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Publication numberUS3664117 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1972
Filing dateJun 5, 1970
Priority dateJun 5, 1970
Also published asDE2126813A1
Publication numberUS 3664117 A, US 3664117A, US-A-3664117, US3664117 A, US3664117A
InventorsMcintosh Bruce C
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Non-time indicating number correction circuit
US 3664117 A
Abstract
When power is applied to a digital clock, the counters therein can assume forbidden states and non-time indicating numbers are generated. This problem is eliminated by a gate circuit responsive to each such non-time indicating number to apply a high frequency signal source to the counter to advance the counter to a time indicating number. Because non-time indicating numbers can also occur on a transient basis, the gate circuit also includes a time delay to avoid response to such transients. The time delay may be provided by a second signal synchronized with the source of transient generation and gated with the strobe signal in a phase to block response to the transient for one-half cycle of the second signal. This non-time indicating number correction circuit is also employed to correct non-time indicating numbers in the alarm time counter when the digital clock is switched to present an alarm time indication.
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United States Patent [151 3,664,117 McIntosh May 23, 1972 [54] NON-TIME INDICATING NUIVIBER Primary ExaminerRichard B. Wilkinson CORRECTION CIRCUIT Assistant Examiner-Edith C. Simmons Attorney-Marvin A. Goldenberg, W. Joseph Shanley, Jr., [72] Invent: Bruce McIntosh Uncai Frank L. Neuhauser, Oscar B. Waddell and Joseph B. Forman [73] Assignee: General Electric Company 57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: June 5, 1970 l 1 When power is applied to a digital clock, the counters therein [211 App! 43786 can assume forbidden states and non-time indicating numbers are generated. This problem is eliminated by a gate circuit [52] US. Cl. .4 ..58/35 W, 235/92 T responsive to each such non-time indicating number to apply a [51] Int. Cl ..G04c 9/02 high frequency signal source to the counter to advance the Field Search 3 235/92 E, counter to a time indicating number Because non-time in- 235/92 328/48 dicating numbers can also occur on a transient basis, the gate circuit also includes a time delay to avoid response to such Refemnces Clml transients. The time delay may be provided by a second signal synchronized with the source of transient generation and UNITED STATES PATENTS gated with the strobe signal in a phase to block response to the 3,051,855 8/1962 Lee ..328/48 X transient for one-half cycle of the second signal. This non-time 3,067,936 11/1962 asp et --235/9 indicating number correction circuit is also employed to cor- 3,l63,747 l2/1964 Veverka 2 rect non time indicating numbers in the alarm time counter 3,178,536 1965 Rosenfield 328/48 X when the digital clock is switched to present an alarm time in- 3,307,023 2/l967 Burger ..235/92 di i 3,350,580 10/1967 Harrison ..328/48 X 6 Claims 3 Drawing Figures CLOCK 75 MINUTE HOUR COUNTER COUNTER COUNTER 5| s7- s7 -93 69 89" --s| I 5| 2 SWITCH MATRIX 4 a I 22l J 5 |o3- I07 [23' -|29 ZIQ 3 los 25"" -'-|27 \65 k ALARM [87 an: W220 M'NUTE COUNTER |49 Isl COUNTER 5 '35 I47 I53 H3 STROBE 7 I COUNTER STROBE o 0-]2 DECODER DEC|MAL I37 DECODER I I4 I39 NON-TIME INDICATING NUMBER CORRECTION CIRCUIT FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a counter correction circuit and more particularly to a circuit for correcting a time indicating counter whenever the counter registers a non-time indicating number.

