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Publication numberUS3665939 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1972
Filing dateJun 4, 1969
Priority dateJun 6, 1968
Also published asDE1966718A1
Publication numberUS 3665939 A, US 3665939A, US-A-3665939, US3665939 A, US3665939A
InventorsIngeborg Laing
Original AssigneeIngeborg Laing
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hair roller and an apparatus for heating hair rollers
US 3665939 A
Abstract
A hair roller having a container enclosing a thermally chargeable storage body of a hydrate which melts at working temperature. Advantageously a heat insulation is provided between said storage body and a sleeve enclosing said container. An apparatus for heating a plurality of hair rollers comprises thermally conductive projections supporting the hair rollers.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Laing 1451 May 30, 1972 [54] HAIR ROLLER AND AN APPARATUS 3,257,541 6/1966 Jorgensen ..219/222 FOR HEATING HAIR ROLLERS 3,016,909 1/1962 Schrock ..l32/40 R 3,473,004 10/1969 Block et a]. ...132/33 R [721 Ingemrg fi g & ggi g 3,478,755 1 H1969 Jorgensen 1 32/33 R Stuttgart cg 3,419,019 12/1968 Holfmann et al, ..132/41 R Germany t 22 Filed: June 4 9 9 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 2 App]. N05 830 322 42,212 3/1933 France ..l32/33 D Primary Examinerl.ouis G. Mancene [30] Foreign Appncauon Priority Data Assistant Examiner-Gregory E. McNeill June 6, 1968 Austria ..A 5389/68 Almmey-Jennie Edmondfi Morton Taylor and Adams 52 us. c1. ..132/33 R v ABSTRACT [51 1 A hair roller havin g a contamer enclosmg a thermally chargea- [58] Field of Search ..132/33 R, 40, 41, 9, 219/222 ble Storage body ofa hydrate which melts t working tempera- References Cited. ture. Advantageously a heat 1nsulat1on is provided between said storage body and a sleeve enclosing said container An UNITED STATES PATENTS apparatus for heating a plurality of hair rollers comprises thermally conductive projections supporting the ban rollers. 3,485,248 12/1969 Murray et a] ..132/33 R l/ 1966 Pastemack 132/362 21 Claim, 20 Drawing Figures J 55 g I 1;

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Patented May 30, 19-12 3,665,939

8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented May 30, 1972 3,665,939

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FIGJI Patented May 30, 1972 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIG. 13

Patented May 30, 197-2 3,665,939

8 Sheets-Sheet 8 I-IAIR ROLLER AND AN APPARATUS FOR HEATING I-IAIR'ROLLERS THE PRIOR ART Hair rollers are known which are heated by an electrical heating device and thenrolled into the hair. They can beused only for dry hair, since their heat. content is inadequate to evaporate the water from damp hair.

It has been suggested to fill hair rollers with paraffinic acids, whose melting point lies substantially in the zone of the required working temperature. These hair rollers have the advantage that a substantially larger quantity of heat can be stored, by using the melting heat. The melting heat of paraffinic acidis about 14' kcal/kg. However, since the density is only 0.7 g/crn, the melting heat (related to 1 cm") is nevertheless only cal. Even hair rollers of this kind have not proved useful in practice, since their heat content is too low. Moreover, during the solidification of the stearic acid the temperature drops veryconsiderably, since the solidified body is deposited afterthe fashion of a skin inside the cylindrical hollow member. As with all waxes, the thermal conductivity of paraffinic acids is very low, so that the released heat still available in the liquid nucleus can flow off to the outside only very slowly, and therefore a large proportion of the melting enthalpy falls in the temperature zone which can no longer be used. For the same reason heating lasts for a very long time, since the heat flow penetrates as far as the nucleus of the hair roller only very slowly. Nor are the prior art heating methods adequate for practical requirements. The hair rollers are either slipped onto heated mandrels or placed in hot water.

