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Publication numberUS3667073 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1972
Filing dateDec 18, 1970
Priority dateDec 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3667073 A, US 3667073A, US-A-3667073, US3667073 A, US3667073A
InventorsHiram H Renfroe
Original AssigneeHiram H Renfroe
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Patient transporter
US 3667073 A
Abstract
An apparatus which provides for effortless moving of a non-ambulatory patient from his bed or operating table to a cart, e.g., recovery room stretcher or the like and from the cart to other non-porous surfaces, e.g., X-ray tables, etc. The major component comprises an inflatable mattress having a constant flow of air pressure communicating therewith and a plurality of nozzles over one side thereof to direct air jets outwardly therefrom. The mattress normally is positioned with the air jets directed downwardly to provide an air cushion or caster for effortless sliding from one horizontal surface to another. However, the mattress may be positioned with the air jets directed upwardly for floatably supporting a patient, having sores, e.g., decubitus ulcers, on a cushion of pressurized gas a distance above the mattress.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Renfroe [451 June 6, 1972 [54] PATIENT TRANSPORTER Hiram H. Renfroe, 505 Burns, West Memphis, Ark. 72301 22 Filed: Dec. 18,1970

21 App1.No.: 99,400

[72] Inventor:

521 vs. CI

3,428,973 2/1969 Hargest et a1 ..5/347 Primary Examiner-Casmir A. Nunberg Attorney-John R. Walker, 111

[ ABSTRACT An apparatus which provides for effortless moving of a nonambulatory patient from his bed or operating table to a cart, e.g., recovery room stretcher or the like and from the cart to other non-porous surfaces, e.g., X-ray tables, etc. The major component comprises an inflatable mattress having a constant flow of air pressure communicating therewith and a plurality of nozzles over one side thereof to direct air jets outwardly therefrom. The mattress normally is positioned with the air jets directed downwardly to provide an air cushion or caster for effortless sliding from one horizontal surface to another. However, the mattress may be positioned with the air jets directed upwardly for floatably supporting a patient, having sores, e.g., decubitus ulcers, on a cushion of pressurized gas a distance above the mattress.

l 1 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to apparatus for use in transporting a non-ambulatory patient from one surface to another.

2. Description of the Prior Art The prior art per se known by the applicant consists of the K01] etal. U.S. Pat. No. 3,493,979. However, other patents known by the applicant which depend upon the air cushion art include the Mackie U.S. Pat. No. 3,251,431; the Amann et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,282,360; the Burns U.S. Pat. No. 3,282,362; and the Nagamatsu U.S. Pat. No. 3,416,626. Further, patents known by the applicant having apparatus for supporting a body on a gaseous cushion consists of: the Hopkins U.S. Pat. No. 3,340,551; the Scales et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,354,476; and the Weinstein et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,456,270.

The '979 patent utilizes a pair of oppositely turning endless belts having an upwardly directed planar surface which works its waybetween the patient and the bed so that the upperbelt eventually supports the patient. Practicing this invention results inthe following chief disadvantages: Firstly, the apparatus is rather complicated, a feature which inherently makes the device expensive to construct. Secondly, the contour of the patient, when lying on a bed, does not conform to the planar surface of the belt upon which he ultimately is placed. This feature results in possible discomfort to the patient as the apparatus is moved between him and his bed.

The 431 and 360 patents have structure for moving an appliance such as a stove or refrigerator. The structure does not lend itself for use as a patient transporter.

The 362 patent pertains to an air cushion vehicle for a stretcher. However, the device includes elaborate structure that will enable the vehicle to pass over obstructions of reasonable size and negotiate uneven terrain without rendering the vehicle objectionably unstable. The 362 device is directed towards expeditiously moving battle casualties from a battle area to locations at which such casualties can be given first aid or from which they can be removed by military ambulances. The 626 patent pertains to a ground effect vehicle. The structure of the 626 patent enables a skim-board or a domestic vacuum cleaner to hover over both carpeted and uncarpeted hard surfaces. The 626 patent apparently solves the problem of enabling a vacuum cleaner or skim-board to hover overcarpeted surfaces with loads up to 100 lbs. in weight without more than the exhaust airoutput of a conventional domestic vacuum cleaner. The structure of the 626 patent does not lend itself for use as a patient transporter.

