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Publication numberUS3658054 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1972
Filing dateMay 11, 1970
Priority dateMay 11, 1970
Publication numberUS 3658054 A, US 3658054A, US-A-3658054, US3658054 A, US3658054A
InventorsIberall Arthur S
Original AssigneeGen Technical Services Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable helmet face mask
US 3658054 A
Abstract
An adjustable helmet for mounting physiological sensors employed to take physiological measurements of patient. The adjustable helmet consists of a front portion of flexible plastic material having three flexible arms adapted to fit over the cheekbones and forehead of the wearer. The ends of each of the flexible arms are provided with a number of slots for adjusting the front portion to a particular person's head. The rear portion of the adjustable helmet, also of flexible plastic, fits snugly over the back of the wearer's head and contains fasteners which snap into any of the slots in the flexible arms. Both the front and rear portions contain grommets for mounting physiological sensors in positions where the physiological measurement is to be made.
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United States Patent Iberall 51 Apr. 25, 1972 [54] ADJUSTABLE HELMET FACE MASK 72] lnventor: Arthur S. lberall, Radnor, Pa.

[73] Assignee: General Technical Services, Incorporated, I Upper Darby, Pa.

r [22] .Filed: May 11, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 36,281

[52] U.S.Cl. ..128/2.05 R, l28/2.05 E, 128/21 B [51] Int. Cl ..A6lb 5/02, A61 b 5/04 [58] Field of Search ..l28/2.05 AV,4l0,

lZS/DIG. 4, 2.1 R, 2.06 E, 2.1 A, 2.1 B, 2.1 E, 2.1

3,490,439 1/1970 Rolston l28/2.l 2,549,836 4/1951 McIntyre et al. 128/2 R 2,886,818 5/1959 Roberts ..2/3 R Attorney-Hair, Freeman & Molinare [57] ABSTRACT An adjustable helmet for mounting physiological sensors employed to take physiological measurements of patient. The adjustable helmet consists of a front portion of flexible plastic material having three flexible arms adapted to fit over the cheekbones and forehead of the wearer. The ends of each of the flexible arms are provided with a number of slots for adjusting the front portion to a particular persons head. The rear portion of the adjustable helmet, also of flexible plastic, fits snugly over the back of the wearers head and contains fasteners which snap into any of the slots in the flexible arms. Both the front and rear portions contain grommets for mounting physiological sensors in positions where the physiological measurement is to be made.

1 Claim, 12 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPRZS I972 3, 658 054 SHEET 1 OF 3 1 NVEN TOR 4/? THUR 5. /BERALL BY MM ATTORNEYS PATENTEU APR 2 5 I972 SHEET 2 [1F 3 INVENTOR AR THUR s. IBERALL y MW ATTORNEYS BY WM PATENTEDAPR 25 I972 3, 658, 054

an 3 [IF 3 EA. F l2 ANTENNA (76 /78 VOLTAGE MODULATOR POWER SUPPL Y 84 R./-7 RE SOURCE AMP m! VEN'I UR, APT/4UP 5. /BERALL ATTORNEYS ADJUSTABLE HELMET FACE MASK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to an adjustable helmet face mask for mounting physiological sensors. In the increasingly complex technology of today, medical personnel find it necessary to have a great number of measurements of the physiological parameters of a patient. These parameters are vital for the accurate prognosis and diagnosis of the patient. In the past many of these measurements were taken manually, for instance the measurements of blood pressure and temperature. Manual measurement of these physiological parameters is inadequate because it is both inconvenient and time consuming to obtain continuous readings of these parameters which are necessary if changes in the patients conditionare to be observed. Also, if each of the required physiological parameters were to be measured manually, it would be most difficult to take there measurements simultaneously as each of the measurements would require an individual to take the measurement.

