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Publication numberUS3656093 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1972
Filing dateJan 12, 1970
Priority dateJul 14, 1967
Also published asDE1765727B1
Publication numberUS 3656093 A, US 3656093A, US-A-3656093, US3656093 A, US3656093A
InventorsRobert John Kinkaid
Original AssigneeAmp Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connectors
US 3656093 A
Abstract
An electrical connector comprises a body section provided with cantilever leg members extending outwardly from one side and in the same plane thereof, the free ends of the leg members having inturned and arcuate-shaped sections defining contacts for electrical engagement with conductive paths of a PC board. The leg members converge toward each other and they are provided with stabilizing lugs to maintain the contacts in position in their passageways of a dielectric housing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Kinkaid [151 3,656,093 [451 Apr. 11, 1972 [54] ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS [72] Inventor: Robert John Kinkaid, New Cumberland,

[73] Assignee: AMP Incorporated, Harrisburg, Pa. [22] Filed: Jan. 12, 1970' [21] Appl. No.: 1,966

, Related 08. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 653,419, July 14, 1967.

[52] [1.8. CL ..339/2l7S,339/17 L, 339/258 P, 339/276T [51] lnt.Cl ..H0lr 13/12 [58] Field ofSearch ..339/217,258, 276

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,104,925 9/1963 Macnamara ..339/217 3,123,428 3/1964 McKee ...339/256 2,682,040 6/1954 Batcheller ..339/258 3,020,520 2/1962 Berg ..339/276X 3,031,640 4/1962 McKee ..339/217 Primary Examiner-Richard E. Moore Attorney-Adrian J. LaRue 57 ABSTRACT An electrical connector comprises a body section provided with cantilever leg members extending outwardly from one side and in the same plane thereof, the free ends of the leg members having intumed and arcuate-shaped sections defining contacts for electrical engagement with conductive paths of a PC board. The leg members converge toward each other and they are provided with stabilizing lugs to maintain the contacts in position in their passageways of a dielectric hous-.

ing.

3 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR 1 1 I972 SHEET 2 BF 2 Jill:

ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 653,419, filed July 14, 1967.

This invention relates to electrical connectors and more particularly to electrical connectors for use in connection with panels such as, for example, printed circuit boards.

In U.S. Pat. No. 3,075,167, a printed circuit connector is disclosed which includes parallel legs extending outwardly from a web portion in a cantilever manner. The legs are disposed in a plane containing the web portion and the free ends of the legs are provided with inwardly-directed contact sections, also in the same plane as the legs and web portion. 'lhese contact sections are for engagement with conductive paths of a printed circuit board, but that they contain sharp edges which increases the wear on the conductive paths in addition to causing abrasion to the paths if they are plated with precious metals.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,926,328 discloses a printed circuit connector which comprises parallel leg members extending outwardly from one end of a body portion at one side as opposed requires a lot of metal to make and the legs are too flexible to provide positive contact. A similar connector is described in U.S. Pat. No. 2,853,689.

An object of the present invention is to provide an electrical connector with cantilever legs provided with large area contact sections at the free ends from thin-rolled stock.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an electrical connector having stabilizing means to maintain the contact sections in position in channels of a passageway of a housing.

A further object is to provide an electrical connector that has smooth contoured contact surfaces for positive contact with mating contact surfaces which reduces contact surface wear and increases contact life.

An additional object is the provision of an electrical connector having cantilevered fork contacts with beams providing equal distribution of contact forces and torquing of the cantilever beams permitting the contact areas to adjust to the surface configuration of the mating contact surfaces.

Other objects and attainments of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a reading of the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the drawings in which there are shown and described illustrative embodiments of the invention; it is to be understood, however, that these embodiments are not intended to be exhaustive nor limiting of the invention but are given for purposes of illustration in order that others skilled in the art may fully understand the invention and the principles thereof and the manner of applying it in practical use so that they may modify it in various forms, each as may be best suited to the conditions of a particular use.

The invention is directed to an electrical connector which comprises a planar body section having cantilever legs extending outwardly therefrom and disposed in the same plane as the body section. Free ends of the legs have contacts disposed substantially at right angles with respect to the plane of the legs and body section. The contacts have contact surfaces at least three times the thickness of the legs and they are arcuateshaped in a fore-and-aft direction as well as in cross section.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective exploded, view of a dielectric housing I with a passageway in cross section and an electrical connector exploded therefrom;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view through a passageway of the housing of FIG. 1 with an electrical connector in position therein;

FIG. 3 is a view taken along lines 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a view taken along lines 4-4 of FIG. 2 showing the configuration of the contact sections;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of an embodiment of the electrical connector;

FIG. 6 is atop plan view ofFIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an exploded plan view of a ferrule member and a wire to be crirnped therein;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 with the wire crirnped in position in the ferrule member;

FIG. 9 is a view taken along lines 9-9 of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 10 is a view taken along lines 10-10 of FIG. 9.

