Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3660958 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1972
Filing dateJun 1, 1970
Priority dateJun 1, 1970
Publication numberUS 3660958 A, US 3660958A, US-A-3660958, US3660958 A, US3660958A
InventorsDonald R Garrison
Original AssigneeVito Guida
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective wrapper for roll of sheet material and method of making same
US 3660958 A
Abstract
A protective wrapper for a cylindrical article such as a roll of sheet material, or the like, which includes at least one sheet of corrugated material to protect the cylindrical article during shipment and storage and during handling operations.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States atent H 1 Garrison y 9, W72

[54] PROTECTIVE WRAPPER FOR ROLL UF [56] References Cited SHEET MATERIAL AND METHOD OF M S UNITED STATES PATENTS 533,705 2/1895 Chatfield ..206/59 F [72] Invent warren 1,996,402 4/l935 Brawer ..206/59 R [73] Assignee: Vito Guide, Centerline, Mich. a part in- 2,885,073 5/1959 Bettoli et al ..229/87 R terest Primary Examiner-William T. Dixson, Jr. [22] Ffled' lune 1970 Attorney-Cullen, Settle, Sloman & Cantor 211 App]. No.: 42,303

[57] ABSTRACT Cl 2 6/ 9 F, A protective wrapper for a cylindrical article such as a roll of 229/87 R sheet material, or the like, which includes at least one sheet of 11/00365cl 35/56 corrugated material to protect the cylindrical article during 1 Field 0f Search 59 59 R, 46 46 Y, shipment and storage and during handling operations.

1 Claims, 6 Drawing res PATENTEDMY 91972 3. 660,958

SHEET 1 BF 2 FIG.2

FIG/l INVENTOR DONALD R- GARRISON ATTORNEYS PATENTEDMAY 91972 3, 660,958

SHEET 2 [IF 2 PROTECTIVE WRAPPER FOR ROLL OF SHEET MATERIAL AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION As is known, sheet material such as paper for news print magazines, etc. are usually shipped in large rolls from the paper manufacturer to the printing plants. These rolls of paper are usually mounted upon a substantially rigid tubular core on which the rolls are to be mounted on an arbor in the paper winding or feeding machines at the plants. Exemplary rolls of paper may be 60 inches long and measure up to 2 to 3 feet in diameter and they may weigh up to 2 tons per roll.

Herebefore, considerable waste had to be taken into account by the paper manufacturers and printing plants, due to damage of the rolls of paper during shipment and handling at the plants. These wastes, which often may amount to as much as $1.00 to $1.30 per roll of paper are due to many problems arising with shipping and handling of the rolls.

For instance, during shipmentof the rolls, the rolls of papers are usually placed in an upright position, one next to the other on the flat bed of the transporting vehicle. Due to vibrations and irregular motion of the transporting vehicle, including sudden stops, the upright standing rolls of papers, placed adjacent to each other, bump into each other and sometimes with considerable force, to damage the outer layers of the paper rolls, although they are conventionally protected by craft paper wrapping which, however, is easily ruptured under these circumstances. ln addition, the bumping of the rolls of paper into each other during transit, very often causes the tubular core of the roll to be deformed so that when the roll of paper has been placed on the arbor of the paper feeding machine in the printing plant the roll will rotate with irregular motion, commonly known as flutter," which causes out of line feeding of the paper and very often ruptures the paper as it is fed from the fluttering roll. Thus, the paper feeding apparatus must be stopped to correct the flutter" and a large amount of paper is wasted due to the irregular feeding from the fluttering roll, slowing down the operation and adding an unnecessary expense caused by .down time and extra man power hours. Even if the internal tubular core of the roll of paper should not have been damaged, there is in almost any instance paper damage on the outer layers of the roll of paper which have to be discarded.

