Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3660191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1972
Filing dateDec 8, 1969
Priority dateDec 8, 1969
Also published asCA941283A1
Publication numberUS 3660191 A, US 3660191A, US-A-3660191, US3660191 A, US3660191A
InventorsDritt Harry J, Shimota Robert E
Original AssigneeKendall & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of carpet seaming
US 3660191 A
Abstract
Adjacent sections of carpeting are joined in a seam between abutting edges of the carpet sections by a strip of heat activatable adhesive tape applied to the back sides of the carpet sections with the carpet sections lying face-up on a surface while heating the tape from its non-adhesive back side.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Field of Search ..156/304, 306, 157, 505, 152;

United States Patent [151 3,660,191 Shimota et al. 51 May 2, 1972 METHOD OF CARPET SEAMING ences Cited [72] Inventors: Robert E. Shimota, Fox River Grove; UNITED STATES PATENTS Ha ry J- t, W both of 3,415,703 12/1968 Burgess 1 56/306 X [73] Assignee: The Kendall Company, Boston Mass. 3,219,508 11/1965 Studer ..l56/304 [22] Filed: Dec.8, 1969 Primary ExaminerCarl D. Quarforth Assistant Examiner-R. E. Schafer 1 1 pp 882,985 Attorney-Robert D. Chodera and T. w. Underhill [52] US. Cl ..156/152, 156/306, 156/304 [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl. ..D06h 5/00- Adjacent sections of carpeting are joined in a seam between 5 abutting edges of the carpet sections by a strip of heat activatable adhesive tape applied to the back sides of the carpet sections with the carpet sections lying face-up on a surface while heating the tape from its non-adhesive back side.

14 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION.

method previously employed entails placing both carpet seg- -ments in a face-down position with adjacent edges in anabutting, relationship. A strip of tape having heat activatable adhesive on-one side is laid on the carpet backing with the adhesive coated'tape side facing and covering the abutting edges of the carpeting. The tape is then bonded to the carpet backing by application of a heating element to the non-adhesive side of the tape. such that the adhesive in contact with the carpet backing is rendered tacky and, upon removal of the heating element, adherent to the carpet backing. Following this operation, the seamed carpeting must be returned to a face-up position for use at its desired site. The second prior method of rug seaming with hot melt adhesive tape is performed while adjacent carpet segments lie face-up on a substrate with edges initially placed in abutment. The abutting edges are positioned directly over a strip of hot-melt adhesive tape laid along a surface so that its adhesive coated surface contacts the carpet back sides. An example of this second method is disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,415,703, issuedto Charles D. Burgess on Dec. 10, 1968. In the method disclosed, the adhesive material is made tacky by application of a heated sadiron directly to the hot-melt adhesive. This is accomplished by rolling back the adjacent carpet edges, holding a heated sadiron in contact with the adhesive surface'of the seaming tape long enough to render the adhesive material tacky, removing the heated sadiron from the adhesive surface, and re-establishing the abutting relationship of the carpet edges in contact with the adhesive surface of the tape.

it is immediately obvious that each of these prior carpet seaming techniques has serious drawbacks and disadvantages. The first method cannot be performed with the carpetingin place at-its permanent site. The carpet segments must be turned face-down before the seaming operation takes place. After the tape is affixed to the carpet backing, the connected carpeting must be turned back to a face-up position, and installed at its intended site. However, most carpeting is somewhat thick and heavy. Consequently, it is unwieldly, awkward to transport, and difficult to manipulate. Therefore, these transportation and turning requirements present a highly objectionable feature of this first method. Considerable energy must be exerted in lifting and manipulating the carpeting. Also, the bond between the tape and carpet Segments may be weakened or destroyed during such moving, causing the seam between the carpet segments to be broken. Accordingly, it would be preferable in many instances to carpet seam with a method that can be performed at the site where the carpet is to remain, with the carpeting laid face-up and moving requirements minimized.

