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Publication numberUS3672481 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1972
Filing dateDec 8, 1969
Priority dateDec 6, 1968
Also published asCA916554A
Publication numberUS 3672481 A, US 3672481A, US-A-3672481, US3672481 A, US3672481A
InventorsAustin Hastie, Willard A Hastie
Original AssigneeCoin Verifiers Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Variable magnetic flux coin-sensing devices
US 3672481 A
Abstract
An improvement is herein provided, in a coin-sorting apparatus wherein a coin is caused to move down a chute defined by an inclined runway and a pair of substantially parallel plates. The improvement comprises a magnet having a slide face physically and magnetically coupled to the magnet positioned in the chute so that a coin moving in the chute is in direct, sliding, face-to-face contact therewith. The magnet includes a magnetic flux adjusting means including a casing of a non-magnetic, non-magnetizable material, with the magnet and the magnetic flux adjusting means mounted in the casing, the magnet and the flux adjusting means being relatively slidably mounted with respect to each other. By adjusting the strength of the magnet by the magnetic flux adjusting means, two conditions are caused to prevail, namely firstly that the magnet will attract and hold all coins made of iron or steel or other ferromagnetic metals and those coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal having a smooth face; and secondly that the magnet will attract but merely retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal and having an imprinted face.
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United States Patent Hastie et al.

[ 1 June 27, 1972 [5 VARIABLE MAGNETIC FLUX COIN- SENSING DEVICES Primary Examiner--Stanley H. Tollberg AnorneyMcCarthy, Depaoli, OBrien & Price [72] Inventors: Willard A. Hastie, Aylmer East, Quebec;

usti: Hustle, Ottawa, Ontario, both of 57 BSTR ana a An improvement is herein provided, in a coin-sorting api l Assigneei verifier?! p y Lima, Ottawaparatus wherein a coin is caused to move down a chute cmariotcanada defined by an inclined runway and a pair of substantially [22] Filed: Dem 8 1969 parallel plates. The improvement comprises a magnet having a slide face physically and magnetically coupled to the magnet [2| Appl No.: 883,131 positioned in the chute so that a coin moving in the chute is in direct, sliding, face-to-face contact therewith. The magnet includes a magnetic flux adjusting means including a casing of a [30] Foreign Appnmuon Priority Dam non-magnetic, non-magnetizable material, with the magnet Dec. 6, 1968 Canada ..O37,067 and the magnetic flux adjusting means mounted in the casing, the magnet and the flux adjusting means being relatively 52 us. Cl ..194 101 slidably mounted with respw to each othery adjusting the [51 1 ML W607; 3/02 strength of the magnet by the magnetic flux adjusting means, 58 Field of Search ...194/99, l0] are Caused P namely firstly magnet will attract and hold all coins made of iron or steel or I 56) References Chad other ferromagnetic metals and those coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal having a smooth face; and secondly UNITED ST TES PATENTS that the magnet will attract but merely retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic l,85 [,557 3/1932 Warzbach et al 194/101 metal and having an imprinted face. 2,277,018 3/l942 Patzer ct alr.... 194/101 2,528,690 ll/l950 Foushee ..l94/l0l 17 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures L 222: 259 224A; 223mm): 225'; 'mmnm 236 22;; 234

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VARIABLE MAGNETIC FLUX COIN-SENSING DEVICES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l Field of the Invention This invention relates to coin-handling devices. It relates to attachments for existing coin-handling devices, to providing improvements in separating genuine coins from spurious coins or slugs, to coin-handling devices including such attachments and also a coin-sorting device for segregating coins according to their denomination and also for segregating coins of the same denominations according to their magnetizable characteristics which is dependent upon chemical composition of the coins.

2. Description of the Prior Art It is now known that slugs and undesired coins may be separated from desired coins by eddy-current testing of the slugs and coins. By these means, slugs and coins which have electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities that are appreciably different from the electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability of desired coins are rejected. However, some commercially available alloys have electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities which are sufficiently close to the electrical resistivities and/or magnetic perrneabilities of some of the desired coins to prevent eddy-current testing of slugs made from those alloys from separating those slugs from those desired coins. As a result, slug rejectors which were in tended to accept certain desired coins and which were in tended to reject all slugs and all other coins and which relied solely upon eddy-current testing have been known to accept some slugs which had electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities similar to the electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability of the desired coins.

