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Publication numberUS3658303 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1972
Filing dateOct 17, 1969
Priority dateOct 17, 1969
Publication numberUS 3658303 A, US 3658303A, US-A-3658303, US3658303 A, US3658303A
InventorsFunk Howard C
Original AssigneeFunk Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drive mechanism for concrete mixer
US 3658303 A
Abstract
A drive mechanism for a concrete mixer comprising a planetary gear train interposed between a motor and the mixer housing for transmitting rotation to the mixer. The planetary gear arrangement comprises a sun gear in driving engagement with a plurality of planet gears for transmitting rotation thereto. Each planet gear is a double gear in simultaneous driving engagement with a stationary ring gear and a freely rotatable ring gear for transmitting rotation to the rotatable ring gear. The rotatable ring gear is secured to the mixer housing for rotation simultaneously therewith. In addition, a ball socket joint connection is provided for the mixer housing for absorbing substantially all the twisting motion for reducing strain on the vehicle or truck.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Funk 51 Apr. 25, W72

[54] DRIVE MECHANISM FOR CONCRETE MIXER [72] Inventor:

[73] Assignee: Funk Mfg. Company, Coffeyville, Kans. [22] Filed: Oct. 17, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 869,446

Howard C. Funk, Coffeyville, Kans.

3,187,997 6/1965 Gooch ..233/23 Primary Examiner-Robert W. Jenkins Attorney-William S. Dorman s7 ABSTRACT A drive mechanism for a concrete mixer comprising a planetary gear train interposed between a motor and the mixer housing for transmitting rotation to the mixer. The planetary gear arrangement comprises a sun gear in driving engagement with a plurality of planet gears for transmitting rotation thereto. Each planet gear is a double gear in simultaneous driving engagement with a stationary ring gear and a freely rotatable ring gear for transmitting rotation to the rotatable ring gear. The rotatable ring gear is secured to the mixer housing for rotation simultaneously therewith. In addition, a ball socket joint connection is provided for the mixer housing for absorbing substantially all the twisting motion for reducing strain on the vehicle or truck.

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mmm mmm won ATTORNEY DRIVE MECHANISM FOR CONCRETE MIXER This invention relates to improvements in concrete mixers and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to a planetary gear drive mechanism for rotating of the mixer housing.

The usual concrete mixer drive mechanism in use today normally comprises a gear box for driving a first relatively small sprocket which is connected to a second relatively large sprocket by means of a chain, or the like. The large gear or sprocket is secured to one end of the mixer housing and rotates the housing simultaneously therewith. The mixer housing and contents are extremely heavy and the rotation thereof during a mixing operation is somewhat violent. This usually transmits a considerable amount of twist to the truck or vehicle frame. In addition, the large gears or sprockets are expensive and the drive mechanism is usually open or unprotected and may create a hazard for the personnel.

The present invention contemplates a novel drive mechanism for concrete mixers particularly designed and constructed to provide the required driving torque for the mixer through more conventional sized gear members. In addition, a ball joint connection is provided for the mixer housing for absorbing substantially all of the twisting or shock from the rotation of the mixer for reducing the strain on the vehicle frame. Furthermore, the gear drive is encased within the mixer housing and sealed from the cement slurry during the mixing operation, thus providing a safe and efficient drive mechanism for the mixer. The gear drive is a planetary gear system comprising a sun gear in driving engagement with a plurality of planet gears, with each of the planet gears being a double gear. Each planet gear is in simultaneous meshing engagement with a stationary ring gear and a rotatable ring gear. The planet gears roll around the inner periphery of the stationary gear and by virtue of a proper gear ratio between the planet gears and the rotatable ring gear, the rolling planet gears transmit rotation to the rotatable ring gear. The rotatable ring gear is secured to the mixer housing for transmitting rotation thereto. The use of the double planet gears provides a drive output for the gears which is much greater than otherwise available with gear members of substantially standard diametric sizes, thus eliminating the need for the large sprocket in order to obtain the desired output for the mixer drive mechanism.

It is an important object of this invention to provide a novel drive mechanism for a concrete mixer particularly designed and constructed for eliminating the need for relatively large sprocket members for rotating of the mixer housing.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel drive mechanism for concrete mixers wherein a ball joint connection is provided for the mixer housing to absorb shock during rotation of the housing to reduce strain on the vehicle frame.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a novel drive mechanism for concrete mixers wherein the drive mechanism is concealed for reducing hazard to the personnel.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel drive mechanism for concrete mixers which is simple and efficient in operation and economical and durable in construction.

