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Publication numberUS3668375 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1972
Filing dateOct 13, 1970
Priority dateOct 13, 1970
Also published asDE2149516A1
Publication numberUS 3668375 A, US 3668375A, US-A-3668375, US3668375 A, US3668375A
InventorsRobert C Ritchie, Bruno S Smilgys
Original AssigneeVeeder Industries Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Printer
US 3668375 A
Abstract
A gasoline pump printer having a cost printing counter, a serial printing counter, and a date printer and operable at the end of each gasoline delivery for printing a record of the delivery. A printer operating shaft is connected to rotate the supporting shafts of the cost and serial counters and date printer one full revolution to (a) rotate the print wheels to perform a printout, (b) reset the cost counter print wheels to "0," and (c) index the serial counter for printing the next serial count, and to operate a shearing mechanism for shearing the printed delivery record from a paper roll.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,668,375 Smilgys et al. 1 June 6, 1972 [s41 PRINTER 3,369,704 2/1968 Manke ..222/30 [72] Inventors: Bruno smflgysflamord, conmmm 3,446,432 5/1969 Smllgys .235/94 C. Ritchie, Feeding Hill, Mass.

Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson [73] Assignee: Veeder Industries Inc., Hartford, Conn. 45mm"! Examiner-Stanley W91 Attorney-Prutzman, Hayes, Kalb & Chilton [22] F1led: Oct. 13, 1970 211 Appl. 116.; 80,260 [571 ABSTRACT A gasoline pump printer having a cost printing counter, a seri- 52 us. 01. .235/94 R 222/30 346/43 Priming mum", and a dam Ptimer and at 51 mm .3671: 5/22 each 8mme delivery Priming a delivery- [58] Field of Search ..235/58 R, 94 R, 94 A; 101/91, A Printer Warming Shams mate "3 suPPminB ml I92, 93 C; 222/30 shafts of the cost and serial counters and date printer one full 6 I revolution to (a) rotate the print wheels to perform a printout, t (b) reset the cost counter print wheels to and (c) index [56] Referenm clfed the serial counter for printing the next serial count, and to UMTED STATES PATENTS operate a shearing mechanism for shearing the printed 1 delivery record from a paper roll. 2,612,428 9/l952 Vroom.....,i "222/30 X 1 3,139,027 6/l964 Normanml, ..-....235/94 X 8Cllims,6DrawingFigures /Z M -fl a0 /2 3/ W M! //4 n v sezvi-w q" 'r*: a V 11 8 T4 4/ M l 1/2 2/! 2// H3 /17 a 54;, 4!! l I '1 r I Z I 4 //z 241 i R. Z 4

I m 1J4 u" 1 2/ M (F 3-: 11 ,11 4 W a lm/ 2/2 3 m w 4 17! ,1'11 w 3 PATENTEnJun 6 I972 3.668.375

sum 1 or a INVENTORS BRUNO S. SMILGYS ROBERT C. RITCHHE ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUH 6 I972 3, 668, 375

SHEET 3 OF 3 FIG. .3

PRINTER BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to printers and more particularly to a new and improved printer having notable utility in fuel dispensing apparatus forproviding a printed record of each fuel delivery.

It is a primary aim of the present invention to provide a new and improved printer for fuel dispensing apparatus operable at the completion of each fuel delivery for printing a record of the fuel delivery.

It is another aim of the present invention to provide a new and improved printing counter having a counter shaft rotatable through one revolution for sequentially rotating the print wheels for producing a printout and resetting the print wheels to0.

' It is a further aim of the present invention to provide a new and improved serial printing counter having a counter shaft rotatable through one revolution for sequentially producing a printout and indexing the serial counter for the succeeding printout. k v a It is another aim of the present invention to provide a new and improved printer of the type having a plurality of coaxial manually settable print wheels.

It is a further aim of the present invention to provide a new and improved shearing mechanism for a printer for severing the printed record from a paper roll.

Other objects will be in'part obvious and in pan pointed out more in detail hereinafter.

A better understanding of the invention will be obtained fromthe following detailed description and the accompanying drawings of an illustrative application of the invention.

7' BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings: FIG. I is a generally schematic representation, broken away, of a gasoline delivery incorporating the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged front elevation view, partly broken P y pump employing a printer away and partly in section, of the printer;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged side elevation view, partly broken away and partly in section of the printer;

FIG. 4 is a partial section view, partly broken away and partly in section, taken substantially along line 4-4 of FIG. 2 and showing a ratchet mechanism of the printer; and

FIGS. 5 and 6 are partial section views, partly in section, taken substantially along line 5-5 of FIG. 2 and showing a cam mechanism of the printer in normal and intermediate operating positions thereof.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT ploying a printer 12 incorporating the present invention is shown comprising a delivery register 14 (for example of the type disclosed in U. S. Pat. No. 3,216,659 of Edward C. Am-

bler et al. dated Nov. 9, 1965' and entitled Resetting Control Mechanism for Counting Device") having volume and cost counters 15, 16 for registering the volume and cost of each fuel delivery and a reset shaft 17 adapted to be rotated one revolution for resetting the volume and cost counters l5, 16 to 0.

An electrical drive unit. 18 (for example of the type disclosed in the commonly assigned copending U. S. Pat. application Ser. No. 71,997 of Silvio Conte filed Sept. 14, 1970 and entitled Drive Unit for FIuid'Delivery Pump") is mounted on the left side of the register. 14 for rotating the reset shaft 17 one revolution for resetting the register prior to the commencement of each fuel delivery. The electrical drive unit 18 is also connected via an intermediate shaft 20 and a coupling 22 to rotate a printer operating shaft 24 one revolution after the completion of each fuel delivery for sequentially printing a ticket or receipt 26 and resetting the printer for the succeedposition, the electric drive unit ing fuel delivery. ln a conventional manner the gasoline delivery pump 10 incorporates a fuel pump 32 driven by an electric motor 34 for delivering gasoline from a suitable source (not shown) through a fluid-meter 35 to a dispensing nozzle 36. The output or volume shaft 40 of the meter 35 is connected for driving the volume counter 15 for registering the volume of fuel delivered and for driving a variator 42 (for example of the type disclosed and described in U. S. Pat. No. 3,4l3,867 of Richard B. Hamlin dated Dec. 3. i968 and entitled Variator). The variator 42 is connected for driving the cost counter 16 for registering the costof the fuel delivered in accordance with the volume of fuel delivered and a unit volume price established by the variator setting. As described more fully in said copending U. S. Pat. application Ser. No. 7l,997 of Silvio Conte, the electric drive unit 18 is operable by a handle 52 such that when the handle is rotated (e.g., in the counterclockwise direction) to-its horizontal or On" 18 is operated to rotate the reset shaft 17 one revolution for sequentially resetting the register 14 and conditioning the pump 10 for delivering gasoline. When the operating handle 52 is rotated in the opposite direction to its Off or vertical position shown in FIG. 1, the electrical drive unit 18 is operated for sequentially deenergizing the pump motor 34 and rotating the printer operating shaft 24 one revolution.

The printer 12 comprises a frame with a pair of side plates 66, 68 and a number of rotary shafts extending between the side plates. A cost printing counter 80 is provided for printing the cost of each fuel delivery and if desired a similar volume printing counter may be provided for printing the volume of each fuel delivery. The cost counter 80 has five counter wheels 82-86 of increasing order rotatably mounted on a shaft 88 and the lowest order counter wheel 82 is connected (viagears 90, 91, a unidirectional spring drive clutch 92, and a coupling 94) to be rotated (in the clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3) by the variator 42 in conjunction with the rotation of the lowest order counter wheel of the cost counter 16. A- U-shaped bail or yoke 96 is pivotally mounted on the counter shaft 88 and a transfer pinion shaft 100 is supported on the bail. Conventional mutilated transfer pinions 102 are mounted on the pinion shaft 100 for engagement with the counter wheels 82-86 for generating transfers between adjacent lower and higher order wheels in a conventional manner.

