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Publication numberUS3659312 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1972
Filing dateNov 25, 1970
Priority dateNov 28, 1969
Also published asCA920309A1, DE2055351A1, DE2055351B2, DE2055351C3
Publication numberUS 3659312 A, US 3659312A, US-A-3659312, US3659312 A, US3659312A
InventorsBo Gunnar Mattsson
Original AssigneeElectrolux Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle
US 3659312 A
Abstract
A multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle has a suction inlet which is movable over a porous object like a rug to remove dirt therefrom. A brush is mounted on the nozzle at the vicinity of the suction inlet for movement between upper and lower positions. The brush in its lower position is below the suction inlet and functions to remove dirt from a non-porous object like a floor. The suction inlet functions to remove dirt from a porous object when the brush is in its upper position above the suction inlet. The brush is moved to its upper and lower positions by a variable pneumatic force which acts upward or downward depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows per unit interval of time in a path of flow from the suction inlet to an air outlet socket. The variable pneumatic force is produced by mechanism which is characterized by the absence of any springs or spring biasing means.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Mattsson May 2, 1972 541 MULTI-PURPOSE VACUUM CLEANER 3,497,903 3/1970 Jonsson .I ....15/319 NOZZLE 3,599,271 8/1971 Ljung et a1....., ..15 319 [72] Inventor: B0 Gunnar Mattsson, Upplands Vasby, primary w scheel Sweden Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore [73] Assignee: Aktiebolaget Electrolux, Stockholm, Attorney-Edmund Fenander Swede 57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Nov. 25, 1970 A multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle has a suction mlet [21] Appl, No.: 92,695 which is movable over a porous object like a rug to remove dirt therefrom. A brush is mounted on the nozzle at the vicinity of the suction inlet for movement between upper and lower [30] Forelgn Apphcauon Pnomy Data positions. The brush in its lower position is below the suction Nov. 28, 1969 Sweden 16382/69 inlet and functions to remove dirt from a -P Object like a floor. The suction inlet functions to remove dirt from a 52 0.5. Ci ..15/319, 15/371, 15 373 P Object when the brush is in its "PW P above the 51 1m. 01. ..A47l 9 02 Suction ihlet- The brush is moved its "PP and lower P [58] Field ofSearch.... ..15/319 355 368 371,382 ions by a variable PheummiC which acts "Pward or 15/419 downward depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows per unit interval of time in a path of flow from [56] References Cited the suction inlet to an air outlet socket. The variable pneumatic force is produced by mechanism which is characterized UNITED STATES PATENTS by the absence of any springs or spring biasing means. 2,688,763 9/1954 Pfaffle et al ..l5/37l 6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures lllllllllllllllll PATENTEDMAY 21972 659 (3 1 2 FIG./

r III,

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention One factor which influences dust absorption is the speed of the air flow through the nozzle for bodily moving and transporting dust and dirt particles from the object to be cleaned to the dust bag in the suction cleaner. In a moving air stream, movement is imparted to a particle of dust or dirt by a force which is dependent upon positive atmospheric pressure at one side of the particle and a pressure at the opposite side thereof which is below atmospheric pressure. Hence, movement is imparted pneumatically to dust and dirt particles by a force which is dependent upon the difference between atmospheric pressure and the vacuum developed by the cleaner. The speed of the air flow increases with increase in the volume of air moved. The capacity of brushes and nozzles working on objects is a primary and basic consideration which determines the ability of a suction cleaner to absorb dust and dirt.

When brushes are employed to suck and draw dust particles from essentially smooth objects like floors, for example, the pneumatic force just referred to is not as great as it is when a porous object is being cleaned. In cleaning porous objects like carpets, for example, a brush generally is not employed and instead a nozzle is employed having an operating surface which is at the immediate vicinity of the suction inlet opening and disposed about the latter. With a nozzle of this type, dust and dirt must be sucked or drawn from the pores of an object and a higher vacuum is developed in the nozzle passageway so that movement will be imparted pneumatically to dust and dirt particles by the pneumatic force referred to above which is dependent upon the difference between atmospheric pressure and the partial vacuum developed in the nozzle passageway which, under these conditions, is higher than the partial vacuum developed when a brush is employed to clean objects which are essentially smooth and less porous.

