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Publication numberUS3669190 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1972
Filing dateDec 21, 1970
Priority dateDec 21, 1970
Publication numberUS 3669190 A, US 3669190A, US-A-3669190, US3669190 A, US3669190A
InventorsSchwegman Harry E, Sizer Phillip S
Original AssigneeOtis Eng Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Methods of completing a well
US 3669190 A
Abstract
A method of completing a well by installing in the well a flow conductor, performing various operations such as cementing the flow conductor in the well bore, drilling out excess cement from the flow conductor, perforating the casing at desired locations, and the like, installing a liner in the flow conductor of smaller internal diameter than the internal diameter of the flow conductor to provide an internal seal surface and oppositely facing stop shoulders in the flow conductor, setting a packer in the liner, and then installing an inner production flow conductor in the well and securing it to the packer. A setting tool for simultaneously locating a liner and a packer in a flow conductor, expanding the liner into sealing and anchored engagement in the flow conductor and then setting the packer in the liner.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,669,190 Sizer et a1. 14 1 June 13, 1972 [54] METHODS OF COMPLETING A WELL 3,203,483 8/1965 Vincent ..l66/207 [72] Inventors: Phillip S. Sizer, Dallas; Harry E. Schweg- 3,455,382 7/1969 Chenoweth ..l66/l 1s [73] Assignee: Otis Engineering Corporation, Dallas, Tex.

Primary Examiner-James A. Leppink [22] Flled: 1970 Attorney-J5. Hastings Ackley [21] App1.No.. 99,889 A STRAC Rem! Applicmon A method of completing a well by installing in the well a flow [60] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 803,507, Dec. 24, conductor. Performing various operationswsh as cementing 9 3. abandoned, which is a division f s the flow conductor in the well bore, drilling out excess cement 605.870, Dec. 29, 1966, Pat. No. 3,498,376. from the flow conductor, perforating the casing at desired 10 cations, and the like, installing a liner in the flow conductor of 521 u.s.c1. ..l66/3l5,l66/ll5, 166/207 smaller internal diameter than the imemal diam!" of the 511 1111.01. ..E2lb 43/00, 1521b 43/10 nducl0r Pmvide imcma' Seal SW13 and W [58] Field of Search 166/1 15, 207, 315,277 W facing P shwlders flow swing a packer in the liner, and then installing an inner production [56] References Cited flow conductor in the well and securing it to the packer. A setting tool for simultaneously locating a liner and a packer in UNITED STATES PATENTS a flow conductor, expanding the liner into sealing and anchored engagement in the flow conductor and then setting 3,162,245 12/1964 Howard et a1. ..l66/207 Vincent 166/207 Wood ..l66/l15 the packer in the liner.

27 Claim, 26 Drawing Figures lob PATENTEUJUH 13 4912 3,669,190

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INVENTORE PHILLIP S. S'ZER HARRY E-SCHWEGMAN BY g a" M AT TORNEY METHODS OF COMPLETING A WELL This application is a continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 803,507 filed Dec. 24, 1968, now abandoned, and which latter application is a division of application Ser. No. 605,870, filed Dec. 29, 1966, now US. Pat. No. 3,498,376.

This invention relates to a method of completing a well and to well tools usable in completing wells.

An object of the invention is to provide a new and improved method of completing a well by installing a flow conductor, such as a well casing, in the bore of a well, wherein the casing has no internal restrictions to interfere with the movement of fluids in its longitudinal passage and providing a restriction in the casing to provide the well casing at a desired location with an internal seal surface of smaller diameter than the passage of the well casing and oppositely facing stop shoulders, the stop shoulders being engageable by means of a well tool which is installable in the well casing at such restriction.

Another object is to provide a method of completing a well which includes the additional step of installing a well tool in the well casing which has seal means which engages the seal surfaces and latch means engageable with the stop shoulders provided by the restriction to secure the well tool in the flow conductor.

Another object is to provide a method of completing a well wherein the restriction at the predetermined location is provided by moving a longitudinally corrugated liner into the flow conductor and then expanding the liner into anchored and sealing engagement with the well casing, the opposite end surfaces of the liner providing the oppositely facing stop shoulders and its internal surface providing the seal surface.

Still another object is to provide a method of completing a well which includes the step of simultaneously with the movement of the liner into the casing also moving a packer and then setting the packer in the liner after it has been expanded in the well casing.

Another object is to provide a method of completing the well which includes the step of mounting the liner on a setting tool to whose lower end is secured a packer, the setting tool having an expander means between the packer and the liner whereby upward movement of the setting tool while the liner is held against upward movement in the flow conductor will expand the liner into anchored and sealing engagement with the casing and then set the packer in the expanded liner.

Still another object is to provide a new and improved method of locating and securing a liner in a predetermined location in a well casing having sections secured by collars which provide internal annular recesses at known locations in the well casing, which includes moving a well tool assembly including a collar recess locator and the setting tool carrying an unexpanded liner and a packer through the well casing and locating the liner at a predetermined location by means of the recess locator; expanding the liner into anchored and sealing engagement in the well casing by operation of the setting tool, and setting the packer in the expander liner.

A main object of the invention is to provide a new and improved setting tool for positioning a longitudinally corrugated liner in a flow conductor, such as a well casing, which has means for expanding the liner into sealing and anchored engagement with the well casing at a desired location therein.

Another object is to provide a setting tool which has means operative by fluid pressure for holding the liner against upward movement in the flow conductor and an expander movable upwardly relative to the liner, when it is held against upward movement, for expanding the liner into sealing and anchored engagement with the well casing.

Still another object is to provide a setting tool wherein the means for holding the liner includes anchor means movable into engagement with the well casing by fluid pressure applied thereto and a hold down means releasably secured against upward movement relative to the anchor means for holding the liner against upward movement in the well casing while the expander is moved upwardly thereinto.

A further object is to provide a setting tool of the type described wherein the operative fluid pressure may be provided to the setting tool through a flow conductor by means of which the setting tool is movable into the well casing.

A still further object is to provide a setting tool wherein the operative fluid pressure is provided by a gas generating means of the setting tool whose actuation is controllable from the surface of the well.

Another object is to provide a setting tool wherein the setting tool has means for holding the hold down means against upward movement relative to the anchor means until the expander of the setting tool has been moved upwardly a predetermined distance relative to the hold down means.

Another object is to provide a new and improved packer, which is releasably connectable to the lower end of a liner expanding tool which has a bottom stop shoulder engageable with a bottom end surface of an expanded liner and a latch releasably held in retracted position by the setting tool which expands when the setting tool is released from the packer to engage the top end surface of the expanded liner to limit its downward movement relative to the liner.

Still another object is to provide a packer having seal means engageable with the internal surface of the liner and with latch means engageable with another well tool, such as a latch mandrel connectable to the lower end of a string of tubing.

A particular object of the invention is to provide a method of installing in a well conductor a liner sleeve having a reduced diameter to provide a smooth sealing surface in the conductor disposed to be engaged by a sealing element positioned in the flow conductor.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a method of installing in a well flow conductor a liner sleeve member providing a smooth sealing surface in its bore having a diameter smaller than the bore of the flow conductor and providing a pair of opposed stop shoulders on opposite ends of the sealing surface.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved method of locating and securing a liner sleeve in a predetermined location in a well flow conductor to provide a sealing surface of reduced diameter in the bore of the flow conductor having opposed stop and lock shoulders on opposite ends of the sealing surface, and inserting a packer member into the well flow conductor having a sealing assembly thereon engageable with the sealing surface for sealing therewith.

