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Publication numberUS3662750 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1972
Filing dateJan 6, 1970
Priority dateJan 6, 1970
Publication numberUS 3662750 A, US 3662750A, US-A-3662750, US3662750 A, US3662750A
InventorsJorgensen Thor V
Original AssigneeJorgensen Thor V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-purpose traction apparatus
US 3662750 A
Abstract
Traction apparatus for the human anatomy characterized by a main frame and a pulling device connected to one end thereof, the other end of the frame being open to provide a space for a portion of the anatomy to extend across same, and a plurality of attachments for the main frame which may be employed in various combinations to provide various abutments or loci of countertraction on various parts of the anatomy. It is a lightweight device which may be used to apply traction to entire limbs or portions of limbs, to the neck, and other portions of the anatomy. In some uses the main frame is disposed in a horizontal position but is also self supporting in a vertical position for other applications of use. The attachments may be oriented to various positions relative to the main frame and are detachable therefrom to render the apparatus compact, whereby it may be readily transported.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Jorgensen [151 3,662,750 I 1 May 16, 1972 [54] MULTI-PURPOSE TRACTION [21] Appl.No.: 983

Australia 128/87 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Portable Fracture Reduction Apparatus" by J. T. Bate, AM.

Journal ofsurgery, Vol. 32, No. l, p. 180- 185 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. Yasko Attorney-Duane C. Burton [57] ABSTRACT Traction apparatus for the human anatomy characterized by a main frame and a pulling device connected to one end thereof, the other end of the frame being open to provide a space for a portion of the anatomy to extend across same, and a plurality of attachments for the main frame which may be employed in various combinations to provide various abutments or loci of countertraction on various parts of the anatomy. It is a lightweight device which may be used to apply traction to entire limbs or portions of limbs, to the neck, and other portions of the anatomy. In some uses the main frame is disposed in a horizontal position but is also self supporting in a vertical position for other applications of use. The attachments may'be oriented to various positions relative to the main frame and are detachable therefrom to render the apparatus compact, whereby it may be readily transported.

4 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEDMM 16 m2 SHLH 1 [1F 2 INVENTOR THOR V JORGENSEN ATTORNEYS PATENTEnm 16 m2 SI'iZET 2 BF 2 INVENTOR THOR V. JORGENSEN ATTORNEYS MULTI-PURPOSE TRACTION APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Devices for applying traction to portions of the human anatomy have long been employed and are of various types and utility. For example, some are of a bulky nature which renders them best suited for use in hospitals or the like. Also, they may be of single purpose utility for use with only one portion of the anatomy, such as a limb,a portion of a limb, or applying traction to the neck or other portions of the anatomy of the patient. As will be apparent, such types of devices have little or no utility where it is desired to apply traction to the patient at the scene of an accident or the like due to their lack of portability or due to their construction which renders them usable with specialized equipment which is available only at a remote locus, such as a hospital or at the office of a doctor where the proper traction must be administered. Since they are often of single purpose utility, moreover, it would be necessary to transport a myriad of equipment to the patient if various types of traction were required, which is impractical.

It will now be apparent that a need exists for a device which has multi-purpose utility yet is sufficiently compact that it may be easily transported to a desired locus. Further, if it requires no further ancillary specialized or expensive equipment it could, in many cases, be employed in the home of a patient, thus obviating expensive hospitalization. Additionally, if it could be constructed in a simple manner and at low cost, yet would serve the myriad of traction applications encountered, it would be of considerable benefit to doctors who, in general, are not provided with the various devices required for single purpose applications of use.