The first method has the disadvantage that the locally strongly limited thermal contact is inadequate, and the second method has the disadvantage that any water remaining on the hair roller when it is taken out must also be evaporated, so that the usable residue of heat is even less.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION It has now been found that these disadvantages can be obviated by using according to the invention as the filling for the hair roller a hydroxide whose transfonnation temperature on dissolution in'its own water-of crystallization coincides with .the' required working temperature of the hair roller. A preferred filler is'barium hydroxide octahydrate, whose transformation temperature can be varied within wide limits according to the invention by the admixture of other hydroxides orsalts. In contrast with paraffin, hydroxides have an extremely high hydration enthalpy which is, for instance, 89 kcal/kg in the case of barium hydroxide octahydrate. At the same time the density is about 2.5 times as high as that of paraffinic acid, so that 156 cal can be stored per cm. Moreover, the thermal conductivity is nine times greater than that of paraffinic acid, so that charging is performed rapidly and also discharging is performed at substantially constant temperature. As a result, during the whole period of effectiveness the hair roller maintainsthe optimum temperature. Other advantageous fillers are ammonia-alum dodecahydrate and other high-melting hydrates.

All thermoplastic materials resistant to weakly basic sub stances are suitable as materials for the hollow member into which the filler is introduced. To prevent the melt from running out if the hollow member is damaged, according to the invention the storage body is. gelled in the liquid phase with sodium alginate or other gel-forming compounds, or substances capable of swelling, Sodium .alginate in a quantity of 0.9 percent is enough for adequate inspissation.

To make it impossible forthe wall of the hair roller to be pierced by sharp objects, according to the invention a wire coil, whose outer diameter is not much smaller than that of the cylinder of the hollow member, or alternatively a wire mesh is incorporated during injection moulding. However, it has been found advantageous to construct the actual storage body container in the form of an extrusion-moulded or deep-drawn copper basin. feature has the advantage that the heat can beintroduced from one. end face. The bottomcan be covered by a small magnetic place which is either inserted into the basin or-glued on from outside, and the place used for heating can be made from soft iron. By this arrangement the hair rollers are pressed onto the heated place by the magnetic forces. According to the invention this arrangement can also be reversed, using a magnetic plate and small soft iron plates which are connected to the hair roller. The heating surface is advantageously placed vertically.

It has been found that hair rollers of normal size constructed according to the invention can be rotated into wet hair and that the stored heat is adequate'for the complete drying of the hair. Testshave shown that these hair rollers remain at constant temperature for about 40 minutes, whereas the prior art hair rollers remain effective for only about 3 minutes. In a special construction of the invention, two cylinders filled with storage body are so inserted in a hair roller that they leave sufficient space between themselves for the insertion of pins.

It has also been found advantageous for the outer end faces to be coated with a heat insulating layer, unless they are made of metal for heating purposes.

Advantageously the heating device is a thermostatically controlled electrically heated plate. However, since a very large amount of energy is required during the charging period, whereas almost no further energy is required for the retention of the heat, in a preferred embodiment of the invention the heating plate is also constructed in the form of a storage plate and the storage body used is a substance whose holding temperature is somewhat higher than that of the hair roller storage body. This construction has the advantage that recharging must be performed only once or twice a day and that the apparatus can also be a cordless apparatus separate from the supply flex and can nevertheless be still used for many hours. Another advantage is that the discharged hair rollers can be recharged in a few minutes, since they take their energy from the store of the heating plate.

It has been found that despite favorable conditions, soaking the strands in water leads to long treatment times. According to-the invention, therefore, instead of water liquids having a lower evaporation enthalpy, for instance, isopropyl alcohol, are used,'if necessary in isopiesticmixture with water, This liquid is applied to the hair strands only when they are already rolled in. Preferably according to the invention a substance such as a fatty acid ester is admixed with the liquid, so that soaking of one side of the rolledin strands is enough to distribute the liquid unifom'lly by capillary effect. Adhesive sub stances can also be admixed with the liquid, which is conveniently applied by sprayers.

Embodiments of hair rollers according to the invention and heating apparatuses associated therewith will now be described with reference to the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an elevation of a hair roller.

FIG. 2 illustrates by means of graphs the operation of a hair roller with a seeded and an unseeded storage substance filling.

FIG. 3 shows in section a variant embodiment of a hair roller according to the invention.

FIG. 4 illustrates by means of a graph the effect of the hair roller illustrated in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a simple embodiment of the heating apparatus.

FIG. 6 is a section through a hair roller according to the invention having a magnetic retaining member.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a hair roller heating apparatus according to the invention.

FIG. 8 is a section, to an enlarged scale, through the intermediate wall of the apparatus shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a further embodiment of a hair roller heating apparatus according to the invention.