Still another object is to provide a method of the character set forth which includes holding the packer member in place in sealing engagement with the liner sleeve.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the reading of the following description of a device constructed in accordance with the invention, and reference to the accompanying drawings thereof, wherein:

FIGS. 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D are vertical sectional views of a setting tool embodying the invention carrying an expanded liner and a packer connected thereto during the movement of the setting tool through a well casing, FIGS. 18, 1C, and 1D being continuations of FIGS. 1A, 1B, and 1C, respectively;

FIGS. 2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D are vertical sectional views of the setting tool showing'the liner in an expanded and anchored position in the well casing and the packer set in the liner, the elements of the setting tool being shown in the positions assumed thereby during the removal of the setting tool from the well, FIGS. 28, 2C, and 20 being continuations of FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C, respectively;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3 3 of FIG. 1C;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4 4 of FIG. IC;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5 5 of FIG. 213;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6 6 of FIG. 2C;

FIG. 7 is a vertical partly sectional view showing a latch mandrel on the lower end of a production flow conductor extending through the packer and releasably secured thereto;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken on line: 8 8 of FIG. 7;

FIGS. 9A, 9B, 9C, and 9D are vertical partly sectional views of a modified form of the setting tool embodying the invention and showing an expanded liner and packer secured thereto, FIGS. 98, 9C, and 9D being continuations of FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 9C, respectively;

FIG. 10 is a schematic view of a well tool assembly including the setting tool illustrated in FIGS. 9A, 9B, 9C, and 9D, being lowered through a well casing and carrying a liner and packer;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken on line 11 ll of FIG. 9B;

FIG. 12 is a schematic view of a wire line tool assembly, including a setting tool embodying the invention, by means of which the setting tool and the liner and packer carried thereby are movable in the well casing;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary view of a packer tool connectable to a tubing string and having sealing members thereon in sealing engagement with the liner sleeve;

FIG. 14 is a view similar to FIG. 13 showing the packer tool having a stop for positioning the sealing assembly in the liner sleeve and holding the same against downward movement through the sleeve;

FIG. 15 is a view similar to FIG. 14 showing a packer tool having a stop shoulder thereon engageable with the lower end of the liner sleeve only to prevent upward movement of the packer tool through the sleeve;

FIG. 16 is a view similar to FIG. 15 showing the lower stop shoulder of the packer tool released to permit removal of the packer tool from the sleeve; and,

FIG. 17 is a view similar to FIG. 15 showing a packer tool having stop shoulders thereon engageable with the opposite ends of the liner sleeve for positively holding the packer tool in place in the liner sleeve.

Referring now particularly to FIGS. 1 through 8 of the drawings, the setting tool 20 for expanding and setting a liner 21 in a flow conductor, such as a well casing C, and then setting a packer 22 in the liner includes a mandrel 25 having a top section 26 connectable by a coupling 27 to the lower end of a string of pipe P by means of which the setting tool is movable into the well casing and through which fluid under pressure may be introduced into the top longitudinal passage 28 of the mandrel. The mandrel has a middle port section 29 whose upper end is threaded, as at 30, in the lower end portion of the top section and a bottom section 31 whose reduced top end portion 32 is threaded in the lower end of the middle section. The tubular body 33 of the packer is connected to the bottom mandrel section by a shear sleeve 34 whose upper end is threaded, as at 35, in the dependent annular extension 36 of the bottom mandrel section and whose lower end is threaded in the enlarged portion 37 of the bore of the packer body. The shear sleeve has a weakened middle section which will fail when a predetermined upward pull is exerted on the setting tool mandrel while the packer body is held against upward movement.

The setting tool also includes a latch sleeve 38 threaded on the dependent extension 36 of the bottom mandrel section and telescoped over the upper end of the packer body for holding a splitlock ring 40 of the packer in its inner retracted inoperative position, as will be described in greater detail below.

A liner expander 44 is threaded on the lower end portion of the middle mandrel section. The expander has an upper annular reduced top end portion 45 over which telescopes the lower end portion of the longitudinally corrugated liner 21, an outwardly and downwardly inclined or beveled annular top expander surface 46 on which rest the bottom edges of the inner corrugations 21a of the liner, a middle expander surface or shoulder 48 inclined at a smaller angle from the vertical than the top expander shoulder, and a plurality of dependent annular collet fingers 50 whose lower ends are provided with external bosses 52 whose downwardly and outwardly inclined top shoulders provide a bottom expander surface 54. The diameter of the top expander surface 46 is somewhat less than the internal diameter of the unexpanded liner at its outer corrugations 21!) so that upon upward movement of the expander relative to the liner, first the top expander surface and then sequentially the middle and bottom expander surfaces engage the liner and progressively and sequentially expand the liner into cylindrical form and into anchored position in the casing. The outward force exerted on the liner and the casing by the collet bosses as they move upwardly through the liner is determined by the force with which the collet fingers resist inward flexing of their lower ends, and the collet bosses in passing through the liner smooth the internal surface thereof. The exterior of the liner may be coated with a sealing and gripping substance which further tends to anchor the expander liner in the casing and also insures a good fluid tight seal therebetween.

During the expansion of the liner it is held against upward movement in the casing by a hold down sleeve 60 of the setting tool releasably secured in the upper position relative to the mandrel illustrated in FIGS. 18 and IC of the drawings by a shear pin 61 which extends through suitable aligned apertures in the lower end portion of the sleeve and the mandrel. The sleeve has an external flange 62 at its lower end which provides an annular downwardly facing shoulder 63 which engages the top end or edge surface of the liner.

To facilitate the assembly of the setting tool, the hold down sleeve may be formed of several sections threaded to one another. As illustrated, the hold down sleeve may include a bottom section 66 whose top end portion is threaded in the bottom end of a middle section 67, and a top section 68 threaded on the top end of the middle section. The hold down sleeve is telescoped inwardly into a cylinder 70 and the lower end of the middle sleeve section has an external flange 71 which is disposed in he bottom section 72 of the cylinder between the bottom internal flange 74 of the bottom cylinder section and an internal annular flange 75 of the middle cylinder section 76, threadedly connected to the top end of the bottom section. The sleeve flange 71 is provided with external annular recesses in which are disposed O-rings 78 which seal between the flange and the internal surface of the middle cylinder section and similarly the cylinder flange 75 has internal recesses in which O-rings 79 are disposed which seal between the middle sleeve and the cylinder sections. The bottom flange 74 of the cylinder also has O rings 80 disposed in internal recesses of the flange which seal between the bottom sleeve and cylinder sections.

The top sleeve section 68 is disposed in the middle cylinder section 76 between its internal flange 75 and the bottom end of the top cylinder section 82 whose reduced lower end portion 83 is threaded in the upper end of the middle cylinder section. The top sleeve section has an external flange 84 provided with O-rings 85 which seal between the sleeve and cylinder top sections.

The hold down sleeve and its external flanges together with the cylinder provide annular chamgers 86, 87, 88 and 89. The pressure from the exterior of the cylinder is communicated to the chambers 87 and 88 through the ports 91 and 92, respectively, in the bottom and middle cylinder sections, respectively. Pressure from the exterior of the cylinder in the chamber 87 acting on the upwardly facing area of the sleeve between the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 78 with the bottom cylinder section and the line of sealing engagement of the O-ring 79 with the middle sleeve section exerts a force on the sleeve tending to move it downwardly in the cylinder and such pressure in the chamber 88 acting on the downwardly facing area of the sleeve between the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 85 with the middle cylinder section and the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 79 with the middle sleeve section exerts a force on the sleeve tending to move it upwardly. The pressure from the exterior also acting on the downwardly facing surfaces of the sleeve between the line of sealing engagement of the O-ring 96 with the mandrel and the line of sealing engagement of the O-ring 80 with the sleeve exerts an upward force on the sleeve.

The areas of the upwardly and downwardly facing surfaces of the sleeve exposed to the pressure exteriorly may be made equal so that the upward and downward forces exerted on the sleeve by the exterior pressure are equal or preferably so that the areas of the upwardly facing surfaces is greater than that of the downwardly facing surfaces and an effective downward force is exerted by the exterior pressure on the sleeve.