This invention relates to a multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle having a suction inlet and a brush mounted for movement on the nozzle between upper and lowerpositions, the brush in its upper position being above the suction inlet and in its lower position below the suction inlet. When the brush is in its upper position the suction inlet is rendered operable to remove dust and dirt from porous objects like carpets and rugs. When the brush is in its lower position the brush is rendered operable to remove dust and dirt from non-porous objects like floors.

2. Description ofthe Prior Art In known multi-purpose nozzles of the kind heretofore provided the brush is moved pneumatically between its upper and lower positions by mechanism which includes a rubber diaphragm to which the brush is connected, such diaphragm forming a wall of a space in communication with the path of air flow ofthe nozzle which is at a partial vacuum. Due to the sub-atmospheric pressure in the nozzle, which varies in accordance with the physical characteristics of the object over which the nozzle is moved, the diaphragm will flex to its upper or lower position and move the brush to its upper or lower position on the nozzle.

In such known multi-purpose nozzles the diaphragm is biased to its lower position by a spring which is so adjusted that the brush can .be shifted on the nozzle solely due to changes in the physical characteristics of the object over which the nozzle is moved. With a nozzle of this type, the vacuum producing ability of the vacuum cleaner connected to the nozzle should not vary within too wide limits. If the suction ability of the vacuum cleaner should decrease to an abnormally high extent, as when the dust bag of the vacuum cleaner becomes clogged with dust and dirt, the partial vacuum or suction pressure produced in the air flow path of the nozzle can become too small to efiect movement of the brush between its upper and lower positionsin the nozzle. Under these conditions the brush may not be moved from its lower to its upper position and will remain in an operative position when a porous object like a carpet, for example, is being vacuumed. If

the suction producing ability of the vacuum cleaner should become excessive, the partial vacuum produced in the air flow path of the nozzle can become too great and may effect movement of the brush from its lower to its upper position when a smooth object like a floor, for example, is being vacuumed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle which is characterized by the absence of springs and spring biasing means and has two operating surfaces available and each one of which automatically becomes operable to perform a specific kind of cleaning depending upon the physical characteristics of the object to be cleaned.

The nozzle has a suction inlet which is primarily suitable to remove dirt from a porous object like a rug. A brush is mounted on the nozzle at the vicinity of the suction inlet for movement between upper and lower positions, the brush in its lower position being below the suction inlet and operable to remove dirt from a non-porous object like a floor. The suction inlet becomes operable to remove dirt from a porous object when the brush is in its upper position above the suction inlet.

In accordance with the invention structure is provided for producing a variable pneumatic force which is directed upward or downward depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows per unit interval of time in a path of flow from the suction inlet to an air outlet socket. The force producing structure is operatively associated with the brush so that the brush will assume a multiplicity of positions, including its upper and lower positions, depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows in the path of flow per unit interval of time.

More particularly, the variable force producing structure comprises a movable member, such as a flexible diaphragm, which is arranged to be influenced on one side by air at a partial vacuum at a first region of the path of flow and on the other side by air at a different partial vacuum at a second region of the path of flow removed lengthwise thereof from the first region. Further, the force producing structure is characterized by the absence of springs and spring biasing means.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING In the drawing, FIG. 1 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle embodying the I invention with the brush illustrated in its lower position and operative to perform cleaning;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken at line 2-2 of FIG. 1 with the brush illustrated in its upper position and inoperative to perform cleaning; and

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken at line 3-3 of I FIG. 1 illustrating the brush in its lower position and operative to perform cleaning.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawing, the multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle embodying the invention comprises an elongated hollow body 10 which comprises top and bottom parts 11 and 12 and a horizontal intermediate wall part 14 therebetween. The parts ll, 12 and 14 are detachably connected together in any suitable manner (not shown).