Accordingly, it was proposed in the prior art to improve the slug rejectors by using not only eddy-current testing of the coins and slugs but also testing of the weight and of the thickness of the inserted coins and slugs. The eddy-current testing enables the slug rejector to reject all slugs and coins which have electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities that are appreciably different from the electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities of desired coins, and the weight and thickness testing enables the slug rejector to reject all coins and slugs which have electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities similar to the electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability of the desired coins which are made from alloys that are different from the alloy of which the desired coins are made. For example, if the desired coins are made from a silver alloy, slugs that are made from a copper alloy which has electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities similar to the electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability of the desired coins would have specific gravities that are appreciably smaller than the specific gravity of the desired coins. This means that if the slugs remain as thin as the desired coins, the slugs would not pass the weight test; and it further means that if the slugs are made thick enough to pass the weight test, the slugs would not pass the thickness test. However, if slugs are made from an alloy which has electrical resistivities and/or magnetic permeabilities similar to the electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability of the desired coins, but which also has a specific gravity appreciably higher than that of the desired coins, they may pass the weight test and also be accepted, since no commercial thickness tester currently rejects solely on the basis of being too thin.

In summary, then, current three-coin chutes sort coins, firstly, according to their diameter and then evaluate them by several additional tests, namely: (I) is the inserted coin underweight (too light)? (2) is the inserted coin slightly under diameter (too small)? (3) is the inserted coin over diameter (too large)? (4) is the inserted coin too thick? (5) is the inserted coin a washer? (6) is the inserted coin (a) formed from a magnetizable or magnetic alloy, or (b) if not, does it have approximately the correct electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability? However, recent changes in the composition of the real coin alloys in Canadian coins have made the above-noted means for distinguishing slugs from real coins, and for segregating coins according to their denomination obsolete. Furthermore, the new real Canadian coinage alloys are so similar both in electrical resistivity properties, in magnetic permeability properties, and in density characteristics to currently available commercial alloys, that slugs can readily be prepared which would meet the electrical resistivity and/or magnetic permeability tests, the weight tests, and the thickness tests of conventional coin separators. Thus, with the advent of read Canadian coinage made from alloys which exhibit paramagnetic properties, all coin chutes which differentiate between real coins and slugs solely by the use of eddy-current testing have been rendered obsolete. In other words, test number 6 above cannot be carried out on the new Canadian coins made from alloys which exhibit paramagnetic properties, e.g., the new Canadian 10 coins (dimes") and the new Canadian 25 coins (quaners").

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION I. Objects and Advantages of the Invention One of the basic objects of the present invention is to provide improvements in the sensitivity of magnetic sensors in coin-handling devices.

A further principal object of the present invention is to provide a magnetic sensor of improved sensitivity with means to variously adjust the sensitivity of the magnetic sensor.

An object of one aspect of the present invention is to provide a means for distinguishing between certain real coins and slugs which does not rely exclusively on the use of eddy-current testing.

An object of another aspect of the present invention is the provision of a coin separator device which may separate genuine coins made of paramagnetic material from slugs made of paramagnetic material.

It is also an object of another aspect of this invention to pro vide a coin-separating device which can distinguish and separate paramagnetic genuine coins from ferromagnetic and/or paramagnetic slugs.

A further principal object of the present invention is to provide an attachment for existing coin-handling devices for converting the same to include magnetic sensing devices having improved sensitivities and also means to adjust such sensitivity.

