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Publication numberUS3670207 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1972
Filing dateSep 25, 1970
Priority dateSep 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3670207 A, US 3670207A, US-A-3670207, US3670207 A, US3670207A
InventorsWilliam A Seabury
Original AssigneeWilliam A Seabury
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular matrix with plug interconnection
US 3670207 A
Abstract
A modular matrix with plug interconnection including at least two individual modular matrix boards of insulating material essentially alike in construction with each board having an upper and a lower face, upper conductive members secured to the upper face and lower conductive members secured to the lower face, detachable contacts secured to the boards, certain of the contacts being electrically united to the upper conductive members and certain of the contacts being electrically united to the lower conductive members, certain of the contacts having wire wrap tails extending beyond the boards with the wire wrap tails of individual boards being electrically united together whereby a series of individual boards may be wired together to produce the equivalent of a large matrix.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,670,207 Seabury, III [4 1 June 13, 1972 1541' MODULAR MATRIX WITH PLUG 3,249,905 5/1966 Ruehlemann ..'...339/1a c INTERCONNECTION FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS [72] Highland 973,983 11/1964 Great Britain ..339/18 R 2487 1,185,681 1/1965 Germany ..339/18 0 [22] Filed: Sept. 25, 1970 V Primary Examiner-David Smith, Jr. [21] APPL 75,408 Attomey-Alan H. Bemstein 52 us. on. ..31mm on, 317/101 cx, 339/18, [571 ABSTRACT 339/17 A modular matrix with plug interconnection including at least [5 1] Int. Cl. "05k 1/ 4 two individual modular matrix boards of insulating material [58] FleldolSearch .;...339/l8, 18 P, 18 C, l7LC, essentially alike in construction with each board having an 339/47 R; 317/101 CM, 10! DH, 101 CC upper and a lower face, upper conductive members secured to I the upper face and lower conductive members secured to the 56] Rflmnm Cmd lower face, detachable contacts secured to the boards, certain of the contacts being electrically united to the upper conduc- UNITED STATES PATENTS tive members and certain of the contacts being electrically united to the lower conductive members, certain of the con- 2,946,976 7/1960 81:151. acts having wire p tails extending beyond the I I with 3,458,848 7/1969 De 1n the wire wrap tails of individual boards being electrically 3,008,113 11/1961 Johnson ""317/101 DH united together whereby a series of individual boards may be 3,353,138 1 1/1967 I LOOSC ..339/18 C wired g h toproduce the equivalent ofa l g matrix. 3,523,273 8/1970 Hammell et al.. 339/47 R 2,750,572 6/1956 Fox ..339/47R 'lcm wrawin n um PATENTEDJUN 1 3 I972 A 3. 670,207

' sum 2 or 3 INVENTOR WILL/AM A. SEABURY, ZZZ

PATENTEnJum m2 3870.207

sumanr a INVENTOR WILLIAM A. SEABURY, 1H

MODULAR MATRIX WITH PLUG INTERCONNECTION The invention further contemplates the provision of a continuous block with openings on equal centers in the x and y direction, with such a block being constructed as a modular matrix, rather than a single large matrix.

The invention also contemplates the provision of a unique diode plug member usable with the matrix.

This invention relates to a modular matrix with plug interconnection and more particularly to a new and improved device ofiering unique manufacturing advantages over the prior art devices.

It is known to provide large matrix boards for use in the electrical and electronic industries. Such boards generally must conform to certain design standards, depending upon the circuitry involved. Thus, it is the practice in the industry to produce large matrix boards that are custom designed; i.e., made to the customers specifications. This is not only costly, but extremely time consuming.

While the industry has at times used the building block principle to create pin boards, nevertheless, this principle has heretofore not beenapplicable to matrix boards requiring connectors on equal centers. See for instance U.S. Pat. No. 3,085,220 wherein a pin board is composed of a series of strips and wherein the connectors are not spaced equally in the x and y sense. See also certain patents exemplified by U. S. Pat. No. 3,070,769 which electrically unite a series of boards by a bussing arrangement that istotally difierent from the circui used in connection with matrix boards.

