Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3659742 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1972
Filing dateDec 22, 1970
Priority dateDec 30, 1969
Also published asDE2064400A1, DE2064400B2, DE2064400C3
Publication numberUS 3659742 A, US 3659742A, US-A-3659742, US3659742 A, US3659742A
InventorsKatuhiro Tagawa
Original AssigneeNissan Motor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquefied fuel gas container
US 3659742 A
Abstract
A container for a liquefied fuel gas, constructed to be prevented from being filled with excess liquefied fuel gas which would otherwise lead to unexpected blasting due to thermal expansion of the stored liquefied fuel gas, the container having main and auxiliary compartments which are completely isolated when the liquefied fuel gas is fed into the main compartment and which are permitted to communicate with each other so as to provide an unoccupied space in the main compartment.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,659,742 Tagawa 1 May 2, 1972 [54] LIQUEFIEI) FUEL GAS CONTAINER 2,733,573 2/1956 Trotter ..222/3 3,223,118 12/1965 Hutelmyer ..l37/576 X [72] Inventor: Katuhiro Tagawa, Tokyo, Japan [73] Assignee: Nissan Motor Company, Limited, Primary ExaminerM- Henson Yokohama, ja a Assistant Examiner-Michael Y. Mar Attorney-John Lezdey [22] Filed: Dec. 22, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 100,601 [57] ABSTRACT A container for a liquefied fuel gas, constructed to be [30] Foreign Application Priority Data prevented from being filled with excess liquefied fuel gas which would otherwise lead to unexpected blasting due to Dec. 30, 1969 Japan ..44/l0550l thermal expansion of the Stored liquefied fuel g the com tainer having main and auxiliary compartments which are US. Cl. ..220/86 R, l37l5lz667 c2gilg mp y isola ed when the liquefied fuel gas is fed into the [58] Field of Search 137/240 main compartment and which are permitted to communicate 6 with each other so as to provide an unoccupied space in the main compartment. [56] References Cited 7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,677,939 5/1954 Clute ..l37/576 X Patented May 2, 1972 2 Sheets-811w x l INVENTOR KHTMH/RO TAGA JH BY J ATTO

Patented May 2, 1972 2 Sheets-Sheet z INVENTOR KATUH/RO AGAv/A BY a g 5 ATTOR Y LIQUEFIED FUEL GAS CONTAINER This invention relates to a container for storing a liquefied fuel gas such as liquefied petroleum gas.

In filling or replenishing a container of a liquefied fuel gas, it is important to have an unoccupied space left in the container to provide room for thermal expansion of the content which would otherwise invite unexpected blasting or rupture of the container while in use. Such unoccupied space usually accounts for about 15 percent of the total internal capacity of the container which, as a consequence, is filled to about 18 percent of the full capacity. This limited replenishment of the container is presently achieved through close-eye observation of a gauge or other suitable visual measuring instrument. Because, however, of the fact that the container as it is can actually be filled to its full capacity, it is liable that the container is filled with excess fuel gas due to improper calibration of the gauge or to misreading on the part of the operator.

An object of this invention is therefore to provide an improved container of a liquefied fuel gas to overcome this problem.

Another object is to provide a liquefied fuel gas container which is free from unexpected blasting or breakage resulting from thermal expansion of the liquefied fuel gas during use.

Still another object is to provide a liquefied fuel gas container which can be only partly filled with the liquefied fuel gas without resort to the visual observation of a gauge or similar measuring instrument or to professional skills.

Still another object is to provide a liquefied fuel gas container in which an unoccupied space is at all times left to provide room for thermal expansion of the content, the unoccupied space accounting about fifteen percent where a liquefied petroleum gas is to be filled in the container.

To achieve these objects, this invention proposes a container for storing a liquefied fuel gas comprising a main compartment, an auxiliary compartment isolated from the main compartment, a fuel charging unit mounted on the main compartment, and means providing communication between the main and auxiliary compartments, the fuel charging unit including a first valve means for controlling the supply of the liquefied fuel gas into the unit and a second valve means for providing communication between the unit and the main compartment and providing selective communication between the unit and the auxiliary compartment, the second valve being in a position to block the communication between the unit and the auxiliary compartment when the main valve is in a position to permit supply of the liquefied fuel gas into the unit and being in a position to establish the communication between the unit and the auxiliary compartment when the main valve is in a position to stop the supply of the liquefied fuel gas into the unit.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front end view ofa preferred embodiment of the container according to this invention;

FIG. 2 is a section taken on line IlIl of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view showing a fuel charging unit forming part ofthe container shown in FIGS. 1 and 2; and

FIG. 4 is a front end view showing an example of valve means to be used in the fuel charging unit shown in FIG. 3.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the container has a main compartment I and an auxiliary compartment 11. These compartments and 11 are separated from each other by means of a partition 12. The internal capacities of these compartments are determined depending upon the type of the liquefied fuel gas to be stored in the container. Where a liquefied petroleum gas is to be stored, the proportion of the capacities of the main and auxiliary compartments l0 and 11, respectively, may be 85 vs. 15, as alluded to above.

