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Publication numberUS3654647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1972
Filing dateFeb 13, 1970
Priority dateFeb 13, 1970
Also published asDE2044757A1, DE7033648U
Publication numberUS 3654647 A, US 3654647A, US-A-3654647, US3654647 A, US3654647A
InventorsNeff Ted
Original AssigneeNeff Ted
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination wire working tool
US 3654647 A
Abstract
A hand tool primarily for use with electrical wiring which combines into one tool all the necessary tools normally required when gripping, pulling, bending, cutting, stripping, and crimping operations are performed during an electrical wiring job. The tool includes needle-nose plier jaws for gripping, pulling, and bending wire; a crimping orifice for crimping solderless electrical terminals to the ends of wire; cutter blades for cutting wire; and a plurality of orifices for cutting and stripping insulation material from insulated wire of different diameters.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Neff [45] Apr. 11, 1972 54] COMBINATION WIRE WORKING TOOL FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [72] lnventor; Ted Nefl, Hunter Industries, 9851 Adbur- 647,526 10/1962 Italy ..7/5.1 {is Avenue, La Hmbra, Calif 90670 673,358 10/1963 Canada ..7/5.3

[22] Filed: 1970 Primary Examiner-Theron E. Condon Assistant ExaminerRoscoe V. Parker, Jr. [2]] Appl' 11,062 Attorney-Fulwider, Patton, Rieber, Lee & Utecht [52] U.S.Cl..... 7/5.3, 8l/9.5 R, 81 5.1 R ABSTRACT [51] f "H02g1/12B25b7/22 A hand tool primarily for use with electrical wiring which [58] Fleld of Search ..7/5.l, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, combines into one too] a the necessary tools normally R required when gripping, pulling, bending, cutting, stripping, and crimping operations are performed during an electrical [56] References Cited wiring job. The tool includes needle-nose plier jaws for gripping, pulling, and bending wire; a crimping orifice for UNITED STATES PATENTS crimping solderless electrical terminals to the ends of wire; cutter blades for cutting wire; and a plurality of orifices for 3,525,107 8/1970 Hays ..7/5.3 cutting and strippinginsulation material from insulated wire of 2,668,464 2/1954 Paules ..7/5.2 X different diameters 2,585,080 2/1952 Beaulieu ..81/9.5 R 3,120,773 2/1964 Esser ..7/5.3 2 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures COMBINATION WIRE WORKING TOOL BACKGROUND OF INVENTION The present invention relates to hand tools in general, and in particular to a combination tool for performing all the various operations required when working with insulated electrical wiring.

There are presently available to the trade certain wireworking tools of various combinations such as a wire stripper and cutter; a wire stripper, cutter and crimper; or wire gripper and cutter. None of these tools, however, have all of the features and functions necessary to do a complete job of gripping, pulling, bending, crimping, cutting, and stripping normally performed on any electrical wiring job, and therefore additional tools are required. This not only is more expensive but is also more time-consuming due to the frequent necessity to change from one tool to another. The device of the instant invention overcomes these disadvantages as will be seen in the following summary and description.

SUMMARY AND OBJECTS OF INVENTION A general object of the present invention is to provide in one combination hand tool all the functions necessary to perform all the operations necessary when working with insulated electrical wiring.

More particularly, it is the object of the present invention to provide a single combination hand tool having means to grip, pull, bend, cut, and strip electrical wiring, and to crimp solderless electrical terminals onto the ends of said wiring, thus eliminating the necessity for more than one tool to do a complete electrical wiring job.

A related object is to provide such a tool with the crimping and cutting means both as near as possible to the pivot point of the tool so that maximum leverage can be obtained for these operations which require the most leverage.

Another object is to provide a combination tool that will perform all the functions named, but which will be economical to produce and which can be marketed at a cost to the user well below that of the multiple tools that would be required to perform a complete electrical wiring job in the absence of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the tool comprising the invention in its preferred form using stamped parts;

FIG. 2 is a top view looking downward on the tool as indicated by arrowed line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an end view of the forward end of the tool as viewed in the direction indicated by arrowed line 33 of FIG.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of an alternate means of constructing the tool using forged parts instead of stamped parts;

FIG. 5 is a top view looking downward on the tool in FIG. 4 as viewed in the direction of arrowed line 5-5 of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is a cross section as viewed in the direction of arrowed line 66 of FIG. 4.