Likewise, during storing of the rolls of paper on the plant floor or on trucks, the rolls are usually stored along their longitudinal side and several rows of rolls are superimposed upon each other in a pyramid shape. The outer-most rolls of the lowest row on the floor are supported against removable stops to prevent them from rolling away from underneath of the other rolls on top of them. By removing any of those rolls of papers stacked in a pyramid form, the lower roll has to be removed carefully so as to permit the next upper roll to slowly slide down to the floor. Due to the time element involved in printing and ordinary carelessness by the paper handling operators, this is not always done with the proper care, so that it happens very often that, when the bottom roll is removed the next upper roll is permitted to drop to the floor with considerable force due to its large weight, thereby flattening the roll to a considerable extent. This flattened condition makes it difficult to put the roll of paper into the paper feeding apparatus. Normally, a considerable length of the paper has to be removed from the flattened portion of the paper roll and discarded as waste before the paper roll again obtains a cylindrical shape so that it can be efficiently fed from the paper roll apparatus.

A further most serious damage problem is consistently encountered by the handling of the large paper rolls by means of lift trucks, such as hi-lows. The in-plant lift trucks are provided with grappling arms adapted to grip cylindrical articles and clamp them in between them, lift them from the ground, rotate them and transport them to another location. Most often the clamps of the grappling arms of the lift truck, upon gripping the rolls of paper around the center and lifting them above the ground, do considerable damage by gauging the outer layers of the paper in spite of the craft paper wrapping around the roll, which in most instances is not strong enough to withstand large pressure or other adverse forces.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In view of the foregoing problem, resulting in considerable damage cost to both the paper manufacturer and the printing plant, the present invention provides an improved wrapper construction for large rolls of papers having a tubular inner core to prevent the outer layers of paper from damage and to prevent the tubular inner core from being deformed due to a direct force applied to the paper rolls.

This is accomplished in the present invention by wrapping the outer layers of the roll of paper in a conventional craft paper wrapper and providing an intermediate corrugated sheet of material and wrapping it around a substantial portion of the roll, preferably extending from the center towards the end thereof. Preferably, the corrugated sheet of material is made of cardboard, approximately one eighth to one fourth of an inch in thickness and having a flat side and a corrugated side. In assembly, the corrugated side is preferably placed to face outwardly and the corrugated sheet of material does not need to be any longer than the external diameter of the roll of paper, although it would not matter if the ends overlap.

The flat side of the corrugated sheet of material is bonded to the craft paper inner wrapper to keep it in place on the roll and an outer wrapper of craft paper, preferably of the same width as the corrugated sheet of material, is disposed over the outwardly facing corrugated side and likewise bonded thereto.

Thus, during transit or storage of a plurality of paper rolls provided with the present improved wrapper construction, the rolls, when placed adjacent each other, or put one on top of each other, lengthwise, are spaced apart at the center by the improved wrapper construction of the present invention, which radially extends beyond the nominal diameter of the rolls. The corrugated sheet of material provides an effective cushion between adjacent rolls adapted to absorb substantial compression and shock forces to which the paper rolls may be subjected during transit and handling.

The improved wrapper construction also provides an effective protective cushion between the outer layers of the roll of paper and the clamps of the gripping arms of the lift truck during handling of the paper rolls inside the plant.

Obviously, the presently improved wrapper construction, providing a cushioning belt around a substantial central portion of the roll, effectively prevents damage or deformation of the central tubular core of the paper roll, even if bumped against each other during transit or caused to drop to the floor inside the plant.

Considering an actual example, each of these heavy rolls of papers may cost on the average $130.00 and, prior to the present invention, a l percent loss per roll had to be taken into account due to the damage waste as explained in the foregoing. For instance, the average paper usage for a busy newspaper may be as many as 300 rolls per day and with a loss of 1 percent per roll, or $1.30 as per example, this loss runs up to a significant amount. Thus, it can be appreciated that by the provision of the present improved wrapper construction, the savings accumulated by considerable reduction or complete elimination of paper waste will by far out-weigh the cost of the improved wrapper construction.