It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide a modular matrix with plug interconnection which overcome the disadvantages of the prior art.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a modular matrix with plug interconnection wherein large matrix boards can be, quickly and economically produced using modular matrix boards.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a modular matrix with plug interconnection wherein the plug centers will be equally spaced from each other on both the x and y axes.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a modular matrix with plug interconnection wherein contacts of different boards are electrically united and wherein such boards possess upper and lower conductive members with the contacts being selectively electrically united to such conductive members.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a modular matrix with plug interconnection wherein a single diode plug possesses two contacts, with one such contact mating with a board contact that is electrically united to. an upper conductive member and the other plug contact simultaneously mating with another board contact that is electrically united to the lower conductive member.

The foregoing as well as other objects of the invention are achieved by providing. a modular matrix with plug interconnection wherein there are at least two individual modular matrix boards of insulating material essentially alike in construction. The invention contemplates using either small numbers or large numbers of essentially alike boards in order to produce the equivalent of a large matrix.

Each modular board has an upper and a lower face, upper conductive members are secured in the upper face and lower conductive members are secured to the lower face. Detachable contacts are secured to the boards with certain of the contacts being electrically united to the upper conductive members and certain of the contacts being united to the lower conductive members. Certain of the contacts have wire wrap tails extending beyond the boards with the wire wrap tails of the individual boards being electrically united together whereby a series of individual boards may be wired together to produce the equivalent of a large matrix.

Each of the modular boards is so constructed as to have a contact of the pair inclined with respect to the plane of the other contact of the pair. The invention further contemplates modular covers for each board, with each cover havingan l.- shaped opening to permit the passage of a pair of contacts associated with a plug member, with the plug contacts being designed to mate with the corresponding pair of contacts on the board. One of the board contacts is electrically united to an upper conductive member and the other of the contact pair is electrically united to the lower conductive member, such that the plug contacts simultaneously establish an electrical path between the upper and lower conductive members.

Other advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent by reference to the attached figures of the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is fragmentary plan view of a modular matrix with plug interconnection embodying the invention, with certain portions of the cover partially cut away to reveal the tips of the modular matrix board contacts, and certain other portions of the cover and the modular matrix board completely removed to reveal the back panel;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the rear face of the modular matrix of FIG. 1 which reveals the back panel wiring of the tails of the board contacts;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view taken within the circular indicator of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the lines 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary exploded perspective view of a comer of a complete matrix assembly showing the plug about to pass through a complementary L-shaped opening in the cover, with portions of the cover cut away to reveal the dual nature of the cover construction, and further showing contacts extending from a board having conductive members, with the tails of certain of the contacts extending rearwardly through complementary openings in the back panel;

FIG. 5A is a plan view of the underside of a fragmentary portion of the modular matrix shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal, sectional view taken through the plug shown in FIG. 5;

7 FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a difi'erent comer of the modular matrix board of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the lines 8-8 of FIG. 7. v

Referring now in greater detail to the various figures of the drawing wherein like reference characters refer to like parts there is shown generally at 10in FIG. 1 a modular matrix with plug interconnection constituting an embodiment of the present invention.

As best shown in FIG. 5 and with further reference to FIG. 1, the modular matrix 10 basically comprises cover 12 which possesses L-shaped openings 12A that receive one of the contacts 13A, 13B, l3C,'l3D and so on, that extend from each of the modular matrix boards 14. Certain of the contacts possess long wire wrap tails 15 that extend through complementary openings in back panel 16.

FIGS. 5 and I further show several diode plugs 18 having contacts 19A and 198 that are adapted to pass through one of the openings 12A in the cover 12, with the contacts 19A and 198 then mating with complementary contacts 13A and 138 that extend from a modular matrix board 14.