The second method mentioned above eliminates some undesirable carpet moving requirements, since the operation may be performed with the carpeting laid face-up at its intended site. However, in this method the abutting carpet edges are rolled back from each other, andthe adhesive is brought to a tacky state by directly contacting it with :a heated sadiron. The carpet edges must be placed back into an abutting rela tionship andpressed into the adhesive material while it is still in athermally softened, tacky condition. A firm bond may not be created unless the carpet backing is' pressed into the adhesive soon after removal of the heating iron. Furthermore, in the second method, the hot sadiron must be placed directly on the adhesive, transforming the adhesive to a tacky material which sticks to the heating iron and whatever else it contacts. The-adhesive transferred to the heating surface of the sadiron obviously is undesirable and may reduce the efficiency of the sadiron. Since the tacky adhesive may be exposed and unprotected on the heated sadiron for at least a short period after removal of the hot sadiron from the adhesive surface, it isvulnerable to accidental spreading onto other objects in the surrounding area, resulting in an extremely undesirable and messy situation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The method of the present invention avoids the problems encountered in prior methods of connecting carpet segments by hot-melt adhesive tape. Carpet seaming may be accomplished according to this invention while the carpet sections are laid face-up in place at their desired permanent site. The adhesive is heated to a tacky state without direct contact between it and the heating means, eliminating the possibility of adhesive material being transferred to the heating means. Thus, any potentially messy situation resulting from exposure of tacky adhesive on the heating means to foreign objects is avoided. The possibility of forming an imperfect seam by reason of the adhesive solidifying before being firmly anchored to the back of each of the carpet segments may be substantially eliminated through at least one variation of this method by placing the carpet edges into abutment with each other and pressing them onto'the surface of the adhesive while the seaming tape'is on the heating means. This method also eliminates the necessity for turning the carpeting before and after the seaming operation, thus simplifying the operation and reducing the possibility of the bond between the tape and carpeting being weakened or broken.

In accordance with the present invention, the seaming of two adjacent pieces of carpeting along abutting edges is achieved by heating and applying a heat activatable adhesive tape to the back sides of the carpet segments along their abutting edges while the carpeting rests face-up on a substrate, possibly at its desired'permanent site. In preparation for this seaming operation, two carpet segments are laid on a floor, or other substrate, face-up in contact along the area where they are to be joined. A strip of tape coated on one side with heat activatable adhesive is placed on the floor beneath the edges of the segments of carpeting which are to be joined in abutment, with the adhesive surface of the tape directedtow'ard the carpetbacking, and with each of the carpet'segments overlying a portion of the adhesive surface of the tape. The tape including the adhesive is heated conductively from its back side by a heating means positioned underneath the tape, the heating means having a top surface in contact with the backing of the tape. The top surface of the heating means supports the portions of the tape and carpet segments overlying the heating means and separates these portions from the surface over which the carpet is to be installed. In at least one variation of this method the top surface may provide a surface against Y which the tape and carpet segments may be pressed as the heating means is moved along the tape for the length of the seam. The heating means may be guided along the length of the seam while it is underneath the tape and carpet segments by a guide means offset from the side thereof to project upwardly therefrom above the face of the carpet between the carpet edges. At least one of the carpet edges is raised to provide an opening between the carpet edges through which the guide means extends. One type of heating means that can be utilized to perform the method of this invention is a thermal activator described in detail in another patent application, Ser. No. 882,944, filed by Mr. Robert E. Shimota, one of the I joint applicants in the present case. That thermal activator has a substantially flat planar supporting and heating surface and a handle attachment which may extend above the surface and the carpet for guiding the activator heater body along the edge underneath the tape in making the seam. To perform the present method, the heater body of such a thermal activator is positioned under the seaming tape so that the non-adhesive side of the tape rests on the activators top surface beneath the carpet segments to be joined. The seaming tape is placed in a threading relationship with the handle attachment section of the activator, which helps guide succeeding portions of tape into proper alignment for seaming the carpet edges as the activator is moved forward under the edges of the carpet segments to be seamed. Before such movement is initiated, the activator is sufi'rciently heated so that contact of the non-adhesive side of the seaming tape by the activators top surface for a reasonably short period brings to a tacky condition the adhesive on the other side of the tape. The minimum temperature a heating means must attain to perform this method is determined by the melting point of the adhesive utilized. It has been found that to make tacky most heat-activatable adhesives, the heating means must be brought to a temperature of at least 200 F. However, this invention is not limited to a method requiring the heating means to necessarily be heated to at least 200 F., as theessence of this invention does not reside in the tackifying temperature of the adhesive used on the seaming tape. The maximum temperature is determined largely by the type of carpet backing on which the tape is to be applied. After the heating means is sufficientlyheated, it is moved forward under the seaming tape. As the heating means proceeds, the forward portion of the seaming tape, i.e. that part of the seaming tape'which extends in front of the heater, is progressively brought into position between the top surface of the heater body and the carpet backing so that it may be heated to a tacky condition. Concurrently, as the heating means proceeds, portions of the tape trail off the rear end of the heater body with its adhesive in a tacky condition. The carpet segments are placed into abutment either on the heating means or behind the heating means as it passes and are pressed into the tacky adhesive. Then the adhesive at points on the tape passed by the heater body. cools and solidifies, bonding the tape to the carpet backs and seaming the adjacent segmentsof carpeting along their abutting edges. A protective element may cover the base of the heating means to help avoid damage to floors or other surfaces which might otherwise contact the heated instrument. By the method of this invention carpet seaming is accomplished simply, cleanly, and with assuredness that strong bonding has been achieved between the tape and carpeting.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Other objects and features will appear from the following description of this invention, detailed in reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates the relationship between the carpet segv FIG. 3 illustrates the relationship between the carpet seg- DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The heating means utilized in the method of this invention may be any one of a number of devices which are capable of heating the adhesive by contacting the non-adhesive back side of the seaming tape under the carpet segments and of being guided along under the tape and carpeting by a person above the carpeting. One type heating means suitable for this method of carpet seaming is shown in FIGS. 1-3. That heating means is a thermal activator 1 having a heater body 2 with a flat top surface 3 and a downwardly sloping trailing top surface 4. The activator 1 includes a heat protective means 5 on the bottom surface 6 of the heater body 2. The activator 1 also includes a guiding handle 7 which is held above the heater body 2 by an attachment section 8 fastened to the side of the heater body 2. The heater body 2 is generally constructed of a heat conductive, preferably metallic, material. It may be heated electrically, with electric current being carried to a heating element within the heater body by insulated conducting wires 9, or non-electrically. Another type heating means suitable for the method of this invention is a relatively flat heater strip 10 such as shown in FIG. 4. The heater strip 10 may be flexible, being comprised of a heating element, such as an electric coil, enclosed within a heat resistant, heat conducting material, such as silicon rubber. If desired, a thermally insulating protective layer of material may cover one side of the heater strip to prevent heat damage to a surface on which the heater strip is laid.

