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Publication numberUS3659350 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1972
Filing dateMar 25, 1970
Priority dateMar 25, 1970
Also published asDE2114582A1
Publication numberUS 3659350 A, US 3659350A, US-A-3659350, US3659350 A, US3659350A
InventorsJames D Mccullough
Original AssigneeDu Pont
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Yarn heating jet
US 3659350 A
Abstract
Improvements are disclosed in apparatus for fluid heat-treatment of continuous multifilament yarn. These include 90 DEG impingement jets for initiating treatment, 30 DEG impingment jets for completing the treatment, and means for redirecting fluid against the yarn. Hot fluid passages in a manifold block are arranged to heat the block uniformly and dead air spaces in a cap member reduce heat loss.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 51 3,659,350 1 51 May 2,1972

McCullough [s4] YARN HEATING JET [721' Inventor: James D. McCullough, Newark, Del.

[73] Assignee: E. l. du Pont de Nemours and Company,

Wilmington, Del.

[22] Filed: Mar. 25, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 22,507

[52] U.S. Cl ..34/155, 28/1 .4, 28/62 [51] Int. Cl ..D06c U013 [58] Field of Search ..28/1.4, 62, 72.12; 19/66 T; 1 34/155 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,423,809 1/1969 Schmitt ..28/72.12 UX 2,688,067 8/1954 Sonnino et a1. ..28/62 X 3,333,313 8/1967 Gilmore et al. ..28/1.4 3,367,100 2/1968 Hughey .28/72.l2 X 3,458,905 8/1969 Dodson, Jr. et al. .....28/1.4 X 3,324,526 6/1967 Burns et a1 .28/l .4 3,237,269 3/1966 Hawkins ..28/1 .4 3,115,691 12/1963 Bunting, Jr. et al v.28/l.4

1 Primary Examiner-Robert R. Mackey Attorney-Norris E. Ruckman [5 7] ABSTRACT Improvements are disclosed in apparatus for fluid heat-treatment of continuous multifilament yam. These include 90 impingement jets for initiating treatment, 30 impingment jets for completing the treatment, and means for redirecting fluid against the yarn. Hot fluid passages in a manifold block are arranged to heat the block uniformly and dead air spaces in a cap member reduce heat loss.

5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEDMAY 2 I972 SHEET 1 BF 2 FIG-1 FIG.

INVENTOR JAMES D. Mc CULLOUGH ATTORNEY PATENTEDMAY 2:912 I 3.659.350

SHEET 2 CF 2 l N VE NTOR JAMES 0. MC CULLOUGH' ATTORNEY YARN HEATING JET BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to fluid heat-treatment of textile yarn material and, more particularly, to an improved fluid jetv device for heating continuous multifilament yarn efficiently and uniformly.

In the manufacture of certain synthetic yarns, especially polyesters, significant product uniformity and process advantages can be had by heating the filaments during drawing as in the process of Pitzl U.S. Pat. No. 3,452,132. The filament material is passed through a fluid jet device and subjected to a high velocity stream of heated fluid, such as air or steam, where the polymeric material is raised to an elevated temperature. This is a critical step in the process, as minor thermal deviations from filament to filament or along a single filament show in the finished product as non-uniform dyeability, poor tenacity and the like.

Burns et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,324,526 and Clendening et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,261,071 disclose apparatus for fluid heating a plurality of continuous multifilament yarns which includes a manifold block for impinging hot treatment fluid on the yarns,

-a separable cap member mating with the block to define an interface having yarn treatment channels extending the length of the interface, and means for holding the cap member against the block during yarn treatment. Orifices in the block direct high velocity fluid into the channels at a forward angle so that hot fluid passes along the channels in the direction of yarn travel. Passages in the blockconduct hot fluid to the orifices, the fluid being supplied under pressure to inlet means into the block.

