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Publication numberUS3670737 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1972
Filing dateJul 2, 1970
Priority dateJul 2, 1970
Also published asCA922789A1, DE2131549A1
Publication numberUS 3670737 A, US 3670737A, US-A-3670737, US3670737 A, US3670737A
InventorsPearo Joseph J
Original AssigneeDiapulse Corp Of America
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus
US 3670737 A
Abstract
An athermapeutic apparatus for administration of electrotherapeutic treatments to living matter for curing or abatement of diseases, infections and the like, by subjecting such matter to high frequency oscillations of a preselected wavelength for predetermined time periods thereby eliminating the generation of accompanying heat generation. The desired electromagnetic oscillations are accurately produced with a minimum of power consumption by utilization of stable solid state circuitry resulting in more accurate pulse frequency generation accompanied by considerably reduced power consumption and enabling a much greater degree of control over both pulse frequency and power output administered to a patient or the like. Proper treatment dosage in terms of pulse frequency and penetration is readily selectable by depression of the proper push-button on the front of apparatus panel, with a lighted signal lamp behind the button indicating each treatment setting as selected by the operator. Moreover, with reduction in power consumption a much greater degree of control over the pulse frequency and power is achieved.
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United States Patent 1 June 20, 1972 Pearo [54] ULTRA-SHORT WAVE ATHERMAPEUTIC APPARATUS [72] Inventor: Joseph J. Pearo, Great Neck, NY.

[73] Assignee: Diapulse Corporation of America, New

Hyde Park, NY.

[22] Filed: July 2, 1970 [21] App]. No.: 51,945

[52] US. Cl ..128/422 Primary Examiner-William E. Kamm Attorney-Wm. F. Kelly, Jr.

[5 ABSTRACT An athermapeutic apparatus for administration of electrotherapeutic treatments to living matter for curing or abatement of diseases, infections and the like, by subjecting such matter to high frequency oscillations of a preselected wavelength for predetennined time periods thereby eliminating the generation of accompanying heat generation. The desired electromagnetic oscillations are accurately produced with a minimum of power consumption by utilization of stable [5 1 1 U40 solid state circuitry resulting in more accurate pulse frequency [58] 28/419 R, 421, 422, 404, 405,

128 l 413 generation accompanied by considerably reduced power consumption and enabling a much greater degree of control over both pulse frequency and power output administered to a pa- [56] References Clted tient or the like. Proper treatment dosage in terms of pulse UNITED STATES PATENTS frequency and penetration is readily selectable by depression l of the proper push-button on the front of apparatus panel, 2,276,995 3/1942 M l nowsk ..t .;..128/4 2 i h a lighted signal lamp behind the button indicating each 3,043,310 7/ 1962 l f f 128/422 treatment setting as selected by the operator. Moreover, with Mtlmowskl reduction in power consumption a much greater degree of 3,299,892 1/1967 Kendall et a1 ..128/421 Conn-o] over the pulse frequency and power i achieved 3,503,403 3/1970 Yarger 128/421 10 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures i% n i OSCILLATOR KEVER POWER AMP. TREATMENT DOUBLE? l2 AMPLIFIER DOUBL ER H540 [4 2/ Pa 4 la FREQUENCY PULSE l7 ME 75/? 24 GENERATOR /5./-

a t LOW VOL7I4GE may VOLTAGE l9 8 SUPPLY sup y POWER f f (9 CONT P'A'TENTEnaunzo m2 3, 670. 787

SHEET 10F 3 i n OSC/LLATOR KEVER POWER AMP. TREATMENT DOUBLER AMPL/F/ER DOUBLEP HEAD /2 14 /8 2 9/3 4 t 5 l7 FPL'QULWCY PULSE METER g GENERATOR /5- I 2 LOW VOL7746 I HIGH VOLTAGE sUPPLY SUPPLY F POWER f H CONTROL 7 F IG. 1

K2 R8 J k/ E 1 -PP9 V -14 I INVENTOR.v

JOSEPH J. PEARO A T TORNEV ULTRA-SHORT WAVE ATl-IERMAPEUTIC APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Atherrnapeutic apparatus of generally similar type, and as shown in US. Pat. No. 3,181,535, granted May 4, I965 to Arthur S. Milinowski and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention, has been marketed for the last several years. However, operation of such apparatus proved relatively expensive due to its high power requirements which was controlled by expensive and limited-life electronic tubes, to produce the desired output pulse. It also followed that a variation in the power deleteriously effected the power-output and pulse frequency during treatment.

SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION It is accordingly the object of the present invention to provide an athermapeutic apparatus wherein power consumption to produce the desired output pulse of the electromagnetic oscillations, administerable to a patient or the like, is greatly minimized.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an athermapeutic apparatus wherein exceedingly stable circuitry is provided which produces more accurate pulse frequency generation with such originally generated pulse utilized to modulate a low power amplifier thereby more economically and dependably modulating the pulse.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an athermapeutic apparatus for the generation of high frequency oscillations wherein modulation of the generated pulse is produced at a low power level resulting in a greater control of such pulse.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an athermapeutic apparatus for the generation of high frequency oscillations wherein the output stage of the pulse generating circuit functions as a frequency doubler thereby eliminating the necessity for a harmonic filter.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an athermapeutic apparatus for the generation of high frequency oscillations having a preselected pulse duration and frequency to which a patient or the like is subjected, and wherein such apparatus is highly efficient and dependable in its operation throughout a relatively long useful life.

