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Publication numberUS3660211 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1972
Filing dateJan 15, 1971
Priority dateJan 15, 1971
Also published asCA953969A1
Publication numberUS 3660211 A, US 3660211A, US-A-3660211, US3660211 A, US3660211A
InventorsBrody Norman M
Original AssigneeNorman Industries
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plastic article and method of production
US 3660211 A
Abstract
Production of a decorative iridescent cast plastic article comprising a clear cast resin, e.g., polyester, body having embedded therein an embossed multicolored iridescent facsimile on a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil of a multicolored iridescent body, e.g., an abalone shell, the embossed facsimile forming a multicolored iridescent image of the iridescent body in the cast resin, with highlights corresponding to those of the iridescent body, said iridescent cast plastic article being produced by forming color separation negatives from a photographic color transparency of such iridescent body, producing lithographic printing plates from the respective color transparencies, printing the colored image of such iridescent body from said lithographic plates onto a pre-determined area of a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil, embossing into the resulting facsimile on such metal foil, a surface contour bringing out the highlights of the iridescent body, cutting the metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile from the metal foil, and embedding the metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile in a clear casting resin.
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United States Patent Brody May 2, 1972 [541 PLASTIC ARTICLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCTION [72] Inventor: Norman M. Brody, Los Angeles, Calif.

[73] Assignee: Norman Industries, Inc., Santa Fe Springs,

Calif.

[22] Filed: Jan. 15, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 106,706

[ 56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,812,134 6/1931 Bragger et a1 ..161/5 X 1,936,980 11/1933 Hooton ..156/300 X 3,287,481 11/1966 Trojan et a1. ..264/139 3,312,197 4/1967 Smith ..264/271 X 3,410,934 1 H1968 Kuritzkes et a1. ..161/5 X 3,481,663 12/1969 Greenstein ..16l/5X Primary Examiner-William A. Powell Attorney-Max Geldin ABSTRACT Production of a decorative iridescent cast plastic article comprising a clear cast resin, e.g., polyester, body having embedded therein an embossed multicolored iridescent facsimile on a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil of a multicolored iridescent body, e.g., an abalone shell, the embossed facsimile forming a multicolored iridescent image of the iridescent body in the cast resin, with highlights corresponding to those of the iridescent body, said iridescent cast plastic article being produced by forming color separation negatives from a photo graphic color transparency of such iridescent body, producing lithographic printing plates from the respective color transparencies, printing the colored image of such iridescent body from said lithographic plates onto a pre-determined area of a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil, embossing into the resulting facsimile on such metal foil, a surface contour bringing out the highlights of the iridescent body, cutting the metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile from the metal foil, and embedding the metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile in a clear casting resin.

16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures This invention relates to production of decorative plastic articles, and is particularly concerned with the provision of such plastic articles having embedded therein a metal foil multicolored iridescent facsimile of a multicolored iridescent body, such as an abalone shell, so that when such iridescent facsimile is viewed by an observer through the cast plastic, there is seen an image having highlights corresponding to those of the iridescent body, e.g., an abalone shell, and forming a multiplicity of iridescent colors upon movement of the image with respect to the eye of the observer, such multicolored iridescent image produced by the facsimile in the cast resin closely resembling the multicolored iridescent body, so that it appears that the iridescent body itself, e.g., the abalone shell, is embedded in the resin.

It has been known in the decorative arts to incorporate or embed artistic and/or colorful items in aclear cast resin. Thus, for example, avery colorful and artistic iridescent cast plastic article can be produced asa decorative piece, by-embedding varicolored iridescent abalone shells in a clear cast resin, and when viewed by an observer, upon movement of the cast plastic article, or movement of the eyes of the observer, a very interesting and colorful variety of irridescent' colors is reflected from the highlights of the varicolored iridescent abalone shells through the clear plastic, which change color upon such movement.

However, many iridescent bodies which are highly colorful and iridescent, such as abalone shells, are relatively expensive, and it has been sought in the decorative arts to provide colorful iridescent plasticv articles of the type noted above, but replacing the actual iridescent body previously embeddedin the plastic, with less expensive substitute materials, while achieving the same artistic and colorful effect noted above.

