted in the opposite direction. The bundles then are preferably bound together by woven warp and weft threads. The twisting of the bundles in opposite directions prevents the cable from becoming distorted due to the twisting of the wires.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the invention will be described in or apparent from the following description and drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective, cross-sectional view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the woven threads binding together the elements of the cable shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the cable shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a partially schematic cross-sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 1.

The cable shown in FIGS. 1 through 4 includes two bundles 6 and 7 of insulated wires 2 and 3, and a pair of flexible plastic tubes 1. The wires 2 and 3 in the bundles 6 and 7 are twisted together so that the bundles have a substantially cylindrical form. The tubes and the bundles 6 and 7 are aligned parallel to one another with the tubes on the outside edges of the cable.

As is shown most clearly in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, the tubes and bundles are bound together by a weft thread 4 which is wound in a spiral pattern, and three warp threads 5 which are woven in a basket-weave pattern over and under the weft thread segments. One warp thread is located in the space between the bundles 6 and 7, and the other threads are located in the spaces between the bundles and the tube. The warp threads 5 bind and hold the weft thread 4 tightly against the tubes and wire bundles so as to hold them together. The diameters of the tubes and bundles are substantially equal, and the cable is relatively flat.

In accordance with one particularly advantageous feature of the present invention, the direction in which the wires in the bundles 6 and 7 are twisted are opposite to one another. For example, the wires in the bundle 7 are twisted in a clockwise direction, whereas the wires in the bundle 6 are twisted in a counter-clockwise direction. The amount of twist given to each bundle is approximately the same.

An advantage of this arrangement is that a relatively large number of conductors are provided in the two bundles, and yet the cable assembly is relatively flexible in the flat direction; that is, in the vertical direction as shown in FIG. 1. Furthermore, the wires are twisted into bundles so as to form a cable relatively simply and at a relatively low cost. Were it not for the reverse twist given to adjacent bundles 6 and 7, the cable might curl or become distorted. However, the reverse twist prevents such distortion and gives the cable a relatively flat configuration. Additionally, the cable shown in FIG. 1 is relatively inflexible in the horizontal or lateral direction, so that it can be mounted so as to stand up on edge, if desired.

It is believed that the use of the reverse twist principle balances the tortional restorative forces in the two bundles of wires against one another so that there is no net tortional force in the cable to cause curling or distortion. The woven binding structurehelps in balancin the restorative forces.

e bundles 6 and 7 preferably are The wires 2 and 3 in t stranded for greater flexibility. However, they can be solid conductors, if desired. The insulation on the wires can be virtually any insulation desired, such as polyvinylchloride, for example.

The tubes 1 preferably are capable of carrying fluids such as air or liquid for fluidic control systems. The tubes can be made of any suitable plastic material. For example, the tubes can be made of polyvinylchloride with a nylon or steel braid imbedded in the plastic for greater strength to withstand fluid pressures. Thus, the finished cable as shown in FIG. 1 will carry both electrical currents and pressurized fluids for operation of equipment such as numerically-controlled machine tools, automatic window opening systems for automobiles, etc.

The warp and weft threads 5 and 4 preferably are made of synthetic fibers such as nylon or polyester. However, natural fibers also can be used.

The above description of the invention is intended to be illustrative and not limiting. Various changes or modifications in the embodiments described may occur to those skilled in the art and these can be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. A woven electrical cable comprising, in combination, a plurality of groups of conductors, the conductors of each group being covered by electrical insulation and twisted together, said groups being aligned side-by-side with one another, the directions of twisting of adjacent ones of said groups being opposite, and warp and weft threads binding said groups of conductors together.

2. A cable as in claim 1 in which each of said groups is substantially cylindrical and including at least one tube bound together in side-by-side relationship with said groups of conductors.

3. A cable as in claim 1 in which there is one weft thread which is wrapped around said groups of conductors in a spiral pattern, and in which said warp threads pass over and under said weft thread in the spaces between said groups.

4. A woven cable comprising a plurality of bundles of insulated wires, the wires in each bundle being twisted together to give the bundle a substantially cylindrical form, said bundles being aligned parallel to and side-by-side one another, insulating warp and weft threads woven together and binding said bundles together to form a cable, the wires in adjacent bundles being twisted in opposite directions.

5. A woven cable as in claim 4 including at least one elongated tubular member aligned parallel to and bound together with said bundles.