Still further objects of the present invention will become obvious to those skilled in the art by reference to the accompanying drawings,wherein FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing the various sections of elements forming the complete athermapeutic apparatus of the present invention,

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuitry of the oscillator doubler and keyer amplifier sections of the apparatus,

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuitry of the pulse generator, power amplifier and doubler, the applicator treatment head, and frequency meter, sections of the apparatus, and

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuitry of the power control, low voltage power supply, and high voltage power supply, sections of the apparatus.

Referring now to the drawings in detail the various sections are shown in FIG, 1 in block diagram with the connections therebetween. For example, the oscillator doubler 1 is connected to the keyer amplifier 2 as well as receiving a voltage from the high voltage supply 9. The keyer amplifier 2 is in turn connected to the pulse generator 3 and to the power amplifier doubler 4, with this latter supplying its output energy to the applicator treatment head 5. A frequency meter 6 is connected to the pulse generator 3 with the latter being supplied with a voltage from the low voltage supply. The power control 7 supplies electrical energy to both the low voltage supply 8 and the high voltage supply 9, as well as to the power amplifier and doubler 4.

The specific circuitry of the oscillator doubler 1 and keyer amplifier 2 is shown in detail in FIG. 2 enclosed within the dotdash lined rectangles bearing the same identifying references 1 and 2, respectively. Referring now in detail to the oscillator doubler 1 it will be noted from FIG. 2, that its circuitry includes an electronic tube VI together with associated resistors R1 through R4, capacitors Cl through C8, inductances Ll through L3, and the crystal XTAL, The resistors R3 and R4 drop the 440 volts supplied by conductor 11 extending from the high voltage supply 9 to the plate of tube V1, to 300 volts. A fuse F1 is inserted in line conductor 11 to protect the oscillator-doubler from over-voltage. The crystal XTAL, being a tuned oscillating device of very accurate frequency, generates a signal at 6,870 megacycles which is amplified by tube VI.

The capacitors C1, C2, C7 and C8 provide radiofrequency by-pass for the DC power lines while capacitors C3 and C4 form a voltage dividing network which supplies the feedback to the crystal XTAL necessary for causing oscillation thereofv Inductor Ll provides a DC path to the cathode of the tube VI while resistor R1 drops the plate voltage for such tube to a level required for its operation. Tuning necessary for the crystal oscillator to function is provided by inductance L2 and capacitor C5, causing this inductance-capacitance circuit to operate at 13.56 megacycles and thus produces the doubling necessary to obtain a signal at such frequency, which is then coupled by capacitor C6 and conductor l2.to the signal grid of tube V2 forming part of the keyer amplifier 2, also shown within a dot-dash enclosure.

In addition to the electronic tube V2, the keyer amplifier circuitry comprises resistors R5 through R9, capacitors C9 through C11, inductances L4 and L5,, a transistor Q1, and a relay RYl with contacts Kl through K3. Resistor R9 supplies the necessary operating voltage to the screen grid of the tube V2 while capacitors C9, C10 and C11 provides RF by-passing at various points in the circuit. Inductor L4 and resistor R5 produce self bias for the operation of the grid circuit for the tube V2 while its thermionic cathode is connected to the collector of transistor Q1. The emitter of this transistor O1 is grounded at G and its base is connected by a conductor l3to the circuitry of the pulse generator 3, so that a signal pulse from the latter turns the transistor Q1 on and oh".

Such action by transistor Q1 produces the required pulse width and frequency to provide the keying action to make the tube V2 alternately conducting and noncondu cting thereby producing a pulsed RF signal at the plate of V2. Since the winding of relay RYl is connected in this plate circuit of tube V2 current flow to such relay is accordingly sensitive" to that flowing in such plate circuit thus making the relay RY] what may be termed a fail safe" device. Consequently, if the current flowing through the plate circuit of V2, and hence the relay winding, should exceed about 4.5 ma. such relay RYl will operate to interrupt the circuit.

The attendant opening of normally closed relay contacts K2 and K3 causes the keyer circuit to cease functioning, with contacts K3 also interrupting the 440 volt supply for the plate voltage across the tube V] of the oscillator doubler l causing the latter to cease functioning. Closure of relay contacts Kl provides for sufficient current flow through the winding of relay RYl to keep it energized until the operational switch SW14 of the power control 7 is moved to its standby" position, as hereinafter described, thereby interrupting the 440 volt supply circuit and resetting relay RYl to its normal position.

The power amplifier and doubler 4 within the dot-dash lines in FIG. 3 includes two electronic tubes V3 and V4, with the plate circuit of the tube V2 of the keyer amplifier 2 being connected by a conductor 14 and through a capacitor C12, to the grid of both tubes V3 and V4. The power amplifier and doubler 4 also comprises resistors R10 through R22, capacitors C13 through C22, inductances L6 through L11, a transistor Q2, push-button switches SW1 through SW6, and indicator lights I1 through I6. A bias voltage for the circuit of -l 50 volts is supplied by a conductor 15 from the high voltage supply 9, as well as such power amplifier and doubler 4 being supplied with 440 volt power by the conductor 11 which is connected 7 to resistor R22, and the indicator lamps 11 to 16 all receive an unregulated 24 volts by a conductor 16 extending from the low voltage supply 8, as well as 2,480 volts being supplied to inductance L from the high voltage supply 9 by conductor 17, as hereinafter described in more detail.

