Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3655051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1972
Filing dateJun 23, 1969
Priority dateJun 23, 1969
Publication numberUS 3655051 A, US 3655051A, US-A-3655051, US3655051 A, US3655051A
InventorsQuase Harold Gerson
Original AssigneeUnderwater Storage Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Underwater storage system
US 3655051 A
Abstract
An underwater storage system collects waste, measures the collection and stores the waste in underwater storage tanks from whence the material is pumped when inlet measurement indicates the necessity. Automatic systems are provided for the storage of sewage waste during peak periods and in large flexible walled tanks having flat rectangular bottoms with horizontal oriented inlet and outlet means. When the peak systems are passed, the present invention provides automatic means to reintroduce the stored sewage into the sewage treatment system. The automatic waste, collection, storage and emptying systems and the flexible containers used in those systems have particularly useful application to sewage systems.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Paten Quase [54] UNDERWATER STORAGE SYSTEM [72] Inventor: Harold Gerson Quase, Kensington, Md.

[73] Assignee: Underwater Storage, Inc., Washington,

[22] Filed: June 23,1969

[21] Appl.No.: 835,655

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,057,234 10/1936 Gorman ..210/88 X 2,483,672 10/1949 Robinson .;....210/88 2,779,730 l/1957 Kelly et a1 ..'..2l0/l24 X [15] 3,655,051 [451 Apr. 11, 1972 Crawford et al ..222/23 ....137/236 ..222/105 3,113,699 12/1963 3,114,384 12/1963 Quase 3,155,280 11/1964 Quase [57] ABSTRACT An underwater storage system collects waste, measures the collection and stores the waste in underwater storage tanks from whence the material is pumped when inlet measurement indicates the necessity. Automatic systems are provided for the storage of sewage waste during peak periods and in large flexible walled tanks having flat rectangular bottoms with horizontal oriented inlet and outlet means. When the peak systems are passed, the present invention provides automatic means to reintroduce the stored sewage into the sewage treatment system. The automatic waste, collection, storage and emptying systems and the'flexible containers used in those systems have particularly useful application to sewage systems.

5 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR H 1912' 3.655.051

SHEET 1 [IF 4 nwmwoa M 38 HAROLD G. QUASE ATTORNEYS PATENTED 11 1BR 3,655,051

sum 2 OF 4 nwsmon HAROLD G. QUASE fi//mge, Qz/a/n/a/ e; gaff gawk Anon N ms PATENTEDAPR H 1912 3.655051 sum 3 OF 4 l wwi ian FIG. 7

INVENTOR HAROLD G. QUASE ATTORNEYS UNDERWATER STORAGE SYSTEM SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The need for water pollution control becomes increasingly significant with the increased use of water and water facilities by the multiplying population. The present invention provides useful collecting systems for small waterside communities, marinasand industries in which waste is measured and then stored in underwater tanks, keeping close track of the amount of waste within the tanks so that they may be emptied when required and so that the tanks may be fully emptied. The present invention also provides systems which measure sewage flow and store excess sewage temporarily to prevent the overloading of treatment facilities, which is a dangerous source of water pollution. The latter is especially true in old municipal installations where storm sewers and general sewage systems are interconnected so that storm sewers flood the treatment facilities during periods of heavy runoff following cloudbursts and storms.

The flexible walled containers described herein are particu larly useful in the sewage holding requirements of the systems employed herein. Preferably, the flexible tanks are made of rubber or neoprene or synthetic material which is rubberized to make it impermeable and long-lived in salt, brackish and fresh water. Detachable cables are preferably provided so that the containers may be surfaced for periodic maintenance if desired.

The system, particularly the temporary sewage storage system, has particular application with subterranean and overland mounted tanks, whether the tanks are rigid or flexible. Large subterranean tanks may be provided according to the teachings of the present invention so that the tanks may automatically accept excessive sewage during times of peak requirements and so that the tanks may automatically feed the sewage back into the treatment system after the peak requirement has been reduced. Large rigid steel tanks are useful for that purpose, both as underground tanks and as tanks mounted above the ground. In the latter case, large pumps are provided to pump excess sewage up into the tanks during peak periods, and the sewage then flows automatically into the treatment facilities during the reduced demand periods. When using rigid tanks, it is particularly desirable to line the tanks with neoprene or rubber for resistance to corrosives in the sewage system. Alternatively, the tanks may be constructed of cement or metal of any particular kind that is suitable in resisting corrosion. Flexible tanks may be used on land or underground as well as underwater. The flexible tanks simply expanding as they are filled and collapsing as they are emptied. When using a flexible tank on land, it is particularly desirable to use a broad base flexible tank, such as described in the second shown embodiment in the detailed description.