An aperture 13 is formed in the wall 10a of the main compartment 10 which is thereby permitted to communicate with the open air. A fuel charging unit which is generally denoted by reference numeral 14 is mounted on the wall 10a of the main compartment 10 through the aperture 13.

The fuel charging unit 14 includes a main valve casing 15 and a sliding valve casing 16. The main casing 15 is integral with the sliding valve casing I6 and extends thereinto at its leading end 15a. The casings 15 and 16 have formed therein bores 15b and 16a, respectively, which communicate with each other through an opening formed at the leading end of the casing 15. The aperture 13 is hermetically sealed off by the outer wall of the sliding valve casing 16.

The bore 15b of the main valve casing 15 communicates with an inlet 17 through which a liquefied fuel gas is injected into the container during replenishment.

The communication between the bore 15b of the main valve casing and the inlet port 17 is regulated by a main valve 18 which is mounted on the outer side of the bore 150 of the easing 15. The main valve 18 is screwed to the casing 15 and is axially movable by turning a tap 18a connected thereto.

A sliding valve 19 having an aperture or apertures 19a formed therein is mounted slidably in the bore 16a of the sliding valve casing 16. A connecting rod 20 extends outwardly from the sliding valve 19 through the bores 16a and 15b toward the main valve 18. A compression spring 21 is mounted in the bore of the sliding valve casing 16, seated on the inner side of the sliding valve 19. The compression spring biases the sliding valve 19 toward the leading end 15a of the casing 15, which leading end 15a thus serves as a valve seat or stop for the sliding valve 19. With the sliding valve 19 biased toward the valve seat 15a in this manner, the connecting member 20 extending therefrom is forced to abut at its free or outer end against the main valve 18. The axial position of the sliding valve 19 is thus determined by the axial position of the main valve 18.

A main outlet port 22 is formed in the wall of the sliding valve casing 16, positioned on the outer side of the siding valve 19 and opened into the main compartment 10. This outlet port 22 provides communication between the bore 15b of the main valve casing 15 and the main compartment 10 through the bore 160 and the aperture or apertures 19a of the sliding valve 19. An injection pipe 23 directed inwardly of the main compartment 10 may be mounted at the main outlet port 22, as illustrated.

An auxiliary outlet port 24 is formed in the wall of the sliding valve casing 16, positioned on the inner side of the sliding valve 19 and opened toward the auxiliary compartment 11. A connecting pipe 25 leads from this auxiliary outlet port 24 into the auxiliary compartment 11 through a hole 26.

When in filling the container with a liquefied fuel gas, the inlet 17 is connected to a source of the liquefied fuel gas and the main valve 18 is moved outwardly by turning the tap 18a to a position which provides fluid communication between the inlet 17 and the bore 15b of the main valve casing 15. Such movement of the main valve 18 is followed by an outward movement of the sliding valve 19 by the action of the spring 21. The sliding value 19 is thus moved outwardly until it is brought in contact with the valve seat or stop 15a forming an inner end of the main valve casing 15. In this condition, the bore 15b of the casing 15 is isolated from the auxiliary outlet port 24 and permitted to communicate only with the main outlet port 22 through the aperture or apertures 19a in the sliding valve 19. Fluid communication between the inlet 17 and the main compartment 10 is thus established, allowing the liquefied fuel gas into the main compartment 10 until the main compartment is filled therewith to its full capacity.

Upon completion of the replenishment of the main compartment 10, the main valve 18 is restored to its initial position by turning the tap so as to block the communication between the inlet 17 and the bore 15b of the main valve casing 15. The main valve 18 thus being moved inwardly, the sliding valve 19 which is in abutting engagement with the main valve 18 through the connecting member 20 is accordingly moved inwardly, viz., away from the valve seat 15a. The result is that fluid communication is established between the main compartment l0 and the auxiliary outlet port 24 through the bore 160 of the sliding valve casing 16 and the aperture or apertures 19a in the sliding value 19. The main compartment is now permitted to communicate with the auxiliary compartment 1], allowing the content of the former into the latterv it will now be appreciated from the foregoing description that only a limited quantity of liquefied fuel gas is stored in the container as a whole although the container in itself is divided into two compartments.

