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Publication numberUS3667462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1972
Filing dateJun 4, 1970
Priority dateJun 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3667462 A, US 3667462A, US-A-3667462, US3667462 A, US3667462A
InventorsJacob R Moon
Original AssigneeJacob R Moon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Orthopedic, surgical, athletic and animal bandaging
US 3667462 A
Abstract
A bandage for animal, orthopedic, surgical and athletic applications comprises a seamless, stretchable, tube knit of synthetic yarn with a fuzzy surface engageable by the hooks of a set of Velcro straps and which provides a bandage the base laps of which can be bonded together so as to minimize slippage during use and the securing strap ends of which are adapted to be hidden.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

mam States Patent Moon [54] ORTHOPEDTC, SURGICAL, ATHLETIC AND ANHVIAL BANDAGING [72] Inventor: Jacob R. Moon, St. Marys Road, Box 642,

Hillsborough, NC. 27278 Notice: The portion of the term of this patent subsequent to Apr. 7, 1987, has been disclaimed.

[22] Filed: June 4, 1970 21 Appl. No.: 43,446

[52] U.S. Cl ..128/169 I [58] Field ofSearch ..128/l55, 156, 157,163,165,

. 128/169, 170, l71;24/l7 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,504,672 4/1970 Moon 128/169 1451 *June 6, 1972 1,980,843 11/1934 Andrews .24/174 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 256,149 8/1926 01 1 1 1t 1 1 ..l28/l55 Primary Examiner-Robert W. Michell Assistant Examiner-J. H. Wolff Att0meyB. B. Olive [57] ABSTRACT A bandage for animal, orthopedic, surgical and athletic applications comprises a seamless, stretchable, tube knit of synthetic yam with a fuzzy surface engageable by the hooks of a set of Velcro straps and which provides a bandage the base laps of which can be bonded together so as to minimize slippage during use and the securing strap ends of which are adapted to be hidden.

10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJuu s 1972 FIG. 2

I N \"ENTOR.

Jacob R. Moon ORTHOPEDIC, SURGICAL, ATHLETIC AND ANIMAL BANDAGING BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to bandages and particularly to tubular knit stretch fabrics employed for bandaging and having Velcro straps for securing the bandaging.

2. Description of the Prior Art As previously set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 3,504,672, it has been the practice to use single thickness, cotton strap bandages exhibiting the character essentially of tightly woven, light weight cotton canvas. This type of bandage has normally required the use of some form of underpadding for the absorption of shock. Thus, it has been necessary first to apply the underpadding and then the bandage in both surgical and animal application. Where conventional bandage is wrapped around a changing form a considerable length of bandage is required to envelope the changing curvature. For example, in working conventional cotton bandage around an elbow, a substantial length of bandage is consumed in the process of fitting the bandage to the form of the elbow.

Prior bandages have exhibited very little stretch or elasticity and have been relatively heavy in weight. Various forms of fastening means have been employed to fasten the outer terminal end of the bandage to the body of the bandage previously wrapped. In one prior bandage, it has been the practice to sew the nap portion of a Velcro fastener to one end of the bandage and to sew the hook portion of the Velcro fastener to the other end of the bandage. After the bandage is wrapped, the portions of the bandage having the mating Velcro hook and nap portions are engaged to secure the bandage. The nature of the surface of the conventional cotton bandage is smooth and has no facility for holding the hooks of a Velcro fastener.

A much improved bandaging for animal, orthopedic protection and support, and surgical uses is provided by the invention described in the referred to U.S. Pat. No. 3,504,627. In the bandage of the prior invention the bandage is made up of a seamless, rib knit tube formed by synthetic yarn, preferably nylon, and which provides a fuzzy surface adapted to receive the hook portion of a Velcro fastener. In the prior invention the Velcro fastener strap is arranged to that it can be embedded directly into any point on the surface of the bandage and thereby eliminate the need for the nap portion of a standard Velcro fastener. Furthermore, the elastic, soft, and multiple-layer nature of the bandage of the prior invention eliminates the need for underpadding, provides inherent shock absorption, fits to changing forms, e.g. an elbow, and exhibits substantial stretch in all directions.