Each counter wheel 8286 comprises a molded O"9" type or print wheel 103, a combined locking ring and transfer gear segment 104 integrally molded with the print wheel 103 and a separate 20-tooth molded drive gear 106 (and for example are constructed as shown and described in U. S. Pat. No. 2,382,708 of Sterling Graydop, Jr. et al. dated Aug. 14, 1945 and entitled Resettable Counter"). The print wheels 103 may be rotated in the adding direction (clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3) relative to the respective drive gears 106 (for resetting the print wheels 103 to 0 while the transfer pinions 102 remain in engagement with the wheel drive gears 106 and combined locking ring and transfer gearsegments 104), and the counter shaft 88 has an axial slot 108 for receiving pivotal reset pawls 109 mounted on the print wheels 103 for resetting the type wheels in the adding direction to A serial printing counter 110 having three coaxial counter wheels 112-114 rotatably mounted on counter shaft 88 (and having an integral construction but otherwise like the counter wheels 82-86) is provided for printing successive serial numbers on successive tickets 26. Conventional mutilated transfer pinions rotatably mounted on pinion shaft l00are provided for indexing the wheels 113, 114 in a conventional manner and a similar mutilated pinion 122 also rotatably mounted on shaft 100 engages the20-tooth drive gear 124 of the lowest order counter wheel 112 for rotating the counter wheel 112 relative to the other counter wheels 113, 114 as hereinafter described. 7

A date printer module is mounted on the printer operating shaft 24 for printing the date on each ticket 26. The

date printer module 130 comprises a support hub or sleeve 132 having 10 equiangularly spaced (i.e., spaced 36) axial detent-grooves 133 and three pairs of "9" print wheels 134 having individual ball detents 136 engageable with the detent grooves 133 of the support sleeve 132. The print wheels 134 may be individually angularly set on the support sleeve 132 for printing the date with the month, day and year each designated by a pair of numerals in a conventional manner. An end washer 140 is affixed onto the inner end of the support sleeve 132 and has a depending tang 142 receivable within an axial slot 144 in the support shaft 24 for keying the date printer module 130 to the shaft. A collar 146 is rotatably mounted on the outer end of the sleeve 132 and is supported within a bushing 148 in the side plate 68. The collar 146 provides a knob for axially withdrawing the date printer module 130 to a withdrawn position shown in part in broken lines in FIG. 2 (where the tang 142 engages a stop pin 152) to provide access for manually setting the date print wheels 134. Thus, the date printer may be easily set at the beginning of each day by merely withdrawing the date printer module 130 and manually setting the print wheels 134 as necessary. A diametrically extending detent spring 156 is mounted on the end of the collar 146 and the shaft 24 is provided with a detent annulus 158 for receiving the detent spring 156 for holding the date printer module 130 in its inner or operative position shown in full lines in FIG. 2..

The printer operating shaft 24 is rotated in the clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3 and the counter shaft 88 is connected by gears 160-162 to be rotated by shaft 24 in the adding direction, clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3. Shafts 162, 164 for backup or ink rolls 165, 166 respectively are connected by suitable gearing (not shown) to be rotated by shaft 24, in the counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3, and a pair of cam shafts 168, 169 are also connected by suitable gearing (not shown) to be rotated, by shaft 24, in the clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3. The shafts 24, 88, 162, 164, 168, 169 are connected by, lzl gearing to be rotated through one revolution together for operating the printer.

A suitable paper roll (not shown) is provided, and as seen in FIG. 3 the paper 180 is fed from the roll between the coaxial cost and serial counters 80, 110 and corresponding backup roll 165 and betweenthe date printer 130 and corresponding backup roll 166. The backup rolls 165 166 are made porous and impregnated with a suitable ink and have raised portions 182 such that when the shaft 24 is rotated one revolution the raised type on the'date printer module 130 at station 184 and the raised type on the cost and serial counters 80, 110 at station 185 cooperate with the raised portions 182 on the rolls 165, 166 to provide a printout on the paper 180.

Referring to FIGS. and 6 a cam mechanism 200 operated by counter shaft 88 is provided for oscillating the transfer pinion shaft 100 during the rotation of the counter shaft 88. The cam mechanism 200 provides for pivoting the transfer pinion shaft in the adding direction approximately 54 from its normal or withdrawnposition shown in full lines in FIGS. 25 (during the first 48 of rotation of counter shaft 88) for sequentially (a) readying the cost and serial counters 80, 110 for printing and (b) rotating the cost and serial counters 80, 110 as a unit with the counter shaft 88 to produce a printout. Upon rotation of the counter shaft 88' through a succeeding 312 to complete a revolution, the cam mechanism 200 pivots the pinion shaft 100 54 back to its initial or normal operating position while counter wheels 82-86 are reset to 0" by counter shaft 88.

