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Publication numberUS3655985 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1972
Filing dateMay 20, 1969
Priority dateMay 20, 1969
Publication numberUS 3655985 A, US 3655985A, US-A-3655985, US3655985 A, US3655985A
InventorsBrown James L, Himebaugh Donald T, Montgomery James R
Original AssigneeMallinckrodt Chemical Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiation-shielding receptacle for a bottle for receiving a radioactive eluate
US 3655985 A
Abstract
A radiation-shielding receptacle for holding a glass bottle for receiving the eluate from the elution of a radioactive material is disclosed. The receptacle includes a hollow cylindric body of nontransparent radiation-shielding material having a window opening in its wall. A first end closure of radiation-shielding material is provided at one end of the body and a second end closure of radiation-shielding material is provided at the other end of the body. The second end closure has a central opening therein smaller than the internal diameter of the body and of a size so that the mouth of a bottle positioned in the body is exposed to receive the eluate. An insert of substantially transparent radiation-shielding material is secured in and fills the window opening so that the eluate in a bottle in the body may be viewed from the outside. The thickness of the body and the thickness of the insert are sufficient to provide a substantial amount of shielding against radioactive emission from the eluate.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Brown et T. Iiimebaugh, Ballwin; James R. Montgomery, St. Louis County, all of Mo.

Malllnckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Mo.

Filed: May 20, 1969 Appl. No.: 826,224

Assignee:

...250/108 R, 250/106 S, 250/ 108 WS' ..'...G21l 5/00 .250/106 S, 108 WS, 72

Relerences Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,223,118 11/1940 Miller 15] 3,655,985 [451 Apr. 11, 1972 Primary Examiner-James W. Lawrence I? Assistant Examiner-Morton J. Home Attorney-Keenig, Senniger, Powers and Leayit ABSTRACT A radiation-shielding receptacle for holding a glass bottle for end closure of radiation-shielding material is provided at the body may other end of the body. The second end closure has a central opening therein smaller than the internal diameter of the body .and of a size so that the mouth of a bottle positioned in the body is exposed to receive the eluate. An insert of substantially transparent radiation-shielding material is secured in and fills the window opening so that the eluate in a bottle in the be viewed from the outside. The thickness of the body and the thickness of the insert are sufficient to provide a substantial amount of shielding against radioactive emission from the eluate.

2,915,640 12/1959 Grubeletal ..250/108 13 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures FOR MiSSlN R l r--;-.------ H 11 V9 1 uullulhmlmllml SEARCH ROOM was Patented April 11, 1972 3,655,985

29 is 5 I h 24/ r 2g 15 FIG. 1 FIG-4 FIG. 6

RADIATlON-SI'IIELDING RECEPTACLE FOR A BOTTLE FOR RECEIVING A RADIOACTIVE ELUATE BACKGROUND OF TI-IEINVENTION generator containing the parent radioisotope on an ion exchange medium or other medium, such as alumina, having a high adsorptive capacity for the parent radioisotope but a low adsorptive capacity for the daughter radioisotope. The desired daughter radioisotope is eluted by washing with a suitable solvent or eluant such as a sterile, pyrogen-free isotonic saline solution. The resultant eluate containing the daughter radioisotope in the form of a dissolved salt is useful as a diagnostic agent and is adapted for intravenous administration.

The generator containing the parent radioisotope adsorption medium for eluting the daughter radioisotope is frequently referred to in the art as a cow" and the elution of the daughter radioisotope therefrom is generally referred to in the art as milking the cow."

Some daughter radioisotopes widely used in medical diagnosis have relatively short half lives, e.g., 6 hours, and it is important that they be generated or prepared shortly before use in a hospital, clinic or other place of usage. Thus, there is need for apparatus to generate and containerize the eluate under sterile conditions once a day in a hospital or clinic. This must be under conditions wherein the user of the apparatus is afforded maximum protection against radioactive emission from the generator. The apparatus must also be relatively simple and easy to use so that hospital technicians, rather than highly trained experts, can perform the operation.

Conventionally, the eluate is received in a vessel (e.g., a glass bottle) which is inserted in a lead cup or a cup of other shielding material. In such an arrangement, it is difficult for the operator of the equipment to tell'exactly when the vessel has received the desired amount of eluate. Sometimes, the vessel is filled and then placed in the shielded cup. In this case, the technician can observe the level of the eluate in the vessel as it fills, but there is a resultant radiation hazard until the vessel is placed within the shielded cup.

