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Publication numberUS3656186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 18, 1972
Filing dateFeb 10, 1970
Priority dateFeb 18, 1969
Also published asDE2007214A1, DE2007214B2, DE2007214C3
Publication numberUS 3656186 A, US 3656186A, US-A-3656186, US3656186 A, US3656186A
InventorsDee Roger
Original AssigneeNat Res Dev
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elbow joint prosthesis
US 3656186 A
Abstract
A prosthetic elbow joint device comprising a first arm curved in two mutually transverse planes and formed with a first hinge part at one end thereof, and a second arm curved in one plane and formed with a second hinge part at one end thereof, the arms and hinge parts being adapted for securement by cement with the first and second arms respectively located in the ulna and humerus in intramedullary manner, the first hinge part seated on a shoulder cut in the olecranon, and the two parts disposed for mutual pivotal connection.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Dee [15.1 3,656,186 [45] Apr. 18, 1972 [54] ELBOW JOINT PROSTHESIS [72] Inventor: Roger Dee, London, England [73] Assignee: National Research Development Corporation, London, England [22] Filed: Feb. 10,1970

[21] App]. No.: 9,678

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Feb. 18, 1969 Great Britain ..8,855/69 [52] US. Cl. ..3/1, 128/92 C [51] Int. Cl. ..A61f1/24 [58] Field ofSearch ..128/92 R,92 BC,92 C, 92 CA; 3/1; 287/14, 96, 100

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,696,817 12/1954 Prevo ..128/92 C 2,668,531 2/1954 Haboush ..128/92 CA FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 482,509 7/1953 1,506,594 11/1967 France ..128/92 C OTHER PUBLICATIONS Arthroplasty of the Knee by L. G. P. Shiers, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, Vol. 363, No, 4, Nov. 1954, page 554 & 555.

Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-Ronald L. F rinks Attorney-Cushman, Darby and Cushman [5 7] ABSTRACT A prosthetic elbow joint device comprising a first arm curved in two mutually transverse planes and formed with a first hinge part at one end thereof, and a second arm curved in one plane and formed with a second hinge part at one end thereof, the arms and hinge parts being adapted for securement by cement with the first and second arms respectively located in the ulna and humerus in intramedullary manner, the first hinge part seated on a shoulder cut in the olecranon, and the two parts disposed for mutual pivotal connection.

4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures Italy ..128/92 CA ELBOW JOINT PROSTHESIS Various forms of elbow joint prosthesis have been proposed but these are not always completely satisfactory in practice. The proposed forms normally involve provision of members which are to be effectively secured within the humerus and ulna by a force fit. This involves a risk of bone damage or, if this risk is to be reduced, the manufacture of a custom-built prosthesis for each recipient. Also, the proposed forms normally involve removal of a substantial part of the olecranon to provide space for the hinge or pivot joint of the prosthesis, but this results in the joint being largely unprotected from any impact on the elbow as when bending and resting the same.

An object of the present invention is to reduce the above difficulties and, to this end, the invention provides a prosthetic elbow joint device comprising a first arm curved in two mutually transverse planes and formed with a first hinge part at one end thereof, and a second arm curved in one plane and formed with a second hinge part at one end thereof, the arms and hinge parts being adapted for securement by cement with the first and second arms respectively located in the ulna and humerus in intramedullary manner, the first hinge part seated on a shoulder cut in the olecranon, and the two hinge parts disposed for mutual pivotal connection.

In order that the invention may be more clearly understood, the same will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 respectively illustrate in plan, side and underneath views the first arm and hinge parts of one embodiment of the invention.

Figs. 4, and 6 similarly illustrate the associated second arm and hinge parts.

Figure 7 illustrates a pivot pin for connection of the two hinge parts.

Considering Figures 1 to 3, comparison of the side view with the other views clearly indicates curvature of the first arm 1 in two mutually perpendicular planes. The arm 1 is of generally rounded corner, trapezoidal cross-sectional shape and with similarly rounded edges at its outer or free end which is chamfered on one side. At its other end, the arm is integrally connected with the first hinge part 2.

The hinge part 2 has a base 3 which is generally flat apart from an increase in thickness at 4 by divergence of one side 5 surface from the other 6. The arm 1 joins the hinge part 2 partly in end-to-end relation at this thicker base portion, and by passing below such portion partway along the non-divergent surface 6 of the base. This last part of the arm is transversely grooved at 7 to assist securement by cement.

A flange 8 projects upwardly from the surface 6 of base 3, this flange being generally aligned with the adjacent part of arm 1, and being of generally triangular shape in side view. The flange 8 is transversely bored at 9.

Turning now to FIGS. 4 to 6, the second arm 10 is seen to be curved in only one plane. Arm 10 is of generally rounded comer, rectangular shape in cross-section along most of its length to its free end. Also, the arm 10 is integral with its associated hinge part 11. However, the arm 10 joins the hinge part 11 wholly in end-to-end relation, the relevant arm end being outwardly flared and of rounded cross-sectional shape except its lower surface. In place of the grooving of arm 1 to assist securement, the arm 10 is provided with two lugs 12 extending one from each side of the arm adjacent its hinge part.

The hinge part 11 comprises a generally U-shaped portion, with U-base 13 joined at its center across the inner end of arm 10, and U-arms 14 extending away from the arm 10. The U- arms are bridged, for part of their length from the U-base, by a web 15 which is flush with the arms on one side, but inclined on the other so that the web tapers towards the U-arm outer ends. Beyond the web, the U-arms are transversely bored at 16.

