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Publication numberUS3660624 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1972
Filing dateFeb 12, 1970
Priority dateFeb 12, 1970
Publication numberUS 3660624 A, US 3660624A, US-A-3660624, US3660624 A, US3660624A
InventorsGeorge Bell
Original AssigneeGeorge Bell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical key for ignition systems
US 3660624 A
Abstract
An electrical key for vehicular ignition systems having ignition system adapters that are irremovably interposed between a predetermined number of spark plug cable receptacles and their distributor contacts. The adapters being of two types, a normally open contact type that is activated by the electrical key and a normally closed contact type not affected by the electrical key. The electrical key including an electrical coded key element working in conjunction with an electrical coded key adapter, when the key element is inserted therein, to produce an electrical continuity in the vehicular ignition system. The key adapter also having wound-up means which will reject the key element when the key is in the "off" position while when rotated in the "on" position will be held in place to cause current to flow through the coded electrical circuitries to the spring loaded solenoid of the system adapters in starting the vehicular engine.
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[ May 2, 1972- [54] ELECTRICAL KEY FOR IGNITION SYSTEMS [72] Inventor: George Bell, 420 Fairview Avenue, Fort Lee, NJ. 07024 22 Flledi Feb. 12,1970

21 Appl.No.: 10,917

' Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 875,334, Nov. 8,

52 us. c1 ..200/44, 70/239, 70/388, 70/1310. 46, 307/10 AT 51 1. 1111. C1. ..E05b 17/00, l-lOlh 27/08 58 Field of Search ..200/42, 44, 61.66; 340/52, 340/64; 307/10 AT; 180/114; 70/237, 238, 239, D16. 46, 388

[56] 7 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS- 1,351,973 9/1920 Stone ..200/42 R 2,105,304 l/l938 Wagner ...200/61.66 x 2,1 16,246 5/1938 Macdonald. ..200/44 2,140,812 12/1938 Ratti ..200/44 x 2,868,905 1/1959 Meyer ....200/44 x 2,921,152 1/1960 Simjian ..200/44 x 6/1964 Richard ..307/10 AT 3,190,979 6/1965 Rose et al. ....200/44 X 3,222,534 12/1965 Scott ....200/44 X 3,266,278 8/1966 Ennitt ....200/44 X 3,295,343 1/1967 Beebe et al. ..70/388 Primary ExaminerRobert K. Schaefer Assistant Examiner-William J. Smith Attorney-Constantine A. Michalos [57] ABSTRACT An electrical key for vehicular ignition systems having ignition system adapters that are irremovably interposed between a predetermined number of spark plug cable receptacles and i their distributor contacts. The adapters being of two types, a

normally open contact type that is activated by the electrical key and a normally closed contact type not affected by the electrical key. The electrical key including an electrical coded key element working in conjunction with an electrical coded key adapter, when the key element is inserted therein, to produce an electrical continuity in the vehicular ignition system. The key adapter also having wound-up means which will reject the key element when the key is in the ofF position while when rotated in the on position will be held in place to cause current to flow through the coded electrical circuitries to the spring loaded solenoid of the system adapters in starting the vehicular engine.

32 33 I9 1 30' S17 gI8 y, 35 20 LT PATENTEDMM 21972 SHEET 2 UF 2 ue I I2 4 02 ma j/ o o o o 0 0M 2 o o 2 2 44 4 2 FIG. 5

INVENTOR. GEORGE BEL. L

ATTORNEY ELECTRICAL KEY FOR IGNITION SYSTEMS CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part of a prior application titled Electrical Lock For Ignition Systems filed by the same applicant of the present invention dated Nov. 8, 1969, Ser. No. 875,334.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to vehicular ignition systems and more particularly to an electric key having adapters in combination with electrical circuits for providing a sub- I stantially tamper proof circuit system that will delay the theft of an automobile or other vehicles having the ignition systems by confusing the electrical circuit connection to prevent or disorganize any current that may be directed to the spark plugs.

Yearly, thousands of cars are stolen or used fora joy ride by unauthorized individuals. The unauthorized use of these vehicles cause more accidents and are damaged more often than other cars, resultingin human and monetary loss.

I-Ier'etofore many devices have been proposed to prevent the theft or the unauthorized use of these vehicles, one such device used a relay which is operated to ground the lead connection of the ignition coil with the distributor of the vehicle when the ignition switch. is operated to theon position by unauthorized persons. Other devices used some kind of burglar alarm mechanism to set ofia signaliwhen an unauthorized person tamperedwiththe ignition system.