Accordingly, the prior-art arrangement has not been wholly satisfactory because of the difficulty in filling the vessel with eluate to a desired level without undesirable radiation leakage. Since the decay characteristics of most of the parent-daughter radioisotope combinations presently in large-scale use require that the generator or cow be milked daily, the use of the priorart techniques and devices undesirably involve daily exposure of the operator to radioactivity during the milking operation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION ate which will minimize the radiation hazards and at the same time permit the level of the eluate to be observed so that the vessel can be filled to the desired level. Desirably, the apparatus will also minimize operator handling and exposure. The apparatus is also easy and economical to use.

The invention involves a radiation-shielding receptacle for holding a substantially transparent vessel for receiving the eluate from the elution of a radioactive material which comprises a hollow body of nontransparent radiation-shielding material having a window opening in its wall. A first end closure of radiation-shielding material is provided at one end of the body, and a second end closure of radiation-shielding material is provided at the other end of the body. The second end clopositioned in the body is exposed to receive the eluate. An insert of substantially transparent radiation-shielding material is secured in and fills the window opening so that the eluate in a vessel in the body may be viewed from the outside. The thickness of the body and the thickness of the insert are suffrcient to provide a substantial amount of shielding against radioactive emission from the eluate for the user. The second end closure desirably is an integral part of the body, with the result that the vessel is inserted into the body from the other end. In this case, the first end closure is conveniently threaded into the body or is detachably secured in some other manner. If desired, a cover or lid of radiationrshielding material adapted for placement over the second end closure may be used so as to provide shielding for the opening in the second end closure and so that the mouth of the vessel positioned in the body may also be shielded. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OFTI-IE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a viewin elevation of a receptacle made according to the invention, showing .a cover therefor raised from the receptacle;

FIG. '2 is a plan viewof the receptacle on line 2-2 of FIG. 1-

FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a vertical cross section of a receptacle, showing a bottle in place therein;

FIG. 5 is a horizontal section on line 5-5 of FIG. 6; and

, FIG. 6 is a view in elevation of a receptacle with the cover in place.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, a radiation-shielding receptacle made according to this invention is shown to comprise a hollow cylindric body 1. This has an elongate window opening or slot 3 extending through its wall in the direction of its height. Body 1 is made of an appropriate radiation-shielding material such as lead. A first end closure or cap 5 of radiation-shielding material, for example, the same material as the cylinder, is provided at one end (the lower end) of the body. As illustrated, the first cap 5 is a plug, e.g., of lead threaded in the lower end of the body. If the materials are very soft, as is lead, externally threaded ring insert 25 and internally threaded ring insert 27 of harder material such as steel can be used to provide the mating threads for threading the cap 5 into body 1. The inserts 25 and 27 can be attached to body 1 and to cap 5, respectively, in any appropriate manner. The plug has a flange 29 extending outwardly below the internally threaded ring insert 27.

A second end closure or cap 7 of radiation-shielding material is provided at the other end (the upper end) of body I. The second cap 7 has a centrally disposed opening 9 therein smaller than the internal diameter of the body 1 and of a size so that the neck 21 and mouth 23 of a vessel 11 positioned in body 1 can protrude through opening 9 so that mouth 23 is exposed to receive the eluate. Second cap 7 is shown as integral with the body 1. This can be conveniently done by making second cap 7 and cylinder 1 as a one-piece casting so that the second end closure is constituted by an integral inwardly directed annular flange at the upper end of the body. In this arrangement, the substantially transparent vessel 11 has to be inserted into the body 1 from the lower end, which is then closed by first cap 5.

The vessel 11 is generally a glass bottle having calibration marks on the side thereof to indicate the amount of eluate therein. An insert 13 of substantially transparent radiationshielding material such as a lead glass is secured in and fills the window opening or slot 3. The vessel 11, the eluate therein FIG. 3 is a bottom plan of a cover, taken on line 3-3 of I and the calibration marks thereon may be viewed from the outside of body 1 through window insert 13. The thickness of the insert 13 and the thickness of the body 1 desirably are sufficient to provide a substantial amount of radiation shielding for the user. Normally window insert 13 will have a thickness greater than the thickness of the wall of body 1.

In the embodiment shown in the drawings, the second cap 7 has an annular rib or ridge 15 extending upwardly therefrom. Desirably, the ridge is of a sufficient height to extend beyond the neck 21 and mouth 23 of a vessel 11 positioned in cylinder 1. A lid or cover 17, having a recess 19 therein of a size suffi cient to completely receive ridge 15, is provided to be positioned on top of second cap 7. When cover 17 is in position, the top of body 1, including the neck 21 and mouth 23 of the vessel 11 positioned therein, is covered. Cover 17 desirably is fonned of the same radiation-shielding material as is body 1, and is of a thickness sufficient to provide a substantial amount of radiation shielding for the user of the equipment.