The bandage of the present invention incorporates the basic features of the prior invention but provides a substantial improvement when the bandage is being subjected to conditions which would tend to cause the bandage to slip out of place or to be accidentally rubbed loose. For example, where the bandage of the prior invention is wrapped around the knee or hock of a horse the bandage of the prior invention will generally remain in place and provide the advantages previously discussed so long as the horse is not engaged in racing, fast running, jumping or the like. In the latter situations the bandage of the prior invention may slip out of place in a relatively short period of use. Also, situations have arisen where athletes and senile patients, for example, accidentally rub or push the ends of the Velcro fasteners loose.

To meet the problem of slippage the present invention incorporates a nylon seamless rib knit tube providing a fuzzy surface and having one beginning end closed by a Velcro hook strap secured to the tube laterally and whose length is substantially longer than the relaxed width of the knit tube. The other terminal end of the tube is closed by a similar Velcro hook strap secured to the tube laterally and which is of substantially the same length as the relaxed width of the tube. Additional Velcro hook straps having notched free ends extending longitudinally are attached to this last end. The arrangement of these various Velcro straps allow both the base and terminal wraps of the bandage to be bonded to Velcro hooks. When in use on the leg of a running horse the bandage is substantially prevented from slipping or at least the bandage is required to be adjusted at only relatively long time intervals. The notched ends allow the additional Velcro straps to be tucked and hidden which prevents easy disengagement.

The object of the invention is to preserve the features of the prior invention while providing additional means for minimizing the tendency of the bandage to slip when in highly active use applications.

The foregoing and other objects will appear from the drawings and description to follow.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side view of a knit fabric having a set of Velcro straps attached according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a pictorial view showing the bandage on a horses knee.

FIG. 3 is a pictorial view showing the bandage on the lower, fetlock to knee, portion of a horses leg.

FIG. 4 illustrates an alternative single notched strap for the terminal end.

FIG. 5 illustrates the bandage of FIG. 4 on an arm.

FIG. 6 illustrates employment of two notched straps on the terminal end.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS in FIGS. 1-3, illustrating the first embodiment, there is represented a seamless, rib knit tube 10 having at one end a Velcro hook fastener strap 1 1 secured by means of stitches 12 to the starting end and the hooks are pictured facing outwardly. An important aspect of the present invention resides around the fact that the length of the Velcro strap 11 is substantially longer than the relaxed width of the tube 10. For example in one embodiment the relaxed width of tube 10 is 3 /2 inches, dimension W. The length of the Velcro strap 11 is made 6 inches, dimension L. Velcro straps are inherently stiff. Once strap 11 is secured by stitching, adhesive or the like, dimension L is maintained.

While the ordinary Velcro fastener arrangement employs separate hook and nap portions only the hook portion is required for the present invention. Tube 10 is preferably formed with a stitch formation and utilizing a type of yarn selected such that the Velcro hook fastener 11 tends to naturally engage the surface of the fabric as securely as would be the case were the strap 11 engaging the nap portion of a conventional Velcro fastener. In one embodiment, tube 10 is knit on a dial and cylinder knitting machine and is formed with a multifilament, stretch ply all nylon yarn sold by the Madison Throwing Company, of Madison, N. C. and identified as 2/ /34 representing two ends, 100 denier and 34 filaments. This particular form of ply nylon when formed into a conventional rib knit tube exhibits substantially 100 percent longitudinal stretch and 300 percent lateral stretch. When heat processed, the fabric exhibits infinite way stretch. The infinite way stretch enables the bandage to follow the exact contour of the base upon which it is wrapped and the complete elasticity provides a soft responsive support that offers virtually no impediment to movement. The fabric is relatively lightweight, e.g., approximately 5% that of conventional bandage. Various lengths and widths may be employed. A rib knit all nylon seamless tube which measures when flat and relaxed 3 A inches in width and feet in length is well suited for most horse bandaging requirements. Such stretch characteristic and lightweight when combined with the characteristic of having a Velcro hook engaging surface has been discovered to be especially suited to use as bandaging. That is, the surface has been found to be fuzzy and ideally suited to engaging Velcro hooks. While rib knit tubes of this same structure which have been knit and then heat tumbled at about 220 F. for 20 minutes to give the desired stretch characteristic are old in the art for apparel applications such as head gear bands, no one, so far as is known, has ever recognized the utility of this type fabric for bandaging and particularly when employed with a Velcro hook fastener strap in a bandage length. After the bandage has had extensive use it may lengthen say thirty percent and thus lose some of its soft stretch characteristic. However, simply by putting the bandage in an ordinary household electric drying machine sufficient heat and tumbling is produced to restore the original relaxed length and desired soft stretch characteristic. The life of the bandage is extended and it is made both washable and reusable.