Furthermore, other devices were used wherein the sole theft prevention means compriseda switchin the ignition circuit which may be locked in a circuitopen position.

Substantially all these devices were unsatisfactory because I these systems required little effort or skill to circumvent them and start the vehicular or'car engine. By simply attaching a jumper wire between appropriate points in the ignition circuit, exposed beneath the hoodof the car, the car engine would be started. 1

The primary purpose of this invention therefore is to accept the fact that unauthorized person will tamper with the electrical circuit of the vehicular ignition system. That the unauthorized person will try to jump wires or connect wires or disconnect wires in the ignition system in his effort to start the engine.

In this invention by irremovably attaching adapters to four ormore distributor spark plug cable receptacles, wherein each adapter has a female receptacle to. receive the spark plug cable which was removed from the distributor cap and a male receptacle to be inserted in the distributor cap, the invention will in most cases stop or delay the starting of the engine. Each adapter will be equipped with four wires of which a selected two will allow a continuity of electric current to the spark plug cable.

In addition, using an electrical key having a key element with an electrical coded circuitry working in conjunction with an'electrical coded circuitry of a key adapter, when the key element 'is inserted therein, to produce an electrical continuity in the vehicular ignition system, the system will be turned on to-allow the current to flow through the system adapters to the spark plugs to start the engine.

Without 'the use of the coded electrical key it would require the unauthorized user to jump wires which may otherwise should not have been connected. The jumping of these wires may cause the battery to be grounded out preventing the start of'the engine. By thus confusion of the adapter wires this invention will prevent or at least delay the car theft or the use of the car by unauthorized persons.

Therefore, an object of thisinvention is to provide for an electrical key for a vehicular ignition system which will confuse the ignition electrical circuit if any unauthorized persons tampers with said circuit.

Another object of this invention is to provide for an electrical key for a vehicularignition system having adapters forirremovable connecting a spark plug cable receptecle to a distributer contact where the adapter is preselectively set beforehand to operate either in a normally open or in a normally closed position, and wherein the adapter includes an electric circuit which requires a knowledge of the combination of the circuit to enable the ignition system to function correctly.

Still another object of this invention is to provide for an electrical key for vehicular ignition systems for preventing theft of the vehicle, the key having an adapter operable by electrical circuits which adapters are irremovably interposed between spark plug receptacles and distribution contacts, and which adapters are easily assembled in an existing vehicle and operable only by knowledge of the adapters electrical circuit combination to start the vehicle engine.

An additional object of this invention is to provide for an electrical key for a car ignition system having an adapter irremovably interposed between a spark plug receptacle and a distributor contact, said adapter having an electrical circuit with four wires of which a selected two will allow a continuity of electric current to the spark plug and which lock further includes an electric key to activate the adapters electrical circuit to start the cars engine.

A further object of this invention is to provide for an electrical key for a car ignition system having a key element with coded electrical circuitry thereon which works in conjunction with coded circuitry of key adapter supported on the vehicle's firewall in front of the lock to unscramble a preselectively set electrical circuitry and thereby allow a continuity of the elec- DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side view, part of which is in section, showing an electrical key for vehicular ignition systems'having an electrical coded key element and an electrical coded key adapter, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side view of the electrical key adapter of the electrical key shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 are composite sectional views taken along line AA, BB and CC ofFIG. 2; and,

FIG. 5, is a schematic electrical circuit diagram of one detailed coded arrangement.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, there is shown an electrical key 10 for a vehicular ignition system including an electrically coded key element 11 having a metalic key portion 12 with a plurality of bitting steps 13 along one edge and an insulated portion 14 with an electrically coded circuitry 15 incorporated therein. The electrical key 10 also includes an electrically coded key adapter 16 connected to an ignition lock section 17 with a standard mechanical lock cylinder 18. The key adapter 16 and the lock 17 are supported on a vehicular fire wall 19, as shown in FIG. 1.

The lock 17 includes the standard cylinder 18 having a plurality of tumblers 20 supported therein which are contacted by the bitting steps 13 of the key element 11 when inserted in an adapter key hole 21. Each of the tumblers 20 is operable by one bitting step 13 of the metalic key portion 12 when rotated in the on position in the usual manner of opening the lock.