FIG. 10 shows in section a hair roller which can be heated in the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 9.

FIG. 1 1 is a top plan view of a further embodiment of a hair roller heating apparatus according to the invention having a magnetic retaining system.

FIG. 12 is a partial perspective view, to an enlarged scale, of the retaining system for a hair roller in the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 1.

FIGS. 13 and 14 are perspective views of two further embodiments of hair roller heating apparatuses according to the invention.

FIG. 15 shows diagrammatically a cross-section of a frustoconical hair roller having an exaggerated taper.

FIG. 16 shows diagrammatically a cross-section of a hair roller having a mandrel operative during its heating.

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of a hair roller having an attaching clamp according to the invention.

FIG. 18 is an elevation of a similar hair roller to that shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a hair roller according to the invention having a bowed clamping member, and

FIG. 20 is a sectional view of an embodiment of a hair roller according to the invention having a two-part storage member and a perforate central part.

. FIG. 1 shows a hair roller 1 having a thermoplastic casing 2 into whose cylindrical wall 3 a wire spiral 4 was introduced during injection moulding. A filling 5 consists of barium hydroxide octahydrate.

FIG. 2 shows the discharge curve 20 of barium hydroxide octahydrate. noticeable feature is the supercooling at the start of discharge, The supercooling can be avoided, as shown by the curve21, by the admixture of a seeding substance consisting'of isomorphous, isotypic or epitaxial crystals whose melting point is substantially higher than that of barium hydroxide octahydrate.

Hair rollers at a very high temperature, for instance, 130 C, can be inserted in the dry hair without the scalp becoming overheated. However, if wet hair were to be treated at this temperature, water vapor would emerge, just as during the ironing of damp washing. The water vapor reaches the scalp and produces an excessive heat transfer, so that unbearable temperatures are produced. On the other hand, it has been found that as high temperatures as possible should be used for fixing the hair. Y

According to the invention, therefore, a hair roller is used which operates at low temperature during the drying period of the wet hair and whose temperature is automatically considerably increased as soon as drying is completed. To this end according to the invention the hollow member filled with the storage substance is enclosed by a sleeve which has advantageously projections or mandrels for the fixing of the hair, a heatins ulating layer, for instance, air, being provided between the hollow member and the sleeve. Since the temperature of the sleeve is determined by the jump of temperature between the surface temperature of the hollow body and the temperature of the hair, the sleeve temperature is lower in proportion as the heat flow ishigher. Initially the heat flow evaporates the water still left inthe hair strand and thereafter heats the strand and compensates for the heat loss therein. However, since the heat transfer is substantially more favorable in the direction of the wet hair, the latter produces a substantially greater heat flow and correspondingly a substantially more considerable drop in temperature than the dry hair. The drop in temperature is directly proportional to the heat-insulating value.

The insulating layer of air between the hollow member and the sleeve can be subdivided into annular air-filled zones whose radial extension is such, in dependence on the holding temperature of the storage medium, that a substantially lower temperature is produced during the drying phase than during the temperature phase of the hair strand already dried. Instead of annular air-filled channels, according to the invention, channels of parallel axis extending over generatrices can be provided, or a layer of foamed plastics.

Known hair rollers heated by bodies storing latent energy share the disadvantage that transformation takes place only on the wall of the hollow member, whereafter the transformation layers progressively move into the center of the hair roller. The result is temperature-time functions which have a substantially higher temperature at the start of discharge than at the termination thereof. To obtain further influence on this disadvantage, which runs counter to the requirements of the invention, according to the invention two storage bodies of different temperature-holding points are provided, one storage body being introduced inside the hollow member, preferably in the form of a cylindrical nucleus, while the second storage body is located in the remaining annular space between the first-mentioned storage body" and the hollow member wall. The first-mentioned storage body has the higher temperature-holding point, so that the discharge starts at the expense of the nucleus. The second storage body forms a heat resistance to the heat flow of the first-mentioned storage body, so that during the first part of the discharge period, until the first-mentioned storage body is recrystallized, the temperature of the hollow member is only negligibly higher than after the discharge of the first-mentioned storage body. After the discharge of the first-mentioned storage body, the second storage body starts to recrystallize after the fashion of a skin, starting from the hollow member periphery. In connection with the aforementioned extra heat resistance, even with this arrangement the temperature will drop during the hair-drying period considerably below the holding point of the second storage body, whereas after the drying of the hair the temperature remains substantially constant until the second storage body has also been completely discharged.