With further reference to FIG. 1 it will be noted that the opposite terminal end of the tube of length W. is closed by means of a further Velcro hook strap of length W. secured by means of stitches 16 to the side of tube 10 opposite to the side to which strap 11 is fastened and with the hooks of strap 15 facing opposite to those of straps 11. In order to provide additional securing of the terminal end or terminal wrap of the bandage an additional pair of Velcro hook straps 17, 18 having free longitudinal extending ends are secured at their respective end to the tube 10 as indicated in FIG. 1 and which leaves the Velcro hooks in the major free end portions of straps l7 and 18 oriented in the same direction as the Velcro hooks of strap 15 and free to engage the outer terminal wrap of the bandage.

FIGS. 2 and 3 illustrate the bandage in use and what is intended to be shown here is that when the bandage is applied to a changing form such as a horse knee or hock as generally represented in FIG. 2 or to the lower leg or cannon bone portion the initial or base wraps of the bandage can be secured to the Velcro hooks of strap 11 which prevents or at least minimizes opportunity of slippage of the bandage during hard use such as during racing.

To explain the foregoing in more detail it may be noted that when the bandage is applied for example to the knee of a horse the beginning end of the bandage is placed so that the hooks of the Velcro strap 11 are turned outwardly and as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 the Velcro strap 11 is running substantially lengthwise of the leg member being bandaged. While holding the Velcro strap 11 oriented in this manner and tensioning the bandage the first wrap of the bandage is taken around the member and then is placed so that a small edge portion of the underside of the first wrap engages the hooks of the Velcro strap 11. This bonds the first wrap to the strap 11. The second wrap is arranged in the same manner in that a small edge portion of the underside second wrap is bonded to the hooks of the Velcro strap 11. It has been found that by continuing to tension and wrap the initial or base wraps of the bandage so as to have edge portions of the initial wraps engage the hooks of the Velcro strap 11 that on an average size horse up to six wraps or more of the base wraps can be bonded to the Velcro strap 11. The remaining wraps are then taken and upon forming the terminal wrap the Velcro hooks of strap 15 will now be facing towards the member being bandaged and towards the outer fuzzy surface of previous wraps so that the Velcro hooks of strap 15 can be firmly embedded and held secured. Likewise straps l7 and 18 will be oriented so that their Velcro hooks also face the outer surfaces of the prior wraps and are also adapted to be embedded in the outer fuzzy surface of these wraps.

Both in the case of the applications illustrated by FIG. 2 as well as in the case of the application illustrated by FIG. 3, it has been found that the bandage of the present invention will remain securely in place even under very severe use conditions such as when the bandaged horse is running, jumping or the like.

It will of course be understood that FIGS. 2 and 3 merely illustrate two possible applications of the improved bandage to animal use. By making the bandage of the present invention in other widths and lengths it can be seen that it is adaptable to many and varied animal, orthopedic protection, orthopedic support, surgical and athletic situations.