Turning now to the drawings and more particularly to FIGS. 1 through 4, a part of a dielectric housing H is illustrated which is provided with passageways 11 for receiving electrical connectors EC. Passageways l are in communication with channel 2 in whicha printed circuit board is to be received. Each of passageways 1 includes projections 3 in opposing surfaces and depressions 4 in other opposing surfaces.

Electrical connector EC comprises a contact section 5 and a ferrule section 6. Contact section 5 includes a body portion 7 provided with extensions 8 along opposing sides thereof. An arcuate stop 9 is struck out from body portion 7 in about the central portion thereof. Stop 9 is directed in the same direction as extensions 8. Extending outwardly from the front end of body portion 7 is a spring lance 10 which is bent back over body portion 7 in overlying relationship with respect to stop 9. Spring lance 10 has a wedge-shaped configuration as illustrated in FIG. 2. Body portion 7 and extensions 8 fit snugly within the rear section of passageway l with extensions 8 engaging projections 3 in passageway 1 to limit the movement of the electrical connector within the passageway and spring lance 10 seats in one of depressions 4 to limit movement of the electrical connector out of the passageway. Arcuate stop 9 prevents spring lance 10 from being permanently set so as not to be operable. With depressions 4 being disposed in opposing surfaces of passageway l, the electrical connector can be inserted in the passageway in more than one direction and still be operable.

Cantilever legs 11 extend outwardly from the front end of body portion 7 and are disposed in the same plane containing body portion 7. As can be discerned from FIG. 2, cantilever legs 11 are tapered inwardly toward each other from body portion 7 toward the free ends thereof. The free ends of cantilever legs lll have arcuate-shaped sections 12 extending in the same direction as extensions 8 which define contacts for electrical engagement with conductive paths of a printed circuit board. In cross section as illustrated in FIG. 4, contacts 12 are radiused along each side thereof in order to provide smooth surfaces therealong. Cantilever legs 11 converge toward each other as illustrated in FIG. 2 so that contacts 12 extend within channel 2 and are spaced apart a distance to properly engage the conductive paths of a printed circuit board. Stabilizing lugs 13 extend outwardly from the outer edges of legs 11 rearwardly of contacts 12 and in the same direction as contacts 12 and extensions 8 to stabilize the movement of legs 11 in passageway 1 so that contacts 12 will be free to move therein. As can be discerned from FIG. 3, lugs 13 have a length slightly in excess of contacts 12in order to properly guide contacts 12 within passageway 1 and the width of contacts 12 is in excess of three times the width of legs 11 which provides broad contacts with thin cantilever legs thereby permitting the use of thin stock as opposed to stock the thickness of the width of the contacts which would present numerous problems.

Recesses 14 are formed in body portion 7 and legs 111 to work-harden the material at these points to equalize pressure at the points of bending of the cantilever legs. Contacts 12 provide smooth-contoured contact surfaces for positive contact with the conductive paths of the printed circuit board. The configuration of contacts 12 reduces wear on the conduc- 'tive paths and increases contact life. Contacts 12 are susceptible to selected plating techniques to provide precious metal plating thereon instead of plating the entire connector. The arcuate configuration of contacts 12 provide an automatic printed circuit board lead-in by virtue of the opposed arcuate configuration of the contacts. The contacts provide a broad contact area to distribute load forces required for good contact. The broad contact area of the contacts also substantially reduces insertion forces. The cantilever beams of the legs are susceptible to torquing thereby permitting contacts 12 to adjust and conform to the surface configuration of the conductive paths of the printed circuit board.

Turning now to FIGS. 5 and 6, electrical connector ECa is illustrated which is an embodiment of electrical connector EC. Body portion 7 is provided with a projection to permit the electrical connector to be force-fitted into a passageway of a housing member with post 16 extending outwardly from the rear surface of the housing and the ends of body portion 7' adjacent post 16 engaging the inner end of the passageway to limit movement of the connector thereinto. Post 16 could be a ferrule section such as ferrule section 6. As can be discerned, cantilever legs 11' are provided with bent sections 17 along the area of contacts 12' so that contacts 12' are disposed centrally of cantilever legs 1 1 to distribute the loading of the contacts on the conductive paths of the printed circuit board about the center line of the electrical connector.

FIGS. 7 through 10 illustrate ferrule section 6 of electrical connector EC but of course this ferrule section can be used in conjunction with any other type of electrical connector in which electrical wire is to be crimped. Ferrule section 6 includes a wire-engaging portion 18 for crimpably engaging the conductive portion of wire 19 and an insulation-engaging portion 20 for engaging the insulation of wire 19 to provide strain relief therebetween. Wire-engaging portion 18 is U-shaped in cross section and has chevron-shaped depressions or serrations 21 formed therein. Serrations 21 permit the strands of wire or solid wire to be extruded thereinto upon crimping pressure being applied to wire-engaging portion 18 thereby providing staggered interruptions in the wire in an axial direction along wire-engaging portion 18 instead of in planes normal to the axis of the wire-engaging portion in accordance with conventional practice as illustrated in US. Pat. No. 2,800,638. The crimp performed by the chevron-shaped serrations does not therefore fatigue the metal and does increase the tensile to provide a more desirable and effective crimp; corrosion resistance is improved and conductivity in the connection is more stable.