The resistor R14, the capacitors C13, C15, and C16, and RF choke inductor L7, provide decoupling and inductor L6 together with capacitor C14 provide tuning for the grid circuit of the tubes V3 and V4 with attendant amplification of the power supplied to such power amplifier 4. Capacitor C17 and C18 provide the RF by-pass for the screen grid circuit of such tubes, while the resistors R12 and R13 are provided to assure stable operation of the amplifier tubes, with resistors R10 and R11 operating as parasitic suppressors for the plate circuit of such tubes V3 and V4. Inductor L10, functioning as an RF choke together with capacitor C20, provide decoupling for the high voltage of 2,480 volts supplied by conductor 17 from the high voltage supply 9. The capacitors C21 and C22 together with inductance L11 form the plate tank circuit which is tuned to 27 megacycles and thus doubles the input frequency, which is then supplied by the power amplifier and doubler 4 to the treatment head 5 by a grounded coaxial cable 18.

The push-button switches SW1 through SW6 are operable to vary the screen grid voltage supplied to the electronic tubes V3 and V4 and thus enables the operator to control the peak output power from the power amplifier and doubler 4. One side of each double-pole switch completes a relatively low voltage circuit to its associated lamp which is housed beneath a color transparent plastic button or the like, to give a lighted indication of the precise switch closed by depression at any given time. The other side of such double-pole switch connects to the adjustable contact of the respective resistors R through R20 with which such particular switch is associated.

By operating any one of these switches SW1 through SW6, a portion of the voltage developed across its particular associated resistor R15 through R21, is applied to the base of transistor Q2 which operates as a voltage regulator, since each resistor R15 through R21 is set by its variable contact to produce a progressively higher voltage in six steps depending upon the particular switch SW1 through SW6 depressed by the operator at any given time. Accordingly, as the voltage applied to the base of transistor Q2 varies, the voltage on its emitter likewise varies and since such voltage is supplied to the screen grid of the tubes V3 and V4, it follows that such variation is preselectable by operation of the appropriate push button switch SW1 through SW6.

Capacitor C19 filters the selected voltage applied to the screen grid of the tubes V3 and V4 and hence reduces transient noise resulting during operation of the voltage regulating transistor Q2. The resistors R21 and R22 form a voltage divider which reduces the applied 440 volts from the power supply through conductor 11, to approximately 250 volts in order to protect the transistor Q2 which is rated at only 300 volts.

The applicator or treatment head 5, shown within the dotdash lines in FIG. 3, is in the form of a movable drum or the like, and houses a coupling capacitor C38 connected to the coaxial conductor 18 and to a tunable circuit within the head 5. Such tunable circuit, which thus receives the 27 megacycle power from the power amplifier and doubler 4, comprises coupled inductances L12 and L13 and a variable capacitor C39. A signal lamp 116 is coupled by an inductance L14 to the tunable circuit and by its brightness indicates when the tunable circuit is properly tuned to the patient under treatment by operation of variable capacitor C39.

The pulse generator 3, shown within the dot-dash lines in FIG. 3, and to which the conductor 13 from the keyer amplifier 2 is connected, comprises a Module No. 1 shown in the upper heavy dotted-line portion of the pulse generator 3. The lower portion of this pulse generator 3 is provided with a vari able resistor R23, double-pole push-button switches SW7 through SW12 which are operable to select the pulse frequency, indicator lamps 17 through 112 positioned interiorly of the transparent plastic push-button'with which it is associated, variable resistors R24 through R29, and fixed resistors R30 through R35 with each one of the latter being serially connected with one of the variable resistors. Accordingly, upon depression of any one of the push-button switches SW7 through SW12, one pole of such switch completes an unregulated 24 volt circuit from the supply conductor 16 to the indicator lamp associated with such depressed switch thus giving a visual indication of the particular switch closed at any given moment.

The other pole of such depressed switch causes a regulated 24 volts to be supplied, by conductor 19 extending from the low voltage power supply 8 as hereinafter described, to the series connected fixed and variable resistor associated with the particular depressed switch at the moment. The output voltage from the resistor bank is then supplied by a conductor 20 to a terminal T1 of the Module No. 1 portion of the pulse generator. The module comprises a transistor 301, a variable phantom resistor R1 shown in dotted lines for explanatory reasons, and corresponding to the particular resistance of the series connected variable resistor and fixed resistor, selected by the particular switch SW7 through SW12 and supplied at any time to the module terminal T1, so that such resistance thus functions to efiect the circuitry of the module in the same manner as would adjustment of this phantom resistor R1.

The Module No. 1 also includes resistors 3R2 and 3R3 and capacitor 3C1 which, together with the unijunction transistor 3Q1, forms a free running circuit that produces pulses according to the resistance as established by the resistance control 3R1. When power is applied (by operation of any one of the switches SW7 through SW12) current flows through resistor 3R1 charging capacitor 3C1 with the time required to complete such charge being a function of the resistance and capacitance of the circuit components. At some point in the charging of capacitor 3C1, the unijunction transistor 3Q1 becomes conductive and discharges the capacitor 3C1 and restarts a repetition of its charging cycle. Since the firing point at which the unijunction transistor 3Q1 becomes conductive is very precise and varies very little with temperature this results in the time between pulses changing very little over a wide range of temperature.

Inasmuch as the discharge current from capacitor 3C1 flows through resistor 3R3 during this very short discharge time, a positive voltage peak develops at the transistor-coupled-end of resistor 3R3 which is applied by a conductor 21 to a terminal 4 of an integrated circuit indicated by the small dottedline rectangle IC within the larger heavy dotted line Module No. 1 at the top of FIG. 3. In addition to the terminal 4 such IC circuit has a terminal 1 connected to one of its output terminals 7 as well as to the base of a pair of transistors 3Q2 and 304, a terminal 2 connected to the base of a unijunction transistor 3Q3 and to one end of a resistor 3R8, a terminal 3 connected to output terminal 8 and to the base of a transistor 3Q5, a terminal 5 connected to ground G through module terminal T2 and conductor 22 to the grounded side of lamps I7 through 112, and a terminal 6 which is the power-input of regulated +3.6 volts supplied by a conductor 23 from the low voltage power supply.