DESCRIPTION Referring initially to FIG. 1, the tool is shown having two overlapping, substantially identical members 10 and 12 joined together by a pivot pin or rivet 14 in a bore 16 which extends laterally through both of said members 10 and 12. The rear portions of members 10 and 12 are formed in the shape of two plier-like handles 18 and 20. The forward end of the tool is formed in the shape of long, tapered, needle-nose plier jaws 22 and 24, and both of said jaws have serrations 26 and 28 on their facing inner working surfaces providing the means for securely gripping objects such as wire.

Immediately adjacent the inner end of jaws 22 and 24, intermediate of said jaws and the pivot point established by pivot pin or rivet 14, is located a solderless electric terminal crimping orifice 30. Said orifice is formed by a concave recess 32 in member 12 which is facing two concave recesses 34 and 36. The radii or recesses 34 and 36 converge and project partially into the center of the space formed by recess 32 to form a projecting tooth 38.

Located immediately to the rear of the pivot point established by pivot pin or rivet 14 is a cutter means consisting of two sharp cutting edges 40 and 42, one on each of the members 10 and 12, overlapping each other and providing the means for cutting wire.

A series of different sized circular orifices, in this instance six, are shown in line down the longitudinal center axis of the tool and are designated by the numerals 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, and 54 respectively. All of the orifices have sharp cutting edges on their entire inner circumference formed as a result of angling the channels forming said orifices at approximately 45. The first and largest of such orifices 44 is located immediately adjacent cutting edges 40 and 42 to the rear side of pivot pin or rivet 14 toward the handle end of the tool and the remaining orifices 46, 48, 50, 52, and 54 follow in progressively smaller diameters respectively. One-half of the circumference of each orifice is located on member 10 and the other half on member 12 having overlapping edges so that when handles 18 and 20 are pivoted away from each other, the orifices will open to receive an insulated wire which is placed in the matching orifice according to the wire size. When handles 18 and 20 are then squeezed together, the sharp edges of the orifices close on the wire and cut through the insulation material. The tool is then pulled toward the cut end of the wire and the insulation material stripped off.

Rearward of orifice 54 are two small projections 56 and 58 located on members 10 and 12, respectively. Projections 56 and 58 are angled inward past the vertical center axis of the tool to overlap each other and form a stop means for restricting the closing of handles 18 and 20 beyond a predetermined point where said orifices 44 through 54 have the desired diameters. Said stop means thus controls the minimum diameters to which said orifices may be closed and thereby prevents the inadvertent cutting of the wire along with the insulation.

FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 show an alternate form of making the tool comprising the present invention utilizing forged parts for the cross members 10' and 12 instead of stamped metal parts as utilized in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3. It will be noted that the tool in FIG. 2, members 10 and 12 are bent at 60 and 62 so as to bring jaws 22, 24, and the working surfaces of crimping orifice 30 into parallel, oppositely facing relationship to each other. This offsetting is not required on parts 10 and 12 in FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 as these forged parts are preformed to provide the proper facing relationship of jaws 22', 24', and the surfaces of orifice 30.

Jaws 22 and 24 in FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 are shown as having recessed areas 64 and 66 within which is located crimping orifice 30'. Said recesses are for the purpose of reducing the lateral width of orifice 30 and tooth 38 so that when a crimping operation is performed on a solderless electrical terminal, less pressure will be required to make the crimping indentation than otherwise would be required if the crimping orifice 30 and tooth 38 were of the same lateral width as jaws 22 and 24.

The other features of the alternate method of construction shown in FIGS. 4, 5, and 6, such as handles 18 and 20', cutting edges 40' and 42, orifices 44', 46', 48', 50', 52', and 54', and projections 56 and 58', are all substantially identical to the corresponding features in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, and therefore need no further description.

If desired, the jaws 22 and 24 may be biased open by a rattrap spring coaxial with the pivot 14 and having arms connected to the members 10 and 12 at 82 and 84.

OPERATION The tool comprising my invention is operated in a similar manner to other plier-like hand tools well known to the art.

For example, in using the gripping jaws the method is exactly the same as any other plier, and the cutter is used the same as any other cutting plier. In using the stripper orifices, an insulated wire is inserted in the proper orifice according to the wire size, and the orifice is then closed by pressing handles 18 and 20 together until they reach the stop means. The sharp cutting edges on the circumference of the orifice cuts through the insulation material while leaving the wire itself intact. The tool is then pulled outwardly toward the end of the wire and the insulation material is stripped off to expose a section of bare wire. In using the crimper, a solderless electrical terminal is placed on the end of a bare wire after the insulation has been stripped off and the terminal is then placed in recess 32 in member 12. Handles 18 and 20 are then squeezed together causing tooth projection 38 to make a rather deep indentation in the terminal wall and thereby crimping the terminal tightly in place on the end of the wire.