HISTORY OF THE ART In application Ser. No. 25,930, entitled Digital Clock Controlled by Voltage Level of Clock Reference Signal, and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application filed Apr. 6, 1970, by Paul Emerson, Hans Thamhain and Bruce McIntosh, there is described a digital clock. This clock utilizes a plurality of binary counters to formulate a digital representation of time. One drawback of such counters is that usually each is made of a greater number of flip-flops than necessary for the modulus desired from the counter. Thus, for example, the to 9 minutes counter would require four flip-flops capable of counting from 0 to 15. While these four flip-flops are gated to recycle upon reaching a count of 9, when power is first applied, or after a power interruption, the counter is capable of assuming states representing non-time indicating numbers such as 10, 1 1, l2, 13, 14 and 15. Although the counters will eventually advance to time indicating numbers, the display of a non-time indicating number is undesirable as it may be taken as a malfunction by the user of the clock.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A solution for the elimination of non-time indicating numbers includes a gate circuit responsive to each number outside the time indicating range of numbers of each counter. A high frequency signal source, such as the strobe signal which, as described in the above-mentioned application, sequentially switches the time indicating counters to the time display device, is applied to the counters by the gate circuit to rapidly change the count. This count advancing continues until the gate circuit no longer sees a non-time indicating number.

The counters in the digital clock described in the abovementioned application are sequentially read out to the display, Accordingly, it is possible to have a count overlay momentari- 1y appear during the transition in sequential switching from the readout of one counter to the readout of another counter so that non-time indicating number may be transiently presented to the gate circuit for correction of such numbers. It is also possible to realize a forbidden count for the moment when the counter changes from one count to the next. As employed in the present discussion, forbidden count is intended to mean a count falling outside of the logic constraints imposed upon the circuitry, which count may result in the display of a non-time indicating number. Thus a delay is provided to prevent response by the gate circuit to such transiently occurring non-time indicating numbers.

In the case where a forbidden number momentarily is present due to the count change of a counter, the delay to the gate means is occasioned by applying to the gate circuit the 60 Hz signal from which the time counters count change signals are derived. Because each counter can only change on the 0 to 1 transition of the 60 Hz signal, this signal is of proper phase to block gate circuit response to the transient for one-half cycle (8.3 milliseconds). This delay is sufficient for the transient to disappear before corrective action is taken.

When a non-time indicating number transiently appears due to a code overlap, i.e. when the counters are being sequentially presented to the output display, the sequencing strobe itself is gated into the gate means to provide a half cycle delay before such a forbidden number can be responded to for correction by the gate circuit. The sequencing strobe, like the 60 Hz signal, is synchronized with the changes in the clock causing the transiently appearing improper codes, so that when these signals are applied in blocking phase relation to the transients they will inhibit response by the gate circuit.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The features and objects of the present invention as well as a more complete understanding will be obtained from the following detailed description of the invention made with reference to the drawings, in which FIG. 1 presents a logic diagram of one embodiment of the non-time indicating number correction circuit and a block diagram of the time counter, alarm counter and related portions of a digital clock;

FIG. 2 is a timing diagram showing the relationship between the 60 Hz delay signal and the application of the high frequency strobe to the counter; and

FIG. 3 is a timing diagram showing the relationship between the high frequency strobe and a corrective signal being applied to the counter.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION In FIG. 1 the portions of the digital clock circuit of the above-mentioned commonly assigned application Ser. No. 25,930 bear the same reference numerals to be found in that application. FIG. 1 shows a time counter made up of a minute counter 27, a 10 minute counter 59 and an hour counter 77; an alarm counter made up of a 10 minute counter 33 and an hour counter 113. Each of these counters is connected to a switch matrix 53 where the information from the counters are sequentially applied to a display device. Note, for example, the connection of counter 27 to matrix 53 is via lines 45, 47, 49 and 51. A strobe signal from a source not shown is applied via line 135, strobe counter 137, leads 139 and 141 and strobe decoder 143 to switch matrix 53 to cause the sequential application of information from the counters to a display device. The display device, although not shown, receives the indication of each counter in sequence via lines 159, 161, 163 and 165, the decimal decoder indicated in FIG. 1 and, for example, a 7 bar decoder (shown in FIG, 1 of the above-mentioned application).

It should be noted that NOR gate logic is used throughout the description. The NOR gate responds to any 1 input to produce a 0 output and to an all 0 input to produce a 1 output. With a two input NOR gate, if one input is always 0, the output is an inversion of any binary data stream applied to the other input. Thus when a constant 1 is applied to one input, the NOR gate will block binary data on the other input.