THE DRAWINGS The present invention is described in detail in the following FIG. 1 is a full side view of a roll of paper or other sheet material provided with the present improved wrapper construction;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross section through the roll of sheet material shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration of the process of applying the present improved wrapper construction through the roll of sheet material shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal side view of two half size rolls of sheet material placed together end-to-end to form a full size roll and provided with the present improved wrapper construction to keep the two half size rolls together;

FIG. 5 is a perspective illustration of a plurality of rolls of sheet material each provided with the present improved wrapper construction placed on end and adjacent to each other for shipping purpose; and

FIG. 6 is a front view of a plurality of rolls of sheet material stacked lengthwise and in pyramid form on a ground surface for storage.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT With reference to the drawings and particularly FIGS. 1 to 3, there is illustrated a roll of sheet material 10, such as for instance, newsprint paper or the like. Normally, or as standardized, the width of the paper or other sheet material is ap proximately 60 inches which determines the height of the paper roll when stood on end and the normal or standardized diameter of the roll of paper or other sheet material 10 is approximately 40 inches.

As particularly illustrated in FIG. 2, the paper or other sheet material is continuously wound around a central tubular core structure 12 which commonly is composed of an intermediate tube 14 made of a substantially tough cardboard or the like, for cost reduction, which, at least lengthwise, provides a substantial degree of rigidity. Both ends of the intermediate core tube are supported on metal inserts 16, each of which is provided with an axial bore 18. The outer metal inserts 16, as is common, are provided for rotation or support on an arbor of a paper feeding apparatus (not shown) for winding, or respectively unwinding, of the roll of paper 10. The metal inserts 16 at the left and right end of the roll 10 provide sufficient stiffness at the end of the roll and thus leaving only the intermediate portion of the roll of sheet material, supported on the tubular core 14, subject to damage and deformation of the core.

The roll of sheet material 10 is conventionally circumferentially covered substantially along its entire length by an inner-wrapper 20, preferably made of craft paper, to provide some degree of protection and wear resistance.

According to the present invention, over a substantial central portion of the roll of sheet material 10 radially outwardly of the tubular core section 14, a sheet of corrugated material 22 is wrapped around the inner craft paper wrapper 20 and is preferably bonded thereto to be retained in place.

As shown in FIG. 3, the sheet of corrugated material which may be cut or the like, has a flat side 24 and a corrugated side 26 and is preferably between one eighth and approximately one fourth of an inch thick. In assembly of the present improved wrapper construction, the sheet of corrugated material 22 is disposed relative to the roll 10, such that the flat side 24 faces inwardly and the corrugated side 26 outwardly. By means of a spraying or brushing method an adhesive 28 is applied between the interfaces of the inner craft wrapper paper 20 and the flat surface 24 of the corrugated sheet of material as it is wound around the roll 10 to secure the bond thereto. It will be understood that the adhesive may be applied to the flat surface of the corrugated sheet of material by any other means or method well known in the art.

After application of the corrugated sheet of material 22, around the substantial center portion of the roll 10, an outer wrapper 30, preferably of craft paper, is wrapped around the corrugated sheet of material and is bonded to the corrugated side 26 by means of applying an adhesive 28 between the corrugated side 26 and the backside of the outer wrapper 30, as shown in FIG. 3. Evidently, the outer wrapper 30 is preferably of the same width as the sheet 22 of corrugated material, and may be pre-bonded to the corrugated sheet prior to applying the improved wrapper construction to the roll 10.

With reference to FIG. 4, inasmuch as FIGS. 1 to 3 illustrates application of the improved wrapper construction to a full size roll of sheet material, the present improved wrapper construction can also be advantageously used to half size rolls 32 and 34 being placed in longitudinally end to end facing abutment.

These two half rolls 32 and 34 are then first covered by wrapper 20 of craft paper, whereafter the improved wrapper construction composed of the sheet of corrugated material 22 and the outer wrapper 30 is placed around the two half size rolls radially around with the half size rolls meeting in end-toend engagement as shown in FIG. 4. First, the improved wrapper construction, not only protects the two half size rolls 32 and 34 against damage, but also keeps the two half size rolls together.

In transit, or storage, as illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, the improved wrapper construction of the present invention provides an effective cushioning means between rolls placed adjacent each other.