The bottom, middle, and top sleeve sections have internal annular flanges 93, 94 and 95, respectively, in whose internal annular recesses are disposed O-rings 96, 97 and 98, respectively, which seal between the mandrel'and the hold down sleeve. The O-rings 96 and 97 are disposed above and below, respectively, lateral ports of the sleeve which provide communication between the lower outer chamber 86 and the exterior of the sleeve. When the sleeve is in its initial position illustrated in FIG. l-B the outer chamber 86 is closed since the mandrel between the locations of the O-rings 96 and 97 does not have any ports.

The O-rings 97 and 98, when the sleeve is in the position il- Iustrated in FIG. 1, are disposed above and below the ports 102 of the mandrel which open to its bottom longitudinal passage 103. The mandrel has ports 104 which, when the sleeve is in the position illustrated in FIG. 1B provide commu nication between the top passage of the mandrel and the outer chamber 89. The mandrel also has bottom ports 105 which, when the sleeve is in the position illustrated in FIG. 1B, are below the G-ring 96 of the sleeve. The bottom ports 105 communicate with the bottom longitudinal passage of the mandrel which is in communication with the exterior of the setting tool at the lower end of the bottom passage through aligned ports 106 and 107 in the middle mandrel section and the expander, respectively.

Fluid pressure introduced into the string of pipe P at the sur' face is communicated through the top mandrel passage 28 and its ports 104 to the top outer chamber 89 and this pressure will exert a downward force on the hold down sleeve over the upwardly facing areas of the top sleeve section 68 between the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 85 with the top cylinder section and the line of sealing engagement of the 0- rings 98 with the mandrel.

The top cylinder section 82 has an internal annular flange 110 in whose internal annular recesses are disposed O-rings III which seal between the top cylinder section and the mandrel between the ports 104 of the middle mandrel section and its top ports 112 which, when the mandrel and the cylinder are in the positions illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 1B, open below the bottom enlarged end portion 114 of the top mandrel section into an annular chamber 115 provided by the mandrel and the top cylinder section. The top mandrel section has O-rings 118 disposed in external annular recesses thereof which seal between the top mandrel and cylinder sections.

The top cylinder section with a plurality of outwardly opening recesses 120 in which are slidably mounted dogs or buttons 121 whose external surfaces are provided with downwardly facing teeth or serrations 122. The dogs are provided with external annular recesses in which are disposed 0- rings 124 which seal between the anchor body and the dogs. The top cylinder section has ports 125 which communicate with the chamber 115 and the dog recesses 120 so that when the pressure within the chamber 115 is increased the force thereof exerted on the inner surfaces of the dogs will move the dogs radially outwardly to engage the well casing and prevent downward movement of the cylinder therein.

A closure ring 130 is threaded in the upper end of the top cylinder section and has a pair of internal annular recesses in which O-rings 131 are disposed to seal between the closure ring and the top mandrel section. An annular closed chamber 133 is thus formed by the mandrel, the cylinder and its closure ring in which air is trapped. The air compresses upon any upward movement of the mandrel relative to the cylinder sleeve and thus yields to permit such relative movement between the mandrel and the cylinder.

If desired, a shear pin 135 may be provided which extends through a suitable aperture of the closure ring into an outwardly opening recess 136 of the top mandrel section to releasably hold the cylinder in its upper position on the mandrel illustrated in FIG. IA.

The packer body 33 has an external annular recess I40 defined by top and bottom annular shoulders 141 and 142 which extend perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the body and by a lower cylindrical surface 143 which extends upwardly from bottom shoulder, an expander surface 144 which extends upwardly and outwardly from the lower surface, and a cylindrical lock surface 145 which extends from the expander surface to the top shoulder. The shoulders limit movement of the packer body relative to the lock ring 40. The expander surface serves to expand the lock ring upon downward movement of the packer body relative to the lock ring if the lock ring is not in fully expanded position, and the lock surface locks the ring in its expanded position against movement to its retracted position when the packer body is in its lowermost position relative to the lock ring wherein the top shoulder 141 is in engagement with the top surface of the lock ring.

The packer body also has an internal seal surface 147 and a plurality of inwardly extending latch lugs 148 below the seal surface which coact with latch means of other tools which are telescopical in the packer body, as will be explained below, to releasably lock such well tools in the packer body. The packer body has a seal assembly 150 mounted thereon whose upward movement is limited by the external annular flange 151 of the packer body and whose downward movement is limited by the top end surface of a retainer ring 152 threaded on the packer body. The retainer ring has an external annular flange 154 which provides an upwardly facing stop shoulder 155.

In use, the packer is secured to the bottom section 31 of the mandrel by the shear sleeve 34 as illustrated in FIG. 1C and its lock ring 40 is then held in retracted position on the lower portion of its latch lock recess 140 by the latch sleeve 38. The elements of the setting tool and of the packer are then in the positions illustrated in FIGS. IA, 1B, 1C, and 1D. Air under atmospheric pressure is then trapped in the outer chambers 133 and 86 of the setting tool. The buttons or dogs 121 are held in their retracted position since pressure in the casing is greater than that in the passage 28. The hold down sleeve is releasably held in the lower position illustrated in FIG. 1B by the shear pin 61 and the cylinder is held in the position illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 13 by the pressure external of the device being greater than that on the inside thereof and by the shear pin 135.

The setting tool with the packer mounted thereon is then lowered to a location in the well casing at which it is desired to locate the packer by means of the string of pipe P and when it is located at such location, the pressure within the top passage 28 of the mandrel is increased, as by introducing fluid under pressure into the upper end of the string of pipe P. This operative fluid pressure communicated through the ports 112 to the chamber 115 and thus to the dog recesses 120 of the cylinder causes the dogs 121 to move outwardly and engage the well casing. The dog teeth grip the internal surfaces of the casin g to prevent movement of the cylinder in the casing. At this time, the operative fluid pressure in the chamber 115 exerts a downward force over the upwardly facing surfaces of the cylinder between the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 111 with the mandrel and the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings l 18 with the cylinder. The operative fluid pressure from the mandrel top passage 28 is also communicated to the chamber 89 and exerts a downward force on the hold down sleeve 60 and, since the bottom end of the top sleeve section 68 engages the top surface of the internal flange 75 of the middle cylinder section, it also exerts a downward force on the cylinder which however is balanced by the upward force exerted by the operative fluid pressure in the chamber 89 on the downwardly facing surface of the cylinder between the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 111 with the mandrel and the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings with the cylinder. As a result, the force of the operative fluid pressure produces an effective downward force on the cylinder.

Simultaneously, the force of the operative fluid pressure in the chamber acting on the downwardly facing surfaces of the mandrel between the line of sealing engagement of the 0- rings 111 with the mandrel and the line of sealing engagement of the O-rings 118 with the cylinder exerts an effective upward force on the mandrel, the other upwardly facing surfaces of the mandrel, the connector sub, and the pipe P exposed to the operative fluid pressure having a combined total area equal to or only slightly greater than the combined total area of the other downwardly facing surfaces of the mandrel, the connector sub, and the pipe also exposed to the operative fluid pressure. As a result the operative fluid pressure tends to move the mandrel and the pipe upwardly relative to the cylinder.

It will thus be apparent that no upward or downward movement of the cylinder can then take place and the sleeve and the liner are very accurately positioned within the well casing against upward movement whenever operative fluid pressure is introduced into the top mandrel passage 28 and the dogs move outwardly into gripping engagement with the well casmg.

The operative fluid pressure tends to move the mandrel and the pipe upwardly and the pipe may also be pulled upwardly at the surface to move the mandrel and the packer upwardly relative to the cylinder, the hold down sleeve and the liner. The pins 61 and 135 are caused to shear to permit such upward movement of the mandrel relative to the hold down sleeve and the cylinder when a predetermined upward force is exerted on the mandrel. As the mandrel moves upwardly, the expander 44 progressively, from the bottom toward the top, expands the longitudinal corrugations of the liner radially outwardly in the manner described above.