FIG. 3 shows a hair roller according to. the invention having a metal sleeve 31 which has a frustoconical bottom 32 and is closed at the top. The sleeve 31 is filled with a first storage body 33 disposed in the nucleus of the sleeve, and a second storage body 34 disposed in an annular zone around the firstmentioned storage body. The storage body 33 disposed in the nucleus has a substantially higher transformation temperature, at which recrystallization or solidification is completed, than the storage body 34. The sleeve 31 is enclosed by a plastics casing 35 which has in known manner mandrels 36 for fixing the hair. The casing 35 is thermally conductively connected only by a number of annular webs 37 to the sleeve 31, but otherwise separated therefrom by hollow channels 38 containing air as an insulating material. Charging is perfonned as follows: the frustoconical bottom 32 is placed onto a heated mandrel 39 of the heating apparatus 30 whose upper zone 40 is also frustoconical, but the diameter of whose mirror end face is somewhat larger than the minor end face diameter of the frustrum forming the bottom 32. This ensures that there is always satisfactory thermal contact between the heated mandrel 39 and the bottom 32 in the zone of generated surface 41 of the frustrum. Part of the heat fed in is conducted via the metal casing 31, and part via a metal star-shaped member 42 of substantially trefoil cross-section which can taper upwardly.

FIG. 4 shows the discharge curve (temperaturetime (1)- curve) of a hair roller according to the invention during hair drying. The maximum temperature 43 is produced by the charging apparatus. The temperature drops as far as the point 44, corresponding to the normal cooling curve of a body charged only with perceptible heat. Thereafter the temperature continues to drop rapidly, since a very large amount of heat is removed by thehigh thermal conductivity of wet hair. Even before the scalp has got overheated by hot vapors, the interval 45 has been reached. Within this interval of time the actual drying takes place with considerable removal of heat and at a sufiiciently low temperature. Only when the hair is dry i.e., the water therein has evaporated does the temperature rise slowly, due to the substantially increasing heat resistance of the rolled-in hair strands, to the neighborhood of the transformation temperature line 46. Thereafter the temperature drops again, as shown by the curve 47, since inside the sleeve 4 or 31 radially symmetrical skins of recrystallized or crystallized storage body are formed which offer a heat resistance of the heat flow. Only after the completion of discharge, as shown at the place 48, does the temperature again drop in accordance with the laws of perceptible heat.

However, if a nucleus 33 (FIG. 3) of high recrystallization temperature is introduced inside the storage nucleus 34, the curve follows a course as shown by reference 49, because since the high temperature in the zone of the nucleus has kept the outer zones of the body 34' in the meltable state, the nucleus 34 now gives off heat with short heat flow paths. The total enthalpy may be regarded as substantially constant. Cooling therefore starts at a place 49a, earlier than in the case of the curve 47-48. However, it is desirable that the temperature should be kept as high as possible for a short time after drying, and this is achieved by the method described.

FIG. shows a heating apparatus for hair rollers. Upwardly facing surface 50 of a cover plate 53 is made of a ferromagnetic materiaL- Disposed therebelow is a heating device 51, with the interposition of a storage body 52 whose temperature-holding point or transformation temperature is higher than the transformation temperature of the hair roller storage body.

FIG. 6 is'a section through a hair roller according to the invention whose plastics casing 60 receives a copper container 61 whose bottom 62 hasbeen closed by rolling. Disposed at the bottom is a barium ferrite magnet 64 which is radially magnetized and holds the heating apparatus firmly on the surface 50 (FIG. 5). The other axial end is covered by a plastic cap 65, so that heat losses are low.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show a heating apparatus for charging hair rollers according tothe invention, in which hair rollers 70 are disposed one upon the other and are pulled against a vertical wall 72 by means of magnetic elements 79, just as in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6. A heating element 73 (FIG. 8) is disposed in the wall 72 which is connected via a very thinwalled sheet-metal section 74 to a baseplate 75, so that as little heat as possible can flow away to the baseplate. Two covers 76, 77 are attached to the wall 72 by hinges 78. The hair rollers 70 are advantageously so arranged that one size is heated under the cover 76 and another size is heated under the cover 77.

