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Publication numberUS3664026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1972
Filing dateAug 22, 1969
Priority dateAug 22, 1969
Publication numberUS 3664026 A, US 3664026A, US-A-3664026, US3664026 A, US3664026A
InventorsLawson Jack M
Original AssigneeLawson Jack M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drapery pleating pattern means
US 3664026 A
Abstract
A paper or fabric pattern strip adapted for use in making the pleated upper section of a drapery panel. Two such pattern strips may be used for forming the pleated section of a pair of drapes for a single window - each pattern strip being adapted for use in forming the opposite side hems and return or border areas and in uniformly spacing the pleated areas of a drapery. By use of the pattern strip of the invention, several widths of fabric may be hemmed and pleated to a certain width with the pleated drapery of each fabric width having uniform pleat spacings and spacings equal to the pleat spacings of each other fabric width. The pattern strip means preferably is in two embodiments adapted for use respectively in forming an odd number of pleats or an even number of pleats in the pleated upper section of a drapery panel.
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Hittite States Patent Lwson ERY PLEATING PATTERN ANS [72] Inventor: Jack M. Lawson, 3161 Ashwood Ave.,

Memphis, Tenn, 38118 [22] Filed: Aug. 22, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 852,271

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 787,974 4/1905 Clark ..33/1l1 1,469,944 10/1923 2,904,891 9/1959 2,929,146 3/1960 3,316,645 5/1967 Fink ..33/1ll X [4 1 May 23, 1972 3,454,203 7/1969 Nelson ..33/ l 37 X Primary Examiner-Robert B. l-Iull Assistant Examiner-Dennis A. Dearing Attomey--John R. Walker, III

[ ABSTRACT A paper or fabric pattern strip adapted for use in making the pleated upper section of a drapery panel. Two such pattern strips may be used for forming the pleated section of a pair of drapes for a single window each pattern strip being adapted for use in forming the opposite side hems and return or border areas and in uniformly spacing the pleated areas of a drapery. By use of the pattern strip of the invention, several widths of fabric may be hemmed and pleated to a certain width with the pleated drapery of each fabric width having uniform pleat spacings and spacings equal to the pleat spacings of each other fabric width. The pattern strip means preferably is in two embodiments adapted for use respectively in forming an odd number of pleats or an even number of pleats in the pleated upper section of a drapery panel.

8 Clairm, 9 Drawing Figures Patented May 23, 1972 I 3,664fl2fi 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 ll 7 l7 F|G.4 29

\ 6% W 7\ 5% g 5% w 6 u FIG.6 29

W N N aaa- E g g 3 H35 u\ I 5 x 1 i a l I E \L (3 I5 i 1N VENTOR. JACK M. LAWSON BY MGM/Z W m7 Patented May 23, 1972 ,IL 4.3; y

4 Sheet-Sheet 4 FIG. 90 P 25\ P) 23X 3 Jr I f I A INVENTOR.

DRAPERY PLEATING PATTERN MEANS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention It relates to domestic sewing procedures generally and particularly to the forming of pleats in drapery material.

2. Description of the Prior Art Heretofore, the typical homemaker formed the pleated area in drapery material by trial and error method and by pinning and adjusting the pleats or pleat widths to obtain a desired number and spacing of the pleated drapery section. Also, in buying the material for sewing the draperies, the typical homemaker was limited in the selection of fabric patterns or widths. In the usual procedure of forming a drapery panel, the typical homemaker selected fabric from a particular width of material having the desired pattern. Generally, a particular pattern desired was correlated to a particular width of material in sewing draperies in prior art practice.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention substantially obviates the difficulty in figuring drapery fullness, pleat spacing, fabric requirements, finished size and matching pleat spacings, and is especially useful when draping two or more areas of different width in a single room or area where the drapery pleat spacings should present a unified appearance. The figuring of the drapery is readily accomplished by utilizing a substantially simple pattern strip which is adapted for use with substantially any of the more common fabric widths or combination of widths. Five different pattern strips are adapted to be used in forming five finished widths of the more common drapery pairs and in widths 50, 75, I00, I25, and 150 inches and to accommodate the more commonly required drapery window widths. By utilizing the pattern strip means of the present invention, a homemaker may have a wider choice of fabric patterns and widths of fabric material. The pattern strip means of the invention provides means for accurately forming the side hems of a drapery panel and results in less waste of fabric material. The pattern strip means is preferably formed of thin paper material and is disposable after use, if desired. It is easy to use and requires negligible skill or practice to use proficiently; a novice can accurately mark the side hems and pleats of a drapery panel and accurately form the drapery to a desired pleated width.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the pattern strip means of the invention adapted for forming a pleated drapery having an odd number of pleat sections.