For use with senile patients and for athletic activities, the embodiment of FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 provide hidden terminal end straps and which has been found to be uniquely adapted to those uses where protection, support and prevention of accidental disengagement of the outside securing Velcro strap ends are all considerations in using the bandage. In either case the bandage of the invention gives uniform pressure and support, readily responds to movement of the body member on which it is wrapped, exhibits a minimum tendency to slip or creep on such member and resists being rubbed or pushed loose.

FIG. 4 illustrates a bandage of the type shown in FIG. 1 with the exception of having only a single free end terminal strap 19. Single strap 19 has a notch 20 adjacent the free end. The notched end, in use, may be tucked beneath the outermost layer of bandage (See FIG. 5) such that accidental loosening of the terminal strap is prevented or minimized, while remaining flat.

FIG. 6 illustrates a third bandage embodiment which utilizes a pair of notched terminal end straps 21, 22. Straps 21, 22 have inwardly facing notches 23, 24 respectively and which are employed in the same manner as the FIG. 4 and 5 bandage straps.

In each embodiment, it will be noted that the bandage is devoid of the usual mating Velcro straps and requires only the hook type Velcro strap. In each embodiment the laps can all be bonded together. In the embodiments of FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 the bandage has the additional feature of being able to have the strap ends effectively hidden and locked around the final lap. Thus, if the athlete, senile patient or horse caretaker is using such a bandage there is minimum opportunity to dislodge the outer Velcro strap ends.

Having described the invention what I claim is:

l. A bandage comprising a seamless knit tube in a predetermined bandage width and length and having at one end a closed bandaging end and at the opposite end a closed bandaging terminal end, a stretchable stitch formation and stretch yarns being utilized to form said tube and being selected such that said tube is characterized by substantial longitudinal and lateral stretch and substantially fuzzy outer surface adapted to receive and securely engage Velcro fastener hooks; a first hook fastener Velcro strap secured crosswise of said starting end and having its hooks turned outwardly of the surface thereof, the length of said first strap being substantially longer than the relaxed width of said tube and being secured to a substantially equal stretched width of said tube and being effective to maintain said width so stretched; and a second Velcro hook fastener strap secured crosswise of said bandaging terminal end but on the side of said tube opposite the side to which said first hook fastener strap is secured and having its hooks turned outwardly of the surface of said terminal end, said second strap being substantially equal in length to the relaxed width of said tube, said bandage in use being adapted to have the edge portions of a plurality of base wraps bonded to Velcro hooks of said first strap and the terminal end of said bandage secured by Velcro hooks of said second strap.

2. A bandage as claimed in claim I wherein said stretch formation and yarns are selected to form said tube of muIti-filament stretch ply nylon rib knit and the Velcro hooks of each of said straps are adapted to engage the surface thereof.

3. A bandage as claimed in claim 2 wherein said longitudinal stretch is substantially percent and said lateral stretch is 300 percent.

4. A bandage as claimed in claim 3 including third and fourth Velcro hook straps having free ends extending substantially longitudinally and outwardly from said terminal end and having other ends secured to said terminal end so as to provide said free end portions having Velcro hooks oriented in the same direction as the Velcro hooks of said second Velcro strap and wherein said terminal end is secured by said third and fourth straps.

5. A bandage as claimed in claim 4 wherein each of said third and fourth Velcro hook straps are formed in their free ends in a form adapting a portion of each said free end to be secured to the outer surface of and other portions to be tucked flatly and hidden beneath the outermost wrap of said bandage.

6. A bandage as claimed in claim 5 wherein said form constitutes a notch form.

7. A bandage as claimed in claim 1 having at least one additional Velcro hook strap with one end secured to said terminal end and one free end, said strap free end being adapted to be secured to said fuzzy surface and being formed in a form adapting portions of said free end to be secured to the outer surface of and other portions to be tucked flatly and be hidden beneath the outermost wrap of said bandage.