The digital clock gate circuit 15 is also shown in FIG. 1. This gate circuit is substantially identical to the gate circuit shown in FIG. 3 of the above-mentioned application, with the exception that NOR gate 216 has replaced inverting amplifier 303. Gate 15 serves to direct 1 pulse per minute to the clock minute counter during normal operation, 2 pulses per second during slow set operation, 60 pulses per second during fast set operation, and with the addition of NOR gate 216, 3.3 K pulses per second during counter correction operation to either the clock minute counter 27 or the alarm 10 minute counter 33. Although described in greater detail in the abovecited application, briefly gate 15 accomplishes this function as follows. The input 29 to gate 15 controls whether the output of the gate is directed to the clock counter or to the alarm counter. Thus the application of a l to NOR gate 311 on line 29 produces a 0 output from NOR gate 311 while inverter 313 changes the 1 to a 0 input for gate 309 and any time-set information from NOR gate 307 is passed by gate 309. If a 0 is presented to gate 311 by line 29, the output of gate 307 is passed by gate 311 and the 1 presented to gate 309 prevents this gate from passing the information from gate 307. Thus NOR gates 309, 311 and inverter 313 provide a data stream switch to control whether the time counter or the alarm counter receives time-set strobing from either the 60 Hz source applied to gate 305 or the 2 pulse per second source applied to gate 301.

During normal operation, a 1 appears on line 29 to establish a clock display condition. At this time, a 0 and a l are applied to NOR gate 301 via lines 17 and 19 respectively. The l on line 19 insures that gate 301 has a 0 output. The 0 on line 17 permits gate 216 to pass high frequency correction pulses from NOR gate 215 of the non-time indicating number impossible time correction circuit 210. In the absence of an output from NOR gate 215, the applied from lead 17 to NOR gate 216 will be inverted and appear as a l at the output thereof to insure that the 60 Hz pulse input on lead 21 will not pass gate 305. Thus, the 1 pulse per minute applied to gate 315 on lead 13 is the only input to the clock time counter. Since during normal operation the two inputs to gate 307 are 0, the output of this gate is a l, causing gate 309 to be 0 so that the 1 pulse per minute applied to gate 315 and inverted thereby is again inverted by inverter 317 and applied to the time clock minute counter 27.

During slow set operation, the I on line 19 becomes 0, permitting the two pulse per second input on line 23 to pass gate 301. The 0 output from gate 305 remains, permitting the two per second pulses at the input of gate 307 to pass to gate 309 and be applied to gate 315. Since the input at gate 315 is 0 except for the 1 pulse per minute, the two per second pulses are passed, inverted, again inverted by inverter 317 and applied to the clock minute counter.

During fast set operation, the input on line 17 becomes 1, which is inverted by NOR gate 216 to appear as a permitting 0 at gate 305, allowing the 60 Hz pulses to be applied to gate 307. The other input to this gate is a 0 due to the inversion by gate 301 of its 1 input on line 17.

It can be seen that only during fast set, when a 1 appears on line 17, the correction afforded by the non-time indicating number gate circuit 210 cannot be received by gate circuit 15 due to the l appearing at the second input to gate 216. This is appropriate because during the time of fast set, the clock indication is being corrected to a desired time.

FIG. 1 also shows that the output of the time and alarm counters, as sequentially strobed to the output lines of switch matrix 53 by the decoded strobe signal, is applied to the nontime indicating number correction circuit 210, comprised of NOR gates 211,212, 213, 214 and 215. Gates 211, 212 and 213 respond to all the non-time indicating counts of time counters 27, 59 and 77 or alarm counters 33 and l 13.

It will be recognized that minute counter 27 is a modulo counter, ten minute counter 59 is a modulo 6 counter and hour counter 77 is a modulo 12 counter. Accordingly, four flip-flops make up minute counter 27, three flip-flops make up 10 minute counter 59 and four flip-flops make up hour counter 77. Alarm 10 minute counter 33 is made up of three flip-flops and alarm hour counter 113 is made up of four flipflops. Thus, it can be seen that each of the counters can assume non-time indicating numbers. For example, as indicated in Table I, the four flip-flops in the hours counter can assume various states when power is first applied or after power has been interrupted so that the numbers 12, 13, 14 or 15 could be generated; the four flip-flop modulo 10 minute counter can assume codes from 10 through 15, all non-time indicating numbers; and Table I, shows that the three flip-flop modulo 6 10 minute counter can assume the non-time indicating numbers 6 and 7.