After the mandrel has been moved an upward distance sufficiently great that the expander 44 has moved upwardly through the liner and the liner has been fully expanded and anchored in the well casing so that it is no longer necessary for the hold down sleeve to hold the liner against upward movement in the casing, the mandrel ports 104 move upwardly past the O-rings l1 1 and fluid communication between the top longitudinal passage 28 and the outer chamber 89 is thus terminated. At this time the ports 102 have not been moved upwardly of the O-rings 98 of the top sleeve section so that the pressure trapped in the chamber 89 still exerts a downward force on the hold down sleeve and no fluid flow can take place from the top longitudinal passage 28 to the bottom longitudinal passage through the outer chamber 89. As the ports 102 are thereafter moved above the O-rings 98, communication is established between the outer chamber 89 and the casing through the bottom longitudinal passage 103 of the mandrel and the ports 106 and 107. The downward force with which the hold down sleeve is biased downwardly is thus reduced.

A downward force, however, is still exerted on the hold down sleeve by the well casing pressure since the area of the upwardly facing surfaces of the sleeve within the chambers 89 and 87 is considerably greater than the downwardly facing area of the sleeve within the outer chamber 86 which is still at atmospheric pressure which is of considerably smaller value than the casing pressure. As upward movement of the mandrel is continued, the ports 105 move upwardly past the O-ring 96 thus admitting the casing pressure into the chamber 86 through the lower longitudinal passage 103 and the mandrel ports 105 and the sleeve ports 101. The pressure across the hold down sleeve is thus equalized, all surfaces of the sleeve now being exposed to the casing pressure.

The reduced upper end portion 45 of the expander now enters into the downwardly opening recess 160 of the hold down sleeve and its top end surface 161 engages the downwardly facing annular shoulder 162 of the sheeve so that further upward movement of the mandrel will now cause upward movement of the hold down sleeve and the shoulder 63 of the sleeve is moved out of engagement with the top edge surface of the liner.

After the liner is completely expanded, the expander moves upwardly of the liner, and the sleeve has been released for upward movement with the mandrel, the ports 102 move above the O-rings 111 and the pressure in the chamber 115 is released. The dogs are thus freed to move inwardly, and, since their teeth face downwardly, will now not prevent upward movement of the cylinder. The cylinder is then moved upwardly with the mandrel and the sleeve when the stop shoulder 165 of the sleeve engages the bottom end surface 166 of the cylinder. If desired, the pressure in the passage 28 may be released immediately prior to the movement of the ports 102 past the O-ring 111 in order that the casing pressure move the dogs to their rectracted positions.

Thereafter the packer moves upwardly through the now expanded liner which provides a smooth internal seal surface until its upward movement is arrested due to the engagement of the stop shoulder 155 of the packer retainer ring 152 with the bottom edge surface 168 of the liner. A further upward force exerted by means of the string of pipe P on the mandrel and, therefore, on the shear sleeve 34 causes the shear sleeve to fail and as the latch sleeve 38 moves upwardly relative to the packer body and out of engagement with the lock ring 40, the lock ring, which is then positioned above the top end shoulder 169 of the liner, expands outwardly until it engages the well casing. The packer will now tend to remain in the upper position illustrated in FIG. 2C due to the frictional engagement of its packing or seal means 150 with the internal surfaces of the liner which it sealingly engages. Should any downward force be exerted on the packer body tending to cause it to move downwardly, the engagement of the top shoulder 141 of the packer body with the top surface of the lock ring and the engagement of the lock ring with the top end surface 169 of the liner will limit its downward movement so that the packer will remain latched to the liner.

If it is then desired to connect a well tool to the packer, such as a string of tubing T through which well fluids may be produced to the surface, the lower end of the tubing is provided with a latch mandrel 170 whose upper reduced end portion is threaded in a downwardly opening recess or enlargement, as at 171, ofa connector sub 172 in whose upper end is threaded the reduced lower end portion 173 of the bottom end of the string of tubing. A sea] assembly 175 is mounted on the upper portion of the latch mandrel, its downward movement on the latch mandrel being limited by the upwardly facing annular shoulder 176 of the latch mandrel and its upward movement being limited by the downwardly facing annular end shoulder or surface 177 of the connector sub 172. The latch mandrel has a pair of opposed inverted J -slots 180 which have downwardly opening leg portions 181, connector portions 182, and latch portions 183. As the latch mandrel is moved into the packer body, the downwardly opening leg portions 181 of its .I-slots receive the latch lugs 148 of the packer body. The latch mandrel is then rotated in a counterclockwise manner, FIGS. 8 and 9, to move the latch portions 183 of the J-slots in alignment with the lugs, whereupon upward movement of the string of tubing will cause the lugs to be received in the latch portions of the J-slots and upward movement of the latch mandrel relative to the packer body will then be limited by the engagement of the latch lugs with the upwardly facing shoulders 184 of the latch mandrel defining the lower ends of the latch portions of the J-slots.

The mandrel has a reduced dependent extension 185 whose lower end may be beveled, as at 186, to provide a cam surface which facilitates or guides its downward movement into the packer body.

The tubing may be easily released for removal from the well thereafter by merely lowering the string of tubing to cause the latch lugs to be in the upper connector portions of the J-slots, rotating the tubing in a clockwise direction to cause the lugs to be placed in alignment with the downwardly opening leg portions 181 of the Jslots, and then moving the tubing upwardly.

It will now be apparent that the setting tool 20 may be used to expand a liner in a flow conductor such as a well casing and thereafter set a packer in such liner, both the liner and the packer being movable into such flow conductor simultaneously by means of the setting tool and that the sequential expansion of the liner and the setting of the packer in the expander liner is accomplished by a simple upward movement imparted to the means by which the setting tool is lowered into the well casing after the pressure in the pipe at the surface has been increased to move the dogs 121 of the cylinder outwardly into gripping engagement with the well casing to hold the cylinder anchored in the casing to accurately position and hold the liner against upward movement in the casing.

It will further be seen that cylinder constitutes an anchor means and that the cylinder, the mandrel, and the hold down sleeve have cooperable fluid pressure operable means for holding the hold down sleeve against upward movement, after the cylinder has been anchored to the casing, until the mandrel has moved a predetermined upward distance relative to the sleeve and the cylinder and the expander has expanded the lower portion of the liner into anchored engagement with the well casing.

It will further be seen that the upper portions of the liner are expanded after the hold down sleeve has been released for upward movement so that the hold down sleeve does not frictionally engage the top end of the liner and impede the expan sion of the top portion of the liner.

Referring now particularly to FIGS. 9 through 11 of the drawings, the setting tool 200 embodying the invention includes a mandrel 201 having a top connector section 203 which may be connected by a suitable coupling 204 to the lower end of another well tool, such as a casing collar recess locator 205, of an assembly of wireline tools. The assembly of tools is movable through a flow conductor, such as the well casing C, by the usual flexible member or cable 207 which has a plurality of pairs of electric conductors 210 and 211 extending therethrough through one pair of which the electric signals from the collar recess locator, which may be of the well known neutron detector type, may be transmitted to a suitable indicator or recorder device 212 and through another pair of which an electric current may be transmitted to an igniter device 214 of the setting tool to cause ignition of a powder charge 215 located in a chamber 217 of the mandrel. The igniter and power charge may be of the type illustrated in the US. Letters Pat. to Baker, No. 2,640,546. The top section 203 of the mandrel has a reduced portion 219 threaded in the upper end of a chamber section 220 of the mandrel and is provided with an O-ring 220 for sealing therebetween. The top mandrel section has a downwardly opening bore 221 into which the explosive charge extends and in whose upper reduced end portion 222 is rigidly secured the igniter device 214.