Further, art objects such as abalone shells come, in varying shapes and sizes and are of varying thickness, and it is accordingly difficult to embed a number of such shells in a cast plastic of a given thickness, particularly at the same depth therein. Moreover, when handled for this purpose, the shells are easily broken into small fragments. In addition, many of the shells are not very colorful or lustrous so that the shells require sorting and selection prior to embedding them in the plastic body. Hence, the proper selection and then embedment of art objects such as abalone shells in a cast resin requires a considerable amount of hand labor and therefore is relatively expensive.

U. S. Pat. No. 2,712,190 discloses incorporation of light reflecting metal foils in plastics to produce ornamental objects, the iridescent efi'ect being obtained by the interference of light reflectedfrom the front and the back of a pair of thin metal films, and through the plastic layers and the metal films therebetween.

U. S. Pat. No. 1,941,736 discloses a process of producing relief pictures on metal foils.

U. S.' Pat- No. 3,364,090 discloses a method of making a three-dimensional display panel featuring a transparentdisplay panel having one side configured in half-tones to produce a relief image thereon visible on both sides of the panel.

However, none of the prior art, including those patents noted above, teaches or discloses the production of decorative iridescent plastic articles, according to the invention, formed of an embossed or relieved replica of an iridescent body such as an abalone shell, incorporated in a cast resin body, to provide a replica of the iridescent body, having the same coloration and highlights of the iridescent body, so that the same pleasing variegated iridescent'color effects are achieved by viewing such replica through the cast resin body, as would be the case if the iridescent body itself, e.g., iridescent abalone shells, were embeddedin the cast resin body.

Thus, the invention provides a method of producing an iridescent cast plastic article, which comprises photographing in full color a multicolored iridescent body, e. g., of varying surface .contour,to form a color transparency, converting said color transparency into color separation negatives, producing lithographic printing plates from the respective color separation negatives, said lithographic printing plates being colored corresponding to the color of the respective color separation negatives, printing the colored image on each of said lithographic plates in succession in a predetermined area of a metal foil to form a multicolored facsimile of said iridescent body on said metal foil, forming an embossing plate having a surface contour corresponding to the highlights of said iridescent body, registering and contacting said embossing plate with said multicolored iridescent facsimile on a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil to form an embossed iridescent facsimile of said iridescent body on said metal foil, cutting said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile from said metal foil, and embedding said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile in a clear casting resin, to form a multicolored iridescent image of said iridescent body in said cast rein, said image having highlights corresponding to those of said iridescent body, and forming a multiplicity of iridescent colors upon movement of said image with respect to the eye of an observer, said multicolored iridescent image produced by said facsimile in said cast resin closely resembling said multicolored iridescent body.

In preferred practice, the invention process includes initially coating the multicolored iridescent body with a clear resin to enhance the iridescence of the body prior to the above noted photogaphing of the iridescent body to form the color transparency.

Also, in preferred practice, the color transparency is converted into four color separation negatives, colored respectively .with the four basic process colors, that is, magenta, cyan, yellow and black, and producing four of the above noted lithographic printing plates from the respective color separation negatives.

According to a preferred method for embedding the iridescent facsimile in the clear casting resin, a clear liquid casting resin is first poured in a mold to form a first resin layer, the first resin layer is permitted to partially solidify, the metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile is placed on the partially solidified first resin layer, a second layer of clear liquid casting resin is placed over the first layer and over the metal foil facsimile, and the first and second layers of the casting resin are completely solidified, to embed the metal foil facsimile in the resulting case resin body between the first and second layers.

The metal foil carrying the embossed iridescent facsimile of the multicolored iridescent body, can be any type of metal foil such as aluminum foil, copper foil, brass foil, and the like, which can be readily subjected to photolithographic printing for producing the colored iridescent replica of the iridescent body, and which can be embossed to produce a relief or highlighted iridescent replica.