The '5 51 patent pertains to apparatus for supporting a body on a gaseous cushion; however, even though the 551 patent has numerous modifications and volumous drawings, the structure of the instant application is not shown or suggested therein.

The 476 patent pertains to' apparatus for supporting a human body or the like on a cushion of pressurized gas. However, the 476 patent is dependent upon an elaborate arrangement of slidable slats so as to form an aperture having somewhat the shape of a profile of the human body. The pressurized gas is directed outwardly from this aperture after having passed through compartments formed by dividers for splitting the air flow.

The 270 patent pertains to a flotation apparatus which depends upon the inherent buoyancy of the human body to be floated ona body of water with the patient being separated from the body of water by a membrane or bladder.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed towards overcoming the disadvantages and problems relative to previous patient transporters. The concept of the present invention is to provide a device for substantial effortless moving of a patient from a bed to a cart, e. g., a recovery room stretcher or the like, and from the cart to the bed or any other non-porous surface. The can has structure which enables the horizontal surface-thereof to be raised or lowered so that it may be flush with abed, an X- ray table, and/or an operating table or the like.-

The operating principle of which the instant invention depends relates to an air cushion :eflect, i. e., a cushion of air between an object and a non-porous resting surface enables the object to be moved to and fro over the resting surface substantially effortlessly due to the floating tendency of the object and the substantial absence of friction. Accordingly, the horizontal surface of the bed, i. e., the upper surface of the mattress or the like, preferably is provided with an impervious sheet or the like.

An important feature of the present invention is a unique inflatable mattress including waffle-like'structure defining numerous bulbous portions over both sides thereof when inflated. Adjacent the apices of the bulbous portions on one side only of the mattress are nozzles for exhausting air jets outwardly and downwardly from the mattress. Anair pump, being in communication with the interior of the mattress, maintains the mattress in an inflated state even though the air is rather rapidly escaping outwardly and downwardly so as to form the air cushion subjacent the mattress. The air cushion subjacent the mattress enables an unassisted person, e. g., a nurse 'or the like, to easily slide the inflated mattressfrom the bed to the cart, etc.

It should be understood that the inflatable mattress is preferably placed upon the air impervious sheet or the like prior to the patient. In other words, the inflatable mattress stays with the patient irrespective of the lower structure supporting the patient, e. g., a bed, a mobile stretcher, and/or an X-ray table or the like. Obviously, the pump must be readily accessible to the mattress at the various locations. Accordingly, it is anticipated that the cart or recovery room stretcher be fitted with structure for permanently supporting the pump and ancillary conduit, etc.

Another important feature of the present invention is that the inflatable mattress may be inverted so that the air nozzles direct the air upwardly from the mattress. Thus, when a patient is placed on the inflatable mattress, the exhausting air, which jets outwardly and upwardly from the mattress, develops an air cushion betweenthe body of the patient and the upper surface of the inflatable mattress. Obviously, the pump is in constant operation and maintains a predetermined air pressure within the mattress while the rapidly exiting air forms an air cushion. This environment-is particularly beneficial for a patient having decubitus ulcers because his blood circulation is enhanced, a drying effect of the ulcer is achieved, and pressure on his ulcers is minimized or eliminated to aid in healing thereof.

The advantages of the patient transporter of the present invention are: l The device is economical to fabricate; (2) it is simple to operate; (3) the patient is not disturbed while being transported since his normal contours while lying on the usual mattress are maintained while the inflated mattress is inflated and while he is moved from the bed to the cart; (4) one person can easily move a heavy patient from a bed to a recovery room stretcher or the like. The stretcher is wheeled to the X-ray or operating room where one person can move the patient from the stretcher to a table surface. The inflatable mattress does not block or interfere with X-ray radiation, even though the mattress remains beneath the patient; (5) the device has numerous uses other than a patient transporter, e. g., aiding in healing decubitus ulcers, as just described.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the mattress taken as on the line III-III of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a side view of a hospital bed illustrating another use of the inflatable mattress, showing the patient floatably supported on a cushion of pressurized gas a distance above the mattress.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on the line V-V of FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The patient transporter of the present invention is character-referenced in the drawings by the numeral 11 and generally includes a four-wheeled cart 13 having a horizontally disposed padded non-porous surface 15, an inflatable mattress l7, and a mechanically driven air pump 19 for inflating the mattress 17.