Other and further objects and advantageous features of the present invention will hereinafter more fully appear in connection with a detailed description of the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a concrete mixer vehicle having a drive mechanism embodying the invention provided thereon.

FIG. 2 is a sectional elevational view of a concrete mixer drive mechanism and ball joint connection embodying the invention.

FIG. 3 is a sectional elevational view of a modified concrete mixer drive and ball connection embodying theinvention.

Referring to the drawings in detail, reference character generally indicates a concrete mixer vehicle of any suitable type comprising the usual truck frame 12 having a mixer housing 14 suitably journalled between a pair of upstanding pedestals 16 and 18, as is well known. A suitable motor 20 is provided for power to rotate the mixer housing and may be conveniently mounted within or totally enclosed within the pedestal 16. The motor 20 is secured to a ball socket joint or connection section generally indicated at 22 in a manner as will be hereinafter set forth. In addition, the motor 20 is operably connected with a planetary gear drive generally indicated at 24 in a manner and for a purpose as will be hereinafter set forth.

Whereas the motor 20 may be of any suitable type, it is preferable to provide a hydraulic motor which may be operably connected with the vehicle engine (not shown) in any suitable or. well known manner for actuation. For example, a hydraulic pump 26 (shown in dotted lines in FIG. I) may be installed or mounted on the vehicle engine at the flywheel end thereof and suitably attached to the vehicle motor for a hydraulic pump. Alternately, the pump 26 may be installed or mounted on the front end of the vehicle engine under the radiator for driving connection directly with the crank shaft (not shown). Suitable hydraulic hoses 28 and 30 may be connected between the pump 26 and motor 20 for transmitting the hydraulic fluid thereto. The hoses 28 and 30 may be threaded through the vehicle frame 12 as is well known. Still another installation arrangement may be provided wherein the drive may be taken directly out of the flywheel power take-off (not shown) normally mounted at the rear of the vehicle engine, with a drive line (not shown) leading rearwardly to a hydraulic pump (not shown) mounted directly beneath the pedestal 16. Suitable hydraulic hoses (not shown) are then provided between the pump and the motor 20 for supplying the hydraulic fluid thereto. The use of a hydraulic pump and hydraulic motor is well known in mixers, and is commonly known as a hydrostatic drive.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the ball socket joint 22 is preferably an integral self-aligning gear coupling which comprises a flange member 32 bolted or otherwise secured to the pedestal 16 as shown at 34 and having a sleeve member 36 extending axially outward therefrom in one direction for insertion within an aperture 38 provided in the pedestal 16. A second flange member 40 is disposed in abutting relationship with the flange 32 and may be secured thereto by the bolts 34. An annular shoulder is provided on the flange 32 for facilitating alignment of the second flange 40 with respect thereto and for maintaining the flanges 32 and 40 in substantial axial alignment. The inner periphery of the sleeve 36 is substantially spherical, as shown at 44, and the inner periphery of the second flange 40 is also substantially spherical, as shown at 46. The spherical surfaces 44 and 46 define a common sphere for a purpose as will be hereinafter set forth.

A shank member 48 xtends axially through the flanges 32 and 40 and is provided with an enlarged head member 50 at one end thereof. The outer periphery of the head member 50 is spherical, as shown at 52, and is of a configuration complementary to the spherical surfaces 44 and 46. A spherical spline 54 is interposed between the head member 50 and the shoulder portion 42 of the flange 32 whereby the spherical head 50 is retained against rotation about the axis thereof, but may freely oscillate as will be hereinafter set forth. The outer end 54 of the head 50 extends into the interior of the pedestal l6 and the motor 20 may be bolted or otherwise secured thereon by means of bolts 56, a portion of which is shown in FIG. 2. The drive shaft 58 of the motor 20 extends longitudinally into a central bore 64 provided in the shank 48 and is secured to the drive shaft 58 by means of a suitable coupling member 66 whereby rotation is transmitted from the drive shaft 58 to the shaft 62 for a purpose as will be hereinafter set forth.