Any multicolored iridescent body can be employed for photographing and production of the foil embossed iridescent facsimile which is printed on the metal foil and embedded in the plastic to produce a facsimile representation of the iridescent body in the plastic. Thus, a preferred iridescent body for producing iridescent foil facsimiles according to the invention are abalone shells, since when embedded in the resin, the highlighted foil embossed multicolored iridescent facsimiles produce a particularly striking variety of colors when the plastic article is moved with respect to varying angles of the eye of an observer. However, other multicolored iridescent bodies can similarly be employed for production of foil. embossed iridescent facsimiles for incorporation into the cast resin body to produce highly desirable decorative items according to the invention. I

The clear casting resins which can be employed for embedding the foil embossed iridescent facsimiles or replicas according to the invention can include any suitable clear casting resin such as polyester, acrylic and other resins such as polycarbonate resins. Preferred casting resins for purposes of the invention are the polyester resins.

The invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the description below of a preferred embodiment of the invention, in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of representations of multicolored abalone shells, employed for producing multicolored facsimiles thereof on a metal foil for embedment in a clear cast resin body, according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view illustration of a portion of an aluminum foil having photolithographed thereon the pictorial multicolored facsimiles of the abalone shells illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross-section of the illustration of FIG. 2, taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal cross-section of the aluminum foil of FIG. 2, having the photolithographed multicolored facsimiles of the abalone shells contained thereon, and following embossing of such multicolored facsimiles to produce multicolored iridescent facsimiles of the abalone shells of FIG. 1 on the aluminum foil;

FIG. 5 illustrates the method of embedding the die cut aluminum foil embossed iridescent facsimiles illustrated in FIG. 4, in a clear polyester casting resin, to produce a decorative cast plastic article containing the aluminum foil embossed multicolored iridescent facsimiles of the abalone shells illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the iridescent cast plastic article produced by the method illustrated in FIG. 5, taken on line 66 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a section taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 6; and

FIG. 8 illustrates a cross-section of an embossed iridescent facsimile of an abalone shell on an aluminum foil, embossed according to a modification of the invention.

The drawing is exaggerated for greater clarity.

Referring to FIG. 1, numerals 10 and 12 illustrate multicolored iridescent abalone shells which are processed according to the invention to produce embossed multicolored iridescent facsimiles on an aluminum foil, for embedment in a cast polyester resin body according to the procedure described below.

According to preferred practice, the shells 10 and 12 are first dipped into a clear liquid casting resin, e.g., containing a curing catalyst, and which can be, for example, a clear polyester or a clear acrylic casting resin, and the resin coating formed on the abalone shells is then solidified and hardened to form a transparent film thereon. The formation of the transparent resin coating on the abalone shells enhances and enriches the iridescence of the shells by reflected light rays from the highlights of the shells. However, although this initial coating operation is preferred, it is not essential and this step can be omitted.

The multicolored iridescent abalone shells l0 and 12, preferably containing a clear or transparent resin coating thereon as noted above, are photographed in full color to form multicolored transparencies of the respective iridescent abalone shells, e. g., of the same size as the shells themselves.

The full color transparencies of the abalone shells 10 and 12 arethen each converted into color separation negatives, preferably one color separation negative for each basic color, e.g., one color separation negative for each of the basic process colors magenta, cyan and yellow, and which can also include black, These color separation negatives are processed in known manner so as to produce a half-tone dot structure for production of lithographic plates, one for each of the above noted basic colors, for each of the shells l0 and 12.

Lithographic plates are then made from each of the color separation negatives, using colored transparent inks, each of the lithographic plates formed from the color separation negatives for each shell, being colored with an ink corresponding to one of the basic colors noted above.

The production of the above noted color transparencies for each shell 10 and 12, the conversion of such transparencies into color separation negatives having a half-tone dot structure, employing suitable filters for this purpose, and the production of regular or conventional lithographic printing plates from the color separation negatives, e.g., by use of light sensitive resists on the lithographic plates and conventional etching procedures followed by application of the appropriate color ink to each of the lithographic plates, are conventional procedures well known in the art, and which per se form no part of the present invention.