Thus, as shown in FIG. 5, a plurality of rolls 20 are placed in upright position in abutting relationship next to each other within a box car, truck bed, or the like for shipping from one facility to another. It can be seen that the improved central wrapper construction 21 provides a spacing 23 between the rolls ends and to each other to improve the wrapper construction 21 and abut each other to provide an efi'ective cushioning between the rolls. Thus, during irregular movement of the vehicle during transit, the central improved wrapper construction, due to its corrugated sheet material, substantially absorbs normal compression and bumping forces to thereby protect the outer layers of the sheet material from being damaged; and protects the core.

Referring to FIG. 6, a plurality of rolls of sheet material 10 may be transported on a vehicle or stored on the ground floor 34 in lengthwise position, laying flat on the ground and stacked upon each other in a pyramid form. To prevent the pyramid form of rolls from collapsing, the outermost rolls of the row of rolls immediately on the floor, are supported against removable stops 36 to prevent them from rolling away. In order to remove the roll from the pyramid stack of rolls, as illustrated in FIG. 6, either the left or right floor stop 36 must be removed causing the roll next adjacent to the stop to roll away whereby the roll and the next adjacent roll between the outer roll and the roll next to it is caused to slide down to the floor 34. Since this involves a considerable drop which is slightly less than the diameter of the roll, conventionally when this happens the conventional inner craft paper wrapper 20 very often burst open causing damage to outer layers of the sheet material of the roll 10, or if not burst open, still damages the outer layers.

It will be appreciated, that by the provision of the improved wrapper construction, the roll dropped from the next upper row to the floor 34 will be efiectively cushioned by the corrugated sheet material so as to prevent any damage to the outer layers of the sheet material.

As in particular illustrated in the drawings, it is common practice in the material handling of these rolls inside the plant, rolls to be picked up by lift trucks commonly known as hi-los, which have a pair of clamping arms provided with semi-circular clamps adapted to grab the rolls from the floor for transit to another location and sometimes rotate them so they will be in the proper position at the working station. Prior to the present invention, this material handling caused considerable damages to the outer layers of the sheet material due to gauging of the gripping arms of the hi-lo's. The improved wrapper construction of the present invention substantially eliminates damage by the gripping arms of the hi-lo.

It will be evident from the foregoing description and accompanying drawings, that the present improved wrapper construction provides an effective protection and cushioning means for large and heavy rolls of material which can be produced at a cost substantially less than the cost of waste normally encountered in transit and handling of large rolls of sheet material, particularly newsprint.

The present invention may be embodied without departing from the spirit and essential characteristic thereof, therefore, the present embodiment is to be considered in all respects as illustrative only and not restricted, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description.

lclaim:

1. A method for providing a cushioning wrapper around an already wrapped newsprint roll of conventional large size and great weight, e.g., about 30 to 40 inches in diameter, about 60 inches in length, and about 4,000 pounds in weight; compris ing bringing to the roll, then stationary, a flat faced corrugated cardboard cushioning wrapper and wrapping it around the roll, then stationary, with the flat face against the wrapped roll, and the corrugated side outward and simultaneously bonding the cushioning wrapper to the wrapped roll;

and then bringing to the roll, then stationary, a smooth thin paper outer wrapper and wrapping it around the roll, then stationary, by applying it to the corrugated outer face of the cushioning wrapper and simultaneously bonding the outer wrapper to the cushioning wrapper.

*0 ll '9 t 4'