As hereinbefore set forth, the gear drive mechanism 24 is disposed within the mixer housing 14, is encased therein by a sleeve member 68 having an outwardly extending circumferential flange 70 at one end thereof and a housing 72 having an outwardly extending circumferential flange 74 extending around the open end thereof. The housing 72 extends through a bore 76 provided in the mixer housing 14 and the flange 74 thereof is disposed in abutting relationship with the flange 70, and the flanges 74 and 70 are bolted or otherwise secured to the housing 14 as shown at 78 in FIG. 2. It is preferable to provide a suitable sealing member 80 between the mixer housing 14 and the flange 74 for precluding leakage of fluid therebetween, and a similar sealing member 82 may be provided between the flanges 70 and 74 for precluding leakage therebetween.

The shank 48 extends axially through the sleeve 68 and is concentrically disposed with respect thereto to provide an annular chamber 84 therebetween. The shank 48 is supported within the sleeve 68 in the proximity of the head chamber 50 by a first tapered roller bearing 86 interposed between the outer periphery of the shank 48 and inner periphery of the sleeve 68. An annular retainer ring 88 is secured to the outer or exposed face of the flange 70 by a plurality of bolts 90 or the like and cooperates with a downwardly directed annular shoulder 92 provided on the inner periphery of the sleeve 68 for retaining the bearing 86 against longitudinal movement. A sleeve 94 is disposed around the outer periphery of the shank 48 longitudinally spaced from the head member 50 and is suitably keyed or splined to the shank 48 and remains stationary therewith. An outwardly extending circumferential flange 96 is provided for the sleeve 94 and is spaced slightly from the outer end of the sleeve 68 as clearly shown in FIG. 2. A second tapered roller bearing 98 is interposed between the inner periphery of the sleeve 68 and the outer periphery of the sleeve 94. An inwardly directed annular shoulder 100 provided on the inner periphery of the sleeve 68 cooperates with the flange 96 for retaining the bearing 98 against longitudinal movement. It will thus be apparent that whereas the shank 48 is held stationary through the connection thereto with the pedestal 16, the sleeve 68 and housing 72 are freely rotatable with respect to the shank 48 for transmitting rotation to the housing 14 in a manner as will be hereinafter set forth.

The planetary gear drive 24 comprises a sun gear 102 keyed or otherwise secured to the outer end of the shaft 62 for rotation simultaneously therewith. An inwardly directed centrally disposed boss member 104 is provided on the cover 72 and extends in a direction toward the shaft 62 for facilitating retaining of the sun gear 102 thereon as is well known. A plurality of planetary gears 106 are circumferentially spaced around the sun gear 102. Only one of the planet gears 106 is shown in FIG. 2 and whereas substantially any desired number thereof may be circumferentially spaced around the sun gear 102, it is preferable to provide three of the planet gears spaced at substantially 120 apart. Each planet gear 106 is substantially identical and comprises a generally annular body 108 supported on a centrally disposed shaft 110 by a pair of spaced bearings 112 and 114. The shaft 110 is suitably supported between a pair of spaced annular plate members 116 and 118. The plates 116 and 118 are supported by suitable roller bearings 120 and 122, respectively. The bearing 120 is disposed on a reduced portion 124 of the sleeve 94 and is retained against longitudinal movement by the flange 96 and an inwardly directed shoulder 126 provided on the member 116. The bearing 122 is disposed around an inwardly directed cylinder member 128 provided on the cover 72 and is retained against longitudinal movement by an inwardly directed annular shoulder 130 provided on the member 118 and an oppositely disposed annular shoulder 132 provided on the outer periphery ofthe cylinder member 128.

The gear body 108 is provided with an annular recess 134 extending around the outer periphery thereof whereby the outer periphery of the gear body 108 is provided with two gear sections, 136 and 138. The diameter of the gear section 136 is preferably greater than the diameter of the gear section 138 as clearly shown in FIG. 2. The gear section 136 is provided with suitable gear teeth which mesh with the sun gear 102 and also mesh with a cylinder ring gear 140 having internal teeth 142 complementary to the teeth 136 provided thereon. The ring gear 140 is rigidly secured to the flange 96 in any suitable manner and remains stationary therewith. The gear section 138 is not engaged by the sun gear 102 but is in meshing engagement with a cylindrical ring gear 144 having internal teeth 146 complementary to the teeth 138 provided thereon. The

gear 144 is rigidly secured with the housing 72 in any suitable manner such as the bolts 148 for simultaneous movement therebetween. It is preferable that the gear ratio or tooth ratio between the planet gear portions 138 and the ring gear 144 be selected whereby the total number of teeth on the planet gear portions 138 be less than the total number of teeth 146 on the ring gear 144 for a purpose as will be hereinafter set forth.