8. A bandage as claimed in claim 7 wherein said strap free end form constitutes a notch form.

9. A bandage comprising a seamless knit tube having at one end a bandaging starting end closed by a sewn seam across such starting end and at the opposite end a closed bandaging terminal end, said terminal end having a first Velcro hook fastener strap secured at one end to said bandage terminal end and having a free end extending substantially longitudinally and outwardly from said bandage terminal end, a stretchable stitch formation and stretch synthetic yarns being utilized to form said tube and being selected such that said tube is characterized by substantial longitudinal and lateral stretch of at least percent in both directions and by a substantial fuuy outer surface adapted to receive and securely engage the hooks of said strap, the said free end of said strap being formed in a form adapting a portion of said free end to be secured to the outer surface of and the remaining portion to be tucked flatly and be hidden beneath the outermost wrap of said bandage.

10. A bandage as claimed in claim 9 wherein said form constitutes a notch form.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1980843 *Dec 7, 1932Nov 13, 1934Oliver B AndrewsBread band
US3504672 *Jan 19, 1968Apr 7, 1970Jacob R MoonSurgical and animal bandaging
GB256149A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3880161 *May 2, 1974Apr 29, 1975J H Guild Co IncElastic bandage and fastener therefor
US4378009 *Jan 14, 1980Mar 29, 1983Donald RowleyBrace for injured parts of the body
US4538602 *Jan 5, 1984Sep 3, 1985Theodore ShapiroLeg wrap
US4600618 *Mar 16, 1984Jul 15, 1986Raychok Jr Paul GSplint material with hook and loop fastener
US4825866 *Aug 27, 1987May 2, 1989Robert PierceWound closure device
US4919990 *Jul 27, 1988Apr 24, 1990Davis Gregory EPaper buster
US5217029 *Mar 4, 1992Jun 8, 1993Shields James FTherapeutic glove
US5259835 *Aug 29, 1991Nov 9, 1993Tri-Point Medical L.P.Wound closure means and method using flowable adhesive
US5445597 *Sep 30, 1993Aug 29, 1995Tri-Point Medical L.P.Wound closure means using flowable adhesive
US5674270 *Jun 27, 1996Oct 7, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyThermal pad having a common attachment and oxygen permeable side
US5728058 *Jun 29, 1995Mar 17, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyElastic knee wrap
US5728146 *Nov 8, 1996Mar 17, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyThermal neck wrap having wing shape and means for position maintenance
US5741318 *Jul 26, 1996Apr 21, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyElastic back wrap having diamond-shaped thermal pattern and anti-slip means
US5837005 *Mar 18, 1997Nov 17, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyThermal pad having a common attachment and oxygen permeable side
US5980562 *Sep 21, 1997Nov 9, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyElastic back wrap having diamond-shaped thermal pattern and anti-slip means
US6194629 *Jul 10, 1997Feb 27, 2001Mark Julian BernhardMay be applied to limb by placing first end of bandage on limb with its slip-resistant surface facing skin, bandage is then wound around limb under tension, first end of bandage being held in place by overlying bandage layer
US6883466Nov 12, 2003Apr 26, 2005Glenn N. ChambersAnimal leg wrap
US7329232Feb 27, 2004Feb 12, 2008Circaid Medical Products, Inc.Limb encircling therapeutic compression device
US8556841 *Jan 3, 2007Oct 15, 2013Yousef DaneshvarDaneshvar wrapping means and methods
US8591447Jun 29, 2010Nov 26, 2013Jennifer DiGraziaWound and bandage protection system and method
WO1997001315A1 *May 17, 1996Jan 16, 1997Procter & GambleElastic wrap having non-targeted reclosable fastener
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/60, 428/100, 128/DIG.150, 602/62
International ClassificationA61F13/15, A61F13/56, A61F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/15, A61F15/006, A61F2013/00119, A61F2013/15048, A61F2013/00102, A61F13/00038, A61F13/62, A61F2013/00565, A61F2013/00093
European ClassificationA61F15/00F, A61F13/00A6B