The hollow body 10 is provided with an upwardly inclined tubular member 15. The tubular member 15 serves as an outlet socket adapted to be connected to a source of air at a partial vacuum, such as a suction cleaner, for example. The outlet socket 15 forms part of a passageway 16 through which air is drawn from an elongated air inlet 17 at the bottom of the nozzle. The air inlet 17, which may be referred to as a suction inlet, comprises a plurality of open grooves 17a which are adjacent to one another and formed by spaced vertical ribs 12a in the central portion of the bottom body part 12. An apertured bottom plate 18 overlies the bottom body part 12 at the lower open ends of the grooves 17a to provide a smooth gliding surface when a porous object like a carpet or rug, for example, is being cleaned. The top, bottom and intermediate body parts 11, 12 and 14 are formed with interior vertical walls 19, 20 and 21 which cooperate with one another to provide the portion 16a of the passageway which extends vertically upward from the suction inlet 17. The top nozzle part 11 and air outlet socket have walls 11a, 11b, 11c, 15a and 1511 which cooperate with one another to provide the portion 16b of the passageway which is at an acute angleto the horizontal and is in communication with the upper end of the portion 16a of the passageway.

A pair of elongated brushes 22 are provided at opposing sides of the suction inlet opening 17. Each brush includes a row of bristles 22a fixed to a brush back 22b which is of inverted U-shape. The brush backs 22b are united to and form unitary parts of an apertured plate 23 serving as a carrier for the brushes 22. The carrier 23 is movable between raised and lower positions, as seen in solid and dotted lines in FIG. 2. The carrier has an opening defined by an inner edge 23a, the opposing longitudinal portions of which move vertically at .the outer faces of the interior longitudinal walls of the hollow body 10.

The brush carrier 23 is fixed to a diaphragm 24 which is movable between upper and lower positions illustrated in F I08. 2 and 3, respectively, in a manner that will be explained presently. As shown, the carrier 23 is provided with upstanding lugs 25 which pass through openings in the diaphragm 24, the enlarged upper ends of the lugs bearing against a force distributing sheet 26 overlying the top surface of the diaphragm.

When, the diaphragm 24.is in its upper position shown in FIG. 2 the brushes 22 are disposed in bottom space or chamber 43 at the underside of the diaphragm. When the diaphragm 24 is in its lower position shown in FIG. 3, the brushes 22 extend downward through elongated openings 28 in the bottom body part 12, as seen in dotted lines in FIG. 2, with the lower ends or tips of the bristles 22a adapted to rest on an essentially smooth surface to becleaned, such as a floor, for example. Rollers 29 are mounted for rotation on the body 10 at 30, as shown in FIG. 1, to support the nozzle on a surface to be cleaned.

In accordance with my invention I provide means, characterized by the absence of springs or spring biasing means, for producing a variable pneumatic force which is directed upward or downward depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows in the passageway or path of flow 16 per unit interval of time. The variable force producing means is operatively connected to the diaphragm 24 and brushes 22 movable therewith so that the brushes will assume a multiplicity of positions, including their upper and lower positions, depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows in the path of flow 16 per unit interval of time.

The force producing means, which constitutes an important feature of my invention, comprises a second diaphragm 31 which is disposed above the intermediate body wall 14. The second diaphragm 31 is connected by a force transmitting member 32 to the diaphragm 24 which is disposed below the intermediate body wall 14. The member 32 extends through an opening in the intermediate wall 14 and is connected at its lower end at 33 to the sheet 26. The upper end of the member 32'is connected at 34 to a plate 35 which overlies the top surfaceof the diaphragm 31. The plate 35 is fixed to the diaphragm 31 by lugs 32 which pass through openings in the diaphragm, the enlarged lower ends of the lugs bearing against a sheet 36 bearing against the bottom surface of the diaphragm.

The peripheral edge portions of the diaphragms 24 and 31 are clamped between theabutting outer edges of the body parts 11, 12 and 14 and form an enlarged head 37 which serves as a bumper to protect objects against which the nozzle may strike when being moved back and forth over a surface being cleaned. The diaphragms 24 and 31 desirably are formed of a suitable elastomeric material like rubber, for example. Interior portions of the diaphragms 24 and 31 also are clamped between adjacent regions of the body parts ll, 12 and 14 or bear and are held against regions of the body parts, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2. The diaphragms 24 and 31 are provided with corrugated sections 38 and 39 to enhance their flexibility.

The diaphragm 31 divides the space between the nozzle body parts 11 and 14 into chambers 40 and 41 and the diaphragm 24 divides the space between the nozzle body parts 12 and 14 into chambers 42 and 43. The air in chamber 43 below the diaphragm 24, by reason of the openings 28, is ambient air at atmospheric pressure.