FIG. 2 is a view illustrating the use of the pattern strip embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a face view of an end section of the pattern strip means of FIG. 1 and shown in an in-use disposition.

F IG. 4 is a face view of the center section of the pattern strip means ofFIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a front face view of a second embodiment of the pattern strip means adapted for forming an even number of pleat sections in a drapery.

FIG. 6 is a view of the center section part of the drapery pattern strip of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a table showing various factors considered in forming pleated draperies and by utilizing the pattern strip means of the invention.

FIG. 8 illustrates the use of the invention in forming a pleated drapery from a combination of fabric widths (approximately one and one-half fabric widths illustrated).

FIGS. 9a, 9b, 9c, 9d and 9e illustrate sequentially the several steps in forming a pleated drapery section.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The first embodiment of the invention, indicated by numeral 11, is adapted for use in forming an odd number of pleats in a drapery section D (see FIGS. 1 5, 8 and 9a 9e). Embodiment 11 preferably includes three sets of markings indicated respectively by numerals 1, 2 and 3 arranged symmetrically respectively on opposite sides of a center indicated by numeral 13. Each set of markings 1, 2 and 3 are adapted for use in forming left and right arranged hem marks 15L, 15R and a plurality of pleat marks 17 on the fabric material (see FIGS. 1, 2 and 3). Hem and pleat marks 15L, 15R; 17 demarcate the drapery section D into left and right hemmed areas l9, 19; left and right border areas 21, 21; and a plurality of alternatingly arranged pleat and space areas respectively 23, 25.

Each set of markings 1, 2 and 3 are configured alike with equal spacing between adjacent pleat marks 17, 17 defining each space area 25 of the fabric, but with different spacing respectively between adjacent pleat marks l7, l7 defining pleated areas 23. As an example, each space distance and each pleat distance of a set of markings of the three sets of markings 1, 2 and 3 are relatively of equal extent. Also, a space distance of one set of markings corresponds in extension substantially with a space distance of another set of markings. It is substantially only a pleat distance of one set of markings which varies with a pleat distance of another set of markings. With reference to FIG. 3, it will be noted that a space distance indicated s of set of markings 1 is substantially the same in extension as a space marking s of the second set of markings indicated 2. Further, it will be noted that a pleat distance p of set of markings indicated 1 is somewhat longer than a pleat distance p" of the second set of markings indicated 2.

It will be noted that the left and right hem marks 15L, 15R and the plurality of pleat marks 17 which are formed on the drapery material is indicated only with reference to the first set of markings indicated 1. It will, of course, be understood that for marking the material at the respective sets of marks indicated 2 and 3, the pencil or chalk marks (not shown) will be placed in alignment respectively with the markings indicated 2 and 3 of pattern strip 11.

FIG. 8 illustrates a pattern strip 11 adapted for forming an odd number of pleats P in a drapery panel formed from approximately one and one-half widths of fabric material. FIG. 8 illustrates only one set of markings, indicated 1, for purposes of clarity. It will, of course, be understood that the one and one-half fabric widths are sewn together along a seam in dicated 27 before the material is marked out for the pleating procedure. The border distances indicated b, b" respectively of sets of markings indicated 1 and 2 preferably each are of standard dimensions (approximately 3% inches). With reference to the set of markings indicated 1 and to F IG. 3, the distance from hem mark 15R to the nearest pleat mark 17 in that particular set defines the border distance b of the pattern strip.