During the 54 return movement of the pinion shaft 100, a one-way locking pawl 202 (FIG. 3) engages the -tooth drive gear 124 to hold the lowest order serial counter wheel 112 against return movement and to thereby index the counter wheel 112 54 or 1% counts (i.e.', count excess) in the adding direction relative to the remaining counter wheels 113, 114. The drive pinion 122 which engages-the lowest order wheel drive gear 124 rotates on the transfer pinion shaft 100 as the pinion shaft 100 returns to its normal or retracted position and a pivotal spring biased locking cam 204 which engages the alternate long teeth 206 of the drive pinion 122 is pivoted outwardly by the long" teeth 206 as the drive pinion 122 rotates on the pinion shaft 100. With the pinion shaft in its normal or fully withdrawn position, a long" tooth 206 of the drive pinion 122 is substantially perpendicular to locking cam 204 and upon the succeeding operation'of the printer (and forward pivotal movement of the pinion shaft 100) the drive pinion 122 is rotated by the locking cam 204 approximately 45 (until two "long" teeth 206 engage the locking cam 204 to lock the drive pinion 122 against further rotation) to in effect index the lowest order counter wheel one-half count in the subtracting direction relative to the remaining serial counter wheels 113, 114 to offset the prior /2 excess count.

Referring to FIG. 4, a lO-tooth ratchet wheel 240 is keyed to the drive gear 106 of the lowest order cost wheel 82 and a ratchet pawl mechanism 242 is mounted on the pinion shaft 100 for engagement with the ratchet wheel 240. The ratchet pawl mechanism comprises a support lever 244 rotatably mounted on pinion shaft 100 and biased by a spring 246 in the counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 4 and a pawl 248 pivotally mounted on support lever 244. With the pinion shaft 100 in its normal operating position shown in FIG. 4, a tail 250 of support lever 244 engages a shaft 252 to pivot the lever 244 clockwise as viewed in FIG. 4 about the pinion shaft 100 to permit a leaf spring 256 to withdraw the pawl 248 substantially out of engagement with the ratchet wheel 240. During approximately the first 10 of forward pivotal movement of the pinion shaft 100 the support lever 244 is pivoted by spring 246 to pivot pawl 248 into engagement with ratchet wheel 240 and if the wheel 82 were at an intermediate count position for example at the one-half count or beyond, to engage a ratchet tooth and index the counter wheel 82 to the next higher full count position. If the wheel 82 were at a lower intermediate count position the pawl 248 will engage the ratchet wheel 240 to rotate the wheel 82 with the remaining cost counter wheels 83-86 (as the pinion shaft 100 is pivoted forwardly) in which case the wheel 82 is in effect indexed to its next lower full count position. i

The cam mechanism 200 comprises a cam plate 210 pivotally mounted on shaft 212 and having a slot for receiving the transfer pinion shaft 100. The cam plate 210 has a central opening contoured to provide an inner cam edge 214 engag'eable by a roller 216 mounted on a collar 218 fixed onto the counter shaft 88. The collar 218'provides an outer cam edge 220 and a stud or follower 222 is mountedon the cam plate 210 for engagement with the outer cam edge 220. The inner and outer cam edges 214, 220 cooperate to pivot the pinion shaft 100 forwardly approximately 54, in the clockwise direction as viewed in FIGS. 5 and 6, from its normal or fully withdrawn angular position shown'in FIG. 5 during the initial 48 of rotation of the shaft 88, and then backwardly 54 to its normal operating position during the remaining 312 of rotation of shaft 88.

After the counter shaft 88 is rotated approximately 4 from its normal operating position shown in FIG. 5 the cam follower 222 is released by the cam edge 220 to permit the pinion shaft 100 to be pivoted by spring 246 forwardly approximately 10 to its position shown in FIG. 6 for operating the ratchet pawl mechanism 242. During the succeeding approximately 44 of rotation of counter shaft 88 the roller 216 engages the inner cam edge 214 to pivot pinion shaft 100 with the counter shaft 88 (and therefore rotate the cost and serial counters 80, as a unit with the counter shaft 88) during which unitary motion the type wheels of the cost and serial counters 80, 110