As shown in FIG. 1, the key adapter 16 also includes an electrically coded circuitry 22 which works in conjunction with the electrical coded circuitry 15 of the coded key element 11 when the key 11 is inserted within the key hole 21 and rotated in the on" position, as hereinafter more fully described.

Therefore, it should be understood that both the cooperation between the electrically coded circuitry 15 and the electrically coded circuitry 22, and the proper engagement of the bitting steps 13 and the tumblers are needed to rotate the key element 11 on the on position to produce an electrical continuity in the vehicular ignitions system and thereby permit ignition to start the vehicular engine.

As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the key adapter 16 has wound-up means which includes a pair of spring loaded hollow wind-up rollers 23 and 24 which are wound-up when the key 11 is inserted in the adapter key hole 21 formed by the two rollers 23 and 24.

The rollers 23 and 24 will wind-up when the key 11 is inserted but will reject the key if the key is not turned and the operators hand is removed. That is, if the bitting steps 13 of the key element 11 do not work in conjunction with the cylinders tumblers 20 to permit rotation of the key 11, the key 11 will be rejected.

The wound-up means further includes a pair of opposed springs 25 and 26 inwardly force two pairs of opposed pins 27 about which the two rollers 23 and 24 are rotatably supported. On the upper pins 27, as viewed in FIG. 3, are anchored one end of a pair of springs 28 and 29. The springs 28 and 29 are anchored at their other ends on brackets 30 and 31 on the inside diametrical surface of the rollers 23 and 24.

Therefore, the two springs 25 and 26 tend to make the key hole 21 smaller, inwardly forcing the rollers 23 and 24 toward the vertical center line of the wound-up means and towards the key 11 when it is inserted therein and the two springs, 28 and 29 tend to push the key outwardly as it is inserted within the key hole 21. These two spring actions cause the rejection of the key 1 1, if not turned on the on position. That is, when the key element 11 is inserted within the adapter 16 the springs 28 and 29 will wind up and cause an outward force, unless the key 11 can be rotated in cooperation with the tumblers 20 and the key bitting steps 13 of the metalic key position of the key 11. Therefore, in order for the key element 11 to work within the lock 17 and adapter 16 it has to cooperate both with the tumbler system as well as with the coded electrical system.

When the key 11 is then rotated in the on position it will be locked in place to cause current to flow through the coded electrical circuitries 15 and 22, to the spring loaded solenoids of the system adapters in starting the vehicular engine.

Referring in addition, to FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, the key adapter 16 is shown including a segmented twelve point rotary contact switch 32 having a stationary insulated section disk 33 with twelve resilient electrical contact terminals 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311 and 312 and a rotary insulated section disk 33A with 12 electrical terminals 321, 322, 345, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, and 332 connected to a plurality of center spring loaded terminals 100 of a receptacle 35 by conductors 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351 and 352.

The stationary disk 33 is attached to the fire wall 19, as shown in FIG. 1, while the rotary disk 33A is integral to the rotating part of the adapter 16 as shown in FIG. 2.

As shown in FIG. 4, the adapter 16 includes the receptacle 35 which is substantially the same as the receptacle 35 of the copending application filed by the same applicant of this invention as hereinbefore outlined.

Therefore when the key element 11 is inserted within the key adapter 16 and rotated to the on" position terminals 301 to 312 will be in contact with terminals 321 to 332, respectively.

In this position, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the key element 11 is in the on position which permits electric current from a battery 36 which is connected through conductor 37 to ground 68, to be directed through a fuse 38 and conductor 39 to the terminal 310 of the stationary disk 33.

When the key element 11 is inserted within the receptacle 35 it will permit current from terminal 310 contacting terminal 330 of the rotary disk 33A;through conductor 350 to spring loaded terminal 34 of the receptacle 35, through a conductor 40 of the key element 11 to spring loaded terminal 44 of the receptacle 35. The electric current continues through conductor 341 to another terminal 321 of the disk 33A wherein it contacts terminal 3010f the disk 33 and from which it is directed through conductor 46 to system adapter 52.

Therefore, when the key element 11 is still within the receptacle 35 it will also connect a receptacle terminal 58 through key conductor 60 to receptacle terminal 64. In the other direction the terminal 58 is connected through conductor 66 to ground 68. Continuing in the first direction, when the key 11 is inserted in receptacle 35 it will permit continuity from terminal 58 through the conductor 60 of the key 11 to the terminal 64 and through conductor 342, past contacts 322 and 302 and conductor 70 to the adapter 52.