The apparatus of the present invention embodies improvements in the above to provide better heat transfer efficiency and reduced filament breaks, at lower steam consumption levels, when processing multifilament yarn.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the apparatus of the present invention, 90 impingement orifices in the manifold block direct fluid perpendicularly against the yarn to initiate treatment after the yarn has entered the treatment channels. Primary orifices direct a greater amount of fluid against the yarn to accomplish the desired heat treatment as the yarn travels through the channels. The primary orifices are angled away from the 90 impingement orifices in the direction of yarn travel, and preferably the orifice axes are at 30 angles to the channel'axes. A semi-circular groove in the cap member is situated transversely across the yarn channels, between the two types of orifices, with the 90 impingement orifices opposite and substantially tangent to one side of the groove so that fluid is redirected against the yarn after it passes the 90 impingement orifices. The primary orifices are located to direct fluid against the yarn after it has traveled past the groove.

The 90 impingement orifices are preferably parallel-sided, rectangular slot orifices with the slots aligned parallel to the side of the groove. Fluid issuing from these orifices serves to separate the filaments, preheat the yarn and remove at least part of any finish materials applied to the yarn, thereby enabling the primary orifices to heat the filaments more efficiently and more uniformly. The primary orifices are preferably cylindrical about the orifice axes. The operation of the apparatus is improved by providing a guide member having a curved coanda-type channel or surface at the exit end of the yarn treatment channels for separating exhaust fluid from the yarn. Wear-resistant guide pins may be provided for guiding the yarn into the center of the treatment channels.

The passages in the manifold block for conducting hot fluid to the orifices are preferably arranged to heat the block to a relatively uniform temperature. Dead air spaces are preferably provided in the cap member to reduce heat losses from the sides of the cap member, so that more nearly uniform treatment temperatures are maintained in the yarn channels.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side sectional view of the jet device of this invention, the section being taken on line 1-1 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 2 shows a cross-section of the device of FIG. 1 taken along line 2-2.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged detail of the portion of FIG. 1 showing the impingement slot orifice and the 30 primary orifice. I

FIG. 4 is a detail plan view on line 4-4 of FIG. 3, showing the orifice arrangement.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Referring now to the figures, the jet device of this invention is an assemblage composed of a flat generally rectangular manifold block 1, a cap member 2 and an intermediate orifice plate 3. Block 1 and orifice plate 3 are brazed to form a unitary piece which together with cap 2 are secured to a stationary mounting bracket 19 by hold-down bolt 4. A plurality of spaced yarn treatmentchannels 5 extend the length of the jet along the interface between cap 2 and plate 3. Each channel has an entrance opening at one end and an exit at the opposite end.

The channels shown are formed into the cap member as open grooves and have a rectangular cross-section about 0.090-inch deep and 0.080-inch wide with a maximum 3 slope of the vertical side walls. In a preferred multi-end device, there are eight parallel channels. Near the entrance end, cap 2 is further modified by a semi-circular groove 6 situated transversely across the yarn channels 5. As best shown in FIG. 3, the 90 impingement slot orifices 7 are located opposite and substantially tangent to the groove 6. As shown in FIG. 4, there is one parallel-sided rectangular slot orifice 7 and one cylindrical primary orifice 11 associated with each channel 5.

Ahead of each impingement point are guide pins 8 and 9 which protrude partly into the threadline channels 5. Each pin contains circumferential grooves 10 at regular intervals coinciding with the centerline axis of the threadline channels. These grooves serve to maintain the respective threadlines in proper alignment with the fluid orifices. Pin 8 protrudes slightly deeper than pin 9 into the channel 5 to form a constricted entrance opening. Orifices 7 and 11 communicate with a fluid supply manifold 12 which is part of a fluid distribution system within block 1 serving to maintain the jet device at a constant operating temperature. The exit end of block 1 is provided with a Coanda tail piece 13 for separating the heated treatment fluid fromthe threadlines and directing it into an exhaust duct (not shown). The aforementioned fluid distribution system in block 1 includes an inlet 14 that in this case is superheated steam. Inlet 14 joins passage 15 at its midpoint so that the fluid divides and flows through two longitudinal passages 16 outboard of the channels 5 to both ends of manifold 12.

Two dead air spaces 17 are machined into the cap 2 outboard of the treatment chambers 5 region. These extend parallel to channels 5 and reduce heat losses at the ends of the cap to maintain channels 5 at substantially uniform temperatures. Cap 2 is held in place by a latch-toggle 18 which pivots from a hinge pin 20 fixed to bracket 19. Latch 18 permits separating cap 2 from block 1 for stringup. In the operative mode shown, cap 2 is locked tightly against the block I.