TABLE I Counter number Binary 2 4 8 O 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 Forbidden ten min- 1 1 0 ute codes (A=1,

B =0). 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 O 1 1 ZQQSQZ? 3 Forbidden minute 0 1 1 A=0)i (these 2 56 l 1 1 codes are for- 1 1 1 biddcn for all counters) By reference to Table I, which indicates all the non-time indicating numbers which the digital clock counters can assume, the inputs to gates 211, 212, and 213 will be recognized. NOR gate 211 responds to those forbidden codes which are forbidden anytime, i.e. regardless of which counter is having its output presented to the display device via lines 159, 161, 163 and 165. Thus, if a 1 appears in the 4 column and in the 8 column, which would indicate numbers 12 or greater, such a number would be improper for any t ounter. NOR gate 211 is accordingly responsive to 4 and 8, the 4 and 8 outputs on leads 163 and 165 igspectively as inverted by inverters 218 and 219. When 4 and 8 are both 0, gate 211 produces a l at its output so that the gate 214 output is O and NOR gate 215 is thereby enabled to pass the high frequency correction pulses from the strobe source at line 135.

Gate 212 is responsive to forbidden codes generated by the ten minute counters 59 or 33. As indicated by Table I, a number 6 and a number 7 are both forbidden numbers which the three flip-flops of the 10 minute counters can assume. Thus, a l indication in both the binary 2 and the binary 4 output pgsitions converted by inverters 217 and 218 to a 0 for 2 and 4 are inputs to NOR gate 212. In addition, when the A output of strobe counter 137 (a three state counter producing a A 0, B 0 output for the minute counter readout; a A l, B 0 output for the 10 minute counters readout; and a A O, B l for the hour counters readout) is l, the 10 minute counter information is present at the output of the switch matrix 53 and accordingly gate 212 responds to a 0 from the A output of strobe counter 137. When 2, I and Z are all 0, NOR gate 212 presents a 1 to NOR gate 214 so that this gate applies a 0 to enable gate 215 to pass the high frequency correcting signal to gate 15.

NOR gate 213 responds to forbidden counts from the clock minute counter 27. Table 1 shows that this modulo 10 four flip-flop counter can assume the binary states of the numbers 10 through 15. Since NOR gate 211 responds to the forbidden numbers 12 through 15, only the numbers 10 and 11 need be recognized by NOR gate 213. The numbers 10 and 11 are both made up of a bina ry 2 and a binary 8. Thus, this NOR gate responds to 2 and 8 in the 0 state. When strobe counter 137 provides a A 0 output and a B 0 output to NOR gate 213 via inverters 221 and 220, the minute counter 27 is being read out and ready for monitoring. Thus, NOR gate 213 provides a l to NOR gate 214 when A and B and 2 and are all 0 so that the high frequency strobe is applied to gate 15.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that NOR gates 211, 212, 213 and 214 contain no deliberate delay producing components and will respond almost instantly to any improper time indication presented by the switch matrix 53. Accordingly, non-time indicating numbers which transiently appear will be needlessly detected by these gates.

One source of transiently appearing non-time indicating is derived from the counters themselves. When the states of the flip-flops change, an forbidden code may momentarily be present. To prevent the non-time indicating number correction circuit from responding to such transients, a delay is included in the correction path by adding the 60 Hz signal to NOR gate 305 in gate circuit 15. Reference is made to FIG. 2 for illustration of the delay obtained by adding the 60 Hz signal.

FIG. 2 shows the shaped 60 Hz square wave as presented to NOR gate 305 on lead 21, the high frequency strobe signal output from gate 215 (gate 216 merely acts as an inverter to the output of gate 215 when a 0 appears at its other input), and the resultant output from gate 305. It will be recognized by reference to the above-identified application Serial No. 25, 930, that the very same 60 Hz signal serves as the clock signal for the time and alarm counters. These counters respond to the 60 Hz clock and the signals derived therefrom (2/sec and l/min) only on the O to 1 transition. This is illustrated in FIG. 2 where it is noted that at time t a O to 1 transition of the 60 Hz signal occurs and the output of NOR gate 215 indicates that the non-time indicating number correction circuit is responding to a non-time number by passing one pulse of the strobe signal. Because NOR gate 305 is receiving a l input from the 60 Hz signal at this time, the transient correction does not pass gate 305.