In an attempt, to locate a device of such type, none have been found available. However, the'U .S. Fat. to Maher, No. 2,606,550, recognizedfthe general need of a portable, lightweight, compact and inexpensive construction which could be used for more than one type of traction application, but the number of applications, is limited and its use is thus restricted, as distinguished from a device which could serve the purpose of the many applications of the highly specialized equipment referred to.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is characterized by a frame having a traction or tension applying device at oneend and various attachments which may be applied to the other end, either singly or in various combinations, and which, dependent upon their choice of use, provide' suitable abutments or loci for applying countertraction to various portions of the anatomy. The other end referred to is open (as distinguished from the patent referred to) and, in general, a portion of the anatomy is disposed within or across this opening, which, as will subsequently appear in greater detail, provides a construction which permits a large number of traction applications to the anatomy. Further, since it adds only a relatively small length to the height of the patient, it may be employed with a normal length bed, thus rendering it particularly useful where the patient is receiving treatment in his home. If it mustbe transported to a remote locus, for example for emergency use, this is possible due to its compact and lightweight construction. Further, even if the particular traction application is unknown in advance, a doctor is assured that the various arrangements of its parts will enable him to apply traction to all of the parts of the anatomy which most frequently require same, such as limbs or the neck, as well as to some of the less frequently injured parts, such as parts of the torso. It is further characterized by suitable supports for supporting the weight of a portion of the anatomy, which aid in the application of the traction force, as well as adding to the comfort of the patient. If desired, also, it may be constructed in a manner such that the traction or pulling point is adjustable to any point within the cross section of the open end, whereby the direction of pull relative to such cross section may be selected as desired.

In summary of the foregoing, principal objectives of the invention are the provision of a main frame having a traction device connected to one end, the main frame being employed in all uses of the device, the other end being open and across which a portion of the anatomyv may be disposed, and a plurality of attachments which may be employed in various combinations to provide suitable countertraction loci or abutments for a portion of the anatomy.

Further objects, advantages and salient features will become more apparent from the detailed description to follow, the appended claims, and the drawing to now be briefly described.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a top plan'of the subject of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation as viewed in the direction of arrow 2, FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a section taken on line 3-3, FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an isometric view of FIGS. 1 to 3;

FIG. 5 is a view like FIG. 4 illustrating one application of use;

FIG. 6 is a similar view illustrating another application of use;

FIG. 7 is a similar view illustrating a further application of use; and

FIG. 8 is an alternative form of frame and winch support which may be employed in FIGS. I to 7.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawing, and first to FIGS. 1 to 4, main frame A, which is employed in all uses of the invention, comprises a pair of square tubes 10, 10a, secured together by a crosstie bar 12 adjacent their left or rear ends, and by upwardly inclined and forwardly extending members 14, 14a at their right or front ends which are joined by a bight portion 16. As will be apparent, tubes 10, 10a are disposed in parallel spaced relationship and leg members 14, 14a form supports for a winch W.

The winch is of generally conventional construction comprising a drum l8 affixedto a rotatable shaft 20 having a handle or 30, 22 affixed to same and which incorporates a releasable ratchet (not shown) which prevents retrograde rotation. Thus, as the drum 18 is rotated in one direction, strap 24, which is affixed to the drum, is wound on same, applying a pulling force on hook 24 affixed to a spring scale 26 attached to the strap. When it is desired to release the pulling force the ratchet can be released to permit retrograde rotation of the drum.

Tubes 10, 10a each threadedly carry a set screw 28, best shown in FIG. 3, which lock extensible members 30 30a which are telescopically received within tubes 10, 10a. Members 30, 300 are each L-shaped, having vertically extending legs 32, 32a, respectively, the purpose of which will subsequently appear. The L-shaped members just described are also designated B, whichcomprise the first attachment to the main frame A.

A U-shaped upright C, forming the second attachment, comrises a pair of parallel spaced square tubes 34, 34a connected by a bight member 36 at their ends.

A third attachment D comprises a pair of L-shaped members having downwardly extending legs 38, 38a, which are telescopically received within tubes 34, 3412. In FIGS. 1, 2 and 5 bight portion 36 of the U-shaped upright C is at the bottom and members D are directed toward the winch. In FIG. 4 they are also directed toward the winch but'the bight portion 36 is now disposed at the top. As will be apparent, however, they may be directed in any of four directions apart, the usual directions being forward, as shown, or rearwardly from same. i

A pair of connecting devices, forming a fourth attachment E, each comprise a pair of adjacent square tubes 40, 42 secured together and secured to a suitable rigid backing member 44 which is provided with a soft pad 46. As shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, one of the tubes of the pad-connector engages a vertical leg of attachment B, the other tube on the pad engages the U-shaped upright C, and the tops of the uprights each carry a forwardly extending member D.