The broad objectives of this invention are the provision of sewage systems for the temporary storage of sewage and the measuring of stored sewage for the automatic control of sewage storage discharge. Equally significant objects of the invention are the provision of large flexible collapsible tanks which are particularly suited to the storage of waste, and which are particularly suited to underwater storage.

These and other objectives of the invention will be apparent from the specification and from the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a system for collecting waste, viewing the collected waste and measuring the waste, storing the materials in a flexible and collapsible underwater tank and discharging the tank when it is indicated full by telemetering equipment.

FIG. 2 is a schematic detail of a preferred form of measuring the tank.

FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of a sewage storage system for overload peak handling in municipal, industrial or community sewage systems.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational detail of one preferred form of flexible walled collapsible storage tank.

FIG. 5 is an end elevation of the collapsible flexible wall storage tank shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 5A is a detail of the base of the tank shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of another form of storage tank.

FIG. 7 is a foreshortened side elevation of the storage tank of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is an end elevation of the storage tank of FIG. 6.

FIG. 9 is a bottom detail of a mounting or an inlet port in the storage tank shown in FIG. 6.

FIG. 10 is a detail of the base construction and sealing for the storage tank shown in FIG. 6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a general representation of a sewage storage and disposal system in which sewage is collected in inlet pipe 10 and moves through a glass inspection pipe 12 and a meter station 14 before passing into a 3 inch rubber inlet hose 16. The sewage is collected in an underwater collapsible rubberized storage tank 18 which is made of neoprene, rubber or a similar material. The tank is vented through line 20 which terminates approximately 10 feet above the grade which is sufficiently high to carry off all odors. A 2 inch suction hose 22 is connected to storage tank 18 and leads to a 2 inch buried rigid pipe 24 which in turn leads to a pump house 26. Cable 28 is buried along the shore line and leads from the meter station to the pump house to telemeter flow of meter station 14 so that the quantity of waste in collapsible tank 18 may always be known.

A schematic detail of the meter station is shown in FIG. 2. The 3 inch collection line 10 may be an inlet from boats moored in a marina. A valve 30 is provided in the collection lines so that the flow to the measure tank 32 may be cut ofi. An auxiliary line 34 is connected to collection line 10 upstream of valve 30 so that valve 36 in the auxiliary line may be opened to flush the main connection line 10. Near the bottom of measure tank 32 a fitting is provided for connecting 3-inch hose 16. Valve 38 in line 16 controls flow into the storage tank 18 shown in FIG. 1. A switch means generally indicated by the numeral 40 is provided in tank 32 so that the amount of material flowing through the tank may be accurately measured. The switch means has an upper level switch 42 and a lower level switch 44 which cooperate with control 46. When matter in tank 32 reaches the upper level switch 42, control 46 opens valve 38 releasing the material into the storage tank. As soon as the level within the tank reaches lower level switch 44, valve 38 is shut ofl by control 46 and it is known that an approximate volume equal to the height between the level switches times the cross sectional area of the measure tank has passed into the storage tank. Counter 48 records each cycle and the counter may directly read in gallons or cubic feet of material sent to the storage tank 18. A similar counter is provided in a control panel in a pump house 26 for telemetering purposes.

FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of a similar sewage storage system used with a municipal sewage system. A sewer main schematically represented by numeral 50 is connected to a control box 52 adjacent an upper edge of the box. The main continues through the box and during normal periods sewage from main 50 exits through sewer pipe 54 to sewage treatment facility 55. During peak periods, when the treatment facility is unable to handle all of the sewage from main 50, pipe 54, as an example, reaches its capacity and the sewage starts to build up in control box 52. As sewage reaches the level of control switch means 56, the switch contact is made setting up appropriate circuits in control 58. The sewage continues to increase its level in box 52 and finally overflows through overflow line 60 into a multiple interconnected series of collapsible storage tanks 62. Although the tanks are shown, for example, in FIG. 3 in serially connected order, parallel connection is suitable. Extremely large tanks may be provided which require no interconnection to other tanks. As can be determined by one skilled in the art, the expected peak overload on the sewer'system must be calculated and, leaving a safety factor, one can compute the volumetric requirements of a single or multiple sewage overflow tanks.