UTILITY The improved jet of this invention is suited for heating and drawing textile denier synthetic thermoplastic yarn material. The dual orifice arrangement enables simultaneous treatment of multiple ends within a yarn temperature uniformity range of 8 centigrade. The high heat transfer efficiency makes possible production of a yarn material having more uniform dye-ability and shrinkage at reduced operating cost.

I claim: I

.ment yarn and including a manifold block for impinging hot treatment fluid on the yarn, a separable cap member mating with the block to define a yarn treatment interface, yarn treat-. ment channels extending the length of said interface, treatment orifices in the block for directing high velocity fluid along said channels, fluid inlet means into the block, passages in the block for conducting fluid from the'inlet to said orifices, and locking means for holding the cap member against the block during yarn treatment; the improvement which comprises 90 impingement orifices in said block for directing fluid perpendicularly against the yarn to initiate treatment as the yarn travels through said channels, primary orifices in the block for directing a greater amount of fluid against the yarn to accomplish the heat treatment, the primary orifices being .angled away from the 90 impingement: orifices in the direction of yarn travel, and a semi-circular groove in the cap member situated transversely across the yarn channels between the 90 impingement orifices and the primary orifices, the 90 impingement orifices being located opposite and substantially tangent to one side of the groove so that fluid is redirected against the yarn after further yarn travel, and the primary orifices being located to direct fluid against the yarn after the yarn has traveled past the groove.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said impingement orifices are parallel-sided rectangular slot orifices and said primary orifices are cylindrical about the orifice axes.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein the axes of said primary orifices are at 30 angles to the channel axes.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein a coanda guide member is situated at the exit and of 'said channels for separating exhaust fluid from the yarn.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein passages for conducting fluid from the inlet to the orifices are situated in the sides of the block and parallel dead air spaces are situated in the cap member outside of the yarn channels to maintain the channels at more nearly uniform temperatures.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2688067 *Oct 17, 1952Aug 31, 1954American Cyanamid CoApparatus adapted for the heat treatment of moving filamentary material
US3115691 *May 31, 1961Dec 31, 1963Du PontApparatus for interlacing multifilament yarn
US3237269 *Sep 26, 1963Mar 1, 1966Du PontYarn bulking jet
US3324526 *May 26, 1965Jun 13, 1967Du PontYarn treating jet
US3333313 *Dec 6, 1965Aug 1, 1967Fmc CorpFilament interlacing apparatus
US3367100 *Jun 23, 1965Feb 6, 1968Monsanto CoMultifilament yarn having individually twisted filaments
US3423809 *Nov 15, 1967Jan 28, 1969Du PontProcess for forming differential shrinkage bulked yarn
US3458905 *Aug 3, 1967Aug 5, 1969Du PontApparatus for entangling fibers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3845528 *Mar 22, 1973Nov 5, 1974Allied ChemNoncircular air orifice in commingling jets for multifilament yarn
US3994056 *Jul 10, 1974Nov 30, 1976Fiber Industries, Inc.Apparatus for fluid treatment of yarn
US4592119 *Nov 30, 1984Jun 3, 1986Barmag Barmer Maschinenfabrik AgAir jet yarn entangling apparatus
US4644622 *Apr 5, 1985Feb 24, 1987Barmag Barmer Maschinenfabrik AgApparatus for air entangling a plurality of advancing yarns
US5146660 *Jun 20, 1991Sep 15, 1992Heberlein Maschinenfabrik AgDevice for air-intermingling multifilament yarns
US7018192 *Dec 11, 2001Mar 28, 2006Ingeniorfirmaet Lytzen A/SApparatus for heat treatment of oblong articles
US7395588 *Sep 30, 2003Jul 8, 2008Mitsubishi Rayon Engineering Co., Ltd.Pressurized steam-jetting nozzle, and method and apparatus for producing nonwoven fabric using the nozzle
US7406818Nov 10, 2004Aug 5, 2008Columbia Insurance CompanyYarn manufacturing apparatus and method
EP2065495A2 *Jul 31, 2008Jun 3, 2009TMT Machinery, Inc.Multiple yarn interlacing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/639, 28/274
International ClassificationD06C29/00, D01D10/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06C29/00, D01D10/0481
European ClassificationD01D10/04H5, D06C29/00