Detailed structure of the cart 13 is not disclosed since any suitable type may be used. However, I prefer to use an 80 inch hydraulic recovery room stretcher currently being manufactured by the Colson Company, located at Carruthersville, Missouri. The particular hospital stretcher best suited for the intended purpose herein is further identified as a series 6894 and includes a litter 21, a chassis 23, and a plurality of casters 25. The height of the litter 21 may be varied by a self-contained hydraulic system actuated by a foot lever 27. The cart 13 preferably includes a non-porous stretcher pad 29 such as that listed in the aforementioned Colson catalog and identified as a 4 inch conductive with cover and Velcro tape No. 6810631.

Additionally, the cart 13 preferably is fitted with suitable structure for supporting the pump 19. The pump 19 communicates with the interior of the mattress 17 through a flexible conduit 31. The pump 19 preferably is driven by an electric motor 33 operated from any convenient outlet in a hospital room. Accordingly, the motor 33 is provided with a ty ical electrical cable 35 having the one end thereof connected to the motor 33 and the other end thereof connected to a male plug 37. The output of the pump 19 may be varied by a rheostat 39, i. e., the rheostat 39 being interposed between the motor 33 and the plug 37 as schematically depicted in FIG. 1 of the drawings.

It should be understood that the pump 19 should be capable of maintaining a relatively low air pressure within the mattress 17, e. g., 2 lbs. per square inch or the like, and the volumetric output of the pump 19 preferably is a nominal 100 cubic feet per minute for reasons yet to be disclosed.

The mattress 17 preferably is integrally formed from a filament webof material impregnated with an air impervious coating. From FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, it may be seen that the outer surface of the mattress 17 is formed from a web of nylon cloth-like material 41 being impregnated with an interior coating of air impervious conductive neoprene 43 or the like. Further, it may been seen that the mattress 17 has a first side 45 and a second side 47. A plurality of cotton ties 49, being symmetrically arranged and disposed between the first and second sides 45, 47, are bonded to the first and second sides 45, 47 so as to produce a waffle-like surface to the first and second sides 45, 47 when the mattress 17 is inflated.

The ties 49 consist of short lengths of cotton material bonded together medially thereof so as to form opposing flap portions 51, 53, structure obvious to those skilled in the art. The respective flap portions 51, 53 having a length greater than their width, e. g., -2 X1 inch, are bonded to the first and sides 45 47 by any well known bonding agent obvious to those skilled in the art.

From FIG. 5 of the drawing, it may be seen that the ties 49 are arranged in rows and the spacing thereof is such that adjacent rows are staggered one with the other. Further, the longitudinal axes of adjacent ties 49 within each row are preferably perpendicular one with the other so as to form the waffle pattern just described. The size of each tuft or bulbous portion forming the waffle pattern preferably is a nominal 4 inches from side to side. In placing the ties 49, the important concept is to avoid a pattern that will result in a straight or continuous valley between tufts for reasons yet to be disclosed. Thus, I prefer the waffle pattern just described. It should be understood that each of the bulbous portions making up the waffle-like pattern communicate internally one with the other so that the inrushing air from the pump 19 is readily distributed throughout the entire interior of the mattress 17.

The bulbous portions of the first side 45 of the mattress 17 respectively include nozzles 55 for exhausting air jets outwardly and downwardly as the pump 19 continuously maintains a predetermined air pressure within the mattress 17. The nozzles 55 may be formed in any well known manner; however, I prefer that the nozzles 55 be formed by having a void of conductive neoprene 43 adjacent the apex of each bulbous portion. In this manner, the outer surface of the first side 45 is continuous and a smooth uninterrupted contour is achieved. It should be understood that the interstices between the minute filaments of the nylon clothlike material 41 allow for rapid exhausting of air from the interior of the mattress 17, thus providing the necessary air jets which substantially provide separation between the mattress l7 and the surface upon which it may be resting, e. g., the non-porous stretcher pad or the like. It should further be understood that the nylon material 41 provides reinforcement so that the nozzles 55 won't tear and the edges thereof won't flare outwardly. The size of the nozzles 55 may be varied so as to be compatible with the volumetric output of the pump 19 and the overall area of the mattress 17. However, the preferred size of the nozzle 55 is a nominal 1 inch diameter circle.