cooperate with the backup roll to print the cost of the fuel delivery and the ticket serial number. During the remaining 312 of rotation the outer cam edge 220 engages the follower 222 to return the pinion shaft 100 to its fully withdrawn or normal position, and the counter shaft 88 resets the cost counter print wheels to 0." During the last 356 of rotation of the counter shaft 88 i.e., after'the follower 222 has been released to permit the pinion shaft 100 to rotate approximately the shaft 88 rotates approximately 366 (i.e., 6' more than a-full revolution) relative to the pinion shaft 100 and therefore 366 relative to the counter print wheels thereby ensuring that-the print wheels are fully reset to "0" with only 360 ofrotation of the counter shaft 88.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3 a shear mechanism 280 is provided for severing the printed ticket 26 from the paper roll. The shear mechanism 280 comprises a first fixed plate 282 and a second shear plate or guillotine .284 reciprocably mounted for cooperation with the fixed plate 282 for shearing the ticket from the paper roll. The shear plate 284 has an intermediate inclined shearing edge 288, and a pair of laterally spaced tension springs 290 are connected to the lateral ends of the shear plate for actuating the shear plate 284 in one direction for shearing the paper. A latch lever 291 and an actuating lever 292 are pivotally mounted on the cam shafts 168, 169 respectively and have lower ends received within slots in the shear plate 284 for controlling the motion of the shear plate. A tension spring 296 is provided for pivoting the lever 292 in the counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3 for actuating the shear plate 284 to a retracted position shown in part by broken lines in FIG. 3 for which purpose the tension spring 296 is sufficiently strong to overcome the bias of the drive springs 290.

,A control cam 300 is mounted on cam shaft 168 for controlling the pivotal, operation of the drive lever 292. The control cam 300 is contoured so as to release the actuating lever 292 after approximately the first 5 of rotation of cam shaft 168 (or printer operating shaft 24) to retract the shear plate 284 and thereby permit the succeeding ticket to be fed downwardly between the plates 282, 284. The latch lever 291 provides for'holding the shear plate 284 in its fully retracted position and a control cam 304 mounted on shaft 169 provides for maintaining the shear-plate 284 latched in its retracted position until just prior to the completion of the full revolution of the printer operating shaft 24 at which point the shear plate 284 is released to shear the ticket 26 from the paper roll.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the drive coupling 22 between intermediate shaft and printer operating shaft 24 is designed to'permit rotation of the printer operating shaft 24 in the correct angular direction only and to ensure proper angular alignment of the shafts 20, 24. For this purpose the drive coupling member 320 has a pair of diametrically related drive pins or teeth 322 at different radial distances from the axis of the shaft 22 and the gear 160 which functions as the driven coupling member has a pair of diametrically related pockets 328 at the same radial-distances from the axis of the shaft 24 for receiving drive pins 322. Also, the pin receptacles 328 and the drive pins 322 are tapered to provide for rotating the shaft 24 in one angular direction only, in the clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3. v

As will be apparent to persons skilled in the art, various modifications, adaptations and variations of the foregoing specific disclosure can be made without departing from the teachings of the present invention,

We claim:

1. A resettable roll printing counter comprising a counter shaft, a plurality of counter wheels of increasing order rotatable on the counter shaft, each counter wheel comprising a print wheel, a combined locking ring and transfer gear segment and a drive gear, the drive gears of at least all the higher order counter wheels being connected to the print wheels to permit rotation of the print wheels in at least one angular direction relative to the drive gears, the print wheels and shaft having cooperating means for resetting the print wheels by rotation of the shaft in said one angular direction, a transfer pinion shaft parallel to the counter shaft mounted for pivotal movement about the axis of the counter shaft, transfer pinions mounted on the pinion shaft intermediate the counter wheels for engagement with the combined locking ring and transfer gear segments and drive gears of the counter wheels for generating transfers between adjacent lower and higher order counter wheels, a rotary backup roll parallel to the counter shaft cooperable with the print wheels as they are rotated in said one angular direction for producing a printout, and operating means for pivoting the pinion shaft in said one angular direction from a first normal pivotal position thereof to an extended pivotal position for rotating the print wheels together in said one angular direction for producing a printout, for thereafter returning the pinion shaft to its normal pivotal position, and for rotating the counter shaft in said one angular direction for resetting the print wheels after the printout is produced.

2. A printing counter according to claim I wherein the operating means comprises means interconnecting the counter shaft and pinion shaft for pivoting the pinion shaft between its normal and extended positions as the counter shaft is rotated.