' FIG. 9 shows an arrangement in which the hair rollers 70 are not retained by magnetic forces, but are inserted in pockets formed by projections 90. Advantageously the contours 91 of the pockets have a uniform curvature, with the same radius of curvature as the hair rollers, over an arc zone of less than 180. Moreover, hair rollers having different diameters are advantageously so arranged that the thicker ones are below and the thinner one thereabove.

I FIG. is a section through a hair roller according to the invention which can be charged by heat being fed in via its periphery at three places 100-102, in an apparatus such as that illustrated in FIG. 9. The length and dimensions are such that the zones 103, 104 always stand in the ratio of 1:2 to the zones 105, 106. A sleeve 107 has beads 108 into which plastics rings 109 formed with projections are advantageously inserted. The ends are formed with beads 99 over which plastics end caps 98 are slipped.

FIGS. 1 1 and 12 show a further variant in which the hair rollers 110 are forced by magnetic forces against plate-shaped starts 111 used for thermal conduction. The hair rollers are formed with peripherally extending slots 112 extending as far as the metal member of the hair roller. The stars 111 are disposed on a tube 113 and connected thereto with good thermal conductivity. Disposed in the tube 113 is an electrical heating element 114 such as is used in a similar form in heating rods or soldering irons.. The tube 113 is advantageously connected to a base 115 via a chromium nickel steel tube 1 16. This ensures that the heat flow between the tube 113 and the base 115 is reduced to the minimum. Disposed between at least each two of the star-shaped thermally conductive plates 1 11 is an axially magnetized permanent magnet 1 17. Disposed at the zenith is an incandescent bulb 118 which indicates that the end temperature has been reached. Instead of the incandescent bulb, a temperature indicator with reversible change of color can be used. 7

FIG. 13 shows a further alternative in which the hearings are disposed in perpendicular intermediate walls 130, 131, hair rollers 13] being disposed in layers one above the other therebetwee n. Heat contact is produced by resilient metal strips 133 biased against the periphery of the hair roller 132.

FIG. 14 illustrates diagrammatically a heating device according to the invention in which hair rollers bear against the heated surfaces at both axial ends 141, 142 which are partspherically outwardly arched and guided in grooves 143, 144. The vertically extending generatrices of the grooves 143, 144 associated with one another enclose between themselves an acute angle, so that the particular hair roller concerned slides by the force of gravity into a position which ensures contact between the inner surfaces of the grooves 143, 144 and the hair roller ends 141, 142. Since in any case hair rollers of different diameters are required, according to the invention the kind used more frequently is constructed somewhat longer. Since on charging, the melting process starts at the bottom of the hair roller if heat is fed in from below, a very high static excess pressure is set up in the lower portion of the hollow member, since the melt has a lower specific density than the crystalline substance. Consequently, the charging time of the hair rollers is relatively long.

Once the inside of the hair roller has melted, on condition that solidification occurs with the hair roller vertical, a concave meniscus-shaped cavity is formed in the upper portion of the hair roller. On further recharging, this cavity is not in liquid-conductive connection with the melting zone starting at the bottom of the inside of the hair roller, so that the wall becomes extremely heavily loaded in the lower zone, and this easily leads to the denting of the bottom.

The invention obviates this disadvantage by steps which either enable the whole cylindrical storage body member to make an axial movement, or by means via which a liquid channel is fonned. For instance, according to the invention the sleeve filled with the storage body is a frustrum whose minor end face is the heating side. The angle of conicity can be only a few degrees, preferably l.5. A further step according to the invention is that the sleeve inner wall is'coated with a separating or sliding medium, such as polyethylene or hard wax, for instance, thus preventing the crystalline body from sticking to the wall. In a third step according to the invention, the heated bottom has disposed on it a mandrel of a material having good thermal conductivity, preferably a mandrel whose cross-section tapers upwards. As a result, a very thin layer of the same longitudinal extension as the mandrel is first melted in the center of the crystalline body. The base zone is liquid-conductively connected to the upper cavity via this annular melting zone. The taper of the wall 151 is shown exaggerated to more clearly illustrate the manner in which the crystalline body 154 is pushed upwards by the melt. In practice the taper is on the order of l.5.