The interior walls of the body 10 are provided with openings 44, 45, 46, 47 and 48 which selectively function to maintain the air in chambers 40, 41 and 42 at different partial vacuums. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the chamberv 42 above the diaphragm 24 is in communication with the portion 16a of the passageway 16 through the openings 44 and 45 in the interior walls of the body parts. The chamber 40 above the diaphragm 31 also is in communication with the portion 16a of the passageway 16 through the openings 44, 46 and 47. The chamber 41 below the diaphragm 31, on the other hand, is in communication with the portion 16b of. the passageway 16 through the opening 48 in the interior wall of the top body part 11, as seen in FIG. 2.

When the air outlet socket 15 is connected to a source of air at a partial vacuum, such as a vacuum cleaner, for example, the partial vacuum at the opening 48 in the portion 16b of the passageway 16 will be greater than that at theopenings 44 in the portion 16a of the'passageway by reason of the pressure drop lengthwise of the passageway 16 between the regions at which the openings 44 and 48 are located. By providing a constriction 49 in the passageway. 16 at the juncture of the passageway portions 16aand 16b, the pressure differential between the partial vacuums at the regions of the openings 48 and 44 can be increased.

By reason of the pressure differential at the regions of the openings 48 and 44 of the passageway 16 the partial vacuum atthe opening 48 always will be greater than that of the openings 44 which means the partial vacuum below the diaphragm 31 will be greater than the partial vacuum above this diaphragm. It then follows that the means just described for producing a variable pneumatic force and illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 will always producea force on the diaphragm 31 which is directed downwardFurther, the magnitude of this downward directed force acting on the diaphragm 31 will be dependent upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows per unit interval of time from the suction inlet 17 to the air outlet socket 15.

The bottom side of the diaphragm 24' will be influenced by ambient air in chamber 43 which is at atmospheric pressure and the top side thereof, which is in communication with the passageway portion 16a through the openings 45 and 44, will be at a partial vacuum. Hence, the diaphragm 24 will be acted upon by a resultant force which always is directed upward.

When the nozzle is being employed to clean a smooth surface like a floor, for example, the magnitude of the partial vacuum at the openings 44 in the passageway portion 16a will be relatively small. This means that the resultant force acting upward on the diaphragm 24 also will be relatively small. But under these operating conditions the rate at which air flows through the passageway 16 per unit interval of time will be very high which means that the pressure differential between the openings 48 and 44 also will be relatively high. When this occurs the resultant downward directed pneumatic force acting on the diaphragm 31 will be very great and this downward directed force will predominate and force the diaphragm downward. This force will be transmitted by the member 32 to the diaphragm 24 and move it downward. This means the brushes 22 will be moved downward to an operative cleaning position which is shown in dotted lines in FIG. 2 and solid lines in FIG. 3. Hence, when the nozzle is being employed to clean a smooth surface the brushes 22 always will be moved to their lower operative positions below the suction inlet 17. And this end result is achieved without any springs or spring biasing means.

When the nozzle is being employed to clean a porous surface like a carpet or rug, for example, the magnitude of the partial vacuum at the openings 44 in the passageway portion 16a will be relatively high. This means that the partial vacuum of air in the chamber 40 above the diaphragm 31 and in the chamber 42 above the diaphragm 24, both of which are in communication with the openings 44, also will be relatively high. Under this operating condition the rate at which air flows through the passageway 16 per unit interval of time will be relatively low which means that the pressure differential between the openings 48 and 44 also will be relatively low. When this occurs the resultant downward directed pneumatic force acting on the diaphragm 31 will be relatively small. This means that the resultant force acting upward on the diaphragm 24 will predominate and force it upward and move the brushes 22 to their raised position above the suction inlet 17.

in view of the manner in which the nozzle operates, as just explained, the vacuum producing ability of the vacuum cleaner connected to the nozzle can vary within relatively wide limits. Another advantage realized by the nozzle described above is that it can be employed with a variety of different vacuum cleaners and will always function with certainty in the manner described above.

l claim:

1. A multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle comprising a hollow body having vertically disposed wall means which forms a downward extending passageway and terminates in an opening defining a suction inlet, said body also having an air outlet socket adapted to be connected to a source of supply of air at a partial vacuum and means providing a path of flow for air between the suction inlet and outlet socket,

b. brush means disposed exteriorly of said wall means at the vicinity of said suction inlet, said brush means having vertically disposed bristles depending downward therefrom,

. structure for mounting said brush means to reciprocate on said body between upper and lower positions,

(1. means for producing a variable pneumatic force which is directed upward or downward depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows in said path of flow per unit interval of time,

e. said variable force producing means being operatively connected to said brush means mounting structure so the brush means assumes a multiplicity of positions including its upper and lower positions depending upon the rate at which air at a partial vacuum flows in said path of flow per unit interval of time, and

f. the tips of said bristles being at a level above that of said suction inlet when said brush means is in its upper position on said hollow body and at a level below that of said suction inlet when said brush means is in its lower position on said hollow body.

2. A vacuum cleaner nozzle as set forth in claim 1 in which said variable pneumatic force producing means produces a force which is directed upward when the rate at which air flows in said path of flow per unit interval of time is at or less than a predetermined value and produces a force which is directed downward when the rate at which air flows in said path of flow per unit interval of time exceeds the predetermined value.

3. A vacuum cleaner nozzle as set forth in claim 2 in which said variable pneumatic force producing means comprises a movable member arranged to be influenced on'one side by air at a partial vacuum at a first region in said path of flow and on the other side by air at a different partial vacuum at a second region of said path of flow removed lengthwise thereof from said first region.

4. A vacuum cleaner nozzle as set forth in claim 3 in which said brush means mounting structure includes a second movable member, and means interconnecting said first and second movable members for transmlttmg force from said first to said second movable member.

5. A vacuum cleaner nozzle as set forth in claim 4 which comprises means including said body providing first and second spaces above and below said first movable member and a third space above said second movable member, said first space being on said one side of said first movable member and said second space being on said other side thereof, and

said third space on the upper side of said second movable member being arranged to be influenced by air at the second partial vacuum at the second region in said path of flow.

6. A vacuum cleaner nozzle as set forth in claim 5 in which the partial vacuum of air at the first region in said path of flow is greater than the partial vacuum of air at the second region in said path of flow.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2688763 *Aug 24, 1948Sep 14, 1954Pfaffle George PSuction head for vacuum cleaners
US3497903 *Nov 22, 1967Mar 3, 1970Electrolux AbSelf-adjusting multipurpose nozzle
US3599271 *Feb 2, 1970Aug 17, 1971Electrolux AbMultipurpose vacuum cleaner nozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3768114 *Sep 3, 1971Oct 30, 1973Electrolux AbCombination rug and floor vacuum cleaner nozzle
US3798704 *Feb 23, 1972Mar 26, 1974Electrolux AbSelf-acting combination rug and floor vacuum cleaner nozzle
US3913168 *Nov 19, 1973Oct 21, 1975Electrolux AbMulti-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle
US5553349 *Feb 6, 1995Sep 10, 1996Aktiebolaget ElectroluxVacuum cleaner nozzle
US6123779 *Jun 1, 1999Sep 26, 2000Fantom Technologies Inc.Cleaning surface of vacuum cleaning heads for cleaning dirty air, detection air pressure and adjustment of brush height and positioning vacuum cleaner
US8387206Jul 6, 2010Mar 5, 2013Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating head
US8387207Jul 7, 2010Mar 5, 2013Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating head
US8424157Jun 10, 2010Apr 23, 2013Dyson Technology LimitedTool for a surface treating appliance
US8468647Mar 11, 2010Jun 25, 2013Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating head
US8544145Jul 6, 2010Oct 1, 2013Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating head
CN101953665BJul 16, 2010Mar 27, 2013戴森技术有限公司Surface treating head
EP0820717A2 *Jul 4, 1997Jan 28, 1998Wessel-Werk GmbhSuction head for vacuum cleaner
WO2011007158A1 *Jun 29, 2010Jan 20, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedA surface treating head
WO2011007159A1 *Jun 29, 2010Jan 20, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedA surface treating head
WO2011007160A1 *Jun 29, 2010Jan 20, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedA surface treating head
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/319, 15/373, 15/371
International ClassificationA47L9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/0646
European ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/06C2B