It will, therefore, be appreciated that the aforementioned and other desirable objects have been achieved; however, it should be emphasized that the particular embodiments of the invention, which are shown and described herein, are intended as merely illustrative and not as restrictive of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A stamped and formed electrical connector adapted for engagement with a printed circuit board or the like, said connector comprising:

a body portion having a pair of spaced-apart cantilever legs extending from one end thereof, said body portion and said legs being stamped from strip stock material and lying along one plane,

said legs being formed inwardly and converging towards each other, said legs having contact means on their ends, said contact means comprising arcuate formations on said legs extending normally of said plane of said body portion and said legs, said contact means providing opposed arcuate contact surfaces which are spaced apart by a distance less than the width of said legs,

a pair of elongated embossments associated with each of said legs, each of said embossments extending in the direction of its respective leg partially on its respective leg and partially on said body portion, the stock material of said legs being strengthened by work hardening in the vicinity of said embossments, and

retention lance means extending from said body portion between said legs, said retention lance means being reversely bent and extending over said body portion on the same side of said connector as the side of said contact means.

2. A connector as set forth in claim 1 including laterally extending stabilizing flange means extending from the sides of said body portion, and laterally extending stabilizing ear means on said legs adjacent to said contact means, said stablitzing flange means and said stabilizing ear means extending in the same direction as said contact means.

3. A stamped and formed electrical connector adapted for engagement with a printed circuit board or the like, said connector comprising:

a body portion having a pair of spaced-apart cantilever legs extending from one end thereof, said body portion and said legs being stamped from strip stock material and lying along one plane,

said legs being formed inwardly and converging towards each other, said legs having contact means on their ends, said contact means comprising arcuate fonnations on said legs extending normally of said plane of said body portion and said legs, said contact means providing opposed arcuate contact surfaces which are spaced apart by a distance less than the width of said legs,

a work hardened zone associated with each of said legs,

each of said zones extending in the direction of its respective leg partially on its respective leg and partially on said body portion, the stock material of said legs being strengthened by work hardening in the vicinity of said zones and retention lance means extending from said body portion between said legs, said retention lance means being reversely bent and extending over said body portion on the same side of said connector as the side of said contact means.

Patent Citations
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US3020520 *Jul 30, 1959Feb 6, 1962Berg QuentinTerminal for making electrical connections
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3736627 *Nov 2, 1971Jun 5, 1973Betts T CorpConnector
US3787801 *Feb 9, 1972Jan 22, 1974Amp IncDouble thickness p.c.b. flag terminal
US3846735 *May 4, 1973Nov 5, 1974Amp IncElectrical contact terminal which can be mated with an identical terminal or with a dissimilar terminal
US3922051 *Dec 20, 1973Nov 25, 1975Amp IncConnector for alphanumeric display panels
US4365860 *Dec 30, 1980Dec 28, 1982Thomas & Betts CorporationIntegral housing insulation-piercing connector
US4784623 *Apr 3, 1987Nov 15, 1988Amp IncorporatedMass terminable flat flexible cable to pin connector
US4790760 *Jun 22, 1987Dec 13, 1988Amp IncorporatedPower distribution adapter
US4959026 *Oct 11, 1989Sep 25, 1990Amp IncorporatedPower distribution adapter
US4975069 *Nov 1, 1989Dec 4, 1990Amp IncorporatedElectrical modular connector
US5716242 *Feb 21, 1997Feb 10, 1998The Whitaker CorporationInsulation displacement contact with retention feature
US5848918 *Jan 28, 1997Dec 15, 1998General Signal CorporationElectrical appliance with novel electrical power connector structure
US5897394 *Dec 20, 1996Apr 27, 1999The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd.Conductor connection terminal and method of connection
US6183312 *Nov 11, 1997Feb 6, 2001The Whitaker CorporationElectrical contact
US6558208 *May 1, 2001May 6, 2003Tyco Electronics Amp, K.K.Electrical contact for press-bonding to electrical wire
US7581972 *Aug 13, 2008Sep 1, 2009Tyco Electronics Nederland B.V.Busbar connection system
US8118622 *Aug 16, 2010Feb 21, 2012Hon Hai Precision Ind. Co., Ltd.Electrical connector decreasing inserting force
US8172624 *Dec 5, 2008May 8, 2012Hubbell IncorporatedWiring device assembly with contact stabilizing structure
US20140011413 *Jun 28, 2013Jan 9, 2014Dai-Ichi Seiko Co., Ltd.Connector terminal and method of fabricating the same
DE3014614A1 *Apr 16, 1980Nov 12, 1981Bunker RamoCompression contact spring for electrical plug connector - formed from pre-stamped plate folded together and having projecting tongue for securing inside housing
EP0132070A2 *Jun 28, 1984Jan 23, 1985Amp IncorporatedElectrical edge connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/872, 439/857, 439/636, 439/884, 439/882
International ClassificationH01R12/18
Cooperative ClassificationH01R12/721
European ClassificationH01R23/70B