It is preferable to provide a suitable lubricant within the chamber 150 of the housing 72 for assuring constant lubrication of the bearings and gears and a plurality of spaced ports 152 may be provided in the sleeve 68 for directing the fluid into the chamber 84 as is well known and, in addition, suitable fluid passageways 154 may be provided in the shank 48 for directing the lubricant into the bore 60 as is well known, and passageways 156 may be provided in the sleeve 68 for assuring an adequate supply of lubricating fluid for the bearing 86.

When it is desired to rotate the mixer housing 14 for any reason, the motor 20 may be actuated in any well known manner whereby the drive shaft 58 thereof transmits rotation to the shaft 62. The rotation of the shaft 62 transmits rotation to the sun gear 102, which in turn transmits simultaneous rotation to each of the planet gears 106. Since the ring gear 140 is held stationary by connection with the stationary shank 48, the engagement between the gear portion 136 and teeth 142 causes the planet gears 106 to roll around the inner periphery of the ring gear 140, or move circumferentially around the sun gear 102. Of course, the gear portions 138 rotate around the sun gear 102 simultaneously with the gear portions 136 and the gear portions 136 are in driving engagement with the teeth 146 of the ring gear 144. The tooth differential between the planet gear portions 138 and the gear teeth 146 causes the ring gear 144 to rotate independently of the planet gears 106. The rotation of the ring gear 144 is transmitted to the housing 72 by virtue of the rigid connection therebetween, and the rotation of the housing 72 is transmitted to the mixer housing 14 through the flanges 74 and 70 secured therebetween.

The flange 70 and sleeve 48 are freely rotatable with respect to the shank 38, and the mixer housing 14 is thus freely rotatable with respect to the shank 48 and ball socket joint 22 and pedestal 16. Of course, the weight of the mixer housing 14, particularly when the mixer housing is filled with cement mixture, creates a considerable amount of wobble or twisting during rotation thereof. The spherical surfaces 44, 46 and 52 permit relative oscillation between the mixer housing 14 and the pedestal 16 and vehicle frame 12 while precluding rotation of the shank 48 about the longitudinal axis thereof. Thus, twisting and strain on the vehicle frame 12 is greatly reduced.

The output of the novel drive mechanism may be designed for driving mixers of substantially any size. For example, with a gear ratio of to l and a hydraulic motor torque of250 ft. 35., the output torque or torque at the mixer drum 14 would be 31,200 ft. lbs. In addition, a hydraulic motor capable of turning at 2500 RPM, divided by a total gear ratio of 125 equals 20 RPM, which is normally considered an ideal maximum speed for a mixer drum.

Referring now to FIG. 3, a ball socket joint generally indicated at 200 and a planetary gear drive generally indicated at 202 are shown which are structurally and functionally generally similar to the ball joint 22 and gear drive mechanism 24. The ball socket joint 200 comprises a flange member 204 bolted or otherwise secured to the pedestal 16 as shown at 206 and having a sleeve member 208 extending axially outward therefrom in one direction for insertion within an aperture 210 provided in the pedestal 16. A second flange member 212 is disposed adjacent the flange 204 and may be secured thereto by the bolts 206. An annular shoulder 214 is provided on the flange 212 and is of an internal diameter corresponding to the outer diameter of the flange 204 for receiving the flange 204 therein to maintain the flanges 204 and 212 in substantial axial alignment. The flange 212 is provided with a sleeve 216 extending axially outward in an opposite direction from the sleeve 208. The inner periphery of the sleeve 208 is substantially spherical, as shown at 218, and the inner periphery of the second sleeve 216 is also substantially spherical, as shown at 220. The spherical surfaces 218 and 220 define a common sphere for a purpose as will be hereinafter set forth.

A shank member 222 extends axially through the flanges 204 and 212 and is provided with an enlarged head member 224 at one end thereof. The outer periphery of the head member 224 is spherical, as shown at 226, and is of a configuration complementary to the spherical surfaces 218 and 220. A spherical spline 228 is interposed between the outer periphery of the head member 24 and the inner periphery of the flange 204 whereby the sperhical head 224 is retained against rotation about the axis thereof, but may freely oscillate as hereinbefore set forth in connection with the head 50. A central bore 230 extends into the head member 224 from a direction oppositely disposed from the shank 222. One end of the bore 230 is open and is closed or sealed by a suitable cover plate 232 secured or bolted to the sleeve 208, thus providing a fluid chamber 234 within the head 224. A plurality of fluid passageways 236 are provided in the head member for communication of fluid from the exterior of the head 224 to the chamber 234.