A preferred variation of the method of carpet seaming in accordance with this invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. This variation permits abutting carpet segments to be pressed onto the tacky adhesive of the seaming tape on the top surface of the heating means. To accomplish this, the carpet segments 11,12 to be joined are laid face-up in an adjacent arrangement on a floor or other surface on which a carpet might rest. In order that the edges of the carpet segments can be raised and placed into abutment, as shown at 13, on the top surface of the heater body, the carpet segments should-first be positioned so that their edges may overlap, as shown at 14, when not raised to the height of the top surface of the heater body 2. The amount of overlapping of the carpet segments is determined by the height of the heater body, it being necessary that the edges of the carpet segments are capable of being placed into abutment along at least a portion of the top surface of the heater body. The heating means 1 is inserted between the carpet segments so that the heater body 2 is under the carpet segments to be joined and under a portion of a strip of heat activatable adhesive tape 15. The adjacent edges of the carpet segments to be joined are raised above the top surface of the heater body 2 and placed in abutment contacting at least a portion of the tapestn'p on the top surface of the heater body. The above-mentioned portion of the strip of heat activatable adhesive tape is positioned between the heater body and the abutting carpeting, with the carpeting on each side of the abutting edges covering and contacting approximately half the tapes adhesive coated surface. The forward portion of tape extending to the front of the heater body (to the right as shown in FIG. 1) may be laid out under the carpet sections or may extend up between the carpet sections, possibly into a tape dispensing means.

The heating means should include some type of guide means by which the heater body may be moved along under the carpeting where the sections are to be joined. When a thermal activator 1 is utilized as the heating means, a handle 7 is providedwhich is held above the carpeting by a handle attachment 8 extending between the carpet segments through an opening created by the raising of at least one of the carpet segments to connect to one side of the heater body.

