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Publication numberUS3665853 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1972
Filing dateNov 17, 1969
Priority dateNov 17, 1969
Also published asDE2051352A1, DE2051352B2, DE2051352C3
Publication numberUS 3665853 A, US 3665853A, US-A-3665853, US3665853 A, US3665853A
InventorsHartmeister Ruben J, Maytag John Hardy
Original AssigneeCoors Porcelain Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Continuous printer and skip-print mechanism
US 3665853 A
Abstract
A continuous printer and skip-print mechanism comprising a plurality of blanket holder segments on a rotated drum successively movable into and out of printing position, a stationary cam, a cam follower on each segment, and operative connections including a withdrawable bridge member between the cam follower and each blanket holder segment for moving the segment into printing position. An air cylinder or other suitable mechanism responsive to the malfunction signal actuates a pivotally mounted trigger and connecting rod which are part of skip-print means for withdrawing the bridging member from the operative connections between the cam follower and each blanket holder segment, thereby producing a gap in the operative connections and preventing movement of the segment into printing position when malfunction occurs, without interrupting subsequent printing operations.
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United States Patent Hartmeister et al.

1 51 May 30, 1972 [5 CONTINUOUS PRINTER AND SKIP- PRINT MECHANISM [73] Assignee: Coors Porcelain Company, Golden, C010.

[22] Filed: Nov. 17, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 877,279

3,114,313 12/1963 Udall ..l0l/247X Primary Examiner-Clyde l. Coughenour Attorney-Bertha L. MacGregor [57] ABSTRACT A continuous printer and skip-print mechanism comprising a plurality of blanket holder segments on a rotated drum successively movable into and out of printing position, a stationary cam, a cam follower on each segment, and operative connections including a withdrawable bridge member between the cam follower and each blanket holder segment for moving the segment into printing position. An air cylinder or other suitable mechanism responsive to the malfunction signal actuates a pivotally mounted trigger and connecting rod which are part of skip-print means for withdrawing the bridging member from the operative connections between the cam follower and each blanket holder segment, thereby producing a gap in the operative connections and preventing movement of the segment into printing position when malfunction occurs, without interrupting subsequent printing operations.

8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures Patented 3 Sheets-Sheet l RUBEN J. HARTMEISTER JOHN HARDY MAYTAG IZLmiZ/i.

ATTORNEY Patented May 30, 1972 ATTORNEY Patented May 30, 1972 3,665,853

3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS.

F 4 .RuBE/v J. HARTMEISTER JOHN HARDY MAYTAG Mr. V

ATTORNEY CONTINUOUS PRINTER AND SKIP-PRINT IVIECHANISM This invention relates to a continuous printer and skip-print mechanism for printing the exterior cylindrical surfaces of containers and other objects, and for automatically preventing the printer blanket segments from moving into printing position in' the event of malfunction of the machine.

The invention is embodied in a printer and transfer unit combination for placing containers on mandrels, printing the containers, followed by removal of the containers from the mandrels and placing them on a peg-carrying chain or other conveyor for subsequent operations thereon. The transfer unit may be of the type shown and described in US. Pat. No. 3,26l,28l, to Ruben J. Hartmeister, assigned to the assignee of this application, or the printer and skip-print mechanism of this invention may be used in combination with other transfer mechanisms.

The printer comprises a rotated drum provided with a plurality of blanket holder segments pivotally mounted thereon and movable into and out of printing contact with the containers or objects to be printed. The drum is suitably juxtaposed with, and connected by gearing to, the aforementioned transfer and work holding unit. In this embodiment, eight such segments are employed. The blanket holding segments are moved successively into printing position, one segment being moved by a cam into printing position while the rest remain retracted and stationary relatively to the printer drum while the latter is rotated continuously.

In the event a defective container in the supply line, or one imperfectly located on the mandrel, or some other defect causes malfunction of any part of the mechanism in the transfer unit or printer, the skip-print mechanism automatically inactivates the mechanism which normally would move the corresponding blanket holding segments into printing position.