The gear drive mechanism 202 is encased in a housing 238 having a closed end 240 provided with a centrally disposed inwardly directed sleeve 242 journalled around the shank 22 by a suitable bearing 244. An outwardly directed sleeve 246 is substantially concentrically disposed with respect to the sleeve 24 and extends in a direction toward the head 224. Suitable sealing means 248 is interposed between the sleeve 246 and the head 224 for precluding leakage of fluid therebetween. An inner sleeve 250 is disposed around the shank 222 and extends inwardly from the sleeve 242. The sleeve 250 is keyed or splined to the outer periphery of the shank 222 and is provided with an outwardly extending circumferential flange 252 having a ring gear 254 rigidly secured to the outer periphery thereof in any well known manner. It will thus be apparent that the ring gear 254 and flanged sleeve 250 remain stationary with the shank 222.

The planetary gear drive 202 is generally similar to the drive mechanism 24 and comprises a sun gear 256 provided at one end of a sleeve 258 which is keyed or otherwise secured to the inner periphery of a flanged sleeve 260 for rotation simultaneously therewith in a manner as will be hereinafter set forth. The sleeve 258 is supported by a reduced portion 262 of the shaft 222 and is journalled thereon by suitable bearings 264. A plurality of planetary gears 266 similar to the gears 106 are circumferentially spaced around the sun gear 256. Only one of the planet gears 266 is shown in FIG. 3 and whereas substantially any desired number thereof may be circumferentially spaced around the sun gear 256, it is preferable to provide three of the planet gears spaced at substantially 120 apart. Each planet gear 256 is substantially identical and comprises a generally annular body 268 supported on a centrally disposed shaft 270 by a pair of spaced bearings 272 and 274. The shaft 270 is suitably supported between a pair of spaced plate members 276 and 278 and plates 276 and 278 are supported around the shaft 222 by a pair of spaced bearings 280 and 282, respectively. The bearing 280 is disposed on a reduced portion 284 of the shaft 222 and is retained against longitudinal movement by an annular shoulder286 and an inwardly directed shoulder 288. The bearing 256 is disposed around the outer periphery of the sleeve 264 and is retained against longitudinal movement by an annular shoulder 292 and the end of the sleeve 260.

The gear body 268 is provided with an annular recess 294 extending around the outer periphery thereof whereby the outer periphery of the gear body 268 is provided with two gear sections, 296 and 298. The outer diameter of the gear section 298 is preferably greater than the outer diameter of the gear section 296 as clearly shown in FIG. 3. The gear section 298 is provided with suitable gear teeth which mesh with a cylindrical ring gear 296 having internal teeth 298 provided on the inner periphery thereof and complementary to the teeth 298. The ring gear 296 is rigidly secured in any suitable manner to the outer housing section 300 for simultaneous movement therebetween. The housing section 300 is also secured to the housing 238 in any well known manner whereby the housing sections 238 and 300 move simultaneously. It is preferable that the gear ratio or tooth ratio between the planet gear portions 298 and the ring gear 296 be selected whereby the total number of teeth on the planet gear portions 298 will be less than the total number of teeth 298 on the ring gear 296 for the purpose as hereinbefore set forth with regard to the gear portions 128 and ring gear 144.

The housing section 300 is provided with a centrally disposed inwardly directed sleeve 302 for receiving the reduced end portion 262 of the shaft 22 therein. The end portion 262 is supported within the sleeve 302 by suitable bearings 304. A chamber 306 is also provided in the housing 300 for receiving a sleeve 308 having a drive gear 310 provided at one end thereof. The sleeve 308 is journalled within the housing by suitable bearings 312 and 314 and is connected with a motor (not shown) in any suitable manner (not shown) for rotation thereby. The sleeve 260 is provided with an outwardly extending circumferential flange 316 having gear teeth 318 provided around the outer periphery thereof. The teeth 318 engage the gear 310 for rotation of the sleeve 260 simultaneously with the rotation of the sleeve 308.

It will be apparent that rotation of the sleeve 308 transmits rotation to the drive gear 310 which in turn rotates the flanged sleeve 260. This transmits rotation to the sleeve 258 and sun gear 256 for rotation of the double planet gears 266 about the respective axes thereof. As hereinbefore set forth, the rotation of the double planet gears 266 transmits rotation to the ring gear 296 for transmitting rotation to the housing sections 300 and 238. The housing sections 300 and 238 may be rigidly secured to the mixer housing 14 in any well known or suitable manner (not shown) for transmitting rotation thereto.