After the above-described relationship between the floor,

. heating means, tape, and carpet segments has been established, the heater body 2 is heated to a temperature sufficient to bring the heat activatable adhesive 16 to a tacky condition by contacting the non-adhesive surface 17 of the tape with the heating means trailing top surface 4 or top surface 3 for a reasonably short time. Heating of the heater body may be accomplished by closing an electric circuit directed to a heating element through insulated conducting wires 9 entering the heating means through the handle section. When the heater body has been sufficiently heated, it is gradually moved forward (to the right as viewed in FIG. 1). As the heating means. proceeds, successive forward portions of tape strip are threaded into proper alignment between the heater body and the carpet segments. Each succeeding tape segment is retained between the carpet and heater body long enough to insure that that segments adhesive coating becomes tacky. Since the carpet segments are brought into abutment above a portion of the top surface of the heater body, the carpeting can be pressed into the tacky adhesive of the tape against the surface of the heater body. Thus, the adhesive definitely exists in a tacky condition for a time while directly contacting the backing of the abutting carpet segments. When the heated activator moves past an activated segment of tape, the adhesive on that segment cools and solidifies, adhering to the backing of each of the carpet segments and seaming them together along the abutting edges. As indicated, downward pressure may be exerted on portions of the carpeting while the adhesive is in its tacky condition and the portions of the abutting carpet segments are overlying portions of the top surface in order to insure a firm connection between the tape and carpet backing. By continuing this procedure as the activator is moved along the length of the desired scam, the carpet segments become securely held together or seamed along their abutting edges. The slope of the heater bodys trailing top surface 4 may permit a smooth transition of the seamed carpeting from a position above the heater body to the floor, so that the seam will not be weakened by a sudden drop.

The top surfaces of the heater body of the thermal activator provide solid support for the seaming tape, when pressure, such as hand pressure, is applied to press the carpet backing down onto the tape during performance of this variation of the seaming method. This support is especially important when the seaming operation is being performed on carpeting over a resilient or spongy pad, such as when seaming over a carpet underlay pad. In prior art methods of carpet seaming, such as the Burgess method discussed above, if pressure 'were applied to press the carpeting down onto the tape while lying on a resilient pad, there would be no solid backing to support the tape. The resilient pad would give way under the pressure, reducing the effectiveness of such pressure to increase the bonding between the tape and the carpet backing. With the support provided by the heater body of the activator in the present invention, however, the effectiveness of such pressure in improving the bonding between the tape and the carpet backing is substantially increased. Of course, after a firm seam has been created by this variation of the method, it may be necessary to spread the carpeting slightly to flatten it and avoid any possible bulges produced by placing in abutment and seaming along the edges which once had overlapped each other.

In instances where, due to carpet bulk or size or other reasons, it is impossible or impractical to provide for overlap of the carpet segments along the edges to be seamed before they are raised above the heater body, a variation of the method of this invention may be employed which difiers slightly from the above-described procedure. This variation may be understood by reference to FIG. 3. In this variation, the heating means, seaming tape, and carpet segment are arranged in basically the same relationship with respect to each other as for the above-described procedure, that is the heater body 2 is positioned under the carpet segments 11,12 at the edges to be seamed, with the tape strip resting on the top surface of the heater body with its adhesive surface directed toward the carpet backing. However, in this variation the carpet segments are placed in abutment instead of being overlapped along the edges to be joined before being placed above the top surface of the heater body. Therefore, they cannot be brought into close abutment when raised and placed above the heater body top surface. Instead, a gap 18 exists between the edges of the carpet segments when positioned above the top surface of the heater body. Occasionally the carpet segments may be stretched to close the, gap, in which cases the previously described procedure may be employed to seam the carpet segments along the edges brought into abutment by stretching the carpeting. Frequently, however, such stretching of the carpeting cannot be easily accomplished. Then it is necessary to heat the adhesive 16 on the seaming tape to a tacky condition by contacting the non-adhesive surface 17 of the tape with the surface of the heater body 2 but to not allow the carpet backing to be pressed into the tacky adhesive until after the heater body has been moved out from under that tackified portion of the adhesive tape strip. When the heater body has been moved forward out from under that tackified portion of the tape strip, the carpet edges can be lowered down into abutment and pressed into the still tacky adhesive behind the trailing edge of the heater body. Then as the adhe- 5 sive cools and bonds to the carpet backing the carpet segments become firmly seamed along the abutting edges.