Each of the four lithographic printing plates containing that portion of the multicolored image of the abalone shells l0 and 12, corresponding to one of the above noted basic colors magenta, cyan, yellow and black, is successively contacted or rolled over a predetermined area on an aluminum foil 16 carried on a paper backing 18. Each of the basic color images on the four lithographic plates for each abalone shell representation are separately applied to and printed on the area indicated at 19 or 20 on the aluminum foil 16, and after the colored ink applied by each of the four lithographic plates is applied, the ink is allowed to dry before the next color applied by another lithographic plate is contacted with the area 19 or 20. Thus, in usual practice, for each of the image representations 10a and 12a of the original abalone shells 10 and 12, lithographically printed in the areas 19 and 20, the lighter colored portion of the image, that is yellow, is first applied, then magenta, then cyan, and finally black, when employed.

After the ink has dried following lithographic printing of the multicolored facsimiles 10a and 12a of abalone shells 10 and 12 on the aluminum foil 16, it is noted that although the facsimiles 10a and 12a are corresponding multicolored replicas of the abalone shells 10 and 12, at this stage of the procedure the multicolored facsimiles 10a and 12a do not have the iridescence of the abalone shells 10 and 12, because the planar surfaces of the multicolored facsimiles 10a and 12a on the aluminum foil 16 do not permit reflection of the light raysv from the highlights, as is the case of the natural abalone shells l0 and 12 due to the irregular surface thereof. In order to provide a surface of the multicolored facsimiles 10a and 12a, which brings out the highlights and provides the iridescent quality of the abalone shells 10 and 12, following drying of the ink after lithographic printing of each of the multicolored facsimiles 10a and 12a, embossing plates produced as described below are applied to each of the multicolored facsimiles 10a and 12a, in the manner pointed out below.

The embossing plates are produced by placing tracing paper on the respective color transparencies of abalone shells 10 and 12, and tracing out the areas of the highlights in each case. According to one mode of procedure, these highlight areas on the tracings are then blocked in with ink and photographic negative is then made from each of the tracings and the negative placed in contact with a photosensitized surface of an embossing die or plate. The sensitized surface is then exposed to light and the light-hardened portions remain while the unexposed portions are removed, and the exposed portions of the plate are then etched to form the embossing plate. This procedure for producing the embossing plate from the inked tracings is a well known procedure and does not per se form a part of the present invention.

The embossing plate or die produced from the inked tracing of the color transparencies of one of the abalone shells l0, and sculptured or etched preferably to approximate the depth of the abalone shell 10, according to the above noted procedure, is then registered with the multicolored facsimile 10a on the aluminum foil 16 and contacted with the abalone shell reproduction 10a on the aluminum foil to form the embossed color reproduction, indicated at 1017 in FIG. 4.

The embossing plate also produced in the manner described above corresponding to the abalone shall reproduction 12a of FIG. 2, is similarly registered and contacted with the reproduction 12a on the aluminum foil 16 for producing the embossed multicolor reproduction 12b of the abalone shell, illustrated in FIG. 4.

Following embossing of the multicolored abalone shell facsimiles or reproductions 10a and 124, the resulting embossed multicolor reproductions 10b and 12b in the aluminum foil 16 in FIG. 4, now exhibit an iridescence corresponding to the original abalone shells 10 and 12.

The multicolored iridescent facsimiles or reproductions b and 12b mounted on the aluminum foil 16 are cut from the aluminum sheet. This can be accomplished in a separate operation following embossing, or the embossing die for each of the reproductions 10b and 12b can be designed so that the outer ridge of the die forming the boundary around the respective abalone shell reproductions 10b and 12b, and which protrudes somewhat beyond the embossed areas, cuts through the aluminum foil and paper around each multicolored iridescent printed image 10b and 12b of the abalone shells 10 and 12.

Referring to FIG. 5, the resulting separate multicolored iridescent abalone shell units 100 and 120, comprising the multicolored iridescent reproductions 10b and 12b, each mounted on the aluminum foil 16, are embedded in a 'clear polyester resin in the manner described below.