The integrated circuit" IC herein utilized is a standard compact housed unit well known in the electronic field as a dual-two input buffer and is connected to form an RS (Resetset) flip-flop and hence need not be herein described in detail. Suffice it to say that when power is applied to such IC unit its output terminals 7 and 8 will be alternately impressed with a high positive voltage of approximately 1.5 volts and a low" negative voltage of about 0.1 volts. When a pulse is applied to its terminal 4 it will make the output terminal 7 assume a low voltage and terminal 8 a high voltage which condition persists no matter how many more pulses are applied to terminal 4. However, when a pulse is applied to [C terminal 2 it makes the output terminal 7 assume the high" voltage of approximately 1.5 volts and terminal 8 the low voltage of O.l volts which likewise remains regardless of how many more pulses are applied to tenninal 2. in order therefore to cause the voltage on terminals 7 and 8 to constantly alternate in voltage output, it is necessary to alternately apply a pulse to IC terminals 2 and 4.

The balance of the Module No. 1 circuitry comprises the terminal T3 to which regulated 24 volts is supplied by conductor 19 extending from the low voltage power supply, with such voltage being carried through resistor 3R2 to the base of unijunction transistor 301, through resistor 3R4 to the collector of transistor 305 and to module terminal T4, through resistor 3R5 to the terminal T5 and the collector of transistor 04, and through resistor 3R6 to the base of unijunction transistor 303 and the collector of transistor 302. This voltage from terminal T3 is also supplied to variable resistor R23 located outside the Module No. 1 and which is connected to module terminals T6 and T7. Resistor R23 is accordingly in series with fixed resistor 3R7 with the latter being connected to the emitter of unijunction transistor 303 as well as through capacitor 3C2 to ground G. Consequently, adjustment of variable resistor R23 determines the pulse width of the output pulse supplied from module terminal T5 to the keyer amplifier 2 by the previously mentioned conductor 13. Module terminal T4 is connected by a conductor 24 to the tenninal 6T1 of a frequency meter Module No. 2 as hereinafter described.

In addition to the above described IC flip-flop circuit, the Module No. 1 circuit includes transistors 302 and 303, resistors 3R6,3R7,3R8 and capacitor 3C2, which comprise a keyed pulse generator. The capacitor C2 of such circuit is charged from the regulated 24 volt supply source through variable resistor R23 and fixed resistor 3R7 and such capacitor 3C2 is discharged by operation of unijunction transistor 303 through resistor 3R8 to ground. When a positive output pulse is applied from IC terminal 7 to the base of transistor 302 current will flow therethrough. Such conduction through transistor 302 produces low voltage at the end of resistor 3R6 which low voltage is supplied to the base of unijunction transistor 303 making the latter inoperative to cause discharge of capacitor 3C2.

When the output from lC terminal 7 changes to a low negative voltage and 1C terminal 8 assumes the high positive voltage by operation of the 1C flip-flop circuit as above described, such low voltage is then applied from terminal 7 to the base of transistor 302 which is insufficient to cause conduction therethrough. This results in the voltage at the end of resistor 3R6 and impressed on the base of transistor 303 becoming high enough to cause transistor 302 to operate normally. Capacitor 3C2 accordingly begins to charge through resistors R23 and 3R7 to the voltage at which transistor 303 fires and discharges the capacitor 3C2 through resistor 3R8 to ground. This discharge pulse from capacitor 3C2 is also supplied from the top of resistor 3R8 and 1C terminal 2. The adjustment of variable resistor R23 accordingly thus establishes a very accurate invariable time period of 65 microseconds for the duration of the pulse supplied to IC terminal 2.

Operation of the unijunction transistor 301 causes the IC output terminal 7 to assume a low voltage which allows unijunction transistor 303 to operate, and after 65 microseconds produces a pulse to [C terminal 2. This pulse resets the [C flip-flop and turns off the unijunction transistor 303, thus conditioning such flip-flop circuit for repetition of the voltage alteration by operation of transistor 301. Inasmuch as lC terminal 7 is connected to the base of transistor 304 and the IC terminal 8 to the base of transistor 305, as previously mentioned, such transistors operate as pulse amplifiers. The amplified pulse from transistor 304 is accordingly supplied by the previously mentioned conductor 13 to the keyer amplifier 2 for a period of 65 microseconds, and similarly an amplified pulse of this same 65 microseconds duration is supplied by conductor 24 to the terminal 6T1 of the Module No. 2 forming the major part of the frequency meter 6, as shown at the bottom of FIG. 3.

The pulse impressed on terminal 6T1 of this Module No. 2 is coupled by a capacitor 6C1 to the base of a transistor 601 which operates as an amplifier. A resistor 6R1 in the module provides a bias voltage to the base of such transistor 601, through terminal 6T2 connected to a 9.1 volt source from the low voltage power supply 8 by a conductor 25, and the module resistor 6R2 constitutes the collector load. A resistor 6R3 couples the pulse signal to the base of transistor 602 with such base connected through a resistor 6R4 to the ground conductor extending from module terminal 6T3. Transistor 602 operates as a keying amplifier and provides a pulse through capacitor 6C2 to the base of a unijunction transistor 603. The emitter of transistors 601 and 602 are connected to grounded terminal 6T3 as is the base of unijunction transistor 603 and one side of a capacitor 6C3. Also the emitter of transistor 602 and the base of unijunction resistor 603 are connected through respective resistors 6R5 and 6R6 to the 9.1 volt module terminal 6T2.