2. Broad Statements of the Invention Accordingly, in accordance with one broad and basic aspect of the present invention, there is provided improved magnetic sensing in coinhandling devices which consists of locating the magnet or magnetizable member of the sensing device in the path which the coin to be sensed will follow to ensure physical face-to-face contact with the coin and also further including means for selectively varying the magnetic attractive force of the sensor. In this aspect of the invention, the magnetic sensing means preferably comprises a magnet, and a slide face physically and magnetically coupled to the magnet. Also, the means for selectively varying the magnetic attractive force includes a casing, formed of nonmagnetic, non-magnetizable material, with the magnet and the magnetic flux adjusting means being mounted in the casing, the magnet and the flux adjusting means being relatively slidably mounted with respect to each other.

By one broad aspect of this invention, there is provided, in a coin-sorting apparaztus wherein a coin is caused to move down a chute, a slide face physically and magnetically coupled to the magnet and projecting into the chute defined by an inclined runway and a pair of substantially parallel plates, the improvement comprising: a magnet positioned in the chute so that a coin moving in the chute is in direct, sliding, face-toface contact therewith, the magnet including a magnetic fluxadjusting means directly contacting and magnetically coupled to the magnet, and including a casing, formed of non-magnetic, non-magnetizable material, with the magnet and the magnetic flux adjusting means being mounted in the casing, the magnet and the flux adjusting means being relatively slidably mounted with respect to each other, the strength of the magnet having been adjusted by such magnetic flux adjusting means: (a) to attract and hold all coins made of iron or steel or other ferromagnetic metals and those coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal having a smooth face; and (b) to attract and retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal and having an embossed or imprinted face.

In one variant of this broad aspect of this invention, three such magnet means are provided, namely, one for testing quaners, one for testing nickels, and one for testing dimes. It may also be readily adapted to test 50 and $l.00 coins.

In one embodiment, the magnet includes a casing (e. g. a cylindrical bushing) formed of non-magnetic or non-magnetizable material (e.g. brass); a slide face is mounted on and/or within the casing, and is formed of magnetic and/or magnetizable material (e. g. steel); a magnet is provided within the casing and magnetically coupled to the slide face (e. g. by having one pole of the magnet in contact with the slide face); and a magnetic flux bleed or controller is mounted with respect to the casing and is movable with respect to the magnet, and is formed of magnetizable material (e. g. is a grub screw which is movable axially from one pole of the magnet).

By another broad aspect of this invention, there is provided, in a coin-sorting apparatus wherein a coin is caused to move down a chute defined by an inclined runway and a pair of substantially parallel plates, the improvement comprising: a cradle in the coin chute, the cradle being pivotally mounted with respect to the coin chute and having one arm thereof provided with a magnet, an extension of one pole of the magnet projecting into the coin chute in the path of movement of coins, the magnet including a magnetic flux-adjusting means, the strength of the magnet having been adjusted: (at) to attract and hold by the rim thereof all coins made of iron or steel or other ferromagnetic metals and those coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal having a smooth rim; and (b) to attract and retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal.

In the latter embodiment, the magnetizable material engages the edges of the coins. The magnetic flux may be adjusted with sufficient sensitivity such that coins having a serrated edge may be separated from those having a smooth edge because of the difference in area of contact between the magnet and the respective types of coins. Accordingly, coins may be selected dependent upon the surface characteristic of the same in combination with the magnetic properties of the material. It will also be realized that edge engagement of coins may be used in any one of a number ofchutes.

In one variant of the invention, the coin-handling device is provided with means to divide the same into one or more passages, or chutes as they may be referred to. There may be as many chutes as desired, for example, one each for nickels, dimes, quarters, fifty-cent pieces and dollar pieces or any combination thereof.