It is preferable that the interior of the housings 238 and 300 as well as the fluid cavity 234 in the head 224 be filled with a suitable lubricating fluid for assuring an efficient operation of the gear drive device 202. Of course, suitable sealing means is provided for the structure 200 and 202 to preclude leakage of the lubricating fluid therefrom.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the present invention provides a novel drive mechanism for concrete mixers comprising four essential sections, a power source which is preferably a hydraulic motor, a ball socket joint section, support bearings for the mixer housing, and a planetary gear drive section. The planetary gear mechanism comprises a plurality of double planet gears circumferentially spaced around a sun gear with each planet gear being in simultaneous driving engagement with a stationary ring gear and a rotatable ring gear for transmitting rotation from the motor to the mixer housing, thus precluding the need for relatively large sprocket members. In addition, the drive mechanism may be encased within the mixer drum or mixer housing, thus reducing hazard to the personnel.

Whereas the present invention has been described in particular relation to the drawings attached hereto, it should be understood that other and further modifications, apart from those shown or suggested herein, may be made within the spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. Self-aligning gear coupling means for supporting a concrete mixer housing and comprises substantially spherical head means connected with the housing for rotatably supporting the housing, support means for receiving and supporting the head means, said support means having a substantially spherical inner periphery complementary with the configuration of the head means for permitting independent oscillation of the head means with respect thereto, and spherical spline means interposed between the head means and support means therefor whereby rotation of the head means about the longitudinal axis thereof is precluded without interference of the said independent oscillation of the head means.

2. Self-aligning gear coupling means for a concrete mixer housing as set forth in claim 1 wherein shank means is provided for connecting the head means with the mixer housing.

3. Self-aligning gear coupling means for a concrete mixer housing as set forth in claim 2 wherein the shank means is integral with the head means.

4. Self-aligning gear coupling means for a concrete mixer housing as set forth in claim 1 wherein the support means comprises a pair of flanged arcuate sleeve members having complementary inner peripheries defining a substantially sphericalsurface for supporting the head, and means for removable securing the flanged sleeve members together.

5. Self-aligning gear coupling means for supporting a concrete mixer housing and comprising shank means for rotatably supporting the .housing, a substantially spherical head member provided on the shank means and integral therewith, sectional support means for receiving and supporting the head member, said support means being provided with a substantially spherical inner periphery complementary with the configuration of the head member for permitting independent oscillation of the head member with respect thereto, and spherical spline means interposed between the head member and support means therefor for precluding rotation of the head member about its longitudinal axis without interference of the said oscillation of the head member.

6. A drive mechanism for a concrete mixer housing and comprising a power source, a ball socket joint, means securing the mixer housing to the ball socket joint, and drive means operably connected between the power source and mixer housing for transmitting rotation to the mixer housing, wherein the ball socket joint is an integral self-aligning gear coupling, and wherein the self-aligning gear coupling comprises shank means for supporting the mixer housing therefrom, an enlarged head member provided on one end of the shank means, said head member provided with a substantially spherical outer periphery, support means for receiving the head member therein, said support means provided with a substantially spherical inner periphery ofa configuration complementary to the outer periphery of the head member for cooperation therewith to provide oscillation of the head member with respect to the support means therefor, and ineluding spherical spline means interposed between the head member and the support means therefor whereby rotation of the head member about the longitudinal axis thereof is precluded without interference of the oscillation of the head member with respect to the support means.

7. A drive mechanism for a concrete mixer housing and comprising a power source, a ball socket joint, means securing the mixer housing to the ball socket joint, and drive means operably connected between the power source and mixer housing for transmitting rotation to the mixer housing, wherein the means for securing the mixer housing to the ball socket joint comprises bearing means supported by the ball socket joint, and sleeve means supported by the bearing means and rigidly secured to the mixer housing whereby said mixer housing is freely rotatable with respect to the ball socket joint.