The heater strip 10 shown in FIG. 4tmay be employed as an alternative to the thermal activator as the heating means in the performance of either of the above-described variations of the method of this invention. The same basic steps as explained above are followed when performing this method with a heater strip 10, except that a person may direct the movement of the heater strip by pulling a cord, strap, wire, or other similar guide means, such as 19, attached to the heater strip and extending under the carpeting. Of course, a similar guiding means could be used with other types of heating means as well.

It is particularly noteworthy that this method may be carried out after the carpeting is positioned at its desired permanent site. Also, by this method, the danger of a messy situation resulting from exposed tacky adhesive on the heating means is eliminated. This method may be employed to perform the described operations in small areas within a home, in large areas such as assembly halls, or at other locations where carpet seaming is desired.

A person skilled in the art of this invention will recognize that there are many variations-within the scope of this invention which may be used to achieve the desired objectives. This invention is intended to include all such variations, limited only to the scope defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A method of face seaming abutting carpet segments comprising the steps of:

a. arranging adjacent carpet segments face-up such that edges of said carpet segments abut;

b. positioning a tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under said carpet segments along the abutting edges thereof with the surface of the adhesive facing toward and contacting the back of the carpet segments;

c. applying heat to the back side of the tape facing away from the surface of the adhesive to heat the tape including the adhesive to activate said adhesive to its tacky adhesive state; and v d. permitting the adhesive to cool and become adhesively bonded to the adjacent carpet segments on each side of said abutting carpet edges.

2. A method of face seaming abutting carpet segments corn-v prising the steps of:

a. arranging adjacent carpet segments face-up such that edges of said carpet segments abut;

b. positioning a tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under said carpet segments along the abutting edges thereof with the surface of the adhesive facing toward and contacting the back of the carpet segments;

0. applying heat to the back side of the tape facing away from the surface of the adhesive to heat the tape includ ing the adhesive to activate said adhesive to its tacky adhesive state;

d. applying pressure upon portions of the carpet segments.

along the abutting carpet edges from the face-side of the carpet segments to press the back side of the carpet segments along the abutting edges onto the heat activated adhesive; and

e. permitting the adhesive to cool and become adhesively bonded to the adjacent carpet segments on each side of said abutting carpet edges.

3. The method of claim 2 wherein a substantially flat, planar firm supporting surface is positioned against the back side of the tape while applying pressure down upon said portions of 75 the carpet segments along the abutting carpet edges.

4. A method of face seaming adjacent carpet segments while the carpet segments are placed face-up over a surface with edges of said carpet segments abutting, comprising the steps of:

a. positioning a strip of tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under said carpet segments along the abutting edges thereof with the surface of said adhesive facing toward the back of the carpet segments, the lateral side edges of said stripof tape on each side of the line of abutment of said carpet edges being substantially parallel to said line of abutment;

b. inserting a heating means underneath said tape, said heating means having a substantially rigid, flat planar top surface, said top surface being in contact with the back side of the tape;

c. actuating said heating means to heat said tape from the back side and thereby heat the adhesive to activate said adhesive to its tacky adhesive state;

d. moving said heating means along the back side of the strip of tape underneath said carpeting by guiding said heating means by a guiding means attached to said heating means and extending around the lateral edge of said strip of tape through an opening between the edges of the carpet segments to a point above said carpet segments, said opening being created progressively between said carpet segments as said heating means is moved by said guiding means which temporarily raises an edge portion of at least one of said carpet segments so that the carpet segments are temporarily separated from abutment with each other;

e. progressively closing said opening behind said guiding means to place the edges of said carpet segments back into .abutment in contact with the adhesive surface of the tape on the top surface of said heating means, and applying pressure to portions of the carpet segmentsalong the abutting carpet edges while said top surface of the heating means is still in position under the tape and carpet segments returned into abutting relationship to press portions of the back side of the carpet segments adjacent the abutting edges into the heat activated adhesive; and

f. moving said heating means away from the heat activated adhesive and permitting the adhesive to cooland become adhesively bonded to the adjacent carpet segments on each side of said abutting carpet edges.