FIG. 15 shows diagrammatically a sleeve whose wall 151 forms a frustrum whose opening angle 152 is about 1.5". Heating is performed through the bottom 153. Due to the conical widening, the crystalline body 154 is pushed upwards as soon as a melt 155 is formed adjacent the bottom.

FIG. 16 shows another construction of the hair roller according to the invention, in which a cylindrical container is hermetically sealed, with the bottom 161 for the introduction of heat, by a folded seam 162. A mandrel 163 is disposed inside the crystalline body 167. On charging a melted zone is formed around the mandrel 163, as shown by the chain-line 164, so that a portion of the melt can pass out of zone 165 into zone 166.

Known hair rollers are attached to the hair by means of pins. This can also be done with the hair rollers according to the invention if they are constructed, for instance, as shown in FIG. 20. The hair roller has a cylindrical sleeve 200 formed with perforations 201. The storage body is disposed in two containers 202, 203 disposed at an axial distance from one another, and apertures 204 are provided through which a plastic pin can be inserted perpendicularly to the cylindrical axis of the hair roller.

Heated hair rollers have progressively become more widely adopted in hairdressing. They comprise a cylinder, which may also have substantially radially extending mandrels, and which is filled with a body of good thermal conductivity, as a rule a body for storing latent energy, and which after being rolled into the hair must be fixed by a clasp or clip. It has been found that this method has disadvantages since, unlike unheated hair rollers, the clip cannot be inserted through the hair roller.

' With heated hair rollers it is impossible to use constructions in which brushes are inserted inside a cylindrical perforate member, since the inside is filled with storage substance.

For hair rollers having a one-part storage body, according to the invention various retaining elements are provided which are attached to one or both axial ends of the hair roller. According to the invention this can be done by toggle levers mounted on one side, or by U-shaped bridges. Preferably, with downwardly hingeable elements the inoperative position should be such that winding-on is not impeded. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the clamping device is allowed to be twisted around the geometrical axis of the hair roller, so that the retaining device can be latched into the angular position which is most favorable. Preferred embodiments are dealt with in the description of the drawings.

FIG. 17 shows a hair roller comprising a preferably ferromagnetic metal member 171 filled with a substance for storing latent heat. The metal member 171 bears heat-insulating plastics rings 172 having comb-shaped projections 173 and axial end discs 174. Disposed on at least one end disc is a toggle lever l75which can be pivoted around a pivot 176 and has a ratchet mechanism by means of which it can be located in the position 175 shown in solid lines or the position 178 shown in chain lines. End disc 179 can also readily be twisted around the geometrical axis 180 of the hair roller.

FIG. 18 is a cross-section through a hair roller having two different ways of twisting the retaining element. The embodiment shown inthe bottom of FIG. 18 enables end plate 189 to be twisted by sliding over a bead 181.

The top part of FIG. 18 shows an embodiment in which the end plate comprises a ring 183 in which a moulded member 184 is mounted in axial positive connection and with provision for rotation.

FIG. 19 shows a different embodiment in which both arms of a bowed member 190 areformed with slots 191 in which knobs 192 are guided which can readily be twisted but can be displaced only with difficulty. As soon as the hair is wound-on, the central portion 193 of the bowed member is pressed onto the roller, the hair being fixed by the recess.

1 claim:

1. A hair roller having a container enclosing a thermally chargeable storage body characterized in that the body comprises an admixture of ionic substances which melt at the working temperature of said hair roller in their own water of crystallization and of a gel forming substance insoluble in the melt of the ionic substances within said working temperature whereby the storage body maintains a non-flowable consistency.

2. A hair roller as set forth in claim 1 characterized in that the container takes the form of a double cylinder and contains 7 the storage body in the annular space between the cylinders.

3. A hair roller particularly as set forth in claim 1, having a sleeve enclosing the storage body container, characterized in that a heat insulation (38) is provided between the thermally chargeable storage body (34) and the sleeve (35).

4. A hair roller as set forth in claim 3, characterized in that the heat insulation consists of air-filled annular spaces (38) enclosing the storage body container (31).

5. A hair roller as set forth in claim 3, characterized in that the heat insulation consists of foamed plastics.

6. A hair roller particularly as set forth in claim 1, characterized in that it is filled with two bodies (33, 34) which store latent heat and have different transformation temperatures.