Recently, devices for receiving electrodes and the like have been developed for placement on a patients head. For example the teaching of Ulett (US. Pat. No. 2,426,958) discloses an electrode holder of rigid construction having a band which may be adjusted about the wearers head and secured by a wing nut and bolt fitting through overlapping portions of the band and slidable in a longitudinal slot provided on one end of the band. These devices are generally expensive, uncomforta ble and inadequate for the purposes of measuring a number of physiological parameters. Consequently, it is desirable to provide a helmet for receiving physiological sensors which will be lightweight, flexible, inexpensive and comfortable for the wearer. It is also desirable to have such a helmet which will be adjustable to any human head.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION In a principal aspect the present invention takes the form of an adjustable helmet face mask for mounting physiological sensors, adapted to fit any persons head, comprising, an anterior portion having a single center, a plurality of flexible arms extending from the center, each of the flexible arms having fastening means for fastening the arms, and means for mounting physiological sensors in sensor locations, and a posterior portion having means for receiving the fastening means such that the helmet face mask is adjustable to a human head, and means for accommodating the physiological sensors in sensor locations.

In a preferred embodiment the plurality of flexible arms of the anterior portion comprise three flexible arms joined to the center of the anterior portion so as to form a substantially inverted Y. The upwardly extending arm is adapted to fit the contour of the wearers forehead from the upper portion of his nose to the back of his head, and the second and third arms are adapted to fit the contour of the wearers face from the FIG. 4 is a top view of the wearer and helmet shown in FIG.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the posterior portion of the adjustable helmet shown in FIG. 1

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the anterior portion of the adjustable helmet shown in FIG. 1

FIG. 7 is a side view of the head of a wearer with a second preferred embodiment of the adjustable helmet in place on the wearers head;

FIG. 8 is a frontal view of the wearer and helmet shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a rear view of the wearer and helmet shown in FIG.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the posterior portion of the adjustable helmet shown in FIG. 7,

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the anterior portion of the adjustable helmet shown in FIG. 7,

FIG. 12 shows a circuit diagram of the transducer (a), a block diagram of the sender (b) and of the receiver (c).

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1-7 show an adjustable helmet face mask for mounting physiological sensors which employs the principles of the present invention. The device includes an anterior portion 10 having a single center 12 from which extend a first flexible arm 14, a second flexible arm 16 and a third flexible arm 18 joined together so as to form an inverted Y as seen in FIG. 2 and FIG. 6.

The posterior portion 20 shown isolated in the perspective view of FIG. 5 includes a vertical flexible band 22 adapted to fit over the wearers head extending from beneath one ear to beneath the other ear. An upper horizontal flexible band 24 is joined at each end to the vertical flexible band 22 at positions above each of the wearers ears respectively. A lower horizontal flexible band 26 is joined at each end of the lower horizontal flexible band 26 to the ends of the vertical flexible band 22 beneath each of the wearers ears. A vertical segment band 28 joins midpoint 25 of the upper horizontal band 24 to the midpoint 27 of the lower horizontal band 26.

The posterior portion 20 is rendered secure on the wearers head by the vertical flexible band 22 fitting over the wearers head which prevents movement of the mask downwardly and by the upper horizontal flexible band 24 fitting behind the upper part of the wearers head which prevents slippage of the mask toward the wearers face. The lower horizontal flexible upper portion of his nose over his left and right cheekbones respectively, and beneath his left and right ears respectively. The means for accommodating physiological sensors comprises a number of grommets attached to the flexible arms at sensor locations. The means for securing the posterior portion includes at least one flexible band adapted to fit behind the persons head and adapted to receive the fastening means for fastening the arms such that the anterior portion and the posterior portion are held securely on the persons head.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side view of the profile of the head of a wearer with a first preferred embodiment of the adjustable helmet in place on the head;

FIG. 2 is a front view of the wearer and helmet shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a rear view of the wearer and helmet shown in FIG.

band 26, fitting behind the lower part of the wearers head and directly beneath the external occipital protuberance 29 of the wearer, cooperates with the vertical segment flexible band 28 by preventing slippage of the mask upwardly.

The helmet is rendered adjustable to fit any persons head by means of fasteners 30 joined to ends of the vertical flexible band 22 and to the midpoint 25 of the upper horizontal band 24 which are adapted to snap into any of the slots 32 located along the first second and third flexible arms 14, 16, and 18, respectively.