The frequency meter M has one of its conductors connected to module terminal 6T4 and hence to the ungrounded side of capacitor 6C3 and to the emitter of unijunction transistor 603. The remaining terminal of the meter M is connected through a variable resistor R57 to module terminal 6T5 and through a fixed resistor 6R7 to the 9.1 volt module terminal 6T2. The meter M is accordingly in the charging circuit for the capacitor 6C3 so that raising the charging current for such capacitor raises the reading of the meter M. The capacitor 6C3, however, is discharged by conduction of transistor 603, at the rate of the incoming pulses supplied to the latter from the pulse generator 3, through conductor 24 and transistors 601 and 602, which results in the higher the frequency of these pulses, the larger the current indicated by the meter M. This is due to the fact that in a resistor-capacitor (RC) timing circuit, the initial charging current is higher than the charging current at a later timing period, so that as the frequency increases the meter M will read upscale. Resistor R57 is provided to adjust the meter M for calibration purposes.

The power control 7, as shown in the dotted lines at the top of FIG. 4, comprises the usual attachment plug P for connection to the customary grounded volt commercial source of supply. Insertion of the plug P in the convenience wall outlet connects the high side of the supply source through a fuse F to a filter arrangement which comprises inductors L15 and L16, and capacitors C36, C37 and C38, and with such high side of the supply source connected to one of the windingsof a relay RY2 and to one of its contacts K4. The grounded low side of the supply source from plug P is also connected to the filter arrangement and to a normally open contact of a double-pole push-button switch SW13. Also this grounded low side of the supply source is connected by a conductor 26 to one of a pair of normally open contacts K6 of a relay RY3, an exhaust fan F, an inductor L18, and filament heating winding of transformer T1, of the high voltage power supply 9, as well as the conductor 26 extending to the primary winding of transformer T3 of the low voltage power supply 8.

The switch SW13 is the actual control switch for the apparatus and when in its depressed position the apparatus is off and when its red illuminated button is out the apparatus is on. One pole of each of the push-button switches SW13, SW14 and SW15 are electrically connected together as shown in FIG. 4, and such switches are mechanically linked so as react relative to one another to complete the energizing circuit to the winding of relay RY2 with attendant closure of its contacts K4. For example, when the push-button switch SW13 is in its depressed off" position, the yellow illuminated standby" push-button switch SW14 will be in its out and hence off position. Such is also true of the green illuminated treatment" switch SW15 since it is off if its push-button is undepressed.

In order to cause energization of relay RY2 and closure of its contacts K4, the operator depresses the push-button switch SW14 which closes its normally open contacts in the relay energizing circuit and at the same time the mechanical linkage causes the push-button switch SW13 to jump out to its "on" position with closure of its normally open contacts. Both switches SW13 and SW14 will accordingly be closed thereby completing the power supply circuit from the plug P to the winding of relay RY2 and causing closure of its contacts K4. At this time the green illuminated push-button switch SW15 is still in its undepressed and hence open position. Closure of relay contacts K4 thus connects the high side of the supply source from the plug P, through a conductor 27, a cable jumper J1, a thermal overload switch SW16 and an interlock switch SW17, to the fused end F2 of the primary winding of transformer T3 of the low voltage supply 8, as well as the remaining end of the primary windings of transformer T1 and inductor L18, and to one end of the primary windings of transformer T2 and inductor L17 of the high voltage supply 9. Since the remainder of the various elements of the power control 7 are dependent for operation on the low voltage supply 8 and high voltage supply 9, reference will now be made to the latter before completing the description of the power control 7.

Energization of low voltage supply transformer T3 by conductors 26 and 27 produces a voltage output which is supplied to a full-wave rectifier arrangement comprising diodes D1 through D4. The 35 volt DC. output from the rectifier bridge is filtered by a capacitor C23, a resistor R36, and a capacitor C24, with the resistor R36 also operating to drop the voltage supply to a regulator transistor 803. A resistor 37 and a zener diode D13 are connected across the rectified DC. output and operate to supply a regulated 22 volts to the base of transistor 8Q3.

This results in a regulated output from such transistor of approximately 24 volts and to which the supply conductor 19 is connected for supplying this regulated 24 volts to the pulse generator 3, as previously mentioned. The previously mentioned supply conductor 16 extending to the pulse generator 3 and the power amplifier and doubler 4, and to the power con trol 7 as hereinafter mentioned, is connected to the collector of transistor 803 so that an unregulated 24 volts is supplied by conductor 16. A resistor R38 and zener diode D14 provide a regulated DC. output of 9.1 volts, which is supplied by previously mentioned conductor 25 to the terminal 6T2 of Module No. 2 forming part of the frequency meter 6. Similarly the zener diode D15 and resistor R39 produce a DC. regulated 36 volts to which the aforementioned conductor 23 is connected for supplying such voltage to IC terminal 6 of the pulse generator 3.

The high voltage power supply transformer T1, as well as the air-circulating fan F, is energized at the same time as the low voltage power supply transformer T2 by closure of contact K4 of relay RY2, as previously mentioned. Consequently such transformer T1 together with its associated inductor L18 provides a regulated AC output from its secondary winding which is then rectified by diodes D and D6 and provides a 440 volt positive potential. Such potential is then filtered by capacitors C25 and C26 with resistors R40 and R41 function ing as bleeders to equalize the voltage drop across such capacitors C25 and C26. This 440 volt positive potential is then supplied to the aforementioned supply conductor 11 extending to the oscillator doubler l and keyer amplifier 2, upon closure of normally open contacts K7 of the relay RY3.