7. A hair roller as set forth in claim 6, characterized in that the storage body (33) having the higher transformation temperature is disposed in the zone of the nucleus of the sleeve, while the storage body (34) having the lower transformation temperature is disposed in an annular zone around the zone of the nucleus.

8. A hair roller particularly as set forth in claim 1, having a storage body which is enclosed in a container and whose density is substantially reduced when the transformation temperature is exceeded, the hair roller being heated from below in the vertical position, characterized in that means (152, 163) are provided via the agency of which the molten body (155, disposed at the bottom (153, 161) can flow upwards past that part (154, 167) of the storage body which is still solid.

9. A hair roller as set forth in claim 8, characterized in that the inner surface of the container (151) enclosing the storage body is substantially frustoconical and widens upwards.

10. A hair roller as set forth in claim 8, characterized in that the inner wall of the container is cylindrical and coated with a sliding layer. l I

11. A hair roller as set forth in claim 10, characterized in that the sliding layer consists of an inserted foil.

12. A hair roller as set forth in claim 8, characterized in that a mandrel (163) of good thermal conductivity which extends substantially into the top cavity (166) of the container (160) is connected to the heat-absorbing bottom (161) of the hair roller.

13. A hair roller asset forth in claim 12, characterized in that the mandrel (163) tapers upwards.

14. A hair roller as set forth in claim 1, characterized in that the storage body is disposed in two containers (202,203) disposed at an axial distance from one another, and a sleeve (200) whose central zone is perforate (201) is provided to receive the two containers.

15. A hair roller having a device for attachment to the rolled-up strands of hair, more particularly as set forth in claim 1, characterized in that an end disc (179) forming a hinge (176) for a hinged lever is'disposed at at least one end face.

16. A hair roller as set forth in claim 15, characterized in that the hinge (184) pivotable around the pivot (180) is positively retained in an end ring (183).

17. A hair roller having a device for attachment to the rolled-up strand of hair, more particularly as set forth in claim 1, characterized in that it bears at both ends knobs (192) retaining a bowed member (193) whose arms are formed with slots (191) having end contours (194) ensuring that the bowed member latches into the knobs in the end position.

18. A hair roller having a container enclosing a thermally chargeable storage body characterized in thatthe body comprises an admixture of ionic substances which melt at the working temperature of said hair roller in their own water of crystallization and of an alginate-gel forming substance insoluable in the melt of the ionic substances within said working temperature whereby the storage body maintains a non-flowable consistency.

19. A hair roller as set forth in claim 18, characterized in that the admixture is less than 1 percent.

20. A hair roller having a container enclosing a thermally chargeable storage body characterized in that the body comprises an admixture of ionic substances which melt at the working temperature of said hair roller in their own water of crystallization and of a gel forming substance insoluable in the melt of the ionic substances within said working temperature whereby the storage body maintains a non-flowable consistency and where the density of the storage body is substantially reduced when the transformation is exceeded, where the hair roller is adapted to be heated from below in the vertical position, where means are provided by which the molten body disposed at the bottom of the container may flow upwardly past that part of the stroage body which is solidified, and where the inner surface of the container enclosing the body is substantially frustoconical in shape having its widest part at the top of the container and tapering downwardly at substantially l.5 to its narrowest part.

21. A hair roller having a container enclosing a thermally chargeable storage body characterized in that the body comprises an admixture of ionic substances which melt at the working temperature of said hair roller in their own water of whereby the storage body maintains a now-flowable consistency, and in having an end disc forming a hinge for a hinged toggle lever disposed on at least one end face of the hair roller where the lever can be pivoted to latch into two positions offcrystallization and of a gel forming substance insoluable in the 5 set each other at an angle melt of the ionic substances within said working temperature

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US3228403 *May 28, 1962Jan 11, 1966Pasternack JacobHair curler
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US3419019 *Dec 6, 1965Dec 31, 1968Rayette FabergeHair curlers
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification132/233, 219/222, 392/339, 165/47, 219/521, 219/242
International ClassificationF28D15/02, F28D20/02, F24F5/00, C09K5/06, A45D2/36
Cooperative ClassificationF28D20/02, Y02E60/145, F24F5/0046, F24F5/00, C09K5/063, A45D2/36
European ClassificationC09K5/06B, A45D2/36, F24F5/00F, F28D20/02, F24F5/00