Before proceeding with exemplary uses of the device, the components of the traction frame will now be briefly recapitulated in the interests of a more clear understanding of language to subsequently be employed. They comprise:

A. a main frame which includes a pair of parallel tubes and a winch, this component being always employed;

B. a pair of lower L-shaped members which telescope within the tubes, just aforesaid, which form adjustable rearward extensions of same;

C. a U-shaped upright member having square parallel tubes.

D. a second pair of upper L-shaped members, each having a leg which telescopes within a square tube of the U-shaped upright; and

E. a pair of padded connectors, each having a pair of adjacent parallel square tubes which telescopically engage certain of the parts, aforesaid.

In addition to the various components just referred to, various attachments for connecting the winch to a member of the anatomy, or for supporting or restraining a portion of the anatomy against undesired motion, are required. These will vary considerably in construction, and, in some instances, will require some improvisation to efiect the desired result. Several of these will be described in connection with exemplary uses of the device to now be described.

In FIG. 5 traction is being applied to an entire leg, it being assumed that traction or reduction is desired somewhere between the thigh and the foot. The right member B is extended to a desired position and locked thereat, one of members E being attached to same for engaging the crotch to provide a pull restraining abutment. The lower end of the left tube 34 of member C is applied to the upright leg of the left member B, the lower end of the right tube of member C resting upon right member B. The second pair of upper L-shaped members D are applied to the upper ends of upright C and extend in a direction toward the winch. These form supports for ends of an adjustable length strap 48 for supporting weight of the leg and, as shown, extend beneath the calf of the leg. The winch may be connected to the foot in various ways, but as illustrated, a plaster cast 50 is provided and a suitably shaped strap 52 engages the plaster cast and the winch hook. As will be apparent, the winch is then actuated to apply desired traction, as determined by the reading on the scale. It will be noted that one of the members E is not employed in this example.

FIG. 6 illustrates a manner of applying traction to the neck of a patient. In this example all of the parts employed in FIG. 5 are employed except both of members E. To provide a restraining abutment, a pair of straps 54 are employed, each having its ends affixed to upright C and each of which engages the top of a shoulder, the latter portion preferably having a pad on same. Another adjustable length strap 56 extends beneath the back of the patient, its ends being connected to members D, thus supporting the weight of the upper torso or chest of the patient. Another adjustable length strap 58 may be applied to support the weight of the head of the patient. Traction is applied by a harness 60 which engages the chin and rear portion of the head of the patient.

FIG. 7 illustrates one manner of applying traction to the forearm and fingers of a patient. In this example only members A and B are employed. A suitable elbow plaster cast 62 is provided which is secured to members B by a strap 64. Any suitable clamp 66 engages the fingers and connects same to the winch. As will be apparent, main frame A is now disposed in a vertical position, rather than a horizontal position, as in FIGS. 4 and 5.

In another manner of applying traction to the neck (not shown), pad-connectors E are attached to lower L-shaped members B with the pads engaging the tops of the shoulders of the patient and with the head of the patient disposed within frame A (as in FIG. 6), but with the arms now entirely outside of frame A. In this example, members D may or may not be employed, depending upon whether or not weight support is required.

If traction on the upper arm is desired, that is, between the elbow and shoulder (not shown), one of members B with a pad E thereon may be employed, the pad engaging the arm adjacent the shoulder. A plaster cast is applied to the bent elbow and the cast connected to the winch with a suitable strap.

The various applications illustrated or just described and the parts of the apparatus employed for each are summarized in the following tabulation, it being understood that main frame A is always employed:

FIG. Lower U-Frame Upper Pads Extens- C Supports E ions B D 4 yes yes yes yes 5 yes yes yes yes( 1) 6 yes yes yes no 7 yes no no no N/S-Neck yes no optional yes N/S-Arm yes( 1) no no yes( 1) In some instances it may be desirable to apply the traction force at an adjustable locus on the main frame, rather than at a fixed point as in FIGS. 1 to 7. FIG. 8 illustrates an alternative form of main frame portion for this purpose. In this construction the winch is affixed to a member 16a which may be adjusted horizontally and vertically relative to leg members 14, 14a so that the tensile force may be applied at any point which, in general, will be at a point within a cross section as defined by a forward projection of the cross section of member C. In this construction the ends of cross bar 68 may slide vertically along members 14, 14a and member 160, which carries winch W, may slide horizontally along bar 68. Set screws, like screws 28, may be employed to lock the cross bar and member 16a in any desired position of adjustment.