The low voltage winding of transformer T1 supplies a low voltage heating current through a conductor 28 to the thermionic cathodes of previously mentioned electronic tubes V1, V2, V3, V4, and to the heating filament of thermal time-delay device TDR. Taps from the secondary winding of transformer T1 together with capacitor C35 and diodes D7 and D8 provide a l50 volt supply which is filtered by capacitor C27 and bleeder resistor R42. This -l50 volt supply is fed to resistor R43 which operates in conjunction with the voltage regulator tube VRl to supply a regulated l 50 volts through previously mentioned conductor to the power amplifier doubler 4, as well as to the power control 7. However, such 150 volts is not supplied to conductor 15 until after a predetermined time period of about 90 seconds required to heat the thermionic cathodes of the tubes V1, V2, V3, V4, as well as the heater filament of the time delay device TDR. When the latter has reached a desired temperature it will only then close its internal contacts andv allow the regulated -l5O volts to pass to conductor 15.

Returning now to the remaining elements of the power control 7, it will be noted that the regulated l50 volts through conductor 15 is supplied to a resistor R58 which has its opposite end connected to a normally open contact of the pushbutton switch SW15, to one terminal of a timer T, and through a resistor R63 to the base of a transistor 706, which is normally operating in a conducting state with bias therefor being provided by resistors R62 and R64. Consequently, with both switches SW13 and SW14 closed and transformers T1 and T3 energized, the normally open contacts K6 and grounded contacts K7 of relay RY3 need only to be closed by the energizing of such relay winding. This may be done by manual setting of the timer T for a preselected time period, thus closing the internal timer switch and connecting the l50 volts supplied thereto by conductor 15 to the winding of relay RY3 through a conductor 30, thereby energizing such relay accompanied by closure of its normally open contacts K6 and K7.

When relay contacts K7 close the 440 volts produced by transformer T1 is supplied to the previously mentioned conductor 11 extending to the power control 7, as well as to the oscillator doubler l and keyer amplifier 2. The closure of relay contacts K6 completes the energizing circuit from conductor 26 to the inductor L17 and primary windings of transformer T2, since their remaining winding ends are connected to supply conductor 27. The secondary winding of the transformer T2 together with bridging capacitor C34 and inductor L17 provide a regulated AC output to the rectifier bridge comprising diodes D9 through D12. The DC. output from this diode bridge is filtered by the bank of capacitors C28 through C33, and resistors R44 through R55 equalize the voltage drop across such capacitors as well as functioning as a bleeder. The resistor R56 operates as a current limiter for controlling the peak current delivered by the filter-capacitor arrangement, which thus decreases to a minimum the possibility of damage to the tubes V3 and V4 of the power amplifier 4, to which the +2,480 volt output of the filter-capacitor arrangement is supplied by previously mentioned conductor 17.

During energization of all the transformers T1, T2 and T3 the unregulated 24 volts will be supplied by the conductor 16 to the power control 7 and hence to a signal lamp 114 positioned in back of the red transparent push-button switch SW13 as long as such switch is in its on" undepressed position. Likewise a signal lamp I15 positioned in back of the yellow transparent standby" push-button switch SW 14 will be simultaneously energized as long as such switch is in its depressed on position and until either the timer T or the green treatment switch SW15 is operated to close the energizing circuit to the winding of relay RY3.

Such yellow signal lamp 115 is energized due to the -l50 volts being applied through conductor 15 and resistors R58 and R63 to the base of normally conducting transistor 706 which causes such transistor to thereupon cease to conduct. The ensuing voltage drop at its collector is thus reduced to zero and the positive potential supplied through resistor R61 causes a transistor 705 to conduct. This accordingly, completes the energizing circuit to the yellow transparent standby" push-button lamp 115 from the conductor 16 to ground. The entire apparatus in its standay condition is then ready to produce pulsed high frequency radiation from its treatment head 5 upon the operator either setting the timer T for the preselected time period or depressing the green treatment push-button switch SW15.

Assuming first that the timer T is set for a preselected time period then operation thereof completes an energizing circuit from the l50 volt conductor 15, through resistor R58 and conductor 30, to the winding of relay RY3 and thence to the secondary winding of transfonner T1. The coil of relay RY3 is accordingly energized and closes its contacts K6 and K7 to connect the 440 volt source to the aforesaid conductor 11 and to cause the generation of the 2,480 volts and the supply thereof to conductor 17. Also, upon closure of the energizing circuit to the winding of relay RY3 by operation of the timer T, the -ISO volts is reduced at the junction of resistors R58 and R63 to a value where transistor 7Q6 again becomes conductive. Such action causes the transistor 705 to stop conducting which extinguishes the yellow" indicating lamp I15 disposed within the push-button of standby switch SW14.

At the same time the supply of the 440 volts and the 2,480 volts to the circuitry, as above noted, is accordingly sensed by transistor 7Q4 through resistors R59 and R60. The ensuing positive potential applied to the base of transistor 7Q4 causes it to conduct thereby lighting indicator lamp 116 disposed within the green plastic treatment push-button SW15, The apparatus will thereupon continue to operate to produce the desired output at the treatment head 5, until the expiration of the time selected by the timer T which then interrupts the energizing circuit for the winding of relay RY3. The green treatment lamp 116 is accordingly extinguished while the yellow standby" lamp I15 is again illuminated, along with the red lamp which has remained illuminated in the out and hence on" position of the control switch SW13. The entire apparatus is then rendered inoperative by the operator depressing the out on" push-button SW13 thus extinguishing the red on" lamp I14, and at the same time the mechanical linkage causes the yellow standby push-button switch SW14 to jump out to its off position and extinguish the yellow standby" lamp 115.