The second embodiment of the invention is indicated by numeral 11 and is adapted for use in forming an even number of pleats in a drapery upper section (see FIGS. 5 and 6). The pattern strip 11 preferably includes three sets of markings indicated in like manner as first embodiment 11 and respectively by numerals or symbols 1, 2 and 3. Second embodiment 11', in like manner to embodiment 11, is demarcated with a longitudinal center, indicated 13; left and right hem marks respectively 15L, 15R; and a plurality of pleat marks, indicated respectively 17'. In like manner to first embodiment 11, the pleat markings 17 of second embodiment l1 define an alternatingly arranged series of pleat and space distances arranged between opposite hem marks 15L, 15R (the pleat and space distances of set of markings indicated 1, is generally indicated respectively by letters p and s in FIG. 5).

The primary distinction between the pattern strip means of the first and second embodiments of the invention may readily be seen by comparing FIGS. 4 and 6. The first embodiment of the pattern strip, illustrated in FIG. 4, is provided with a pleat distance at the longitudinal center 13 which is indicated generally by letter p bracketing the pleat distance of set of markings indicated 1. In contrast, FIG. 6 of the second embodiment is provided with pleat marking means demarcating a space distance s at the longitudinal center 13. Since the space distances in each of the embodiments is substantially uniform for each set of markings, the first pleat marks respectively on opposite sides of longitudinal center 13 of second embodiment 11' are spaced substantially equidistantly from center 13' for each set of markings 1, 2 and 3 (see FIG. 6). This is in contrast to the pleat markings for each set of markings of embodiment 11 wherein the pleat markings for the center pleat of the first and second sets of markings are arranged respectively in incremental arrangement on opposite sides of the Iongitudinal center 13 (see FIG. 4).

A border distance is defined on each end of embodiment 11' for each set of markings indicated 1, 2 and 3. The left and right border distances of the first set of markings indicated 1 of the second embodiment are indicated in FIG. by letters b, b. It will, of course, be understood that the second and third set of markings indicated 2 and 3 of the second embodiment also are arranged for forming the typical return or border area of a finished pleated drapery section.

Each embodiment 11 and 11' is illustrated and described as having three sets of markings indicated respectively 1, 2 and 3. Although three sets of markings preferably are formed on each pattern strip 11 or 11, it may be desirable to form a pattern strip having two, four or more sets of markings. Preferably, the hem marks indicated generally by numeral 15 are of different form than are the pleat marks indicated generally by numeral 17. The distinction between the hem marks and pleat marks 15, 17 may be as seen in the drawings and with the hem marks 15 being formed transversely across the strip and with the pleat marks being indicated each by an arrow pointing toward the straight working edge 29 of a respective pattern strip. If desired, contrasting color means may be used in lieu of or in addition to the symbol markings for each set of markings indicated 1, 2 and 3; if desired, the sets of markings 1, 2 and 3 may each be formed ofa color contrasting to the colors of the other two sets of markings for readily distinguishing a selected set of markings.

The pattern strip means of the invention preferably is marketed by packaging a pair of pattern strips 11, 11 or 11, 11 in a single package and may include pins and other sewing material necessary for the drapery-making procedure. With reference to FIG. 7, it will be noted that there is preferably provided five different lengths of pattern strips adapted for forming a finished pair of draperies 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 inches. With further reference to FIG. 7, it will be noted that the pair of draperies 50, 100, and 150 inches wide each require the use ofa pair of pattern strips 11, 11 and with each strip of the pair of pattern strips being adapted to form an odd number of pleats. In like manner, a pair of pattern strips 11, 11' are adapted to be used in forming a pair of finished draperies of 75 or 125 inches and with the pattern strip of each pair being adapted for use in forming an even number ofpleats.