8. A drive mechanism for a concrete mixer housing and comprising a power source, a ball socket joint, means securing the mixer housing to the ball socket joint, and drive means operably connected between the power source and mixer housing for transmitting rotation to the mixer housing, wherein the ball socket joint comprises shank means for supporting the mixer housing, an enlarged head member provided on the shank means, said head member being provided with a substantially spherical outer periphery, support means for receiving the head member therein, said support means being provided with a substantially spherical inner periphery of a configuration complementary to the outer periphery of the head member for cooperating therewith to permit movement of the head member with respect to the support means therefor, spherical spline means interposed between the head member and the support means thereforwhereby rotation of the head member about the longitudinal axis thereof IS precluded without interference of the oscillation of the head member with respect to the support means; the means for securing the mixer housing to the ball socket joint comprises bearing means carried by the shank means, flanged sleeve means supported by the bearing means and rigidly secured to the mixer housing for rotatable supporting of the housing with respect to the ball socket joint.

8 i III

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3749372 *Jan 27, 1972Jul 31, 1973Funk Mfg CoYieldable support means and drive mechanism for concrete mixer drums
US3785622 *Oct 2, 1972Jan 15, 1974Machinery Co ConstMounting device for mobile concrete mixing drum
US3788610 *Jun 27, 1972Jan 29, 1974Rexnord IncLubricant system for drive and support of concrete mixer drum
US4124304 *Aug 1, 1977Nov 7, 1978Okubo Haguruma Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaDirect drum drive for concrete mixer trucks
US4243328 *Jul 16, 1979Jan 6, 1981Challenge-Cook Bros. IncorporatedTrailer transit mixer
US4335963 *Mar 27, 1980Jun 22, 1982Cooper IndustriesOutput coupling for concrete mixer transmission
US4340309 *Jun 25, 1980Jul 20, 1982Challenge-Cook Bros., IncorporatedTrailer transit mixer
US4362390 *Aug 6, 1980Dec 7, 1982Zahnradfabrik Friedrichshafen, AktiengesellschaftDrive assembly for vehicular cement mixers
US4378163 *Jan 28, 1982Mar 29, 1983Cooper Industries, Inc.Output coupling for concrete mixer transmission
US4453830 *Feb 16, 1983Jun 12, 1984Cooper Industries, Inc.Output coupling for concrete mixer transmission
US5348387 *Nov 18, 1992Sep 20, 1994Gordon Dale FAuxiliary bearing and drive mechanism for a concrete mixer
US5782559 *Sep 6, 1996Jul 21, 1998J-Star Industries, Inc.Self-propelled material mixer
US5820258 *Apr 8, 1997Oct 13, 1998Oshkosh Truck CorporationCement mixer drum support
US6692401 *Sep 25, 2001Feb 17, 2004Pierburg GmbhTwo-stage gear mechanism
US7832919Aug 8, 2005Nov 16, 2010Zf Friedrichshafen AgGear train for driving a mixer drum mounted on a vehicle
US7845843Jun 7, 2006Dec 7, 2010Zf Friedrichshafen AgCompensation device for compensating the angular discrepancy of a mixing drum
US7878699Aug 8, 2005Feb 1, 2011Zf Friedrichshafen AgDrive for mixing drum with elastic element arranged between bearing incorporating drive system and base
DE102004038506A1 *Aug 7, 2004Feb 23, 2006Zf Friedrichshafen AgGetriebe, insbesondere zum Antrieb einer Trommel eines Fahrmischers
EP0444540A1 *Feb 22, 1991Sep 4, 1991Lescha Maschinenfabrik GmbH & Co. KGMixer
EP1236606A2 *Feb 27, 2002Sep 4, 2002Comer Group S.p.A.Reduction unit particularly for actuating the screw feeders of mixing trucks and auxiliary elements
WO2006015837A1Aug 8, 2005Feb 16, 2006Zahnradfabrik FriedrichshafenGear transmission, in particular to drive the drum of a drive mixer
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/61, 366/62
International ClassificationB28C5/42, B28C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28C5/4217
European ClassificationB28C5/42A1B3
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 9, 1988AS20Assign the entire interest
Free format text: MCNEILUS TRUCK AND MANUFACTURING, INC., DODGE CTR., MN 55927, A MN CORP. * CHALLENGE-COOK BROS. : 19871221
Dec 9, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: MCNEILUS TRUCK AND MANUFACTURING, INC., DODGE CTR.
Free format text: ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST SUBJECT;ASSIGNOR:CHALLENGE-COOK BROS.;REEL/FRAME:004984/0668
Effective date: 19871221
Owner name: MCNEILUS TRUCK AND MANUFACTURING, INC., A MN CORP.