The powder charge 215 is supported in its upper position in the chamber 217 illustrated in FIG. 9A by a piston 224 disposed in the chamber mandrel section 220. The piston has a rod 226 which extends downwardly from the chamber through the longitudinal passage 228 of a mandrel section 229 whose enlarged upper end portion 230 is threaded in the lower end of the chamber mandrel section. An O-ring 231 disposed in an external annular recess of the mandrel section seals between it and the chamber section and an O-ring 232 disposed in an internal recess of the mandrel section 230 seals between it and the piston rod 226. The piston rod extends downwardly into a longitudinal slot 235 of the mandrel section 229 and is rigidly secured to a tubular extension 237 disposed about the mandrel by a pin 238 which extends through aligned apertures in the extension and the piston rod.

The mandrel also includes a tubular section 240 ,whose upper reduced end portion 241 is threaded in a downwardly opening bore of the section 229 and a bottom section a whose upper reduced threaded end portion 32a is threaded in the lower end of the tubular mandrel portion 240. An expander 44a is threaded on the bottom end of the tubular mandrel section and a packer 22a is secured to the bottom man drel section.

The bottom mandrel section 300, the expander 44a, and the packer 22a being identical to the expander 44, the bottom section 30 and packer 22 of the setting tool 20, their elements have been so provided with the same reference numerals, to which the subscript a" has been added, as the corresponding elements of the bottom mandrel section 30, the expander 44 and the packer 22.

A hold down sleeve 245 is releasably secured to the mandrel by a shear pin 246, or, alternatively, it may be supported against downward movement on the mandrel by the liner 21a whose inner corrugations engage and rest upon the top expander surface 46a. The mandrel at its upper end portion has longitudinal upwardly opening slots 248 which define a plurality of resilient collet fingers 249 provided adjacent their upper ends with external bosses 250 which are received in an internal annular recess 251 of a cylinder 254. The engagement of the top shoulders 252 of the external bosses with the annular downwardly and outwardly inclined annular shoulder 255 defining the top end of the annular recess limits downward movement of the cylinder relative to the hold down sleeve and the mandrel. The collet fingers also have inner bosses 258 which engage the mandrel lock surface 259 above the external annular groove 260 of the tubular mandrel section 240 and are receivable therein when the mandrel is moved upwardly a predetermined distance relative to the sleeve. The top ends of the collect fingers are engageable with the downwardly facing internal annular shoulder 263 of the cylinder to limit upward movement of the hold down sleeve relative to the cylinder.

The cylinder is provided with a plurality of external recesses 266 in which dogs or buttons 267 are movably disposed. The dogs have external annular recesses in which O-rings 268 are disposed which seal between the dogs and the cylinder. The dogs have downwardly facing teeth or serrations 269. The cylinder has ports 271 which provide communication between the recesses 266 and an annular chamber 272 which is closed at its lower end by the O-rings 274 disposed in internal annular recesses of the cylinder which seal between the cylinder and the mandrel. The upper end of the chamber 272 is closed by a piston sleeve275 which extends into the enlarged upper portion of the bore of the cylinder and is provided with O-rings 276 disposed in an external annular recess thereof which seal between the piston sleeve and the cylinder and the O-rings 277 disposed in internal annular recesses thereof which seal between the piston sleeve and the mandrel. The piston sleeve is held in the upper position illustrated in FIG. 913 by a liquid, such as oil, trapped in the closed chamber 272. The area of the piston sleeve between the lines of sealing engagement of its 0- rings 276 and 277 with the cylinder and the mandrel is equal to or less than the combined areas of the dogs within the lines of the sealing engagementof their O-rings 268 wit the cylinder in order that the hydrostatic pressure in the casing does not move the piston sleeve downwardly and thus cause premature outward movement of the dogs. It will be apparent that when the piston sleeve 275 is moved downwardly, the pressure of the liquid trapped in the closed chamber 272 is applied to the inner surfaces of the dogs 267 and causes the dogs to move outwardly to engage the internal surfaces of a flow conductor, such as a well casing C, to anchor the cylinder against .downward movement in the well casing.

The liquid in the chamber is allowed to escape from the chamber to the longitudinal passage 280 of the mandrel through ports 281 thereof when the mandrel is moved a predetermined distance upwardly relative to the cylinder.

In use, the setting tool 200 with its elements in the position illustrated in FIG. 10 and with the liner 21a and packer 220 secured thereto, is connected by the coupling collar 204 to the lower end of a collar recess detector 205 which, in turn, is connected by a usual connector head 284 to the cable 207. The collar log of the well casing is of course available to the operator who, as he lowers the string of tools through the well casing, by means of the collar recess detector and the indicator device 212 which produces a signal each time the locator moves past a collar recess can determine very precisely and accurately the location ofthe liner 21a in the casing. When the liner is located at a desired location in the well casing, an electric current is transmitted through a pair of electric conductors to the igniter device 214 which ignites the powder charge215. The powder when it ignites generates a large volume of gas. The expanding gas thus generated in the chamber tends to move the piston 224 downwardly relative to the mandrel and the mandrel upwardly.

As the piston moves downwardly, it moves its rod extension 237 downwardly which, in turn, moves the piston sleeve 275 downwardly relative to the cylinder which is now held against downward movement relative to the hold down sleeve 245 by the collet finger bosses 250. The hold down sleeve, in turn, is held against downward movement relative to the mandrel by the liner 21a and the shear pin 246. As the piston sleeve 275 moves downwardly, the liquid in the chamber 272 is placed under pressure thereby and the force of this liquid pressure moves the digs outwardly into gripping engagement with the well casing.

Once the cylinder is anchored in the well casing, the force of the expanding gas moves the mandrel upwardly relative to the cylinder, the pin 246 shearing when a predetermined upward force is exerted on the mandrel, while the hold down sleeve is held against upward movement due to the engagement of the top shoulders of the external bosses 250 of its collet fingers 249 with the internal shoulder 255 of the cylinder. As the mandrel moves upwardly relative to the liner, the liner is expanded into sealing and anchoring engagement with the well casing. After the expander 44a has moved through the liner so that the liner is expanded and anchored in the well casing against upward movement, and prior to the engagement of the top shoulder 1610 of the expander with the shoulder 255 of the hold down sleeve, the mandrel recess 260 moves into alignment with the internal collet finger bosses 258 so that the hold down sleeve is freed for upward movement relative to the cylinder, the collet fingers being moved resiliently inwardly due to the camming action between the outwardly and downwardly inclined cam shoulders 252 of the external bosses 250 with the shoulder 255 defining the top end of the latch recess 25]. As the upward movement of the mandrel continues, and prior to the engagement of the top end surfaces of the collet fingers with the downwardly facing shoulder 263 of the cylinder, the port 281 of the mandrel moves upwardly of the O-rings 274 so that the liquid pressure within the chamber 272 is released and the pressure across the buttons or dogs is equalized and they are not longer biased outwardly with great force. As a result, since the dog teeth face downwardly, the cylinder moves upwardly with the mandrel and the piston sleeve when the top ends of the collet fingers engage the shoulder 263 of the cylinder. The upward movement of the mandrel may now be continued by pulling upwardly on the cable 207 at the surface. As the upward movement of the setting tool is continued, the packer 22a is moved upwardly through the expanded liner until its stop shoulder 155a engages the bottom edge of the liner whereupon an upward force exerted by means of the cable on the mandrel causes the shear sleeve 34a to fail and the packer means 150a is left positioned in the liner with its seal or packing means 150a sealing between the packer body and the liner. The latch sleeve 38a, of course, moves upwardly and out of engagement with the lock ring 40a so that the lock ring 40a expands and thereafter limits downward movement of the packer relative to the liner. A string of tubing may then be releasably secured to the packer by means ofa latch mandrel, such as the one illustrated in FIG. 8.