The hinge parts are so shaped and dimensioned for alignment of the bores 9 and 16 with the U-portion of part 11 embracing the flange 8 or part 2, and the inclined surface of web 15 facing the outermost such surface of flange 8. The hinge parts are connected by a pin, such as that of FIG. 7, which is passed through the bores and upset at its ends by a G-clamp or other suitable tool.

The curvature of the arms 1 and 11) is so designed that, as noted above, they can be freely inserted in the ulna and humerus, with the base portion 3 of hinge part 2 seated on a shoulder cut in the olecranon and the hinge parts connected. The seating of base 3 is indicated in Figure 2 relative to the olecranon shown in chain line. securement will be by cement, such as by use of suitable acrylic resin, and this is enhanced by the slotting at 7 and the lugs 12.

This mode of implantation is advantageous in that the arms 1 and 10 can be of reduced dimensions relative to force-fitting arms, and so permit a few standard size parts to be provided for use with a relatively large range of bone sizes. It might be mentioned in this connection that the only basic variation required in practice is one of geometry, since the illustrated arm 1 is for a right hand side ulna and would have its curvature reversed as seen in FIGS. 1 and 3 for a left hand side ulna.

A further advantage is that retention of part of the olecranon as a seat for the hinge serves to avoid effectively direct impact on the hinge when the elbow is bent.

Regarding manufacture of the prosthesis, this is preferably of chrome cobalt alloy such as that under the name "Vinertia which is well suited to this application. An alternative, although less preferable, is stainless steel.

Iclaim:

1. A prosthetic elbow joint device comprising:

a hinge assembly including a first hinge part and a second hinge part pivotally coupled for relative rotation about a generally transverse axis therethrough;

a first rigid intramedullary arm extending from said first hinge part, said first arm following a compound curvature along a lower, first portion thereof, disposed nearer said first hinge part, with a first component of curvature out" wardly convex and laterally offsetting outwardly relative to a first plane including said rotation axis and a second component of curvature rearwardly convex and offsetting forwardly relative to a second plane mutually perpendicu lar to both said first plane and said rotation axis, and said first arm having an upper, free end second portion with a generally straight longitudinal axis substantially parallel to said second plane and orthogonal with said rotation axis;

and a second rigid intramedullary arm extending from said second hinge part;

said hinge assembly being wholly off-set forwardly from said longitudinal axis of said first arm free end portion.

2. A device according to claim 1 wherein said second arm is curved rearwardly along substantially the whole of its length relative to said second plane, but in the opposite sense to said second component of curvature of said first arm, while said second arm is substantially straight in said first plane.

3. A device according to claim 1 wherein said first hinge part comprises a base member portion with a generally flat undersurface parallel to said longitudinal axis, and a first bored bearing member portion upstanding from a generally centralized zone of the opposite surface of said base portion, and wherein said second hinge part comprises a pair of second bored bearing member portions projecting in fork-like manner from a common portion joined with said second arm, said second bearing member portions embracing said first bored bearing member portion with their respective bores all aligned, and a pivot pin passing through and rotatably secured in said bores.

4. A device according to claim 3 wherein said first bearing member portion is of generally triangular shape in said common plane with the triangle base joined with said base member portion and the free apex rounded, and wherein said second bearing member portions are bridged by a web joined with said common portion and chamfered in generally complementary manner with the adjacent side of said triangular shape when said arms are oppositely directed.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2668531 *Feb 15, 1952Feb 9, 1954Haboush Edward JProsthesis for hip joint
US2696817 *Apr 30, 1952Dec 14, 1954Samuel B PrevoProsthetic elbow joint
*DE976768A Title not available
FR1506594A * Title not available
IT482509A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 * Arthroplasty of the Knee by L. G. P. Shiers, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, Vol. 36B, No. 4, Nov. 1954, page 554 & 555.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3760427 *Mar 24, 1972Sep 25, 1973Schultz RSurgically implantable prosthetic joint
US3772709 *Jun 15, 1972Nov 20, 1973A SwansonProsthetic joint
US3813700 *Apr 16, 1973Jun 4, 1974Tavernetti RProsthetic knee device
US3816854 *Jul 3, 1973Jun 18, 1974A SchleinProsthesis for total arthroplasty of the elbow joint
US3852831 *Jan 29, 1974Dec 10, 1974Nat Res DevEndoprosthetic elbow joint
US3879766 *Oct 11, 1973Apr 29, 1975Nat Res DevEndoprosthetic bone joint device
US3991425 *Nov 20, 1975Nov 16, 1976Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyProsthetic bone joint devices
US4008495 *Jun 26, 1975Feb 22, 1977National Research Development CorporationProsthetic bone joint devices
US4187559 *Jun 12, 1978Feb 12, 1980Sybron CorporationBody joint endoprosthesis
US4383337 *Oct 22, 1980May 17, 1983Zimmer Usa, Inc.Elbow prosthesis
US5997543 *Feb 20, 1998Dec 7, 1999Biomet LimitedSurgical instrumentation
US6162253 *Dec 9, 1998Dec 19, 2000Iowa State University Research Foundation, Inc.Total elbow arthroplasty system
US6306171Apr 4, 2000Oct 23, 2001Iowa State University Research Foundation, Inc.Total elbow arthroplasty system
US7608110Mar 11, 2005Oct 27, 2009O'driscoll Shawn WSystems for bone replacement
US8226726Sep 3, 2009Jul 24, 2012Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Method and instrumentation for patello-femoral joint replacement
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/20.12
International ClassificationA61F2/30, A61F2/38
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/3804, A61F2002/30626
European ClassificationA61F2/38B