5. The method of carpet seaming of claim 4 wherein said heating means is caused to be heated by electrical means located in said heating means.

6. A method of face seaming adjacent carpet segments positioned face-up over a surface comprising the steps of:

a. positioning said carpet segments so that one carpet segment overlaps another carpet segment on said surface on the areas of said carpet segments adjacent the edges along which said carpet segments are to be seamed;

b. positioning a strip of tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under the overlapping region of said carpet segments with the surface of said adhesive facing toward the back of the carpet segments;

c. raising portions of said carpet segments along the edges to be seamed and a portion of said strip of tape and inserting thereunder a heating means, said heating means having a substantially flat, top surface which is placed in contact with the back side of the raised portion of tape;

d. placing the edges of said raised portions of carpet segments into abutment on the adhesive surface of said raised portion of tape contacting with its back side said top surface of the heating means;

e. actuating said heating means to heat said tape from the back side and thereby heat the adhesive to its tacky adhesive state;

f. applying pressure to the portions of the carpet segments along the abutting edges on said tape contacting the top surface of the heating means to press portions of the back side of the carpet segments along the abutting edges into the heat activated adhesive; and

g. moving said heating means away from the heat activated adhesive, thereby permitting the adhesive to cool and become adhesively bonded to the adjacent carpet segments on each side of said abutting edges.

7. The method of claim 6 wherein the portions of said carpet segments and said strip of tape are raised to a distance above said surface so that the edges of the raised carpet portions, when positioned parallel to the top surface of the heating means, no longer overlap.

8. The method of claim 7 wherein the portions of said carpet segments are raised to a distance above said surface so that the edges of the raised carpet portions are in abutment with each other when positioned upon the overlying tape upon the top surface of the heating means.

9. The method of carpet seaming of claim 6 which includes the further step of flattening the carpeting after each carpet segment has become adhesively bonded to the adhesive tape.

10. The method of carpet seaming of claim 6 wherein said heating means is moved away from said heat activatedadhesive along the back side of the strip of tape underneath the carpeting by guiding means.

11. The method of carpet seaming of claim 10 wherein said guiding means is attached to said heating means and extends around the lateral edge of said strip of tape through an opening between the edges of the carpet segments to a point above said carpet segments, said opening being created progressively between said carpet segments as said heating means is moved by said guiding means which temporarily holds up an edge portion of at least one of said carpet segments so that the carpet segments are temporarily separated and said opening being progressively closed behind said guiding means to place the edges of said carpet segments into abutment in contact with the adhesive surface of the tape on the top surface of the heating means.

12. A method of face seaming adjacent carpet segments emplaced over a surface comprising the steps'of:

a. arranging adjacent carpet segments face-up over a surface such that edges of said carpet segments abut;

b. positioning a tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under said carpet segments along the abutting edges thereof with the surface of the adhesive facing toward the contacting the back of the carpet segments;

c. raising portions of said carpet segments along the edges to be seamed and a portion of said strip of tape and inserting thereunder a heating means, said heating means having a substantially flat top surface which is placed in contact with the back side of the raised portion of tape;

d. actuating said heating means to heat said tape from the back side and thereby heat the adhesive to activate said adhesive to its tacky adhesive state;

e. moving said heating means forward along the back side of the strip of tape away from the heat activated adhesive, so that portions of said tape which include heat activated ad hesive trail off the heating means;

f. lowering said raised portions of said carpet segments back into abutment and pressing their back sides along the abutting edges onto the heat activated adhesive of the portions of said tape which trailed off the heating means; and

g. permitting the adhesive to cool and become adhesively bonded to the adjacent carpet segments on each side of the abutting carpet edges.