In accordance with the instant invention, the vessel 11 can be inserted in the body 1 and the bottom closed before the milking operation commences. The shielded vessel can then be positioned to receive the eluate. The level of the eluate can be observed at all times through the insert 13 in the wall of the body. When the operation is completed, it is not necessary to handle the vessel at all. Rather, it can be transported in the radiation-shielding receptaclewhere needed. If desired, the cover 17 may be applied to the body to provide still further radiation shielding because of the possibility of some emission of radiation from the exposed mouth and neck of the vessel 11. The lower closure 5 is made removable for ready shielded transfer of the vessel 11 from the body 1 to an assay shield such as shown in the copending coassigned application of Lloyd G. Struttman, Ser. No. 658,788, filed Aug. 7, 1967, issued as U.S. Pat. 3,506,832 Apr. 14, 1970, by allowing the vessel to slide out of the body 1 into the assay shield.

in view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is.

intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

l. A radiation-shielding receptacle for holding a transparent vessel having a neck for receiving the eluate from the elution of a radioactive material, said receptacle comprising a hollow body of nontransparent radiation-shielding material having upper and lower end closures of radiation-shielding material, one of said end closures being removably attached to said body, the upper end closure having a central opening therein smaller than the internal cross section of the body and extending completely through said upper end closure for receiving the neck of the vessel with the neck extending upwardly out of the receptacle through said opening for access to the mouth of the vessel for the elution operation, the wall of said body having an elongate window opening therein extending in the direction of the height of the body, and an insert of substantially transparent radiation-shielding material in said window opening for viewing of the eluate in a vessel in the receptacle while shielding against radioactive emission from the eluate.

2. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 1 wherein the lower end closure is removably attached to the threaded ring of a harder metal than lead secured therein at its lower end, and the lower end closure comprises a plug of lead having an externally threaded ring of a harder metal than lead secured therearound and threaded in the internally threaded ring.

6. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 5 wherein the plug has a flange extending outwardly below the externally threaded ring.

7. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 1 having a removable cover of radiation-shielding material overlying the upper end closure.

8. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 1 for holding a glass bottle having a neck wherein the opening in the upper end closure is larger than the neck and the height of the receptacle is such that the neck extends upwardly through the opening.

9. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 8 wherein the body is of hollow cylindric form, the upper end closure is constituted by an integral inwardly directed annular flange at the upper end of the body, and the lower end closure is constituted by a plug threaded in the lower end of the body.

10. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 9 wherein the window opening is constituted by a slot extending down from the upper end of the body terminating short of the lower end of the body.

11. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 10 wherein the body and closures are made of lead, and the insert is made of lead glass.

12. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 11 wherein the insert is thicker than the wall of the body.

13. A radiation-shielding receptacle as set forth in claim 12 having a cover of radiation-shielding material for the upper end of the receptacle, the latter having an annular rib around the central opening therein and the cover having a recess for receiving the rib and the upper end of the neck of the bottle.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2223118 *Mar 25, 1938Nov 26, 1940Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoAbsorptive glass
US2915640 *Apr 29, 1957Dec 1, 1959Olin MathiesonContainer
Referenced by
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US3769490 *Mar 27, 1972Oct 30, 1973Squibb & Sons IncTransparent storage container for tc-99m eluate
US3973554 *Apr 24, 1975Aug 10, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Department Of Health, Education And WelfareRadiation safety shield for a syringe
US4020355 *Jun 30, 1975Apr 26, 1977E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Receptacle for radioactive material
US4040419 *Feb 2, 1976Aug 9, 1977Abraham GoldmanShielding holder for a syringe having indirect viewing means
US4081688 *Jul 22, 1976Mar 28, 1978Chevron Research CompanyShielded container
US4144461 *Jan 17, 1977Mar 13, 1979Victoreen, Inc.Method and apparatus for assay and storage of radioactive solutions
US4185619 *Dec 1, 1975Jan 29, 1980Atomic Products CorporationRetractable shield for syringes
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US4788438 *Jan 20, 1987Nov 29, 1988E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyContainer having engaging abutments thereon
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Classifications
U.S. Classification250/506.1, 600/5, 976/DIG.350, 206/459.1
International ClassificationG21F5/015, G21F5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG21F5/015
European ClassificationG21F5/015
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 14, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: MALLINCKRODT, INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:MALCO, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004572/0403
Effective date: 19860101