If, it may be mentioned, the content of the main compartment has flown into the auxiliary compartment due to a rise in the ambient temperature, it is necessary that the stored content in the auxiliary compartment be restored to the main compartment when the content in the main compartment is used up or after the content has been contracted to its initial state. For this purpose, the partition 12 may preferably be positioned to slant toward the hole 26 relative to a horizontal plane so that the content in the auxiliary compartment spontaneously moves into the main compartment in the absence of an opposing effort from the main compartment. The return of the content from the auxiliary to main compartment will be facilitated if a drain port 27 is formed at the lowermost portion of the sliding valve casing 16.

To prevent the partition 12 from being forcibly warped or deformed as a result of the thermal expansion of the content in the main compartment while in use, a pressure equalizer port 28 of a limited size may be formed in the partition 12, providing constant communication between the main and auxiliary compartments l0 and 11, respectively. Provision of such port 28 is also advantageous because the partition 12 can be made of a relatively thin plate; the mechanical pressure which would otherwise borne solely by the partition is partly allowed into the auxiliary compartment through the pressure equalizer hole 28. The equalizer hole 28 may be sized in a manner that the liquefied fuel gas which is being introduced into the main compartment during filling of the container is precluded from readily flowing into the auxiliary compartment due to the pressure resulting from the injection of the liquefied fuel gas.

Although the main and auxiliary compartments have heretofore been described and shown as integral with each other and isolated by the partition, the auxiliary compartment may constructed as an independent unit which is positioned separately and which is connected to the main compartment through a suitable pipe providing communication between the auxiliary compartment and the auxiliary outlet port of the slid ing valve casing.

The liquefied fuel gas to be stored in the container according to this invention may include any gaseous fuel to be stored in a liquefied state, examples being a liquefied petroleum gas, ethane gas, methane gas, etc.

If desired, an auxiliary fuel charging unit 14 may be provided for stand-by purposes.

What is claimed is:

l. A container for storing a liquefied fuel gas, comprising a main compartment, an auxiliary compartment isolated from said main compartment, a fuel charging unit mounted on said main compartment, and means providing communication between said main and auxiliary compartments, said fuel charging unit inciuding a first valve means for controlling the supply of said liquefied fuel gas into said unit and a second valve means for providing communication between said unit and said main compartment and providing selective communication between said unit and said auxiliary compartment, said second valve being in a position to block said communication between said unit and said auxiliary compartment when said main valve is in a position to permit supply of said liquefied fuel gas into said unit and being in a position to establish said communication between said unit and said auxiliary compartment when said main valve is in a position to stop said supply of the liquefied fuel gas into said unit.

2. A container according to claim 1, wherein said auxiliary compartment is sized relative to said main compartment for providing an unoccupied space in said main compartment upon completion of replenishment of the main com artment.

. A container according to claim 1, wherein sai main and auxiliary compartments are independent units connected by said means.

4. A container according to claim 1, wherein said main and auxiliary compartments are integral with each other and separated from each other by a partition having formed therein a hole through which said means provides said communication between said main and auxiliary compartments.

5. A container according to claim 4, wherein said partition is positioned to slant toward said hole relative to a horizontal plane.

6. A container according to claim 4, wherein said unit has formed at its lowermost portion a drain port through which said unit communicates with said main compartment.

7. A container according to claim 4, wherein said partition has formed therein a pressure equalizer port of a limited size.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2677939 *Nov 19, 1951May 11, 1954Henry H CluteLiquefied gas container
US2733573 *Dec 1, 1954Feb 7, 1956 trotter
US3223118 *Aug 30, 1963Dec 14, 1965Cutler Meat Products CompanyAir brake tanks
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5411058 *Dec 22, 1992May 2, 1995Welsh; James W.Method and apparatus for utilizing gaseous and liquid fuels in an internal combustion device
US6016834 *Mar 28, 1996Jan 25, 2000Leidl; Jacob JohnPropane vehicle tank and shut-off valve
WO1994015089A1 *Dec 22, 1993Jul 7, 1994Welsh Technologies IncMethod and apparatus for utilizing gaseous and liquid fuels in an internal combustion engine