The examples above thus include traction to the entire length ofa leg (FIG. 5), traction to the neck (FIG. 6) and as otherwise described but not shown, traction to the forearm (FIG. 7), and traction to the upper arm (as described but not shown). As will now be apparent, traction to the upper portion of a leg is also possible in which event countertraction may be applied with a pad engaging the crotch but with the traction force applied at the knee or somewhere above same, either with suitable straps or a plaster cast. Similarly, traction may be applied to the leg between the knee and foot by securing the leg at the knee with a plaster cast or straps and applying traction as in FIG. 5.

As will now be apparent, the various modes of use of the main frame and all or a portion of its attachments, as described, provide a single, lightweight, and portable apparatus which may be employed for a considerable number of traction purposes, both for entire limbs or portions of same, or the neck. It is to be understood, however, that other specific applications are possible by selection of the various parts and their particular orientations and adjustments. It is therefore apparent that the specific uses illustrated and described are exemplary, only, and that the invention is not limited to same except as defined with the scope of the appended claims. For example, in connection with the arrangement shown in FIG. 5, it will be understood that the U-shaped upright member C may be installed even though a limb of a patient is already mounted within the main frame A. This is accomplished by disposing the U-shaped member C in a horizontal plane beneath the limb. When the bight portion 36 is disposed adjacent the vertically disposed portions of the L-shaped members B, the member C is pivoted about the bight portion 36 until the tubes 34 and 34a are disposed in a vertical plane. The member C is maintained in this position by interconnecting one of the tubes 34 of the member C with one of the upright portions of the L- shaped member B through the use of the fourth attachment E.

What is claimed is:

1. An anatomy traction device comprising:

a. a main frame having first and second ends and normally adapted to be disposed on a generally horizontal surface, said main frame including 1 a pair of spaced apart, generally parallel tubes,

2. a support having a traction device disposed adjacent the first end of said main frame and above thereof,

3. a bar disposed normal to the tubes for securing one of said tubes to another,

4. the tubes at the second end of said main frame being hollow in construction,

5. the second end of said main frame being open thereabove thereby providing a space across which a portion of the anatomy may be extended;

b. a first pair of L-shaped attachment members each having first and second legs, the first leg of each of said attachment members being disposed in telescoping relation within a corresponding one of said tubes at the second end of said main frame, the second leg of each of said attachment members being disposed normal to said main frame and extending upwardly therefrom;

c. lock means for adjustably locking each attachment member to its corresponding tube;

d. a U-shaped member having a pair of hollow tubes, said tubes being connected to each other at one end thereof by a bight member, the second leg of at least one of said L-shaped attachment members being disposed in telescoping relation within one of the hollow tubes of said U-shaped member, the complemental surfaces of said second leg of said L-shaped attachment member and the hollow tube of said U-shaped member cooperating to prevent relative rotational movement therebetween;

. a padded anatomy engaging member having a hollow attaching means formed thereon, the second leg of at least one of said L-shaped attachment members being disposed in telescoping relation within the hollow attaching means of said padded member;

f. a second pair of attachment members, each having an L- shaped portion, a first part thereof being disposed in telescoping relation within a corresponding one of the hollow tubes of said U-shaped member, a second part thereof being disposed in parallel relation with the tubes of said main frame and extending toward the first end thereof, said second parts supporting a strap member adapted to be used to support a part of an anatomy relative to said main frame; and

g. said padded member cooperating with said traction device to support a part of an anatomy in the open space pro 3. a bar disposed normal to the tubes for securing one of said tubes to another,

4. the tubes at the second end of said main frame being hollow in construction 5. the second end of said main frame being open thereabove thereby providing a space across which a portion of the anatomy may be extended;

b. a first pair of L-shaped attachment members each having first and second legs, the first leg of each of said attachment members being disposed in telescoping relation within a corresponding one of said tubes at the second end of said main frame, the second leg of each of said attachment members being disposed normal to said main frame and extending upwardly therefrom;

c. lock means for adjustably locking each attachment member to its corresponding tube; d. a pair of padded anatomy engaging members each having f. a second pair of attachment members, each having an L- shaped portion a first pan of which is disposed in telescoping relation within a corresponding one of the hollow tubes of said U-shaped member, a second part of which is disposed in parallel relation with the tubes of said main frame and extending toward the first end thereof, said second parts supporting a strap member adapted to be used to support a part of an anatomy relative to said main frame; and

g. said padded members cooperating with said traction device to support a part of an anatomy in the open space above the second end of said main frame and intermediate said traction device and said padded members thereby permitting X-raying and the like of a part of an anatomy without interfering obstruction from said traction device.