The remainder of the conductors connected to the right side portion as viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5 of receptacle 35, such as conductors 81, 82 and 83, which in turn are connected to terminals 84, 85 and 86, are confusional dummy conductors which are connected to the circuitry of the adapters, as hereinafter more fully described.

Another conductor 88, which is connected to terminal of the receptacle 35, is grounded through a jack 92, to receptacle terminal 94 through conductor 96 to ground 68. Here again the jack 92 is in the closed position until the electric key element 11 is inserted within the receptacle 35 to open the jack 92 and thus discontinue the electrical continuity between terminals 90 and 94. The conductor 88 in turn, is connected to any one or more adapters, at their positive terminals, as hereinafter more fully described. The jack 92 is kept in an open position by an insulated portion 98 when the key 1 1 is inserted within the receptacle 35.

Referring to FIG. 5 a more detailed description of one possible combination of the electrical key connection system is shown. The electric key 10 in this connection system includes one normally open contact type adapter 52 and one normally closed contact type adapter 130. It should be understood that any number of adapters can be used, limited only to the number of spark plug receptacles. The more adapters the more electrical connection combinations can be created.

The electrical circuit of the FIG.-5 of this invention is the same as the electrical circuit of FIG. 2 of the invention described in the copending application referred herein wherein the conductors 40 and 60 of the key element 11 are the same as conductors 40 and 60 of the key 36 and which operably connect the terminals 34 and 44, and 58 and 64 of the receptacle 35, respectively.

As shown in FIG. 5, the fuse 38, is connected to the battery 36, and terminals 101 and 102, are connected to positive terminals and 152 of adapter 52 through conductors 1 12 and 118, respectively. The terminal 44 of the receptacle 35 is connected to a positive terminal 154 of the adapter 52.

The terminal 64 of the receptacle 35, which is connected to ground 68 when the key 11 is inserted within the receptacle 35, is connected to a negative terminal of the adapter 52 through the conductor 70.

As further shown in FIG. 5 the terminals 84, 85 and 86 of receptacle 35 are respectively connected to negative terminal 161, positive terminal 162 and positive terminal 163 of the adapter 130, by conductors 81, 82 and 83 respectively. The terminal 90 of jack is connected through conductor 88 to positive tenninal 164 of the adapter 130.

FIG. 5 also shows the method by which the adapters, such as adapters 52 and 130, are connected to the ignition system of the vehicle.

Adapter 52 includes an electrical male contact pin which is irremovable locked within female receptacle 172 of a vehicle distributor 360. That is the contact pin 170 includes a one way lock clip 174 which when inserted within the female receptacle 172 is locked in place and cannot be removed without breaking or destroying the vehicle distributor or the adapter 52.

This, in effect, would destroy the electrical continuity of the adapter circuit which in turn, confuse the current flowing to the ignition system and prevent the starting of the engine.

Further, adapter 52 includes receptacles 176 in which the spark plug cable 127 is received. The spark plug cable also has attached thereon a one way lock clip 178 which when inserted within spark plug cable receptacle 176 of the adapter 52 is irremovably secured within the adapter 52.

The adapter 52 includes a solenoid 200 which is spring loaded in a normally open position by spring 202 bearing between adapter housing 204 and piston 206 of the solenoid 200. When the solenoid 200 is activated the piston 206 will move in a direction shown by arrow 214 to connect terminals 208 and 210. When the terminals 208 and 210 are connected electric current will be directed through the distributor receptacle 172, through the contact pin 170 to the contact 210, through piston 206 to contact 208, through spark plug receptacle 176, through the spark plug cable 127 to the spark plug (not shown).

Adapter 130 includes an electrical male contact pin 220 which is irremovably locked within female receptacles 222 of the distributor 361. That is the contact pin 220 includes a one way lock clip 224 to permanently secure the pin 220 within receptacle 222 when the pin 220 is inserted therein. Here again the adapter 130 cannot be removed without destroying the adapter 130 and/or distributor. The spark plug cable 122 also has attached thereon a one way clip 228 which when inserted within spark plug cable receptacal 226 it will be irremovably secured therein.