An important object of this invention is to provide skipprint means responsive to a signal of malfunction in the machine, whereby a blanket holder segment is automatically inactivated and prevented from contacting or printing afaulty container or a mandrel without a work piece thereon. This object is achieved by tripping mechanism responsive to the malfunction signal, said mechanism controlling the position of a transfer block, referred to herein as a bridging member, without interrupting the continuous operation of the following printing movements. In the normal printing operation, the bridging member functions to transmit motion from a cam follower to a blanket holder segment for the purpose of moving the blanket segment into printing contact with a container to be printed. In the event of malfunction, the bridging member is automatically withdrawn, and thus prevents the cam follower from transmitting motion to the blanket holder segment by leaving a gap in the operative connections between the cam follower and blanket holder segment. Thus the blanket holder segment is automatically inactivated and held in stationary position relatively to the printer drum. This mode of operation difiers from prior art printers which permit movement of the segment into printing position and in the event of malfunction require retracting of the blanket holder segment relatively to the drum on which the segments are mounted.

The withdrawal of the bridging member or transfer block of our invention from the operative connection means between the cam follower and a blanket segment is momentary and reinsertion of the bridging member to bridge the gap and to restore the operative connection takes place when the cam follower has traversed'the length of the printing area of the cam and has reached the low or non-working area of the cam.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the drawings and following description.

In the drawings FIG. 1 is an elevational side view, partly in section, showing part of a printer drum with one of a plurality of printer blanket holder segments mounted on the drum, showing also part of a cam which actuates a cam follower for operating the blanket holder segment, and mechanism for automatically tripping the skip-print means, the parts being shown in the printing positions.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1, on an enlarged scale, the parts being shown in the skipprint positions.

FIG. 3 is a transverse vertical sectional view on an enlarged scale, in the plane of the line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a transverse vertical sectional view on an enlarged scale, in the plane of the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings, a continuously rotating printer comprises a blanket holder drum l0 and a plurality of blanket holders I1 and printing blankets 12 mounted on the drum. Only one of the blanket holders 11 and part of another are shown in the drawings, though usually eight such blanket holder segments, equally spaced from each other circumferentially on the drum, are employed in the printer. Each blanket holder segment 11 is pivotally mounted near its leading edge on a shaft 13 in bearings 14, as best shown in FIG. 4. Each holder has a bar I5 attached to its trailing edge which is free to move radially outwardly relatively to the holder drum 10. The blankets 12 are held on the holders 11 by means of the ratchet shaft 16 and stationary shaft 17. A ratchet l8 and pawl 19 hold the blanket taut on the holder 1 1. v

A cam follower frame 20 is mounted in bearings 21 held in place by screws 22 in blanket holder segment 11. A cam follower 23, mounted on an eccentric adjusting shaft 24, is actuated by a cam 25 which is part of a stationary cam-ring 26. A spring 27 is mounted on the blanket holder segment 11 on a retainer 28, for holding the stop bar 15 against the stop 31. A spring 29, mounted on spring retainer 30, holds the cam follower 23 against the cam 26-26.

The motion transmitting mechanism between the cam follower 23 and the blanket holder segment 11 comprises a bottom stop pad 32, back stop pad 33, transfer or stop block 34 which serves as a bridging member fastened toa pivoted arm 35, top stop pad 36, and stop bracket 37 mounted on the stop bar 15. The bracket 37 also is bolted to the blanket segment 11. A connecting rod 38 is pivotally connected at 39 to the pivoted arm 35, and at its opposite end is pivotally connected at 40 to a bearing housing actuator arm 41. The arm 41 is mounted on a needle bearing 42 (FIG. 4). This mounting permits trigger motion to be transmitted from a trigger 43 to the bridging member or stop block 34, as will be more fully explained in the description of the operation of the machine. A spring 44 and bracket 45 hold the bridging member or stop block 34 in the position shown in FIG. 1 until such time as a malfunction signal causes'the triggerto skip-print.

Any conventional malfunction signal (not shown) actuates an air cylinder 50 and air cylinder piston rod 51 or other suitable actuating means. The rod 51 normally is retracted but is moved to extended position when the air cylinder responds to the malfunction signal, thereby moving the cam follower holder 52 outwardly, which causes the cam follower 53 to intersect the path of the trigger 43 to actuate the trigger to move from the position of FIG. 1 to that of FIG. 2. The cam follower holder pivot pin 54 mounts the holder'on the block 55.