The contacts 13 and 19 are of the so-called hermaphroditic type and include bevelled mating surfaces 22 and a relief opening 24 in accordance with Fox U.S. Pat. Nos. Re. 23,574 and 2,828,506, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference. It will be clear to those skilled in the art that contacts of other construction may be utilized since the invention herein claimed does not reside in the particular contacts used. For this reason, it is conceivable that even male and female contacts may be used.

With reference to FIG. 5, the details of the cover '12 maybe seen. The cover 12 is preferably a unitary piece that is produced in a single mold. The cover 12 includes a series of L shaped openings 12A that extend only partly through the thickness of the cover 12. As shown in the cut-away portion of FIG. 5, the openings 12A merge part way through into openings 128, each of which are essentially comprised of a pair of merging circular openings. It will further be observed from FIG. 5 that the L-shaped openings 12A include bevelled surfaces to facilitate the entry of the contacts 19A and 19B of the plug 18.

It will be further seen in FIG. 5 that the L-shaped openings 12A actually constitutea closed entry type of opening, and permit the passage of plug contacts 19A and 198 in but one orientation.

Furthermore, the plug 18 (FIG. 5) possesses a grasping peg 26 to aid insertion and removal. Furthermore, the cover 12includes lugs 28 that are received in complementary openings 30 (FIG. I) of the modular matrix boards 14.

The details of the L-shaped opening 12A and the bicircular openings 12B are also shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. Attention is called to FIG. 3 wherein the bevelled edges defining L-shaped openings 12A are readily visible. FIG. 3 also shows a lower opening 123 that is juxtaposed beneath the upper L-shaped opening 12A. This construction is also quite visible in FIG. 4 wherein the bevelled edges 32 defining the L-shaped opening 12A merge with an inner L-shaped opening 34 that in turn communicates with one of the circular openings which together constitute an opening 128.

The details of the modular matrix boards 14 are visible in FIGS. 1, 5, 5A, 7 and 8. As shown in FIG. 1, four modular matrix boards 14 may be assembled into the frame 20. However, a large number of modular matrix boards 14 may be assembled together to produce the equivalent of a very large matrix board.

In prior practice, matrix boards were custom designed, depending upon the needs of the potential user. This not only added greatly to the cost, but also added greatly to the manufacturing time.

With the present invention a matrix of the desired dimensions can be built up using the necessary number of modular matrix boards 14, with the finished matrix possessing the unique feature of having the L-shaped openings 12A so spaced from each other that a contact pair located immediately below an L-shaped opening 12A is equally spaced from the neighboring contact pairs in both the x and y directions.

As shown in FIG. 4, the contacts 13 are somewhat recessed within the openings in the cover 12. In particular, the top edge 36 of a contact 13 is seen to pass completely through the bicircular opening 123 and to extend just within the inner opening 34 of the L-shaped opening 12A. Thus, as shown in FIG. 4 the contact 13 preferably does not reach into the area defined by the bevelled edges 32.

As shown in FIGS. 1, 5, 7 and 8 the upper face 38 of each A modular matrix board 14 possesses a series of parallel upper conductive members 40 that are preferably formed by printing, photographing or etching techniques well known to those skilled in the art.

As indicated in FIG. I, each modular matrix board 14 possesses five parallel upper conductive members 40, and certain of the contacts 13 are electrically united to one of the upper conductive members 40. See FIGS. 7 and 8 wherein contacts UT and I3U are electrically united to upper conductive member 40A by soldering or other techniques well known to those skilled in the art. However, certain of the other contacts, like contacts 13? and 13R of FIGS. 7 and 8 are not united to any upper conductive member 40. Instead, these contacts, like contacts 13F and 13R, pass through the modular matrix board 14 (which is of an insulating material) and are electrically united to a lower conductive member 44 that is secured to the lower face 42 of a modular matrix board 14.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention there are five parallel upper conductive members 40 as shown in FIG. 1, and there are also five parallel lower conductive members 44, one of which appears in FIGS. 5A and 8. It will be seen that the upper conductive members 40 run at a direction perpendicular to the direction ofthe lower conductive members 44.