3. A printing counter according to claim 2 wherein the interconnecting means comprises cam means mounted on the counter shaft and a pivotal lever for pivoting the pinion shaft and having follower means engageable with said cam means.

4. A printing counter according to claim 2 wherein said cooperating means comprises detent means for resetting the print wheels by rotation of the counter shaft substantially one revolution in said one angular direction from an initial angular position thereof and wherein the interconnecting means is operable by rotation of the counter shaft from its initial angular position to pivot the pinion shaft from its normal pivotal position an angular amount greater than the corresponding angle of rotation of the counter shaft such that the counter shaft rotates through an angle greater than 360 relative to the v pinion shaft as the counter shaft is rotatedin said one angular direction through the remainder of said revolution.

5. A printing counter according to claim 1 further comprising a ratchet pawl mechanism for indexing the lowest order counter wheel relative to the remaining counter wheels to a full count position as the pinion shaft is pivoted in said one angular direction from its normal pivotal position.

6. A printing counter according to claim 5 wherein the ratchet pawl mechanism comprises a ratchet wheel connected to the lowest order counter wheel and a ratchet pawl mounted on the pinion shaft and engageable with the ratchet wheel for indexing the wheel as the pinion shaft is pivoted in said one angular direction from its normal pivotal position.

7. A printing counter according to claim 4 further comprising drive means for rotating the counter shaft substantially 360 in said one angular direction from its initial angular position, said drive means including a rotary drive coupling having an input coupling member with a pair of diametrically related axially extending drive teeth and a driven coupling member having diametrically related tooth abutments engageable by the drive teeth, the drive teeth and tooth abutments being at difi'erent radial distances from the axis of the coupling to ensure proper angular alignment of the drive and driven coupling members. I

8. A serial printing counter comprising a counter shaft, a plurality of counter wheels of increasing order rotatable on the counter shaft, the counter wheels comprising a print wheel, a combined locking ring and transfer gear segment and a drive gear, a transfer pinion shaft parallel to the counter shaft mounted for pivotal movement about the axis of the counter shaft, transfer pinions mounted on the pinion shaft intermediate the counter wheels for engagement with combined locking ring and transfer gear segments and drive gears of the counter wheels for generating transfers between adjacent lower and higher order counter wheels, a rotary backup roll parallel to the counter shaft cooperable with the print wheels as they are rotated in one angular direction for producing a printout, operating means for pivoting the pinion shaft in said one angular direction from a first normal pivotal position thereof to an extended pivotal position for rotating the print wheels together for producing a printout and for returning the pinion shaft to its normal pivotal position, a drive pinion mounted on the pinion shaft for engagement with the drive gear of the lowest order counter wheel for rotating the wheel in said one angular direction with the pinion shaft, an arcuate locking ring engageable with the drive pinion for locking the pinion against rotation as the pinion shaft is pivoted in said one angular direction, and a one-way locking pawl engageable with the drive gear of the lowest order counter wheel for indexing the wheel relative to the remaining counter wheels as the pinion shaft is returned to its normal pivotal position.

* k K k

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2612428 *Jan 7, 1950Sep 30, 1952Veeder Root IncRecorder
US3139027 *Sep 18, 1961Jun 30, 1964Rockwell Mfg CoPrinter mechanism
US3369704 *Sep 7, 1965Feb 20, 1968Veeder Root IncPrinter and register control mechanism
US3446432 *Nov 25, 1966May 27, 1969Veeder Industries IncMeter duplicator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3904009 *Apr 12, 1974Sep 9, 1975Veeder Industries IncFluid dispensing system having token dispenser
US4816650 *Jun 22, 1987Mar 28, 1989Agis AvtjoglouDisplay of information at service stations
US5407115 *Jan 13, 1993Apr 18, 1995Gilbarco, Inc.Printed receipt severing
US6318917Nov 20, 1998Nov 20, 2001Dresser, Inc.Gasoline dispensing system and method using a single printer
WO1999026878A2 *Nov 20, 1998Jun 3, 1999Dresser IndGasoline dispensing system and method using a single printer
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/94.00R, 222/30, 346/43
International ClassificationB67D7/22, B67D7/24
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/22, B67D7/24
European ClassificationB67D7/24, B67D7/22