The mattress 17 preferably also includes a peripheral inflatable skirt 57 communicating internally thereof with the bulbous portions so that when the mattress 17 is inflated, the lower surface of the skirt 57 contiguously engages the surface upon which the mattress 17 is resting, e. g., the stretcher pad 29 or the like. Accordingly, the height of the skirt 57, when inflated, is at least as great as the distance from the apices of the bulbous portions of the first side 45 to the apices of the bulbous portions of the second side 47 for substantially capturing a pocket of air between the first side 45 of the mattress 17 and the pad 29 when the mattress 17 is inflated.

The skirt 57 may be formed in any well known manner obvious to those skilled in the art, e. g., an integrally formed tubu-. lar portion 59 adjacent the first side 45 and extending the length of the perimeter of the mattress 17, a second tubular portion 61 adjacent the second side 47 and also extending the length of the perimeter of the mattress 17. The tubular portions 59, 61 may be maintained at a spaced apart distance by an intermediate member 63 which may be somewhat rigid or the intermediate member 63 may be fixedly attached to random ties 49 with additional cotton material (not shown).

The mattress l7 additionally includes an inlet nozzle 65 for receiving the conduit 31. The inlet nozzle 65 communicates with the interior of the mattress 17 through a port 67 conveniently located on the member 63, i. e., the port 67 preferably being located intermediate the length of the mattress 17 substantially as depicted ,in FIG. 4 of the drawings. The pump 19 preferably should be capable of maintaining a rather low air pressure, e. g., 2 lbs. per square inch, within the mattress 17 while moving a rather high volume of air, e. g., cubic feet per minute or the like. This will provide rigidity for the mattress 17, maintain an optimum spaced apart distance between the first and second sides 45, 47 thereof, and substantially floatably suspend the mattress 17 above the pad 29 so that the mattress 17 and a patient P resting thereon may be frictionlessly slidfrom the cart 13 to a bed 69 or other horizontal surface, e. g., an X-ray or operating table (not shown).

It should be understood that the bed 69 preferably is provided with a non-porous horizontal surface, i. e., a rubberized sheet 71 (FIGS. 2 and 3). The bed 69 preferably includes a conventional mattress 73 and other typical structure normally associated with a hospital bed. In this regard, the mattress 73 may have an outer surface of non-porous material, in which case the rubberized sheet 71 would be superfluous. The purpose for the rubberized sheet 71 is to deflect the air jets exiting from the nozzles 55 so that a spaced apart distance is maintained between the first side 45 of the mattress 17 and the sheet 71.

The preferred sequence of operation preferably commences by having the inflatable mattress 17 previously placed on the conventional mattress 73 prior to the patient P being initially admitted or placed upon the bed 69. Obviously, the mattress 17 would be deflated and preferably covered by the usual percale sheet. For this reason, the nozzle 65 preferably is extremely flexible so as not to present an objectionable bulge which obviously would annoy or possibly irritate the patient P. Assuming the patient P to be non-ambulatory, once he is placed on the mattress 17, he stays with the mattress 17 from his bed 69 to the cart 13 where he may be wheeled to various strategic parts of a hospital, e. g., an operating room or an X- ray facility (not shown). In this regard, the patient P is moved from the bed 69 to the cart 13 by activating the pump 19 which inflates the mattress 17. Obviously, obese or heavy patients require more force to lift than do thin or light patients. Accordingly, the rheostat 39 may be manually adjusted so that the output from the pump 19 is compatible with the weight of the patient P. It should be understood that the cart 13 is manually wheeled so as to be disposed alongside or parallel with the bed 69, as best illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawing.