It will be seen from FIG. 5 that certain of the contacts, like contacts 13A and 13D possess wire wrap tails 15. It is to be noted that contact 13A has a wire wrap tail 15A, with the contact 13-A being electrically united to upper conductive member 40A.

However, contact 13D has a wire wrap tail 15D, but the contact 13D is not electrically united to any upper conductive member 40. Instead, the wire wrap tail 15D is electrically united to lower conductive member 44 as shown in FIG. 5A.

Contacts 138 and 13C do not possess wire wrap tails, but instead terminate in stub ends 468 and 46C. As shown in FIG. 5A, stub 46B is electrically united to lower conductive member 44, with the stub end 46C simply terminating near the lower face 42, but without being in contact with any lower conductive member 44. This is so because the stub end 46C extends from contact 130 that is electrically united to upper conductive member 403 as shown in FIG. 5.

The relationship of FIGS. 5, 5A and 7 may be understood by starting with comer 48 of the modular matrix board 14 as seen in FIG. 5. The upper conductive member 40A extends toward corner 50 of FIG. 7 and the upper conductive member 408 extends similarly from corner 48 to corner 50. Thus, different portions of side 52 of modular matrix board 14 are visible in FIGS. 5 and 7.

The internal structure of the diode plug 18 can be seen in FIG. 6 including contacts 19A and 198. As seen in FIG. 6, the contacts 19A and 19B are wired to a diode 54. Thus, the insertion of the plug 18 has the effect of mating plug contacts 19 with a pair of modular matrix board contacts 13, such that the circuitry associated with the individual board contacts 13 may be united together into a single circuit which also contains the diode 54.

It will be seen that a pair of plug contacts 19 are inclined with respect to each other, such that the plane of one of the contacts 19 lies at an angle (preferably with respect to the plane of the other plug contact 19. The same arrangement prevails with respect to a pair of board contacts, except that the planes of the board contacts are disposed at a 90 angle with respect to each mating plug contact.

It is therefore seen that one plug contact mates with a board contact that is electrically united to an upper conductive member on the board while the other plug contact simultaneously mates with another board contact that is electrically united to a lower conductive member. Thus, in a single plug connection a circuit is made that will include an upper conductive member 40 and a lower conductive member 44.

The wiring together of the wire wrap tails I5 is best understood by reference to FIG. 2 with further reference to FIG. 5 which shows the wire wrap tails 15 passing through openings 16A in the back panel 16. However, as shown in FIG. 2, the various modular matrix boards 14 are secured together in the frame 20 by means of removable plates 56 that are held in place by bolts 58.

It will be seen from FIG. 2 that the wire wrap tails extending from, for instance, modular matrix board 14D (tails A, B, C and D) are wired by conductors 60 to wire wrap tails 15 that extend from modular matrix board 14C. In reviewing FIG. 2 it will be seen that the four modular matrix boards may be wired together in a predetermined pattern, such that the four modular matrix boards together constitute the equivalent of one large matrix board. It will be seen that a greater number of modular matrix boards 14 may be similarly wired together, with each modular matrix board being of essentially identical construction.

In view of the foregoing it follows that a large number of modular matrix boards 14 may be kept in stock and simply assembled together in an appropriate frame or frames. Each board 14 is of essentially identical construction having parallel upper conductive members 40 that run in a direction perpendicular to parallel lower conductive members 44. Pairs of contacts 13 extend from each modular matrix board 14, with each contact pair being equidistant from neighboring contact pairs such that when a series of modular matrix boards are assembled, all of the contact pairs will be at equal distances in an x and y direction from their neighboring contact pairs.