6. A woven cable as in claim 5 including two of said tubular members, one at each edge of said cable, each of said tubular members being fluid-tight.

7. Electrical cable comprising a plurality of bundles of insulated wires, said bundles being aligned side-by-side with one another, the wires in adjacent ones of said bundles being twisted in opposite directions, and a woven network of insulating threads binding said bundles together to form a cable.

8. A cable as in claim 7 including a plurality of flexible, fluid-tight tubes bound together in side-by-side relationship with said bundles.

9. A cable as in claim 8 in which there are two of said bundles and two of said tubes, with the tubes located on opposite sides of said bundles.

10. A cable as in claim 7 in which said threads include a single weft thread wound spirally around said bundles and at least one warp thread woven with said weft thread in a basketweave pattern in the space between said bundles.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US297177 *Apr 22, 1884 shelbourne
US989532 *Dec 6, 1910Apr 11, 1911George A TraverMeans for holding and conveying air-tubes and electric conductors to submarine divers.
US1776903 *Jun 7, 1928Sep 30, 1930Albert HartElectric conductor
US2167098 *Nov 20, 1935Jul 25, 1939Lane Wells CoStrand-carried multiple conductor wire rope
IT315227A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Advertising Brochure Entitled F R C Computer Woven Ribbon Cables Published by The Zippertubing Co., 6 pages.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3984622 *Feb 20, 1976Oct 5, 1976Southern Weaving CompanyMulti-conductor cable harness with woven breakout cover and method of making same
US4080543 *Nov 5, 1974Mar 21, 1978Hitachi, Ltd.Winding assembly of gap winding type electric rotary machines
US4095042 *Sep 7, 1976Jun 13, 1978Southern Weaving CompanyWoven shielded cable
US4385021 *Jul 14, 1981May 24, 1983Mobil Oil CorporationMethod for making air hose bundles for gun arrays
US4473716 *Nov 12, 1981Sep 25, 1984New England Electric Wire CorporationCompacted fine wire cable and method for producing same
US4639054 *Apr 8, 1985Jan 27, 1987Intelligent Storage Inc.Cable terminal connector
US4777326 *May 11, 1987Oct 11, 1988Hewlett-Packard CompanyWoven cable with multiple lossy transmission lines
US4804806 *Jun 15, 1987Feb 14, 1989Woven Electronics CorporationWoven electrical transmission cable for rapid aircraft repair and method
US5421080 *Feb 8, 1993Jun 6, 1995Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMachine and method for making for assembling multiconductors and a support
US6087583 *Oct 28, 1998Jul 11, 2000AlcatelMultiwire parallel conductor
US6268567 *Jan 25, 2000Jul 31, 2001International Business Machines CorporationDual purpose ribbon cable
US6433283May 21, 2001Aug 13, 2002International Business Machines CorporationDual purpose ribbon cable
US7559902Aug 20, 2004Jul 14, 2009Foster-Miller, Inc.Physiological monitoring garment
US8585606Sep 23, 2010Nov 19, 2013QinetiQ North America, Inc.Physiological status monitoring system
EP0457424A1 *Mar 27, 1991Nov 21, 1991Becton Dickinson and CompanyMulticonductor and support and machine and method for making
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/47, 174/34, 174/117.00F, 174/27
International ClassificationH01B7/00, H01B7/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01B7/0072, H01B7/083
European ClassificationH01B7/08D, H01B7/00K
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 27, 1984AS99Other assignments
Free format text: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., 129 WEST TRADE ST., CHARLOTTE, NC 28230 * WOVEN ELECTRONICSCORPORATION : 19840710 OTHER CASES: NONE; ASIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST SUBJECT TO LICENSE RECITED
Sep 27, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., 129 WEST T
Free format text: ASIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST SUBJECT TO LICENSE RECITED;ASSIGNOR:WOVEN ELECTRONICS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004305/0596
Effective date: 19840710
Feb 25, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC.; ATLANTA, GA. A
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WOVEN ELECTRONICS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004113/0816
Effective date: 19820827
Owner name: WOVEN ELECTRONICS CORPORATION, EVANS ST., CITY VIE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. EFFECTIVE AUG. 27, 1982.;ASSIGNOR:SW INVESTMENT CORPORATION A SC CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004101/0294
Effective date: 19821129
Feb 25, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: SW INVESTMENT CORPORATION A SC CORP.
Effective date: 19821129
Owner name: WOVEN ELECTRONICS CORPORATION, EVANS ST., CITY VIE