When the sewage from main 50 reaches a lower incoming level, the main sewer line 54 begins to handle all of the sewage and the water in box 52 falls below switch 56. At. that time, the sewage treatment facility at the end of pipe 54 is operating below its rated capacity. Switch means 56 sensing a fall of the water, thus completes circuits in control 58 to begin operation of pump 64 which pumps the sewage from the collapsible storage tanks 62 through return line 66 back into the main sewage system in pipes 50 or 54, whichever is convenient.

It will be noted that the embodiment of FIG. 3 for sewage storage is particularly useful for storm sewer systems which have predictable overflow peaks. The overflow system is also useful to extend the capacity of sewage systems by provided overrun storage for peak periods which otherwise would overtax treatment facilities.

Tanks which are especially useful for the storage of sewage are described in the following figures.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a storage tank having a generally continuous and integral lateral end and upper wall formed of a neoprene or rubber or rubberized fluid-impervious material. Wall 70 may be seamed and welded as is well known in the existing art. A strongback frame 72 is provided as a closure for the substantially continuous downward periphery of the integral upper wall section 70. As best seen in FIG. 5, the strongback frame comprises two spaced clamping members 76. A fluid impermeable covering is provided on the strongback frame. Covering 78 may be a sheet material of the same constituency of the upper flexible wall portion, or the sheet 78 may be made of a rigid material since flexibility is not a requirement of the lower sheet. An upper surface 80 spans an area between the peripheral portions of the upper wall 70 and downward extending peripheral portions 84 and 86 of the upper Wall and sealing member respectively are squeezed together by the cooperating clamping means 74 and 76. The clamping means are preferably in the form of strongbacks which provide the supporting frame for the structure. Steel piles 90 are sunk into the ground 92 and detachable anchor cables connect the strongback frame to the steel piles. Buoyant members 100 are received in sheaths 102 which extend along the collapsible tank near the upper surface thereof. A multiplicity of vents 104 is provided in the upper central portion of the storage tank flexible wall 70 and the vents are interconnected by a vent line 106.

In a preferred embodiment of the tanks, inlet and outlet ports 110 are supported between inner strongback clamping members 74. Inner and outer elbows 112 and 114 are connected to ports 110 so that fluid flow both on the outside and the inside of the tank is substantially parallel to the strongback member. Several advantages are achieved by the directional control of fluid flow. The bottom of the tank is continually agitated by water flowing therethrough, which tends to remove sludge deposits, vertical forces are reduced, and distribution throughout the tank is substantially even. Retainers l 16, which are connected to the strongback frame 72, support the flexible rubber or rubber-like hoses 118 which serve the storage tank as inlets and outlets.

An access door 120 is provided with a conventional circular watertight seal so that the tank may be opened for cleaning when necessary.

Another form of storage tank is shown in FIGS. 6 through 10. A broad strongback formed base 130 is shown as rigidly supported by angularly disposed plates 132 on driven anchor piles 134. Alternatively, base 130 may be connected to anchor piles 134 by detachable cables in the manner shown in the previous drawings. The integrally formed flexible wall portion 136 holds near its upper extremities parallel buoyant members 138 which extend over the entire length of the storage tank. Vents 140 are positioned along the top of the flexible wall, and in a preferred form, vents 140 are interconnected as shown in FIG. 4. In preferred form of the latter tank, as shown in detail in FIG. 9, inlet and outlet ports 142 are connected between two adjacent strongbacks 144. Flange plate 146 of port 142 is equipped with bolt receiving holes 148.

As shown in FIG. 10, upper wall 136 is joined to a similar sheet which forms lower wall element 150 by clamping peripheral areas of the respective walls with strongbacks 152 and 154. Similar strongback clamps are provided at opposite ends of the rectangular base 130. Central strongback 156 completes the structure of the base.