A first layer of 'a clear casting resin such as a clear polyester or clear acrylic casting resin, in liquid form, is placed in a mold 22, the resin layer being illustrated at 24.

The resin preferably employed in' accordance with the invention is a conventional clear polyester casting resin available commercially in the trade from various manufacturers. Generally such polyester resins are produced by reaction of dibasic acids such as maleic acid, with dihydric alcohols, and usually containing an unsaturated monomer such as styrene. The polyester is available commercially in the first stage of polymerization, that is the ester formation stage. Just prior to use, that is just prior to pouring in a mold, a suitable peroxide catalyst such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, is added, to effect hardening, which can take place at room temperature over an extended period, or such hardening can be accelerated by the application of heat. Mixtures or blends of various types of polyester resins can be employed so as to obtain a desired type of cast resin product, which can be either hardy and glass-like or relatively soft and flexible and hence shatter-proof if dropped, and forming a clear transparent resin body.

I After permitting the first clear polyester layer 24 to partially solidify, the abalone shell facsimiles 10c and 12c are placed in a predetermined spaced relation with respect to each other, I

on the surface of the first clear polyester layer, as indicated by dotted line 26 in FIG. 5. The facsimile units 10c and 120 of the abalone shells are placed on the surface of the polyester resin layer 24 with the multicolored reproductions 10b and 12b facing downwardly, as illustrated in FIG. 5. Thereafter, a second layer of clear casting resin, preferably polyester resin, in liquid form, is poured over the first layer 24 and over the abalone shell facsimile units 100 and 120, to a predetermined height in the mold. This placement of the multicolored abalone shell units 10c and 12c between the two polyester resin layers 24 and 28, upon curing and solidifying of the resin layers, gives the effect of the multicolored abalone shell images 10b and 12b floating in the resin medium.

Upon partial solidification of the second polyester resin layer 28, a final opaque resin layer 30, in the form of a liquid casting resin, such as a polyester casting resin, and containing an opaque color such as black, is poured over the upper surface of the second layer 28 to a predetermined height in the mold.

Following a short period of setting at ambient temperature in the mold, e.g., about 20 to about 30 minutes, the resulting article or unit 32, comprising the resin body formed of the resin pours 24, 28 and 30, having embedded therein the abalone shell facsimile units 10c and 12c comprising the multicolored iridescent facsimiles or images 10b and 12b of the abalone shells 10 and 12, each mounted on aluminum foil, and disposed parallel to the surfaces 34 and 36 of the clear cast resin body, is passed through an infra red oven operating at a temperature ranging from about 140 F to about 160 F. The unit 32 is permitted to remain in the oven for about 20 to about 30 minutes and is then removed and permitted to cool. It will be understood, if desired, that the resin can be cured at room temperature, but requiring a longer curing period under these conditions. The resulting cast plastic article, illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, when viewed through the upper clear cast resin surface 34, with the opaque resin layer 30 on the far side, shows the multicolored iridescent facsimiles or images 10b and 12b against a black opaque background provided by the outer opaque resin layer 30. The embossed reproductions 10b and 12b of the abalone shells, printed with the multicolored transparent inks, emit a variety of iridescent colors, closely resembling the iridescent shells 10 and 12. Light striking the high spots of the embossed areas of the facsimiles 10b and 12b change color and become more reflective as the article or unit 32 is moved with respect to the eye, or as the eye of the observer is moved to different angles with respect to the surfaces 34 of the plastic article 32. This is due to the multiple reflections of light rays from the various relief and highlighted surfaces of the embossed color replicas 10b and 12b corresponding to the highlighted areas of shells 10 and 12.

It will be understood that any number ofembossed multicolored reproductions of the abalone shells on aluminum foil can be incorporated into the clear polyester resin body formed of the layers 24 and 28, so as to enhance the artistic effect obtained upon viewing the abalone shell replicas through the plastic body. This is illustrated by the addition of another multicolored embossed reproduction 13b on aluminum foil embodying unit 13c, forming the image of another abalone shell, as illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 6, similar to reproduction units and 120.