Grommets 34 for receiving physiological sensors are snapped securely into flexible bands 22, 24, and 26 and flexible arms 14, 16 and 18 in a number of sensor locations. For instance, rornmet 34ais located over the ersons tem oral arg P P tery for mounting the physiological sensor for measuring temporal blood pressure and grommet 34 b is positioned near the persons earlobe for mounting the blood oxygenation sensor.

The adjustable helmet is positioned on a person s head,

locating the single center 12 of the anterior portion 10 on the respectively forming the substantially inverted Y shown in FIG. 2. The helmet is locked into position extending the ends of the second and third flexible arms 16 and 18 to positions near the fasteners 30 and snapping the flexible arms 16 and 18 into positions rigid yet comfortable for the wearer.

The adjustable helmet thus fastened is in a secure position on the wearers head, anchored in front at the upper portion of the wearer's nose by anterior portion and in back beneath the wearers external protuberance 29 by the posterior portion 20.

FIG. 7-11 show a second preferred embodiment of an adjustable helmet face mask for mounting physiological sensors which employs the principles of the present invention.

The posterior portion 50 shown isolated in the perspective view of FIG. 10 differs from the embodiment of FIG. 5 is several aspects. The upper and lower horizontal flexible bands 24 and 26 of FIG. 5 are replaced by a singlehorizontal band 52 fitting behind the wearers head beneath his occipital protuberance 29 and having cavities through which the wearers ears may fit. As in the first embodiment shown in FIG. 5, a vertical flexible band 54 fits over the wearers head from beneath one ear to beneath the other. Also, a flexible connecting vertical segment 56 connects the midpoint 53 of the single horizontal band 52 to the midpoint 55 of the vertical flexible band 54.

The anterior portion58 of the second preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 11 differs from that in FIG. 6 only in that the first flexible arm 60 is shorter than the first flexible arm 14 of FIG. 6. The difference is attributable to the fact that the first flexible arm 60 is designed to be secured atop the wearers head to the vertical flexible band 54 as shown in FIG. 7 rather than behind the wearers head to the upper horizontal band as shown in FIG. 1.

A particular example of monitoring apparatus is shown in FIGS. 2 and 12. There a blood pressure transducer 62 is mounted over the wearers temporal artery. A pressure sensitive diaphragm 63 is employed in the transducer to sense the blood pressure of the wearers external temporal artery. The position of the diaphragm will vary with the varying blood pressure of the wearer.

The transducer 62 may take the form of a Wheatstone Bridge 64 having fixed resistors 65, 66, 67 and 68 and a variable resistor 69. The variable resistor may be positioned on the diaphragm 63 so that movement of the diaphragm 63 causes physical distortion of the variable resistor 69. The distortion varies the resistance of resistor 69 and serves to produce a voltage across the output terminals 70 of the bridge 64 representative of the distortion.

Power is supplied to the transducer 62 from a DC voltage source 71. The current from source 71 may be controlled by a single pole, single throw, manually operable switch 72 in series with source 71. The switch 72 and source 71 are in series across input terminals 73 of thebridge 64.

The voltage across the output terminals 70 is transmitted to a voltage amplifier 76 as shown in the block diagram of FIG. 12b. Output voltage is fed through a voltage amplifier 76 to a modulator 78 where it is modulated by a radio frequency carrier wave produced by a radio frequency generator 80 and radio frequency amplifier 82. Power source 84 supplies power to the individual units. The wave shape then flows into antenna 86 where electromagnetic wave shapes are formed and radiated.

The voltage may be monitored on an oscilloscope, voltmeter, or digital recorder after reception by a radio frequency receiver having a dipole antenna 86, filter 88, demodulator 90 and power supply 92 as shown in the block diagram 120. An oscilloscope 94 would be preferable to show time varying changes in the blood pressure wave shape whereas the voltmeter response would merely show an arrow wavering between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure of the wearer.