The patient P is effortlessly moved from his bed 69 to the cart 13 by one person or operator, e. g., a nurse or the like. The location of the rheostat 39 is optional. However, I prefer that the rheostat be attached to the flexible conduit 31 adjacent the end received by the nozzle 65. This is so the operator can quickly and frequently change the setting of the rheostat 39 as desired while manually moving the mattress 17 supporting the patient P from the bed 69 to the cart 13. If desired, rheostat 39 may be foot controlled in which case it would be located on the floor or the bottom of cart 13.

It should be understood that the crack or space between the cart 13 and the bed 69 will allow some of the air jets to escape straight down and not be deflected by either the pad 29 or the sheet 71. However, there is sufficient lift provided by the remaining air jets to allow for frictionless sliding of the mattress 17 from the bed 69 to the cart 13. In certain instances it may be necessary to slightly increase the output of the pump 19. Thus, ready access to the rheostat 39 is recommended.

It should be understood that the waffle-like structure defining the numerous bulbous portions over the first side 45 of the mattress 17 does not provide a straight or continuous valley between tufts for allowing a rush of air alongthe valley. This would somewhat diminish the optimum air cushion effect and would be more noticeable as the valley portion of the mattress 17 passed over the crack or crevice between the bed 69 and the cart 13.

The operator merely guides the mattress 17 to a preferred location from one surface to another. The air cushion effect accomplishes the work which should result in greatly reducing back strains on hospital employees. Additionally, the patient transporter 1 1 of the present invention should reduce the number of hospital employees required, i. e., one person, male or female, can now move a patient from his bed 69 to the cart 13. where he may be easily wheeled to strategic locations in the hospital where the patient can again be moved effortlessly from the cart 13 as previously disclosed.

Referring now to FIG. 4 of the drawing wherein it may be seen that the mattress 17 is made use of for a different purpose than that just disclosed. FIG. 4 shows the usual hospital bed 69 having the usual mattress 73 for supporting the patient P. Additionally, the inflatable mattress 17 of the present invention is interposed between the mattress 73 and the patient P. Further, the mattress 17 is positioned so that the first side 45, having the nozzles 55 therein, is directed upwardly, for reasons yet to be disclosed.

The pump 19, being disassociated from the cart 13, is placed adjacent the bed 69 and communicates with the mattress 17 through the previously disclosed conduit 31. The pump 19 preferably is actuated by the previously disclosed rheostat 39 for inflating the mattress 17. When the mattress 17 is thusly positioned and inflated, the nozzles 55 allow for exhausting of air jets outwardly and upwardly from the first side 45 thereof. Accordingly, the patient P is supported a spaced apart distance above the first side 45 of the mattress 17 on a gaseous cushion of air as the pump 19 continuously maintains a predetermined air pressure within the mattress 17, e. g., 2 lbs. per square inch or the like.

This'use is particularly directed toward treatment of a patient P who may have burns over his body or a portion thereof or may have decubitus ulcers or the like where the weight of the patient P applies objectionable pressure on these sores when he is supported by the conventional mattress. Therefore, supporting a patient on a gaseous cushion relieves the pressure and promotes healing of the sores. Further, a drying efi'ect of the sores is also achieved.

Recent medical pioneering techniques in treating bum patients advocate the use of heat in treating a burn, reference LECTURES POUR TOUS (October 1970), copyrighted 1970 by Edi-Monde S. A. R. L., Avenue Raymond Poincare, Paris 16, France, as appeared in the November 1970 issue of the READERS DIGEST magazine. Accordingly, it is anticipated that the mattress 17 of the present invention may be inflated with air which is temperature and humidity controlled, i. e., the air from the pump 19 would pass through a heated chamber (not shown) and/or a moisture decreasing chamber (not shown) before entering the inlet nozzle 65, obvious structure to those skilled in the art.