In addition to reproducing the iridescent character of the original abalone shells, upon movement of the plastic article 32 containing the embossed multicolored abalone shell replicas, with respect to the eye of an observer, the abalone shell images embedded in the plastic body take'on a threedimensional form in the plastic, and the combination of the reproduced multicolored representation, the iridescence emanating therefrom and the three-dimensional effect of the abalone shell images in the plastic body, produces an effect which closely resembles the effect obtained if the abalone shells 10 and 12 themselves were embedded in the plastic body 32,instead of the embossed multicolored replicas 10b, 12c and 130.

FIG. 8 illustrates a modification of the embossed multicolored facsimile 10b produced from the abalone shell 10. Thus, the embossed multicolored reproduction 10b is 'the same as 10b on the paperback aluminum foil l6, and produced in the same manner as the colored facsimile 10b, except that the embossing plate for printing the embossed image 10b has highs and lows of equal depth, distributed uniformly over the plate, so that when the plate is contacted with the multicolored printed image 10a of FIG. 3, the embossed multicolored replica 10b of the abalone shell 10 is formed, with corresponding high and low surface portions 40 and 42, as noted in FIG. 8, distributed uniformly over the surface of the multicolored reproduction 10b. Although this modified embossed reproduction 10b, with its embossed surfaces brings out in large measure the highlights of the original of the abalone shell 10, when viewed through the plastic body, e.g., 32 in which it is embedded as described above, it does not produce as great an iridescent effect as in the case of the multicolored embossed reproductions 10b and 12b in which the surfaces more truly correspond to the highs and lows of the surfaces in the shells 10 and 12, and thus more faithfully bring out the highlights of the shells. However, the modification of FIG. 8 does have the virtue that it is more economical to produce than the embossed replicas illustrated at 10b and 12b.

Although the present invention has been described above chiefly in connection with the production of iridescent multicolored replicas of abalone shells, for embedment in a clear casting resin body, the principles of the invention can also be applied to other configuration such as cartoon characters, and the like, creating a reflected iridescent light motion by reflection, refraction and the like, as in the case of the iridescent effect produced as described above with respect to the embossed multicolored abalone shell reproductions.

From the foregoing, it is seen that the invention provides for production of iridescent plastic articles having a pleasing and interesting effect on the eye of the viewer, employing in place of an expensive article or art object itself such as abalone shells, embedded in plastic, facsimiles of or reproductions of such objects which truly reproduce substantially the same effect as the art objects themselves, but produced in accordance with the invention at a substantially lower cost than by use of the artistic articles themselves.

Further, as applied to abalone shells as described above, since the multicolored iridescent facsimiles or reproductions of the shells are embossed into a thin planar sheet of metal foil, the placement of a plurality of such foil reproductions at a certain level or planar location in the clear casting resin and the embedment therein are facilitated, pennitting a continuity of operation of the process as compared to the difficult task of embedding the abalone shells per se in the casting resin and the selection of suitable shells for this purpose, which are avoided by the present invention. Also, in many instances a more colorful iridescent reproduction of an abalone shellis obtained according to the invention, as compared to the abalone shell itself. These advantages also apply to the reproduction of other art-objects according to the invention.

While I have described particular embodiments of my invention for the purpose of illustration, it should be understood that other modifications and adaptations thereof may be made within the spirit of the invention, and hence the invention is not to be taken as limited except by the scope of the appended claims.

lclaim:

l. A method of producing an iridescent cast plastic article, which comprises photographing in full color a multicolored iridescent body, to form a color transparency, converting said color transparency into color separation negatives, producing lithographic printing plates from the respective color separation negatives, said lithographic printing plates being colored corresponding to the color of the respective color separation negatives, printingthe colored image on each of said lithographic plate in succession in a predetermined area of a metal foil to form a multicolored facsimile of said iridescent body on said metal foil, forming an embossing plate having a surface contour corresponding to the highlights of said iridescent body, registering and contacting said embossing plate with said multicolored iridescent facsimile on said metal foil to form an embossed iridescent facsimile of said iridescent body on said metal foil, cutting said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile from said metal foil, and embedding said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile in a clear casting'resin, to form a multicolored iridescent image of said iridescent body in said clear cast resin, said image having highlights corresponding to those of said iridescent body, and forming a multiplicity of iridescent colors upon movement of said image with respect to the eye of an observer, said multicolored iridescent image produced by said facsimile in said cast resin closely resembling said multicolored iridescent body.