That which is claimed is:

1. An underwater storage system comprising sewage inlet tube means, a collapsible, flexible and submerged storage tank means connected to the inlet tube means for receiving material passing through the inlet tube means, meter station means connected a) to the inlet tube means for measuring material flowing from the inlet tube means into the submerged storage tank means and b) for passing sewage therethrough into the submerged storage tank means, separate outlet tube means connected to the storage tank means for receiving material therefrom and extending from the storage tank means to a point spaced from water in which the storage tank means is submerged, vent means connected to the storage tank means and extending therefrom to a point spaced above the surface of the water in which the storage tank means is submerged, pump means connected to an end of the outlet means remote from the storage tank means, and circuit means extending from the meter station means to the pump means for indicating at the pump means the amount of material having passed through the inlet tube means; the meter station means comprising a measure tank having an inlet adjacent an upper portion thereof, having an outlet connected adjacent the bottom of the measure tank and having a vent extending from an upper surface of the measure tank upward and terminating in a distal end above the inlet tube means, level responsive measuring means mounted in the measure tank and having upper and lower positions, control means connected to the level means and connected to outlet valve means for opening the outlet valve means when fluid in the measure tank is in an upper position and for closing the outlet valve means when fluid within the measure tank is at the lower position and counter means connected to the control means for recording cycling of fluid level in the measure tank.

2. An underwater storage system comprising a sewer pipe, a collapsible, flexible and submerged storage tank means connected to the sewer pipe for receiving matter from the sewer pipe during peak overload periods thereof, meter station means connected a) to the sewer pipe for measuring material flowing from the sewer pipe into the submerged storage tank means and b) for passing sewage therethrough into the submerged storage tank means, separate outlet tube means connected to the storage tank means for receiving material therefrom and extending from the storage tank means to a point spaced from water in which the storage tank means is submerged, vent means connected to the storage tank means and extending therefrom to a point spaced above the surface of the water in which the storage tank means is submerged, pump means connected to an end of the outlet means remote from the storage tank means, circuit means extending from the meter station means to the pump means for indicating at the pump means the amount of material having passed from the sewer pipe, and return line means connected between the pump means and the sewer pipe for returning material from the storage tank means via the outlet tube means and the pump means to the sewer pipe after peak loads thereof.

3. The system of claim 2 wherein the storage tank means comprises multiple storage tank means for receiving matter from the sewer pipe during peak overload periods thereof.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein the meter station means comprises a meter tank having a sewer pipe inlet means connected adjacent an upper portion thereof and sewer pipe discharge means connected adjacent a lower portion thereof and having a first overflow line connected between the meter tank and the storage tank.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the meter tank further comprises telemetering means connected to the tank and to the pump means for starting the pump means after fluid has risen above the telemetering means and sequentially has fallen below the telemetering means. 5

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2057234 *Jun 15, 1936Oct 13, 1936 Edward a
US2483672 *Jan 8, 1944Oct 4, 1949Worthington Pump & Mach CorpWater treating apparatus
US2779730 *Apr 27, 1953Jan 29, 1957Process Engineers IncSewage treatment
US3113699 *May 3, 1961Dec 10, 1963Us Rubber CoUnderwater liquid storage system
US3114384 *Jan 12, 1959Dec 17, 1963Quase Harold GUnderwater storage system
US3155280 *Sep 29, 1961Nov 3, 1964Quase Harold GBuoyant flexible container and underwater anchorage therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3988241 *Mar 17, 1975Oct 26, 1976Johann RafaelFloating device for removing refuse situated on and under a water surface
US4123358 *Jul 25, 1977Oct 31, 1978Bruce FlaggeSeptic system liquid level control apparatus
US4148729 *Aug 25, 1976Apr 10, 1979Howard George ASystem for storing and handling used cooking oils
US6436289 *Oct 13, 2000Aug 20, 2002Duncan JohnstoneVertical membrane storage system and method of storing liquids using the same
US6726846Aug 8, 2002Apr 27, 2004Duncan JohnstoneVertical membrane storage system and method of storing liquids using the same
US8685252Feb 3, 2011Apr 1, 2014Dxv Water Technologies, LlcWater treatment systems and methods
US8999162Mar 14, 2014Apr 7, 2015Econopure Water Systems, LlcWater treatment systems and methods
US20080190849 *Feb 12, 2008Aug 14, 2008Dxv Water Technologies, LlcDepth exposed membrane for water extraction
US20100237016 *Sep 23, 2010Dxv Water Technologies, LlcDepth exposed membrane for water extraction
US20110186513 *Aug 4, 2011Dxv Water Technologies, LlcWater treatment systems and methods
WO2002030831A1 *Oct 15, 2001Apr 18, 2002Duncan JohnstoneVertical membrane storage system and method of storing liquids using the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/88, 210/124, 210/129, 210/170.8, 137/236.1, 210/257.1
International ClassificationE03F7/00, E03F7/12
Cooperative ClassificationE03F7/12
European ClassificationE03F7/12