Although the invention has been described and illustrated with respect to a preferred embodiment thereof, it is not to be so limited since changes and modifications may be made therein which are within the full intended scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A device for transporting a patient while in a recumbent position upon a bed having a horizontal substantially nonporous surface, said device comprising a cart means disposed alongside said bed being parallel and adjacent thereto also having a horizontal substantially non-porous surface, an inflatable mattress having first and second sides thereto being interposed between said patient and said horizontal surface of said bed with said first side thereof directed downwardly, air pump means for inflating said mattress, said mattress including wafile-like structure defining numerous bulbous portions over said first and second sides thereof when inflated by said pump means, said bulbous portions of said mattress communicating internally thereof one with the other, said bulbous portions of said first side of said mattress respectively including nozzle means for exhausting air jets outwardly and downwardly as said pump means continuously maintains a predetermined air pressure within said mattress for providing rigidity thereto, for separating said first and second sides as said patient is supported by said second side, and for substantially floatably suspending said mattress above said horizontal surface of said bed so that said mattress and said patient may be frictionlessly slid from said bed to said cart and from said cart to said bed.

2. The transporting device of claim 1 in which said mattress is substantially integrally formed from a filament web impregnated with an air impervious coating.

3. The transporting device of claim 2 in which the respective apices of said bulbous portions of said first side of said mattress are void of said air impervious coating to define said nozzles.

4. The transporting device of claim 3 in which said mattress includes peripheral inflatable skirt means communicating internally thereof with said bulbous portions, said skirt means having a height at least as great as the distance from the apices of the bulbous portions of said first side to the apices of the bulbous portions of said second side for substantially capturing a pocket of air subjacent said bulbous portions of said first side of said mattress when said mattress is inflated and supported on said non-porous surfaces of said bed or said cart means,

5. The transporting device of claim 4 in which is included means for varying the volume of air being delivered by said pump means.

6. The transporting device of claim 5 in which said air impervious coating consists of conductive neoprene.

7. The combination with a bed having a horizontal surface of an inflatable mattress disposed on top of the bed, air pump means for inflating said mattress, said mattress having first and second sides and including waffle-like structure defining numerous bulbous portions over said first and second sides thereof when inflated by said pump means, said bulbous portions of said mattress communicating internally thereof one with the other, said mattress being disposed on said horizontal surface of said bed with said first side thereof facing upwardly, said bulbous portions of said first side of said mattress including a plurality of small nozzle means disposed over a substantial portion of said first side for'exhausting air jets outwardly and upwardly as said pump means continuously maintains a predetermined air pressure within said mattress for floatably urging a patient having decubitus ulcers upwardly from said first side thereof so that his blood circulation is enhanced, a drying effect is achieved, and pressure on his decubitus ulcers is minimized to aid in the healing thereof.

8. The transporting device of claim 7 in which said mattress is integrally formed from a filament web impregnated with an air impervious coating.

9. The transporting device of claim 8 in which the respective apices of said bulbous portions of said first side of said mattress are void of said air impervious coating to define said nozzle means.

10. A device for transporting a patient while in a recumbent position upon a bed having a horizontal substantially nonporous surface, said device comprising a cart means disposed alongside said bed being parallel and adjacent thereto also having a horizontal substantially non-porous surface, an inflatable mattress having first and second sides thereto being interposed between said patient and said horizontal surface of said bed with said first side thereof directed downwardly, air pump means for inflating said mattress, said first side including nozzle means for exhausting air jets outwardly and downwardly as said pump means continuously maintains a predetermined air pressure within said mattress for providing rigidity thereto, for separating said first and second sides as said patient is supported by said second side, and for substantially floatably suspending said mattress above said horizontal surface of said bed so that said mattress and said patient may be frictionlessly slid from said bed to said cart and from said cart to said bed.

11. The combination with a bed having a horizontal surface of an inflatable mattress disposed on top of the bed, air pump means for inflating said mattress, said mattress having first and second sides said mattress being disposed on said horizontal surface of said bed with said first side thereof facing upwardly, said first side of said mattress including a plurality of small nozzle means disposed over a substantial portion of said first side for exhausting a plurality of air jets outwardly and upwardly as said pump means continuously maintains a predetermined air pressure within said mattress for floatably urging a patient having decubitus ulcers upwardly from said first side thereof so that his blood circulation is enhanced, a drying effect is achieved, and pressure on his decubitus ulcers is minimized to aid in the healing thereof.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/81.10R, 5/715
International ClassificationA61G7/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61G7/1021, A61G7/1019, A61G7/1057, A61G7/103, A61G7/1046, A61G2210/50
European ClassificationA61G7/10N6, A61G7/10S6, A61G7/10T8, A61G7/10P4