If desired, as illustrated in FIG. 12, the operative fluid pressure for the setting tool 20 may also be provided by any suitable gas generator device or assembly 300 connected to the top end of its top mandrel section 26 by means of the connector sub 27. The gas generator assembly 300 includes a tubular member 302 having an internal chamber 303 closed at its top end and whose lower tubular reduced end portion 305 is threaded in the upper end portion of the connector sub 27 so that the pressure of the gas generated by the ignition of the powder charge 306 in the chamber will be transmitted into the top passage 28 of the mandrel 25. An insulated pair of electric conductors 211 of a cable 207 extend into the chamber through a suitable sealed aperture to operate a suitable means 309 for igniting the powder charge. When the setting tool 20 is provided with such gas generating assembly it may be lowered and moved through a well casing by means of the flexible cable 207 and be connected in a string of wireline tools which may also include a casing collar recess locator such as the locator 205 in the same manner as the setting tool 200. The setting tool is operated by providing an electric current to the igniting device 309 through a pair of insulated conductors 211 of the cable 207 when by use of the collar recess locator 205 and an indicator device such as the device 212 it is determined that the liner is at the desired location in the well casing. When the powder charge 306 is ignited the generated gas provides the operative fluid pressure to the top longitudinal passage 28 and the expander will then be moved upwardly into the liner carried by the tool 20, the dogs of the cylinder 70 will be moved to their outer expanded positions locking the cylinder to the well casing, the mandrel 25 will be moved upwardly to cause the expander to expand the liner and thereafter the hold down sleeve will be released for upward movement as described above in connection with the operation of the setting tool 20, as when it is lowered into the well casing by means of a pipe P and the operative fluid pressure is transmitted through the pipe P into the top longitudinal passage. When the ports 102 of the mandrel move above the O-rings 111, the mandrel is moved to the position illustrated in FIG. 2B relative to the cylinder, the operative fluid pressure in the chamber and the passage and therefore the chamber 313 is released to the bottom longitudinal passage 103 of the mandrel and the pressure across the dogs 121 is equalized. Since the dogs have downwardly facing teeth, they will not resist upward movement of the mandrel through the well casing and the setting tool may be moved upwardly in the well casing to set the packer in the expanded liner and removed from the well.

It will be apparent that, if desired, the setting tool 200 may be operated by fluid pressure delivered from the surface to the chamber 217 above the piston 225 by means of a string of pipe instead of by gas produced by a gas generating means carried off the tool. In this case, the chamber section 220 is connected directly to the lower end of the string of pipe so that fluid pressure from the pipe is communicated to the chamber 217 above the piston.

It is further believed readily apparent that the liner 421 may be set in the casing C by means of the setting tool and expander 20 in the manner previously described, without having the packer attached to the lower end of the setting tool for anchoring in sealing position in the expander liner when the setting tool is disconnected from the packer.

Instead, as shown in FIGS. 13 through 17, it is believed readily apparent that the liner sleeve 421 may be disposed in expanded position in the casing C and the setting tool and expander removed from within the casing leaving the liner in place. Thereafter, a string of well tubing T having a packer or sea] assembly 400 connected therein by threads, as shown in FIG. 13, may be lowered into the well casing and the packing assembly 400 disposed within the bore of the liner sleeve with the sealing elements or rings 402 mounted on the mandrel 401 of the packing assembly positioned in sealing engagement with the bore wall of the liner sleeve. The tubing may move slightly longitudinally within the bore of the sleeve, if desired, to accommodate changes in length of the tubing string, while the smooth interior wall surface 422 of the liner sleeve, being smaller than the bore wall of the casing C will receive the sealing elements 402 in sealing engagement after the sea] assembly has been moved downwardly in the well casing to position the sealing elements thereon within the liner sleeve. This liner provides an improved sealing surface or reduced diameter within the bore of the casing which may be engaged by the sealing elements 402 of the packer assembly 400 without damaging the sealing elements during their lowering through the casing string.

If desired, as shown in FIG. 14, a packer 440 having a mandrel 441 with sealing elements or rings 442 thereon identical to those of the form first described may be lowered into the well. The mandrel 441 is provided at its upper end with an external annular flange 443 which is of a diameter greater than the bore 422 through the liner sleeve, so that the downwardly facing shoulder 444 on the flange will engage the upwardly facing stop shoulder 424 at the upper end of the liner sleeve 421. Thus, the tubing may be supported on the shoulder 424 of the liner sleeve with the packing rings 442 positively positioned in registry in the bore of the liner for sealing engagement with the bore wall 422 of the liner sleeve.

It is also believed readily apparent that, if desired, as shown in F108. 15 and 16, a packer assembly 500 having a mandrel 501 provided with sealing rings 502 on its exterior for engaging and sealing against the bore wall of the liner sleeve 521 may be lowered into the casing C into sealing engagement with the liner sleeve. The mandrel 501 is provided with a normally expanded split locking ring 531 which is slidable on an external annular recess or reduced portion 532 is formed on the exterior of the mandrel below an external annular flange 537 on the mandrel below the packing rings, which limits upward movement of the locking ring on the mandrel. The reduced portion or annular recess 532 accommodates the split locking ring 531 to permit the same to be cammed inwardly to pass through the bore of the liner sleeve 521 to a position below the sleeve. Since the split ring is of the type that is normally biased outwardly to expanded position, being of a normal diameter larger than the bore of the liner sleeve 521, when the locking ring moves below the liner sleeve the ring will expand and be disposed to engage the downwardly facing stop shoulder or lock shoulder 523 at the lower end of the liner sleeve 521 to be moved downwardly upon an enlarged external annular locking surface 533 formed on the mandrel below the reduced section or recess 532 on the mandrel.

A supporting ring sleeve 534 is secured to the mandrel by shear pins 535 and held in place thereon with its upper end engaging the downwardly facing shoulder 536 at the lower end of the expander surface 533, whereby the upper end of the supporting ring 534 engages the lower end of the locking split locking ring 531, as shown in FIG. 15, to support the same in expanded locking position. The upper beveled edge 531a of the split locking ring will thus engage the downwardly facing lock shoulder 523 of the liner sleeve, to prevent upward movement ofthe packer assembly in the liner.

It is readily apparent that, when desired, the packer may be retrieved from the well casing C by an upward pull, shearing the pin 535, as shown in FIG. 16, to permit the sleeve 534 to move downwardly and the split ring 531 to likewise be moved downwardly below the external annular expander surface 533, until the lower end of the sleeve 534 engages and is supported on the upwardly facing shoulder 506 at the upper end of the coupling sub 505 on the lower end of the packer mandrel 501, as shown in H0. 16.

The cam surface 53lb at the upper edge of the split ring will now engage the lower shoulder 523 of the liner sleeve as the packer assembly is lifted upwardly and cam the locking ring inwardly to permit it to pass through the liner sleeve and the packer assembly to be removed from the well casing.

A further slight variation of the packer assembly is shown in H0. 17, wherein the packer assembly 600 is provided with a mandrel 601 substantially identical in all respects in its lower portion to the mandrel 501 of the form just described and shown in FIGS. 15 and 16. However, an external annular stop shoulder or flange 643 is formed at the upper end of the man drel 601, and this flange or stop shoulder is adapted to engage the upwardly facing stop shoulder 624 at the upper end of the liner sleeve 62] in the same manner as the flange or stop shoulder 443 of the form of FIG. 14. The expansible split locking ring 631 will engage the downwardly facing lock shoulder 623 of the liner sleeve and so positively lock the packer assembly against upward movement in the base of the liner while the flange 643 prevents downward movement. Thus, the packer assembly is locked in place in the base of the liner sleeve with the seal rings 602 in sealing engagement with the smooth inner sealing surface 622 of the bore wall of the liner sleeve.