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US533705 *Sep 25, 1894Feb 5, 1895 Package for sheathing-paper
US1996402 *Jun 30, 1932Apr 2, 1935North American Rayon CorpCone wrapper
US2885073 *Aug 8, 1958May 5, 1959Ruberoid CoPackaging of self-sealing shingles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4137690 *Sep 14, 1977Feb 6, 1979Westvaco CorporationApparatus for wrapping paper rolls
US4884385 *Mar 4, 1987Dec 5, 1989Appleton Papers Inc.Interleaved spiral wrapping of foam product and stretch film for packaging carbonless paper rolls
US4936459 *Jun 20, 1989Jun 26, 1990Appleton Papers Inc.Interleaved spiral wrapping of foam product and stretch film for packaging carbonless paper rolls
US4989396 *Aug 15, 1989Feb 5, 1991Highland Supply CorporationCurl wrap and methods for using same
US5007538 *Jun 20, 1989Apr 16, 1991Appleton Papers Inc.Interleaved spiral wrapping of foam product and stretch film for packaging carbonless paper rolls
US5114012 *Oct 22, 1990May 19, 1992Wta Inc.Interleaved spiral wrapping of foam product and stretch film for packaging carbonless paper rolls
US5143133 *Jan 21, 1992Sep 1, 1992U.S. Packaging, Inc.Furniture covering for shipment
US5238114 *Apr 10, 1992Aug 24, 1993Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Strand packages
US5557882 *May 11, 1995Sep 24, 1996Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant package having a waxy wrapper
US5584162 *May 11, 1995Dec 17, 1996Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product
US5636493 *Jun 6, 1995Jun 10, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
US5651232 *May 11, 1995Jul 29, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral product
US5653089 *Jun 2, 1995Aug 5, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
US5661950 *May 11, 1995Sep 2, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US5667871 *Nov 26, 1993Sep 16, 1997Geopax Ltd.Slit sheet packing material
US5688578 *Feb 8, 1995Nov 18, 1997Goodrich; David P.Composite packaging material having an expanded sheet with a separator sheet
US5740655 *May 28, 1997Apr 21, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US5758470 *Aug 28, 1996Jun 2, 1998Lantech, Inc.Method and apparatus for placing cornerboards and wrapping a load
US5775056 *Nov 25, 1994Jul 7, 1998Vesme Systems OyMethod and apparatus for wrapping a package and forming folds of the wrapping sheet onto the top surface of the package
US5782057 *Apr 21, 1997Jul 21, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
US5816021 *Apr 22, 1997Oct 6, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method and apparatus for wrapping a floral grouping with multiple sheet wrapper
US5842323 *May 7, 1997Dec 1, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6052968 *Mar 10, 1998Apr 25, 2000Southpac Trust Int'l, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6186326 *Mar 11, 1999Feb 13, 2001Automatic Handling, Inc.Wrapped paper roll
US6347498Nov 2, 2000Feb 19, 2002Automatic Handling, Inc.Wrapping machine for a paper roll and an article assembled thereby
US6357204Apr 24, 2000Mar 19, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6502370 *Aug 2, 2001Jan 7, 2003Guglielmo MartelliMethod for manufacturing a package for packaging food products and apparatus for executing the method
US6530480Oct 5, 2000Mar 11, 2003Osram Sylvania, Inc.Overpack carton
US6591582Feb 12, 2002Jul 15, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a floral grouping
US6810643 *Apr 21, 2003Nov 2, 2004L&P Property Management CompanyMethod of roll packing compressible materials
US6871480 *Sep 29, 1998Mar 29, 2005David P. GoodrichPleated paper and method of manufacturing
US6904734Nov 22, 2002Jun 14, 2005Osram Sylvania Inc.Method for packing a primary shipping case
US7017854May 10, 2004Mar 28, 2006L&P Property Management CompanyRoll packed compressible materials
US7281629 *Dec 22, 2004Oct 16, 2007Mark PavlanskyEnd piece and wide line ribbon package
US7464516 *Dec 7, 2006Dec 16, 2008Schweitzer-Manduit International, Inc.Over-wrap apparatus and method for a bobbin and paper
EP0692734A1 *Jun 13, 1995Jan 17, 1996Konica CorporationPackage for a rolled photosensitive material
WO1996024540A1 *Feb 8, 1996Aug 15, 1996David P GoodrichApparatus for manufacturing of composite cushioning product
WO2004094234A2 *Jan 28, 2004Nov 4, 2004L & P Property Management CoMethod of roll packing compressible materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/399, 53/449, 229/87.2, 206/446, 206/410, 229/939
International ClassificationB65D85/672
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/672, Y10S229/939
European ClassificationB65D85/672