FIG. 2 also shows that when power is interrupted and reapplied between times and t so that a nontransient non-time indicating number is generated by the counters, the high frequency strobe is passed by gate 215. NOR gate 305, however, responds to pass the high frequency strobe only when the 60 Hz signal is in the state. Thus, between times and t the high frequency signal is applied to correct the forbidden indication in, for example, the 10 minute counter where the faulty number was located, but there is no correction between times 1,, and when the 60 Hz signal is in the I state. Correction continues at time 1 correction being completed between times and l The second source of transiently occurring forbidden numbers is the switch matrix 53. As the matrix switches from reading one counter to reading another counter, one or more gates of the matrix may not switch fast enough and a code overlay can momentarily occur. FIG. 3 shows that the solution provided by the non-time indicating number correction circuit is to incorporate a second delay in the form of the high frequency strobe itself. It will be appreciated that the gating of the 60 Hz cycle into the correction data stream at NOR gate 305 does not provide correction for transients occurring in the switch matrix, since such transients can occur during the 0 state of the 60 Hz signal and thus correction information would be passed by gate 305.

FIG. 3 shows, from top to bottom, the strobe signal as applied to gate 215, the A output of strobe counter 137, the B output of this counter and the output of NOR gates 214, 215, 216 and 305. FIG. 3 is related to FIG. 2 by again showing correction of a continuing forbidden code in the ten minute counter. FIG. 3 provides an exploded view of the signals passed by the gates in the t time period of FIG. 2.

Since NOR gate 212 responds to a forbidden 10 minute count, the A output of the strobe counter 137 is presented in FIG. 3. The B output of this counter is also presented to indicate the generation of a transient non-time indicating number by switch matrix 53.

The output of NOR gate 214 is an inversion of the output of gate 212. When inputs Z, 2and z are in the 0 state to produce a l at the output of gate 212, gate 214 is accordingly in the 0 state. This occurs during the 10 minute state of strobe counter 137, as indicated in FIG. 3 by the letter T directly beneath the strobe signal illustration. During the next cycle, counter 137 is in the hour counter read state as indicated by H and the output of NOR gate 214 has dropped to the 1 state. During this time there is a transition in the switch matrix between reading the hour counter and the minute counter as indicated by the B output of counter 137 and a forbidden count is shown transiently occurring at the output of gate 214. Here again, it should be recognized that strobe counter 137 and thus switch matrix 53 changes states in response to the 0 to 1 transition of the strobe so that a forbidden code can be generated only at this transition. Thus, it is readily seen that the next half cycle of the strobe after the transient forbidden code is produced is a 1 state half cycle so that the output of gate 215 is 0 and the transient correction pulse present at the output of gate 214 does not pass.

FIG. 3 also shows the correction pulses for correcting the illegal count in the ten minute counter passing gates 215, 216, and 305. It is seen that during the third readout of the 10 minute counter (indicated by the third T) a legal count is recognized and the pulse of strobe signal is cut short upon recognition of a legal number by gate 212.

It is noted that gates 211, 212, and 213 of the non-time indicating number correction circuit 210 provide an AND function with input inversion, and that gate 214 provides an OR function plus output inversion.

A substitute for the NOR logic employed is AND gates to replace NOR gates 21], 212 and 213 and to eliminate inverters 217, 218 and 219. NOR gate 214 could be replaced by an OR gate and an inverter. The AND gate replacing NORgate 211 would respond to counter 4 and 8 information; the AND gate replacing NOR gate 212 would respond to A, 2 and 4 inguts; and the NOR gate 213 replacement would respond to X, B, 2 and 8 inputs. Those skilled in the art will recognize many other combinations of logic circuits to provide the correction function described.