This packer assembly may be removed from the casing in the same manner as the form of FIGS. 15 and 16 by an upward pull shearing the pins 635 to permit the supporting sleeve 634 and locking ring 631 to move downwardly on the mandrel below the expander surface 633 and the locking ring to be cammed inwardly below the expander surface 633 by the camming engagement of the beveled upper edges 63lb on the locking ring with the lower end 623 of the liner sleeve, whereby the locking ring may pass upwardly through the mandrel.

It will be seen, therefore, that the liner sleeve may be utilized to provide a sealing surface for a packing assembly supported on a tubing string to effect a more satisfactory seal between the tubing and the casing. The packing assembly may have an external diameter smaller than the bore of the casing and yet be of a diameter which will tightly engage and seal against the smooth bore wall of the liner sleeve. Also, it will be readily apparent that the method of installing a liner sleeve in the wall casing to provide a smooth sealing surface in the bore of the casing having a diameter smaller than the bore of the casing and providing a pair of opposed stop shoulders on opposite ends of the sealing surface permits use of the liner to position packing assemblies in the well casing in effective sealing engagement therewith after having been moved through the length of the casing to position them in the liner sleeve. Also, there has been set forth a method of locating a liner sleeve in a well casing, then locating a packer assembly on a well tubing string in the liner sleeve in sealing engagement therewith; and, further, holding the packer assembly against downward movement or against upward movement, or against both downward and upward movements, with respect to the liner sleeve, and wherein the packing assembly is removable from sealing engagement the liner sleeve when desired.

it will now be seen that several forms of a new and improved setting tool for expanding a liner into sealing and anchored engagement in a well casing have been illustrated and described and that the expanded liner provides a seal surface of smaller diameter than the well casing and top and bottom stop surfaces engageable by a stop means of a packer for securing the packer against displacement from the liner after it is installed by means of the setting tool in the expanded liner.

it will further be seen that if several liners and packers are to be set in the casing at vertically spaced locations therein, the lowermost liner and packer are installed first, then the next upper packer and liner, and so on. As a result, the seal means of the packers are not worn due to engagement with the restrictors in the casing above the location at which they are to be mounted.

it will further be seen that the well casing at the time of its installation in a well bore does not have to have any landing nipples of restricted internal diameter connected therein in and to which other well tools such as packers may thereafter be installed or releasably secured, and that, since the well casing has no such restrictions, various tools and fluids may be moved through the casing without passing restrictions in the casing which would impede their movement or cause undue wear to the components of such tools.

It will further be seen that due to factors beyond the control of the operator, such as the elongation of the well casing due to tension as a long length thereof is installed in the well, changes in temperature and variations in the lengths of the sections of the well casing or the degree to which their threaded end portions extend into coupling collars which connect adjacent casing sections, the locations of the landing nipples cannot be precisely predetermined at the time of the making up of the well casing so that, when the casing is installed in the well bore, the landing nipples will be at desired locations in the well. By use of suitable surface equipment, such as a collar recess detector and a cable length measuring device, the liners may be located very precisely at desired locations in the well casing.

It will further be seen that the setting tools embodying the invention may be movable downwardly into a casing by means of a string of pipe through which an operative fluid pressure may be introduced to operate the setting tools or, if desired,

the setting tools may be operable by fluid pressure generated by gas generating means ofsetting tool.

it will further be seen that a new and improved method of completing a well has been described and illustrated which includes the steps of installing in the well bore a flow conductor, such as a well casing, performing various operations on the well by means of the unrestricted passage of the flow conductor, and then providing a restriction in the flow conductor of smaller internal diameter than the internal diameter of the flow conductor to provide an internal seal surface and oppositely facing stop shoulders in order that a well tool may be secured in sealed relation in the flow conductor at such restriction.

It will further be seen that the restriction may be provided by locating a liner in the flow conductor at a desired position, expanding the liner into sealing and anchored position in the flow conductor, and thereafter securing a packer in such expanded liner.

It will further be seen that the method may include simultaneously locating the liner and a packer in a flow conductor, expanding the liner into sealing and anchored engagement in the flow conductor, and then moving the packer into the liner, and that preferably the expansion of the liner and the setting of the packer is accomplished by moving an expander upwardly through the liner and then moving the packer upwardly into he liner so that the setting tool and expander may thereafter be easily removed from the well.

It will also be seen that a new and improved packer has been illustrated and described which is connectable to a setting tool having means for expanding a liner in a well casing and which is movable by the setting tool into the liner after it has been expanded, and that the packer has a body provided with a stop shoulder engageable with the bottom end surface of the expanded liner and a latch releasably held in retracted position which expands when the setting tool is released from the acker to engage the top end surface of the expanded liner to limit its downward movement relative to the packer.

It will further be seen that the packer body is provided with external seal means for sealing between the body and the liner and with an internal seal surface engageable by seal means of another well tool positionable in the packer and with latch means engageable with such another well tool for releasably connecting such tool to the packer body.

It will also be apparent that, if the tools and 200 are secured into the well casing on a pipe, a collar recess locator is mounted on the pipe above the setting tool and will be operated to determine the location of a liner carried by the setting tool in the well casing.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory only, and changes in the details of the construction illustrated may be made by those skilled in the art, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. A method of completing a well comprising: installing a flow conductor of substantially unrestrictedinternal passage in a well bore; performing operations on the well by movement of substances and well tools through the flow conductor; locating and fixing a landing section liner sleeve at a predetermined location in the flow conductor which provides internal seal surface of smaller diameter than the passage of the flow conductor and oppositely facing stop shoulders; and setting a well tool in said landing section liner sleeve having means engageable with the opposed stop shoulders to limit longitudinal movement of said well tool in the landing section liner sleeve and having seal means engageable with the seal surface for sealing therebetween.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein said well tool is a packer, and installing a second well tool in the packer.

3. A method of completing a well comprising: installing in a well a well casing formed of sections connected by coupling collars which provide spaced internal collar recesses; moving into said well casing a well tool assembly including a setting tool carrying a liner and a packer and a collar recess detector for locating the liner at a predetermined position in the well casing by means of signals transmitted from the detector to an indicator at the surface of the well to which the detector transmits a signal each time it passes a collar recess, expanding the liner outwardly progressively upwardly by moving the setting tool upwardly relative to the liner, and then installing the well packer in the expanded liner by continued upward movement of the setting tool.

4. The method of claim 3, and releasing the setting tool from the packer when the packer has been installed in the liner.

5. A method of completing a well installation in a well having a well flow conductor having no internal restrictions therein in the bore of said well, said method including: performing operations on the well by means of said unrestricted passage of said flow conductor; moving a packer, a packer setting tool, an expansible packer housing sleeve in contracted condition and an expander for said housing sleeve simultaneously through the well flow conductor to a desired location therein; holding the top end portion of said unexpanded expansible packer housing sleeve against movement in the flow conductor while moving said expander through said housing sleeve to expand said packer housing sleeve into expanded gripping and sealing engagement with the flow conductor; releasing said expander from said housing sleeve after completion of the expansion of said housing sleeve; securing said packer in locked sealing engagement with said housing sleeve; releasing said setting tool from said packer; and removing said setting tool and said expander from the well through the flow conductor.

6. The method of claim 5 and the additional step of securing a tubing string to said packer in said housing sleeve.

7. A method of completing a well comprising: installing a flow conductor of substantially unrestricted internal passage in a well bore; performing well completion and testing operations on the well by movement of substances and well tools inserted through the conductor into the well, and withdrawing said tools; locating a landing section liner sleeve in the flow conductor at a predetermined location therein, expanding said liner sleeve into gripping sealing engagement with the bore wall of the flow conductor to provide internal opposed stop shoulders and an internal sea] surface of smaller diameter than the passage of the flow conductor; and setting a well tool in said landing section liner sleeve having means engageable with the stop shoulders of said liner to limit longitudinal movement of said well tool in the liner sleeve and having seal means thereon engageable with the seal surface in the bore of said liner sleeve for sealing therebetween.