The normal operation of the printer is as follows: The printer drum 10 with blanket holder segments 11 thereon rotates continuously, and in this embodiment is shown as rotating counter clockwise. The cam ring 26, with cam working area 25 thereon, is stationary. The working area 25 of the cam is opposite the mandrel wheel 60 which carries containers 61, or other objects to be printed, as shown in FIG. 1. The mandrel wheel 60 is geared to the blanket holder segment drum to rotate continuously to carry the containers 61 past the blanket segments 12. As the printer drum rotates, the blanket holder segments 11 are carried with the drum 10 to successively pass in an arcuate path between the rotating mandrel wheel 60 and the cam surface 25 of the stationary ring 26. The periphery of the mandrel and of the blanket segments do not intersect. This movement of the drum and blanket holder segments mounted thereon causes the cam follower 23 to move onto the outwardly extending working area 25 of the cam into the operative position, as shown in FIG. 1, where it is ready to transmit radially outward movement to the blanket holder segment 11 into printing position. This radially outward movement is transmitted by the cam follower 23 through the bottom stop pad 32, bridging member 34, top stop pad 36, and stop bracket 37, to the blanket holder segment 11, to thereby produce pivotal movement of the segment about the pivot shaft 13, resulting in movement of the blanket 12 into printing contact with the articles 61 on mandrel wheel 60. This is the normal operation of the printer, during which time the bridging member 34 closes the gap between the bottom stop pad 32 and top stop pad 36. The bridging member 34 and .the pivoted arm 35 on which it is mounted are held in the closed gap" position by the spring 44 and bracket 45 at all times during the printing operation.

In the event of malfunction of the printer, a signal is con- .veyed to the air cylinder 50, to move the rod 51 to extended position, thus moving the cam follower holder 52 outwardly and causing the cam follower 53 to contact the trigger 43, as shown in FIG. 2. The trigger 43 is fastened to the bearing housing actuator arm 41, which has pivotally connected thereto the end 40 of the connecting rod 38. Movement of the trigger thus imparts a pulling motion to the rod 38 which in turn pivotally moves the arm 35 and bridging member 34 from the position of FIG. 1 to that of FIG. 2, thereby withdrawing the bridging member 34 and leaving a gap between the top stop pad 36 and bottom stop pad 32 which prevents the cam follower 23 from transmitting motion to the blanket holder segment and thus prevents the blanket from making printing contact with an article on a mandrel.

As soon as the cam follower 23 has traversed the length of the working surface of the cam 25 and has reached the low or non-working area of the cam ring 26, the bridging member 34 is automatically reinserted between the pads 32 and 36 to bridge the gap and to restore the operative connection between the cam follower 23 and the blanket holder segment 11, whereupon normal printing function of the successively actuated blanket segments is restored. The fact that the skipprint mechanism functions to prevent movement of a blanket holder segment, causing it to remain stationary in non-printing position relatively to the rotating printer drum when malfunction occurs, thus eliminating necessity for any retracting movement of a blanket holder segment, contributes substantially to the efficiency and speed of operation of the printer.

Since the triggering and skip-print means encounter no resistance in operation, the parts may be of relatively light mass and therefore capable of more rapid operation, in excess of 1,000 containers per minute, than has been practical in prior art operations.

- We claim:

1. A printer and skip-print mechanism for printing articles carried on a rotated wheel comprising a. a plurality of blanket holder segments mounted on a rotated drum successively movable to printing position relatively to articles to be printed,

a stationary cam,

a cam follower on each blanket holder segment,

. operative connections including a withdrawable bridge member between each cam follower and blanket holder segment for moving the segment into printing position, and

e. skip-print means responsive to a malfunction signal operatively connected to said withdrawable bridge member for withdrawing the bridge member from said operative connections between the cam follower and segment and thereby preventing movement of the segment into printing position when malfunction occurs.

2. The printer and skip-print mechanism defined by claim 1,

in which the skip-print means includes a trigger on each blanket holder segment, and a connecting rod operatively connected to the trigger and to said operative connections between the cam follower and blanket holder segment.

. The printer and skip-print mechanism defined by claim 1,

in which the operative connections between each cam follower and blanket holder segment comprise a bottom stop pad and a top stop pad between which the bridge member is loosely located, a pivotally mounted bridge member arm, and spring means holding said am and bridge member in motion transmitting position between said stop pads.