It therefore follows that the present invention constitutes a highly useful tool which not only greatly hastens the manufacture of a particular matrix board, but also greatly simplifies plug interconnection techniques by connecting through the use of a single plug an upper and a lower conductive member into a single circuit. It will also be seen that the plug 18 need not be a diode plug, but can simply be a shorting plug. in either event, the closed entry feature of the invention presents a distinct advantage.

Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully illustrate my invention that others may, by applying current or future knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under various conditions of service.

What is claimed as my invention is:

1. A large modular matrix with plug interconnection including at least two individual modular matrix boards of insulating material electrically and mechanically united in abutting relationship in essentially the same plane, each of said boards having an upper face and a lower face, upper conductive members secured to said upper face and lower conductive members secured to said lower face, detachable contacts secured to said boards in board contact pairs, the first contact of each pair being electrically united to one of said upper conductive members and the second contact of each pair being electrically united to one of said lower conductive members, said contact pairs being inclined with respect to each other in order to achieve reasonably close packing, certain of said contacts having wire wrap tails extending beyond said boards, with the wire wrap tails of individual matrix boards being electrically united together so that a series of individual matrix boardsmay be wired together to produce a large modular matrix, and at least one plug having a pair of plug contacts which mate substantially simultaneously with a pair of board contacts to make a circuit including at least one upper board conductive member and at least one lower board conductive member.

2. The matrix of claim 1 wherein said board contact pairs are disposed in planes at 90 with respect to each other.

3. The matrix of claim 1 wherein said plug contacts are wired together in a circuit including a diode.

4. The invention of claim 3 wherein each board contact pair is equidistant from neighboring contact pairs in the the x and'y sense.

5. The invention of claim 1 wherein each board is fitted with a cover having depending lugs being received in corresponding openings in each board, each cover having L-shaped openings merging into bicircular openings to permit closedentry access to said board contacts which extend into said cover.

6. The invention of claim 5 including a frame holding said boards and covers.

7. The invention of claim 6 including a back panel with openings pennitting the passage of said wire wrap tails.

* I i II I

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2750572 *Apr 29, 1953Jun 12, 1956Benjamin FoxMulti-contact connector
US2946976 *Aug 22, 1955Jul 26, 1960Sperry Rand CorpPrinted circuit board with bifurcated terminals
US3008113 *Jul 30, 1958Nov 7, 1961IbmElectrical interconnecting and mounting device for printed-circuit boards
US3249905 *Aug 9, 1963May 3, 1966Elco CorpStrip contact
US3353138 *Mar 22, 1965Nov 14, 1967Amp IncProgramming system
US3458848 *Mar 7, 1967Jul 29, 1969Sealectro CorpJack plugs
US3523273 *Jul 3, 1968Aug 4, 1970Amp IncElectrical connectors
DE1185681B *Apr 28, 1961Jan 21, 1965Harting Elektro WUEberbrueckungsstecker fuer Kreuzschienenverteiler, vorzugsweise bei Muenz-Rueckgabe- Einrichtungen an Warenselbstverkaeufern
GB973983A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4012096 *Jun 4, 1975Mar 15, 1977Porta Systems CorporationTelephone connector block apparatus
US4164665 *Oct 25, 1977Aug 14, 1979Centra-Burkle Gmbh & Co.Manually programmable storage device
US4516816 *Jan 5, 1983May 14, 1985Winthrop Michael FIn circuit modification device for dual in line packaged components
US4616896 *Apr 15, 1985Oct 14, 1986La Telemecanique ElectriqueConnecting terminal for printed circuit board
US5411417 *Jul 28, 1994May 2, 1995Weidmueller Interface Gmbh & Co.Terminal block arrangement with overvoltage protection component
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/806, 439/49, 439/78, 439/922, 361/792
International ClassificationH01R29/00, G11C17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG11C17/00, Y10S439/922, H01R29/00
European ClassificationH01R29/00, G11C17/00