A pair of pattern strips 11, 11 or 11', 11' is preferably marketed with printed matter exhibited on the package exterior showing the finished width of a pair of draperies and also preferably includes a recommended width of fabric for use in forming one pair of draperies. As an example, a drapery pattern package may be provided with the following information:

Recommended widths of fabric for one pair of draperies 75 inches wide:

35 36 Four widths (sew two widths each side) 44 45 Three widths (sew one and one-half widths each side) 47 48 Three widths (sew one and one-half widths each side) 50 52 Three widths (sew one and one-half widths each side) For example, should the homemaker desire to form a pair of draperies 75 inches wide from material 44 inches wide, she may proceed in forming each drapery half of 37% inches in the following manner: A raw edged drapery panel is formed by sewing one and one-half width of the material together as along a seam line 27 (see FIG. 8). The user then places a pattern strip 11 of the pair of pattern strips 11, 11 on the drapery upper section, and after centering the strip to the center of the material, pins the pattern strip to the material. The user may then crease the pattern strip and material respectively along the center of each and bring the end edges together as indicated by the arrows in FIG. 2. The user may then determine which set of the markings l, 2 or 3 may be used for forming the drapery. A typical hemmed edge is of minimum 1% inch width which amounts to between three and four inches of the material of a hemmed panel. The user, by observing the overlap of material at each hem mark 15L, 15R of the three sets of markings may readily determine which set of markings to use in marking and laying out the drapery material. As an example, should less than 1% inches of the material extend oppositely past the opposite hem marks of set of markings indicated 1, the user would drop back to the second set of markings (indicated 2) and hem to the hem marks 15, 15 which are indicated by symbols on numerals 2 of the markings. In like manner, should there not be sufiicient material extending past the second hem mark to obtain a preferred 1% inch hem, the user may drop back to the third hem marks and use the third set of markings throughout in forming the finished pleated drapery.

With reference to FIG. 7, it will be noted that a 37 /2 finished pleated drapery panel or half pair of draperies may be formed from substantially three different hemmed panel widths, respectively 62, 66 or 72 inches wide. Such procedure permits the homemaker to select a desired pattern from one of the four fabric widths and to accurately lay out and mark a drapery upper section. It will be noted that the pleat spacings of each pattern strip 11 or 11' is substantially the same in extension and varies approximately only A inch and from approximately 4% inches to 4 /2 inches. The pleat distances of the pattern strips vary somewhat and in the pleating procedures each pleat may vary in pleated material from approximately three inches to 4% inches depending on the particular pattern strip and fabric width utilized in forming the drapery. The left and right border distances of each pattern strip demarcate respectively the return and overlap areas of a finished drapery and preferably each are of typical 3% inch extension.

The pattern strip means of the invention is adapted for forming a pair of symmetrical reversible draperies adapted to be reversed to reduce fading or sun exposure and a pleated drapery panel may be turned 180 inches and reversed or a pair of drapery panels may be reversible relative to the left and right sides of the window. Only a single pattern strip 11 or 11' is utilized in forming a single pleated drapery panel for certain large size windows or such windows having a so-called oneway draw type drapery.

The various steps in forming a pleated drapery are illustrated in FIGS. 9a 9e: Pleat and hem marks P and H are formed on the drapery material D by using a pattern strip 11 or 11 and demarcating the material respectively into hem areas 19, border areas 21, and alternatingly arranged pleat and space areas respectively 23, 25 by marking on the material with chalk or the like at the particular set of markings, 1, 2, or 3 chosen as heretofore described. The hemmed areas 25 each are preferably double folded and secured by thread means 31. The series of pleat areas 23 each are then gathered into a single pleat 33 and secured by thread means 35 (see FIG. Each pleat 33 may then be formed into pinch pleats 37 and secured by thread means 39. FIG. 9e illustrates a finished pleated drapery upper section.

lclaim:

l. A pattern strip adapted for use in making a drapery pleated upper section from drapery material and for use in forming opposite side ends, opposite border areas and the pleat areas of the drapery material, said pattern strip having at least two sets of fixed markings formed on the longitudinal extension of said strip; each set of markings including a left and a right hem mark spaced apart longitudinally of the strip and a series of pleat marks arranged between said hem marks and demarcating said strip into a plurality of intermittently arranged pleat distances with each pleat distance being equal in length to each other pleat distance, with the spacing between each adjacent two pleat distances being substantially equal, and with the border distances from each hem mark to the nearest pleat mark being substantially equal; said two sets of markings each being generally symmetrically arranged relative to a common center between respective left and right hem marks; said two sets of markings having an equal number of pleat distances with each pleat distance of one set of markings being longer than each pleat distance of the other set of markings; each border distance of one set of markings being substantially equal to each border distance of the other set of markings, each said spacing between adjacent pleat distances of one of said two sets of markings being substantially equal to each said spacing between adjacent pleat distances of the other of said two sets of markings; and means formed on the strip for distinguishing one set of markings from the other set of markings.