2. A method as defined in claim 1, including initially coating said multicolored iridescent body with a clear resin to enhance the iridescence of said body prior to said photographing said iridescent body.

3. A method as defined in claim 1, including converting said color transparency into magenta, cyan, yellow and black color separation negatives, and producing four said lithographic printing plates from said respective color transparencies, said lithographic printing plates being colored magenta, cyan, yellow and black.

4. A method as defined in claim 1, said embedding said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile in said clear casting resin comprising pouring a clear liquid casting resin in a mold to form a first resin layer, permitting said first resin layer to partially solidify, placing said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile on said partially solidified first resin layer, pouring a second layer of clear liquid casting resin over said first layer and said metal foil facsimile, and completely solidifying said first and second layers and casting resin, to embed said metal foil facsimile in the resulting cast resin body.

5. A method as defined in claim 1, said metal foil being an aluminum foil, and said clear cast resin being a clear polyester casting resin.

6. A method as defined in claim 1, said multicolored iridescent body being an abalone shell, and said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile being a metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile of said abalone shell.

7. A method as defined in claim 2, including converting said color transparency into magenta, cyan, yellow and black color separation negatives, and producing four said lithographic printing plates from said respective color transparencies, said lithographic printing plates being colored magenta, cyan, yellow and black.

8. A method as defined in claim 7, said metal foil being an aluminum foil, and said clear cast resin being a clear polyester casting resin.

9. A method as defined in claim 8, said multicolored iridescent body being an abalone shell, and said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile being a metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile of said abalone shell.

10. A method as defined in claim 9, said embedding said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile in said clear casting resin comprising pouring a clear liquid casting resin in a mold to form a first resin layer, permitting said first resin layer to partially solidify, placing said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile on said partially solidified first resin layer, pouring a second layer of clear liquid casting resin over said first layer and said metal foil facsimile, and completely solidifying said first and second layers of casting resin, to embed said metal foil facsimile in the resulting cast resin body.

1 1. An iridescent cast plastic article which comprises a clear cast resin body having embedded therein an embossed multicolored iridescent facsimile on a metal foil of a multicolored iridescent body of varying surface contour, said embossed facsimile having surface portions corresponding to the highlights of the surface contour of said iridescent body, and forming a multicolored iridescent image of said iridescent body in said cast resin, said image having highlights corresponding to those of said iridescent body, said image producing a multiplicity of iridescent colors upon movement of said image with respect to the eye of an observer, said iridescent image produced by said metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile embedded in said cast resin, closely resembling said multicolored iridescent body.

12. An iridescent cast plastic article as defined in claim 11, said metal foil being an aluminum foil.

13. An iridescent cast plastic article as defined in claim 11, said cast resin body being a clear polyester cast resin.

14. An iridescent cast plastic article as defined in claim 12, said cast resin body being a clear polyester cast resin.

15. An iridescent cast plastic article as defined in claim 11, said embossed multicolored iridescent facsimile being an embossed multicolored iridescent facsimile of a multicolored iridescent abalone shell.

16. An iridescent cast plastic article as defined in claim 14, said emboxed multicolored iridescent facsimile being an embossed multicolored iridescent facs'unile of a multicolored iridescent abalone shell.

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US3720567 *Feb 9, 1971Mar 13, 1973Glass Lab CoLight reflective composite molding
US3740542 *Jun 5, 1972Jun 19, 1973Norman IndustriesDecorative lamp
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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/67, 428/30, 156/219, 428/13, 428/15, 264/279, 264/293, 264/251, 264/73, 264/308, 264/279.1, 156/300, 156/245
International ClassificationB44F1/00, B44F1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB44F1/14
European ClassificationB44F1/14