While in the foregoing, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it is to be understood,

that all those embodiments obvious to persons skilled in the art, and all those embodiments which are equivalent are to be included within the scope of the claimed invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An adjustable helmet face mask for mounting physiological sensors adapted to fit a person s head, comprising, in combination,

an anterior portion having a single center,,flexible arms extending from said center, a first flexible arm, second flexible arm, and third flexible arm, each of said arms extending from said center, said center adapted to locate over the upper nasal portion with said first arm extending upward over the forehead to engage the anterior portion, said second and third arms extending outward and downward from said center portion and connectable with said anterior section such that said second and third arms extend over the cheekbones, and beneath the ears when the helmet is mounted on the person s head,

a posterior portion having a means for receiving said fastening means such that said anterior and posterior portions are fastenable in varient positions and adjustable to a human head in a plurality of positions, and means on at least one of said portions for mounting physiological sensors in a plurality of sensor locations.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426958 *Dec 27, 1944Sep 2, 1947Claussen Fred BElectrode holder for use in electroencephalography
US2549836 *Jun 14, 1946Apr 24, 1951Dunn Arthur LElectrode-carrying headgear for electroencephalographic analysis
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US3132643 *Aug 18, 1960May 12, 1964Melpar IncBlood pressure measurement
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3769966 *Mar 22, 1971Nov 6, 1973York UniversityApparatus for determining local cerebral blood flow
US3882850 *May 9, 1973May 13, 1975Bailin HowardBrain wave feedback instrument
US3890959 *Apr 26, 1973Jun 24, 1975Univ New YorkMethod for determining discrete localized blood flow in a large volume of tissue
US3998213 *Apr 8, 1975Dec 21, 1976Bio-Volt CorporationSelf-adjustable holder for automatically positioning electroencephalographic electrodes
US4085739 *Nov 22, 1976Apr 25, 1978Sams Marvin WElectroencephalograph cap and electrode harness
US4587677 *Oct 16, 1984May 13, 1986Cooper Canada LimitedClip for joining a first member to a second
US4817628 *Oct 18, 1985Apr 4, 1989David L. ZealearSystem and method for evaluating neurological function controlling muscular movements
US4836219 *Jul 8, 1987Jun 6, 1989President & Fellows Of Harvard CollegeElectronic sleep monitor headgear
US4875477 *Jun 27, 1988Oct 24, 1989Dragerwerk AktiengesellschaftProtective mask having a built-in sensor for monitoring vital functions
US4995401 *Feb 26, 1988Feb 26, 1991Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemDevice for measuring anterior fontanelle pressure
US5230342 *Aug 30, 1991Jul 27, 1993Baxter International Inc.Blood pressure monitoring technique which utilizes a patient's supraorbital artery
US5591175 *Aug 12, 1993Jan 7, 1997Juto; Jan-ErikDevice for positioning a person's head in a coordinate system
US5942979 *Apr 7, 1997Aug 24, 1999Luppino; RichardOn guard vehicle safety warning system
US5971931 *Mar 29, 1994Oct 26, 1999Raff; Gilbert LewisBiologic micromonitoring methods and systems
US6121953 *Feb 6, 1997Sep 19, 2000Modern Cartoons, Ltd.Virtual reality system for sensing facial movements
US7570170 *Jun 8, 2005Aug 4, 2009Delphi Technologies, Inc.Monitoring apparatus for a helmet
US8448266 *Dec 9, 2011May 28, 2013Sports Maska Inc.Adjustable helmet shell
US8746090 *Jan 31, 2011Jun 10, 2014General Electric CompanyArrangement for fastening sensor to face of subject and measuring assembly
US20110197689 *Jan 31, 2011Aug 18, 2011Heikki HaveriArrangement for fastening sensor to face of subject and measuring assembly
US20120144564 *Dec 9, 2011Jun 14, 2012Garnet AlexanderAdjustable helmet shell
US20130018277 *Jul 15, 2011Jan 17, 2013Jung-Tung LiuNon-invasive intracranial pressure monitor
WO1998036631A2 *Feb 6, 1998Aug 27, 1998Modern Cartoons LtdSystem for sensing facial movements in virtual reality
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/485, 2/9
International ClassificationA61B5/00
European ClassificationA61B5/00B