Assuming now it is desired to operate the apparatus for an unlimited period of time, the operator again first depresses the yellow standby" push-button SW14 which through the connecting linkage forces the red on" push-button switch SW13 outward with attendant illumination of its red indicator lamp 114. After the lapse of the approximately 90 seconds time delay and operation of the relay TDR, the yellow standby indicator lamp 115 is illuminated. Instead of setting the timer T for a definite operating time period, the operator now merely depresses the green treatment push-button switch SW15 which illuminates its lamp 116. At the same time the mechanical linkage causes the yellow standbyf push-button switch SW14 to jump out extinguishing its yellow indicating lamp 115.

Since one pole of the push-button switch SW15 is connected to the red control switch SW13, closure of the green treatment switch SW15 continues to cause the winding of relay RY2 to remain energized despite the opening of the contacts of the yellow standby push-button switch SW14. The remaining pole of the green" treatment push-button switch SW15, being in electrical parallel with the timer T, accordingly closes the energizing circuit to the winding of relay RY3 in the same manner as above described. This causes the identical ensuing results in the operation of the apparatus and the transmission of pulsed high frequency radiations from the treatment head 5 so long as the operator retains the green treatment push-button switch SW in its depressed position.

When the operator desires to discontinue operation of the apparatus he merely depresses the yellow standby" push-button switch SW14 thereby causing its mechanical linkage to force the depressed green treatment push-button switch SW15 to its outer off position. This interrupts the energizing circuit to the winding of relay RY3 causing its contacts K6 and K7 to again open and stopping the supply of the 440 and 2,480 volts to the above-mentioned circuits. Thereafter the operator then depresses the on red push-button switch SW13 which extinguishes red and yellow lamps I14 and 115 and interrupts the energizing circuit to the winding of relay RY2, with the mechanical linkage pushing the yellow standby push-button switch SW14 to its outer off" position.

During operation of the apparatus, either by the timer T or manually by depression of the green" treatment push-button switch SW15, the operation of the other units are identical. For example, the push-button switches SW1 through SW6, as previously mentioned are operable to selectively vary the screen grid voltage supplied to the electronic tubes V3 and V4 by the introduction of various value resistors R15 through R21 into the grid circuit and with an associated lamp 11 through 16 indicating the particular switch SW1 through SW6 selected at the moment. Such variation of screen grid voltage in six steps enables the operator to progressively select the peak wattage output power supplied by the power amplifier and doubler 4 to the treatment head 5, in terms of penetration of the high frequency pulsed radiation into the body of a patient during treatment.

Similarly the switches SW7 through SW12 are operable to progressively select the pulse frequency per second in steps of -160-300-400-500-600 during which the high frequency pulsed radiation of 65 microseconds duration is produced by the treatment head 5. Such operation results from the various resistance values selected by depression of each one of the push-button switches SW7 through SW12. The particular resistance chosen effects the voltage supplied to the Module No. 1 of the pulse generator 3. Hence the output pulse thus supplied by the latter to the keyer amplifier 2 by conductor 13, controls not only the 65 microseconds duration of each one of these pulsed radiations emanating from the treatment head 5 but also the total thereof per second at each selection by depression of the desired push-button switch SW7 through SW12 and illumination of its associated incandescent lamp 17 through 112 indicating the particular selection made. Inasmuch as the frequency meter M is connected through Module No. 2 to the pulse generator 3, such meter records the total output emanating from the treatment head in terms of wattage at each frequency setting selected by the separate switches SW7 through SW12.

It should thus be obvious to those skilled in the art from the foregoing that an atherrnapeutic apparatus is herein disclosed for producing pulsed high frequency radiation of a definite and unvarying duration and to which a. patient may be subjected for preselected definite total periods of such pulsed radiations. Moreover, such apparatus is operable at greatly reduced power consumption and with a higher degree of control over pulsed frequency and power output, but utilization of exceptionally stable circuitry and more accurate frequency generation. Operation is greatly simplified by employment of selective push-buttons depressible by an operator to control the desired pulse duration and frequency of the radiations.

Although one form of the athermapeutic apparatus of the present invention has been herein shown and described, it is to be understood that further modifications thereof may be made without departing from the invention.

I claim:

1. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus for administering therapeutic treatment to a patient without accompanying heat generation in the body of such patient, said apparatus comprising oscillation generating and doubler means operable to produce continuous high frequency electrical oscillations of predetermined frequency and which is doubled to produce an output therefrom, a keyer amplifier connected to said oscillation and doubler means including a safety relay operable to interrupt the operation of said oscillation generating and doubler means upon excess current flow through said keyer amplifier, a power amplifier and doubler means connected to said keyer amplifier and operable to double the frequency delivered as output therefrom and said power amplifier and doubler means having a plurality of push-button switches connected thereto and selectively depressible by an operator to preselect the desired peak output power produced by said power amplifier and doubler means in response to depression of each individual push-button switch, a treatment head connected to said power amplifier and doubler means for transmitting the pulsed high frequency oscillations from said treatment head into selected areas of a patients body, a pulse generator connected to said keyer amplifier and provided with a plurality of push-button switches selectively depressible by an operator to cause said keyer amplifier to accurately establish a preselected pulse duration and frequency of the oscillations delivered as output from said keyer amplifier in response to depression of each operator selected push-button switch, and a frequency meter connected to said pulse generator and operable to register the power output from said athermapeutic apparatus; a low voltage source connected to various units of said athermapeutic apparatus and operable to supply a plurality of relatively low voltages of different magnitude thereto, a high voltage source operable to supply a plurality of relatively high voltages to various units of said athermapeutic apparatus, and a power control manually operable to cause activation of said low voltage source followed after the lapse of a preselected period by activation of said high voltage source and thereby causing the transmission of high frequency oscillations of preselected pulse duration and frequency from said treatment head to a juxtapositioned patient.

2. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the oscillation generating and doubler means includes a crystal as a tuned oscillating device of very accurate frequency which is amplified by an electronic tube connected to a plurality of capacitors and inductors to cause accurate frequency generation and doubling from said oscillation generating and doubler means 3. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the keyer amplifier includes an electronic tube having its plate circuit connected to the winding of said safety relay and a transistor operable to produce the desired duration and frequency required to provide the keying action necessary to render said electronic tube operable to produce the desired output from said keyer amplifier, and said transistor also being operable upon the passage of excess current through said electronic tube to cause energization of said safety relay with attendant interruption of the operation of said oscillation generating and doubler means.

4. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the power amplifier and doubler means comprises electronic tubes having their grid electrodes connected to the output from said keyer amplifier and their plate electrodes connected to an inductance shunted by a pair of capacitors to form a plate tank circuit tuned to a frequency of 27.12 megacycles thereby doubling the frequency received from said keyer amplifier, and said plurality of push-button switches each housing an electric lamp and being selectively depressible by an operator to cause illumination of the lamp housed in said depressed switch and simultaneous operation of a transistor with attendant variation in the screen grid voltage supplied to said electronic tubes thereby establishing the peak output power delivered by said power amplifier and doubler means to said treatment head.

5. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the pulse generator comprises a module provided with a transistor operable to periodically supply a positive voltage peak to an integrated flip-flop circuit, a pair of transistors connected to the output of said integrated flip-flop circuit and operable as amplifiers for the pulse supplied by said pulse generator to said keyer amplifier and to said frequency meter, and a pair of transistors operable to cause an accurate invariable pulsed discharge of a capacitor connected to said integrated flipflop circuit for establishing a fixed period of 65 microseconds duration for the alternate operation of said integrated flip-flop circuit and hence the accurate duration of the pulse supplied by said pulse generator to said keyer amplifier,

6. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 5, wherein a plurality of illuminable push-button switches are selectively operable to connect resistors of various total ohmic value to the voltage supply for the module of said pulse generator to establish the magnitude of the positive voltage peak supplied by said transistor to the integrated flipflop circuit and hence the frequency of the pulse of accurate duration supplied by said pulse generator to said keyer amplifier.

7. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 5, wherein the pulse generator is connected to a frequency meter module comprising a pair of transistors operable to amplify the pulse received from said pulse generator, a capacitor charged from a relatively low voltage source and connected to an indicating meter, a third transistor connected to said capacitor and to said pair of amplifying transistors and operable to cause discharge of said capacitor at the rate of the pulses supplied to said third transistor through said pair of amplifying transistors, and said meter indicating a higher current upon an increase in the rate of the pulses supplied to said third transistor through said pair of amplifying transistors, and said meter indicating a higher current upon an increase in the rate of the pulses supplied from said pulse generator.

8. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the low voltage supply source operable to supply a plurality of relatively low voltages of different magnitude comprises a transformer having a low voltage secondary winding connected to a full wave rectifying bridge to produce a direct current output, a filtering arrangement connected to the output from said bridge comprising interconnected capacitors, resistors and a regulator transistor operable to produce different magnitudes of regulated and unregulated voltages at diverse points on said filtering arrangement to which conductors are connected for supplying said various voltages to the several elements of said athermapeutic apparatus.

9. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the high voltage source comprises a first transformer provided with a secondary winding operable to produce two output voltages of relatively high magnitude, a bridge arrangement connected to each output from said transformer for rectifying the voltage produced thereby, a relay adapted to be energized by one of said voltage supplies and provided with contacts closeable upon energization of said relay to supply the rectified voltage of highest magnitude from said first transformer to said keyer amplifier and said oscillator doubler, and a second transformer energizable upon closure of said relay contacts for producing an exceptionally high voltage which is rectified and supplied to said power amplifier doubler.

10. An ultra-short wave athermapeutic apparatus as specified in claim 1, wherein the power control comprises a plurality of interlocking push-button switches, one of said switches being connected to a commercial electric supply source and constituting an on-off" switch for initiating and stopping the operation of said athermapeutic apparatus, a second standby switch connected to said on-off" switch and operable only when said interlocked on-off switch has been moved to its outward undepressed position, to close an energizing circuit; a relay provided with a winding energizable upon closure of both said on-off" and standby switches to cause closure of a pair of normally open contacts and completion of an energizing circuit to the transformer of said low voltage supply and to the first transformer of said high voltage supply, and a parallel connected timer and treatment" pushbutton switch either of which is operable after a preselected period of time to cause energization of the relay of said high voltage supply and its second transformer accompanied by operation of said athermapeutic apparatus for the period selected by said timer or during the period said treatment" push-button switch is depressed, and said apparatus being disconnectable from the domestic supply source by depression of said on-off push-button switch with its interlock forcing out the depressed "standby switch to its open position.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification607/71
International ClassificationA61N1/40
Cooperative ClassificationA61N1/40
European ClassificationA61N1/40