3. An anatomy traction device as described in claim 2 in which which said U-shaped member is disposed in inverted relation of said main frame whereby the bight member thereof is distally disposed to said main frame.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2606550 *Nov 19, 1949Aug 12, 1952Maher James FPortable fracture-traction splint
AU102400A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 * Portable Fracture Reduction Apparatus by J. T. Bate, AM. Journal of Surgery, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. 180 185
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3756227 *Sep 23, 1971Sep 4, 1973Sager JEmergency traction splint
US3850166 *Mar 30, 1973Nov 26, 1974Tamny SFracture reduction system
US4194501 *Jul 31, 1978Mar 25, 1980Watt Russell AFirst aid splint for cervical spine injuries
US4220147 *Dec 5, 1977Sep 2, 1980Allen Ralph SPartially disassemblable traction sling
US4350153 *Aug 3, 1981Sep 21, 1982Borschneck Anthony GSplint for use with a human leg
US4494533 *Apr 6, 1982Jan 22, 1985Nunzio SgroiAsymetrically adjustable traction device
US4539979 *Apr 27, 1983Sep 10, 1985Bremer Orthopedics, Inc.Temporary cervical traction maintenance
US4664099 *May 12, 1986May 12, 1987Pearl Jr William JTraction device
US4700696 *Mar 17, 1986Oct 20, 1987Schoffstall Charles DMethod and apparatus for applying traction
US4865022 *Apr 19, 1989Sep 12, 1989Gorsen Robert MSelf applicable spring loaded pelvic traction device
US4890605 *Dec 4, 1987Jan 2, 1990Rosendale Robert WCervical traction device
US4895328 *Jun 5, 1989Jan 23, 1990Terrance RyanTherapeutic device for sufferers of back pain
US4964400 *Mar 3, 1989Oct 23, 1990Lincoln Mills, Inc.Surgical limb supporting apparatus with tension measuring device
US5027799 *Apr 19, 1989Jul 2, 1991Lincoln Mills, Inc.Limb supporting device for arthroscopic surgery
US5040523 *Aug 23, 1990Aug 20, 1991Jaeger Industrial Co., Ltd.Structure of physical traction machine
US5451202 *Sep 22, 1993Sep 19, 1995Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc.Cervical traction device
US5540643 *Jan 30, 1995Jul 30, 1996Fontaine; Raymond E.Back stretching apparatus
US6895969 *Feb 6, 2003May 24, 2005Roger J. MalcolmOrthopedic traction device
US6916302 *Oct 19, 2001Jul 12, 2005Jon C. GehrkeAppendage elevator system
US7144380 *Jul 23, 2002Dec 5, 2006Gilliam Larry ATraction method and device
US7451509 *Feb 18, 2004Nov 18, 2008Jordan DawesEnhancer device for enhancing the utility of a user's bed
US20030018287 *Jul 23, 2002Jan 23, 2003Gilliam Larry A.Traction method and device
US20030078527 *Oct 19, 2001Apr 24, 2003Gehrke Jon C.Appendage elevator system
US20040049143 *Sep 6, 2002Mar 11, 2004Short David L.Shoulder reduction device
US20040154627 *Feb 6, 2003Aug 12, 2004Malcolm Roger J.Orthopedic traction device
US20050081296 *Feb 18, 2004Apr 21, 2005Jordan DawesEnhancer device for enhancing the utility of a user's bed
DE2638077A1 *Aug 24, 1976Mar 10, 1977Wiener Geb GulltropGeraet zur strecktherapie
WO1996010970A1 *Oct 3, 1995Apr 18, 1996Jakobsson, Bengt-IngvarA device for the treatment of leg fractures
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/35, 602/32
International ClassificationA61H1/02, A61F5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61H1/0218, A61F5/04
European ClassificationA61F5/04, A61H1/02D