4. The printer and skip-print mechanism defined by claim 1, in which the skip-print means comprises a reciprocable rod responsive to a malfunction signal, a pivotally mounted trigger on each blanket holder segment, trigger contacting means movable by the rod to intersect the path of the trigger, and operative means between the trigger and the bridge member for withdrawing the bridge member from the operative connections between the cam follower and segment.

5. The printer and skip-print mechanism defined by claim 4, in which the operative means between the trigger and the bridge member comprise a bearing housing arm connected to. the trigger, a connecting rod having one end pivotally connected to the bearing housing arm and its other end pivotally connected to the bridge member arm.

6. A printer and skip-print mechanism for printing articles carried on a rotated wheel comprising a. a plurality of blanket holder segments mounted on arotated drum successively movable to printing position relatively to articles on the wheel,

b. a stationary cam having a circumferential working surface opposite the articles to be printed,

c. a spring pressed cam follower frame pivoted on each blanket holder segment,

d. a cam follower on each frame,

e. operative connections including a withdrawable bridge member between each cam follower and blanket holder segment for moving the segment into printing position,

f. yielding means holding the bridge member in motion transmitting position in said operative connections, and

g. trigger operated skip-print means responsive to a malfunction signal operatively connected to said withdrawable bridge member for withdrawing the bridge member and producing a gap in the operative connections between the cam follower and segment and thereby preventing transmission of movement from the cam follower to the segment.

7. The machine defined by claim 6, which includes a connecting rod, a trigger, a bearing housing connected to the trigger, and pivotal connections between the bearing housing and rod and between the bridge member and rod, for transmitting withdrawal motion from the trigger to the bridge member.

8. A printer and skip-print mechanism comprising a. a plurality of blanket holder segments mounted on a rotated support,

b. means successively moving said blanket holder segments to printing position, and

c. skip-print mechanism responsive to a malfunction signal including a bridge member which is withdrawable from the means successively moving the segments into printing position, whereby movement of the segments into printing position is prevented when malfunction occurs, said skip-print mechanism comprising an air cylinder responsive responsive to a malfunction signal, a reciprocable rod actuated by the air cylinder, a bearing housing arm pivotally mounted on each blanket holder segment, a trigger connected to the bearing housing arm, trigger connecting means movable by the reciprocable rod to intersect the path of the trigger, and operative connections between the bearing housing arm and the bridge member.

Patent Citations
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US3114313 *Oct 3, 1960Dec 17, 1963Linotype Machinery LtdOn-off impression mechanism for two cylinder printing presses
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4037530 *Dec 1, 1975Jul 26, 1977Coors Container CompanyMandrel trip mechanism for can printers
US4370943 *Dec 19, 1980Feb 1, 1983Shin Nippon Koki Co., Ltd.Apparatus for painting containers
US4750420 *Nov 3, 1987Jun 14, 1988Adolph Coors CompanyRotatable cam for skip-print mandrel wheel assembly
US4773326 *Sep 11, 1987Sep 27, 1988Adolph Coors CompanyPrinting machine with mandrel wheel skip-print verification and response
US5148742 *Jan 10, 1991Sep 22, 1992Belgium Tool And Die CompanyCan coater with improved deactivator responsive to absence of a workpiece
US5816994 *Jun 23, 1997Oct 6, 1998Lawrence Paper CompanyBox-blank printer/slotting apparatus
US6651552Jul 22, 2002Nov 25, 2003Sequa Can Machinery, Inc.Automated can decorating apparatus having mechanical mandrel trip
US6840166Jun 12, 2003Jan 11, 2005Machine Engineering, Inc.Mandrel trip apparatus
US8707866Mar 21, 2012Apr 29, 2014James M. JeterRail guide mounting assembly for mandrel trip apparatus
EP0494659A2 *Jan 8, 1992Jul 15, 1992Belgium Tool And Die CompanyCan coater with improved deactivator responsive to absence of a workpiece
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/247, 101/234, 101/38.1
International ClassificationB41F17/22, B41F17/08
Cooperative ClassificationB41F17/22
European ClassificationB41F17/22
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 19, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: ADOLPH COORS COMPANY, A CO CORP., COLORADO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:COORS CONTAINER COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:005012/0119
Effective date: 19851216