CONCLUSION The combination in one tool of needle-nose plier-like jaws, a solderless terminal crimper, a wire cutter, and a plurality of wire-stripper orifices to cut and strip insulation material from a wire offers many advantages not available in any other single tool, as will be immediately recognized by those engaged in electrical wiring installation and repair. For example, the added cost of two or more tools to do the operation of this one tool is eliminated, and the added time and inconvenience in changing from one tool to another is also eliminated.

Although a preferred embodiment of the invention has been disclosed for the purpose of illustration, it will be understood that various changes, modifications, and substitutions may be incorporated in such embodiment, within the scope of the invention, without departing from the spirit of the invention as illustrated, described, and claimed herein.

I claim as my invention:

1. A gripping, crimping, cutting and stripping tool comprismg:

a pair of operating members pivotally connected for movement about a pivot axis in scissor-like relation, the opposite extremities of said members being laterally off-set to provide a pair of generally aligned handle portions disposed in opposed relation on one side of said axis and a pair of generally aligned gripping portions disposed in opposed relation on the opposite side of said axis for abutting engagement upon closure of said handle portrons;

said members including generally aligned, opposed crimping portions located between said gripping portions and said one side of said axis for abutting engagement upon said closure of said handle portions;

said members further including on said opposite side of said axis overlapping portions terminating in shearing edges adapted to cut wire, said overlapping portions including a plurality of opposed, complemental arcuate recesses cooperative to define stripper openings reduceable in size upon said closure of said handle portions; and

said members further including stop means located outwardly of said stripper openings and interengageable upon said closure of said handle portions to fix the size of said stripper openings,

2. A tool according to claim 1 wherein said stop means comprises inwardly projecting portions on said operating members, respectively, and engageable to limit the extent of said closure of said handle portions.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585080 *May 27, 1948Feb 12, 1952Western Electric CoWire stripping pliers
US2668464 *Aug 2, 1949Feb 9, 1954Aircraft Marine Prod IncWire cutting and stripping tool
US3120773 *May 29, 1961Feb 11, 1964Ideal IndCrimp tool and dies
US3525107 *May 8, 1968Aug 25, 1970Amp IncTerminal crimping,wirecutting and insulation stripping tool
CA673358A *Oct 29, 1963Vaco Products CoCutoff device for threaded bolts and screws
IT647526A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3871078 *Mar 12, 1973Mar 18, 1975Ogle RobertWire insulation stripper
US3947905 *Mar 12, 1975Apr 6, 1976Ted NeffMulti-purpose electrical wiring tools
US4028756 *Apr 9, 1975Jun 14, 1977Thomas & Betts CorporationHand tool for working on electrical conductors
US4074732 *Jan 5, 1977Feb 21, 1978Wilkens Kenneth AWire cutting, stripping and twisting tool
US4226145 *Jun 25, 1979Oct 7, 1980Gill John FWire stripper
US4536939 *Nov 19, 1982Aug 27, 1985At&T Technologies, Inc.Tool for terminating telephone cordage with modular plugs
US4637084 *Dec 6, 1984Jan 20, 1987Wood Michael DCrimping and cutting tool
US5711182 *Sep 9, 1996Jan 27, 1998Yang; Shyi-DongCrimping tool with wire stripping capability
US6029297 *Jun 19, 1998Feb 29, 2000French; Thomas J.Multi-purpose electrician pliers tool
US6684439 *Aug 30, 2001Feb 3, 2004Actuant CorporationCoaxial cable termination tool
US7350313 *Oct 14, 2005Apr 1, 2008LabinalDevice for cutting and marking a metal cable
US7670357Jul 12, 2005Mar 2, 2010Stryker Leibinger Gmbh & Co. KgSurgical instrument for manipulating a bent wire
US8800411May 23, 2012Aug 12, 2014Maighbarran SeemangalMulti-purpose electrical plier and striking tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification7/107, D08/58, 7/131
International ClassificationH02G1/12, H01R43/04, H01R43/042
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/042, H02G1/1214, H02G1/12
European ClassificationH01R43/042, H02G1/12, H02G1/12B2B2C