The adapter 130, being a normally closed contact adapter, includes a solenoid 230 which is spring loaded in a normally closed position by spring 232 bearing between adapter housing 234 and piston 236 of solenoid 230. When the solenoid 230 is activated the piston 236 will move in a direction shown by arrow 244 to disconnect terminals 238 and 240 which would prevent current flowing to the spark plug and thus prevent starting of the engine. It should be noted therefore, that when the terminals 238 and 240 are connected, electric current will be directed through the distribution receptacle 222, through the contact pin 220 to contact 240, through piston 236 to contact 238, through spark plug receptacle 226, through the spark plug cable 122 to the spark plug (not shown).

Therefore, through the medium of this invention, the starting of the engine by tampering with the ignition system by an unauthorized person would in most cases be deterred. This invention further, would substantially eliminate or at least delay the unauthorized person from starting said engine. The ignition system could not be jumped to start the engine without knowing the complex combinations of the adapter electrical lines presented to him. Each adapter will be equipped with the four wires of which a selected two shall allow a continuity from the distributor through the adapter to the spark plug. The more adapters used the more combinations will be available to the system. This will delay the theft of the car through the confusion of the adapter circuit and in turn, prevent the ignition circuit from being suitably connected to the spark plugs of the engine thereby the unauthorized person shall be deterred from stealing or taking the car.

If the wires are cut it will probably create an open circuit to the spark plugs and thus will prevent the continuity of electric current thereto. If the wires are jumped, it will probably cause a normally closed solenoid to open and prevent current from flowing to the spark plugs. In any event, any cutting or jumping without knowledge of the circuit may confuse the ignition system and thus prevent the starting of the car engine.

More specifically, as shown in FIG. 4, if an unauthorized person opens jacks 92 in order to insert a plastic or a metal between the jack terminals, he will have accomplished nothing because this will in no way affect the system. The jack 92 is used as an additional means of deterring the actual operation of the system by confusing the circuitry. If on the other hand the unauthorized person will tamper with and jump a conductor it may cause a normally close adapter to open or a normally open adapter to close or may ground out any current that should have been directed to the ada ters. Furthennore, if any conductors, such as conductors 11 46, 82 or 83, are

connected or jumped out as it may be usually perpetrated by an unauthorized person, there would be not effect to the system because these conductors are already connected to the adapter terminals, 150, 154, 162 and 163, respectively. There are various combinations that can be set by a car owner which must be known by any other party wishing to effect a continuity in the ignition system to start the engine.

In addition, to the electrical combinations which must be known to effect electrical continuity the person wishing to effect continuity must be provided with the proper electrical key element which has a coded electrical circuitry to work in conjunction with the coded circuitry of the key adapter to unscramble a preselectively set electrical circuitry to permit continuity of the electrical circuitry to start the vehicles engine. Even further than this electrical combination there is an additional mechanical combination that has to be provided on the key element.

Therefore, the starting of this vehicular engine without the electrical key becomes virtually impossible because it depends upon two entirely separate locking means which are further complicated by the false or dummy wiring.

While the present invention has been described in preferred embodiments, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various modifications can be made therein within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An electrical key for a vehicular engine ignition system I comprising lock means, and key means including the combination of mechanical means for opening said lock means and electrically coded circuitry means, said lock means includes mechanical tumblers, and said key means includes an electrically coded key element having a metallic key portion with bitting steps for cooperation with the tumblers of said lock means and an insulated portion with an electrically coded circuitry, and further said key means having a key adapter with an electrically coded circuitry for cooperation with the electrically coded circuitry of the insulated portion of said key element, and further wherein said lock means includes a key hole and said adapter includes receptacle means having a key hole in line with the key hole of said lock'means and said electrically coded circuitry incorporated about said key hole for receiving said key element therein for its coded electrical circuitry cooperating therewith in producing continuity of the ignition electrical circuitry in starting the engine, said receptacle includes a plurality of spring loaded terminals for effecting contact with the electrical coded continuity of said key element in effecting continuity in the electrical vehicular system, and wherein said receptacle further includes wound-up means having a pair of spring loaded rollers forming the receptacle key hole which winds up when said key element is inserted and operably rejects said key element if the key element does not cooperate with the tumblers of said lock means to turn it in the "on position.

2. The structure of claim 1, wherein said receptacle further includes a pair of opposed springs inwardly forcing said rollers for contacting said key element as it is inserted therein.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification200/43.5, 70/239, 70/DIG.460, 70/388, 200/43.8, 307/10.3
International ClassificationB60R25/04, H01H27/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01H27/10, B60R25/22, B60R25/04, Y10S70/46
European ClassificationB60R25/04, B60R25/22, H01H27/10