13. A method of face seaming carpet segmentspositioned face-up on a surface comprising the steps of:

a. arranging adjacent carpet segments face-up over a surface such that edges of said carpet segments abut;

b. positioning a tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under said carpet segments along the abutting edges thereof with the surface of the adhesive facing toward and contacting the back of the carpet segments;

c. raising a section of the tape and the overlying portions of said carpet segments above said surface;

d. applying heat to the back side of said section of tape to heat the adhesive on the side to activate said adhesive;

e. insulating said surface from the heat while said heat is being applied to said tape;

f. lowering the tape along an inclined path from its raised position to its original position on said surface;

g. lowering'the overlying portions of said carpet along said incline;

h. positioning said carpet segments into abutment with each other;

i. pressing the overlying portions of the carpet segments onto the heat activated adhesive.

14. A method of face seaming adjacent carpet segments positioned face-up comprising the steps of;

a. positioning said carpet segments so that one carpet segment overlaps another carpet segment on said surface on the areas of said carpet segments adjacent the edges along which said carpet segments are to be seamed;

b. positioning a strip of tape having a front side and a back side with heat activatable adhesive on said front side under the overlapping region of said carpet segments with the surface of said adhesive facing toward the back of the carpet segments;

c. raising portions of said carpet segments along the edges to be seamed and the sections of said strip of tape underlying said portions;

d. applying heat to the back side of said section of tape to heat the adhesive on the side to activate said adhesive;

e. insulating said surface from the heat while said heat is being applied to said tape;

f. positioning the edges of said raised portions of carpet segments into abutment with each other on the adhesive surface of said-raised portion of tape while heat is being ap-' plied to the back side;

g. applying pressure to the portions of the abutting carpet segments to press the back sides onto the heat activated adhesive while heat is being applied to the back side of the tape;

h. removing said heat from the heat activated adhesive and permitting the adhesive to cool.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3219508 *Feb 13, 1964Nov 23, 1965Us Rubber CoMethod of seaming vinyl-backed materials
US3415703 *Mar 18, 1966Dec 10, 1968Giffen Burgess CorpProcess for face-seaming carpeting
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4204904 *Oct 17, 1977May 27, 1980Tabor Donald RRoofing material handling and sealing machine
US4483896 *Feb 4, 1983Nov 20, 1984Seam TeamCarpet seaming tape with separate heating circuits
US4565728 *Oct 1, 1984Jan 21, 1986Seam Team, Inc.System and method for application of internal heating to thermally responsive structures
US4581091 *Jan 23, 1985Apr 8, 1986Lane Kenneth ADispensing seam tape below and centered with respect to juxtadoded edges of adjacent sections
US4584040 *Jan 30, 1984Apr 22, 1986Partnership Of Lloyd E. Anderson, Betty P. Anderson And Martin L. AndersonCarpet seaming apparatus
US4617083 *Aug 6, 1985Oct 14, 1986Yrizarris Raymond DCarpet seaming tool
US4726867 *Apr 15, 1987Feb 23, 1988Willard GustavsenHot melt bonding
US4935280 *Nov 28, 1988Jun 19, 1990Gangi Richard PHeat bond tape for carpet seaming
US5191692 *Mar 1, 1991Mar 9, 1993Tac-Fast Systems SaCarpet jointing method
US5382462 *Jul 28, 1993Jan 17, 1995Tac-Fast Systems SaCarpet tape
US5691026 *Mar 8, 1994Nov 25, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyFastener member with a dual purpose cover sheet
US5691027 *Sep 29, 1995Nov 25, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyFastener with a dual purpose cover sheet
US5693171 *Nov 14, 1994Dec 2, 1997Orcon CorporationMethod and apparatus for seaming carpets
US5723195 *Sep 21, 1993Mar 3, 1998Pacione; Joseph RoccoCarpet and underpad attachment system
US5902427 *Jul 11, 1997May 11, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyFastener arrangement with dual purpose cover sheet
US6761199 *Jan 28, 2002Jul 13, 2004Bruce Edward MetzgerSeaming board and methods of installing floor covering
US7422044 *Jun 30, 2004Sep 9, 2008Perez Benigno GMachine for on-site folding and securing a tape to an unfinished edge of a carpet
EP0117012A2 *Jan 3, 1984Aug 29, 1984Seam Team Inc.Carpet seaming tape and apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/152, 156/304.4, 156/324.4, 156/304.6
International ClassificationA47G27/04, A47G27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0443
European ClassificationA47G27/04C1