2. A pattern strip as defined in claim 1 wherein each set of markings includes pleat marks demarcating an odd number of pleat distances.

3. A pattern strip as defined in claim 1 wherein each set of markings includes pleat marks demarcating an even number of pleat distances.

4. A pattern strip as defined in claim 1 which additionally includes a centerline mark formed on said strip at a common center position respectively between the left and right hem marks of said two sets of markings.

5. A pattern strip as defined in claim 1 wherein the left and right hem marks of each set of markings are of form in contrast to the pleat marks.

6. A pattern strip as defined in claim 5 wherein said means for distinguishing one set of markings from the other set of markings includes like symbols formed at each mark of a set of markings distinguishable from like symbols formed at each mark of the other set of markings.

7. A pattern strip as defined in claim 6 wherein one set of markings are formed of a color contrasting to the color of the other set of markings.

8. The pattern strip of claim 1 which is formed of thin paper material adapted to be disposed of after use.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US787974 *Mar 3, 1904Apr 25, 1905Silas I ClarkTailor's buttonhole-ruler.
US1469944 *May 1, 1922Oct 9, 1923Merrill Moses CMeasuring rule
US2904891 *Feb 5, 1957Sep 22, 1959Cook Paul RLayout means for use in masonry construction
US2929146 *Jul 6, 1956Mar 22, 1960Time Saver Equipment IncMarking gauge for use in pinchpleating draperies
US3316645 *Apr 22, 1965May 2, 1967Coloplete CorpMarking rule for drapery pleating
US3454203 *Dec 29, 1966Jul 8, 1969Nelson PatriciaPleat making guide
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4817292 *Mar 23, 1987Apr 4, 1989Callahan Earnest JPleat placement chart and method of using the same
US5094006 *Jan 19, 1990Mar 10, 1992Parkhill Blinds And Curtains LimitedSwag
US5666737 *Dec 19, 1995Sep 16, 1997Ryan, Iii; James C.Template for european style cabinetry
US6067722 *Jul 27, 1999May 30, 2000Goodyer; Robert B.Marking tape
US6108918 *Apr 9, 1998Aug 29, 2000R. H. Rowley CompanyMethod and apparatus for making swags
US6866082 *Feb 3, 2003Mar 15, 2005Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Templates and kits for creation of hanging products
US7296609Aug 23, 2005Nov 20, 2007Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Hanging products
US7647707 *Aug 10, 2007Jan 19, 2010Byron Jeffrey ManleyTemplate and method to prepare various fabrics to receive a decorative edging
US7854048 *Dec 21, 2010Clover Mfg. Co., Ltd.Handicraft assisting tool
US20040003507 *Jul 8, 2002Jan 8, 2004Jordan David ScottConduit layout tool
US20040172844 *Mar 7, 2003Sep 9, 2004Murray Janis L.Pattern hole-transfer template, and hole patterning method
US20050083393 *Aug 27, 2004Apr 21, 2005Murray Janis L.Pattern hole-transfer template, and hole patterning method
US20060037721 *Aug 23, 2005Feb 23, 2006David ZahnerHanging products
US20080052940 *Aug 10, 2007Mar 6, 2008Byron Jeffrey ManleyTemplate and method to prepare various fabrics to receive a decorative edging
US20090288278 *Nov 26, 2009Clover Mfg. Co., LtdHandicraft assisting tool
US20120079734 *Apr 5, 2012Joseph GreenwayRoofing measuring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/759, 33/563, 223/35
International ClassificationA47H13/16, G01B3/02, A47H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01B3/02, A47H13/16
European ClassificationG01B3/02, A47H13/16