8. A method of treating a well having therein a flow conductor having a substantially unrestricted internal passage, comprising: performing well testing and completion operations on the well by movement of substances and well tools through the flow conductor in place in the well; supporting a packer in the well flow conductor adjacent a desired location; supporting an unexpanded expansible locating and locking sleeve in the well conductor above the packer; expanding the locating and locking sleeve at said position in said well conductor to grip the wall of the flow conductor at such location to provide a sea] surface of reduced bore in the flow conductor having opposed lock and stop shoulders at its opposite ends; moving the packer upwardly in the flow conductor into locking and sealing engagement with said locating and locking sleeve; releasing the support from the locating and locking sleeve; releasing the support from the packer and removing the supports from the well bore leaving the packer in anchored sealing position in the locating and locking sleeve.

9. In the method set forth in claim 8 the additional step of lowering a tubing string into the well flow conductor and connecting the lower end of said tubing string to the packer anchored in place in the locating and locking sleeve to provide a flow course from the packer to the surface.

10. A method of treating a well having a well casing therein formed of sections connected by coupling collars and having a substantially uniform unrestricted bore therethrough, said method comprising: moving a well tool assembly including a setting tool carrying an expansible packer housing sleeve and a packer into the well casing from the surface; locating a posi tion in the well casing at which it is desired to anchor the packer housing sleeve and packer in sealing engagement in the well casing; expanding the packer housing sleeve at such location by moving the assembly upwardly; and installing the well packer in the expanded housing sleeve by continued upward movement of the well tool assembly to lock the packer in anchored sealing engagement with the housing sleeve in the casing.

ll. The method of claim and the additional steps of releasing the setting tool from the packer housing sleeve and from the packer when the packer has been installed in the housing sleeve; and removing the setting tool from the well casing.

12. A method of completing a well installation in a well having a well casing therein with a substantially uniform unrestricted bore extending therethrough, said method comprising: moving into the well casing a setting tool having a packer mounted thereon at its lower end in an unexpanded non-seal ing, non-gripping condition, so as to be supported by said setting tool in such condition in the well casing; supporting an unexpanded expansible packer landing housing sleeve on the setting tool above an expander carried by the setting tool below the packer housing sleeve; positioning the setting tool in the well at a desired depth therein at which it is desired to support the packer landing housing sleeve in sealing engagement with the casing; moving the setting tool to move the expander member through the packer landing housing sleeve to expand said landing housing sleeve into gripping engagement with the inner surface of the casing; disconnecting the setting tool from the packer landing housing sleeve after the landing housing sleeve has been expanded into gripping engagement with the inner surface of the casing; moving the setting tool upwardly in the well casing to move the packer into position to engage the landing housing sleeve in locked sealing engagement therewith against movement in either direction; disconnecting the setting tool from the packer and removing the setting tool from the well leaving the packer in anchored sealing engagement in the packer landing housing sleeve.

l3. A method of the character set forth in claim 12 including: the additional steps of sensing the position in the well at which the packer landing housing sleeve is to be set by means of locating the coupling recesses between adjacent joints of casing in the well; and expanding the packer landing housing sleeve into gripping engagement with the well casing at the position so located.

14. The method of claim 12 including the additional step of lowering a tubing string into the well casing; connecting the lower end of the tubing in sealing anchored engagement to the packer anchored in the packer landing housing sleeve in the casing for conducting fluids flowing from the well below the packer through the packer into the tubing string and to the surface.

15. A method of completing a well having a flow conductor of substantially unrestricted internal passage therein comprising: moving into the flow conductor a setting tool having an unexpanded expansible packer landing housing sleeve and an expander carried by the setting tool engageable with the packer housing sleeve; positioning the setting tool in the flow conductor at a depth therein at which it is desired to dispose the packer landing housing sleeve in gripping sealing engagement with the casing; moving the setting tool to move the expander member to expand said landing housing sleeve into gripping sealing engagement with the inner wall surface of the flow conductor to provide a smooth internal sealing surface wall of reduced diameter in the flow conductor having op posed stop shoulders at its ends; disconnecting the setting tool from the packer landing housing sleeve after the same has been expanded into gripping sealing engagement with the inner wall surface of the flow conductor; removing the setting tool from within the flow conductor; then inserting a tubular conductor having a packing assembly thereon into the flow conductor; moving the packing assemibly downwardly in the flow conductor to position the same in sealing engagement with the inner surface wall of the packer landing housing sleeve; and supporting the packer assembly in place in such sleeve to provide a seal between the flow conductor and the tubular conductor at the packer housing landing sleeve.

16. A method as set forth in claim 15 including: the additional step of holding the packer assembly in place in the packer landing housing sleeve against longitudinal movement with respect thereto by engaging the packer assembly with at least one of the stop shoulders of said sleeve.

17. A method as set forth in claim l5 including: the additional step of holding the packer assembly in place in the packer landing housing sleeve against downward longitudinal movement with respect thereto by engagement of the packer assembly with the stop shoulder on the upper end of said sleeve.

18. A method as set forth in claim 15 including: the additional step of holding the packer assembly in place in the packer landing housing sleeve against upward longitudinal movement with respect thereto by engaging the packer assembly with the stop shoulder at the lower end of said sleeve.

19. A method as set forth in claim 1.5 including: the additional step of holding the packer assembly in place in the packer landing housing sleeve against longitudinal movement in either direction with respect thereto by engaging the packer assembly with the opposed stop shoulders of said sleeve.

20. A method as set forth in claim 18 including: the additional step of releasing the packer assembly from engagement with the stop shoulder at the lower end of the landing housing sleeve for removal of the packer assembly from the flow conductor.

21. A method as set forth in claim 19 including: the additional step of releasing the packer assembly from holding engagement with the stop shoulder at the lower end of the landing housing sleeve for removal of the packer assembly from the flow conductor.

22. A method of completing a well having a flow conductor with an unrestricted substantially uniform bore disposed therein, which includes: moving into the flow conductor a contracted expansible packer landing housing sleeve to a point in the flow conductor at which it is: desired to locate the same; expanding the contracted expansible packer landing housing sleeve into gripping sealing engagement with the bore wall of the flow conductor at such location in the flow conductor to provide a smooth internal sealing surface wall of diameter smaller than the bore of the flow conductor and having stop shoulders at its opposite ends; inserting a tubing string having a sealing packer assembly thereon into the first flow conductor; moving the tubing string downwardly in the first flow conductor to position the packer assembly in sealing engagement with the internal reduced sealing surface wall of the packer landing housing sleeve; and holding the packer assembly in sealing engagement with the internal sealing surface wall of said packer housing sleeve for sealing between the tubing string and the first fiow conductor at such point.

23. In the method set forth in claim 22, the further step of holding the packer assembly in place in said packer landing housing sleeve against longitudinal movement with respect to said sleeve by engagement of the packer assembly with at least one of the shoulders of the sleeve.

24. The method of claim 23, wherein the step of holding the packer assembly in place in the landing housing sleeve is directed to preventing downward movement of the packer as sembly with respect to the sleeve.

25. The method of claim 23, wherein the step of holding the packer assembly in place in the landing housing sleeve is directed to preventing upward movement of the packer assembly with respect to the sleeve.

ductor; actuating the setting tool to expand the packer landing housing sleeve into gripping sealing engagement with the bore wall of the flow conductor at the selected point; removing the setting tool from the flow conductor; installing a packer assembly connected with a second flow conductor in the well into sealing engagement with the bore wall of the packer landing housing sleeve in place therein and sealing between the second conductor and the packer landing housing sleeve by means of said packer assembly.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/387, 166/207, 166/115
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B43/10, E21B43/02, E21B23/06
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/06, E21B43/105
European ClassificationE21B23/06, E21B43/10F1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 15, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: HALLIBURTON COMPANY, TEXAS
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:OTIS ENGINEERING CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:006779/0356
Effective date: 19930624