It should also be recognized that while particular signals were selected to provide the delays to avoid correction for transiently occurring non-time indicating numbers, the only requirements are that the signal selected to provide the delay be synchronized with the source creating the transients and that the signals be applied through inverters if necessary to insure blockage of corrective response to the transient during the half cycle in which it occurs.

If the counters are not sequentially read out, but instead, continuously applied to display devices, the switch matrix is eliminated as a source of transient forbidden counts and the 60 Hz signal may be used for count correction as well as for delay. In this case, separate detectors would be needed for each counter, but the outputs of all such detectors could be summed together for presentation to the non-time indicating number correction circuit.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a digital clock having a time counter, a non-time indicating number correction circuit comprising a signal source, said signal source having a repetition rate that is high compared to the normal time change rate of said counter, and

gate means responsive to counter non-time indicating numbers to apply said signal source to advance said counter to a time indicating number.

2. A correction circuit as recited in claim 1 wherein said gate means includes delay means to delay the application of said signal source to advance said counter to avoid response to transient occurrence of non-time indicating numbers.

3. A correction circuit as recited in claim 2 wherein said delay means includes a signal source synchronized with counter changes producing said transients and applied to said gate means in blocking phase relation to the transients, whereby a non-time indicating number must endure for more than one half cycle of the synchronized signal source to be corrected.

4. A correction circuit as recited in claim 3 wherein the signal source applied as a correction strobe to advance said counter and the delay signal source are the same.

5. A correction circuit as recited in claim 2 wherein said time counter includes a minute counter, a ten minute counter and an hour counter sequentially switched to a display such that non-time indicating numbers may transiently appear at the count transition of the counters and with the sequential readout switching of the counters,

said delay means includes a signal source synchronized with count transitions of the counters,

the delaying signal being combined with the correction strobe signal in blocking phase relating to count transition transients, and

said correction strobe signal being synchronized with counter readout switching and applied to said gate means in blocking phase relating to readout switching transients, whereby said gate means will not respond to a non-time indicating number transiently occurring at a count transition for one half cycle of said delaying signal and one half cycle of said strobe signal after occurrence of a non-time indicating number due to counter readout switching.

6. A correction circuit as recited in claim 1 wherein said digital clock further includes an alarm counter and switch means to permit display of the alarm time indication, said correction circuit being responsive to alarm counter non-time indicating numbers for correction thereof when said switch means is in the alarm display position.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3798428 *Mar 20, 1972Mar 19, 1974Seikosha KkElectronic time-keeping apparatus
US4130319 *Mar 4, 1976Dec 19, 1978Coal Industry (Patents) LimitedMining machines
US4193255 *Jul 18, 1978Mar 18, 1980Citizen Watch Co., Ltd.Electronic timepiece with calendar function
US4196583 *Sep 20, 1978Apr 8, 1980Kabushiki Kaisha Daini SeikoshaAnalogue electronic alarm timepiece
US4444512 *Oct 21, 1981Apr 24, 1984Societe Suisse Pour L'industrie Horlogere Management Services S.A.Method and circuit for comparing the timekeeping state and contents of a register in an electronic reminder giving timepiece
EP0050350A2 *Oct 19, 1981Apr 28, 1982Societe Suisse Pour L'industrie Horlogere Management Services S.A.Process for comparing the actual time with the contents of a register in an alarm timepiece, circuit therefor and utilisation of said circuit
Classifications
U.S. Classification368/201, 968/846, 968/972, 368/251, 377/50, 968/903, 377/32
International ClassificationG04F10/00, G04G13/00, G04G5/02, G04G3/02, G06F7/68, G06F7/60, G04G3/00, G04G5/00, G04F10/04, G04G13/02
Cooperative ClassificationG04G5/02, G04G13/025, G04G3/022, G06F7/68, G04F10/04
European ClassificationG04G3/02B, G04G5/02, G04G13/02B, G04F10/04, G06F7/68
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 27, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: RCA LICENSING CORPORATION, TWO INDEPENDECE WAY, PR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004854/0730
Effective date: 19880126
Owner name: RCA LICENSING CORPORATION, A DE CORP.,NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:4854/730
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004854/0730