In other variants and embodiments of this aspect of this invention, the chute divider is in the form ofa pivotally mounted cradle which is engaged by the coin. A coin having the size and weight of a quarter" is engaged by the two arms of the cradle, pivots the cradle and then is automatically discharged down a quarter" coin chute. A coin having the size and weight of a nickel passes between the arms of the first pivotally mounted cradle. It engages the arms of a second pivotally mounted cradle. If it has the weight and size of a genuine "nickel," it causes the cradle to pivot and then discharge the coin down a nickel'' chute. Coins having the size and weight of a dime" or a "penny" pass between the arms of the second pivotally mounted cradle and engage a counterweighted pivotally mounted gate. Coins having the weight of a penny" have sufi'icient momentum to. open the gate and are discharged to a "penny reject chute. Coins having the weight of a "dime have insufficient momentum to open the gate, and are deflected to a dime chute. Each of the quarter, nickel," and "dime" chutes is provided with the magnet with which the coin is in direct, sliding, face-toface contact, the magnet having the magnet flux-adjusting means.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS l. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view taken from one side of the coin-handling device showing one face thereof and illustrating one aspect of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. I taken from the other side of the coin-handling device and illustrating a further aspect of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 2 but with the stripping plate removed for clarity;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 2 but with the stripping plate and the movable gate rotated through to reveal the parts therebelow and provide an end elevational view of the rotated parts;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 2 but with the stripping plate, the movable gate, and the movable wall each removed for clarity;

FIG. 6 is a section along the line Vl-VI of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is a section along the line Vll-Vll of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a section along the line VIII-VIII of FIG. I;

FIG. 9 is a fragmatic elevational view of FIG. 3, showing the path of "quarters" through the coin-handling device;

FIG. I0 is a fragmatic elevational view of FIG. 3, showing the path of nickels through the coin-handling device; and

FIG. 11 is a fragmatjc elevational view of FIG. 3, showing the path ofdimes through the coin-handling device.

2. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The coin chutes according to aspects of the present invention as shown in the drawings are preferably adapted to be used in conjunction with other presently conventional coinseparating devices which separate coins by means of their weight, by means of their diameter, by means of their thickness, and by testing for the presence of apertures therethrough, and also is preferably used with presently commercially available coin-scavenging devices for the releasing of unacceptable coins or slugs. In order to provide a complete description of the co-operation between the coin chute of aspects of the present invention and the conventional coin chutes, reference will now be made to FIGS. 1 5. Brief descriptions only will be given for these particular separators, it being understood that more complete descriptions may be found in one or more of the following Canadian Pat. Nos.: 470,637 issued Jan. 9, I951 to Robert M. Foushee; 552,76l issued Feb. 4, I958 to Merral P. I-Iaverstick; 561,074 issued July 29, 1958 to John Gottfried; 561.800 issued Aug. 12, I958 to Merral P. Haverstick; 595,94l issued Apr. 12, 1960 to Merral P. Haverstick; 745.437 issued Nov. 1, 1966 to Anton Okolischan; and 755,884 issued Apr. 4, I967 to Anton Okolischan.

3. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF FIGS. 1 5

Referring now to FIGS. 1 5 inclusive, the numeral 20 denotes the frame of the coin separator provided by aspects of the present invention. That frame is essentially a flat plate provided with a projecting flange 22 on one edge thereof and with an opposed, facing flange 24 at the other edge thereof. Two spaced apart ears 26 are provided on flange 22, each appearing as a post upstanding from frame 20. The cars 26 support a pivot pin 28 which in turn, rotatably supports a movable gate 100. Movable gate includes a main portion 102 provided with a pair of longitudinally extending arms 104 joined, near their outer ends, by a transverse rib 106. At the outer end of each of the arms 104 is a bushing 108 through which pivot pin 28 passes. Gate 100 can thus rotate about the pin 28 from a position in parallel relation with the central web 30 of the frame to a position angularly disposed relative to central web 30. A spring 32 encircles the pivot pin 28, one end projecting through aperture 34 in web 30 and engaging therewith, the other end bearing against a transverse rib 106 of the gate 100. Spring 32 thus biases gate 100 into parallel relation with the central web 30 of the frame 20. A spacer 110 is formed on the gate 100, the spacer 110 being adapted to engage the central web 30 of the frame 20 to limit the movement of the gate 100 toward the central web of the frame 20. This spacer 110 is suitably dimensioned to enable the gate 100 to co-operate with the central web 30 of the frame 20 to provide the entering portion of a coin passageway.

A movable wall 200 is also rotatably mounted about the pivot pin 28 by means of spaced apart, upstanding lugs 202 through which pivot pin 28 passes. No additional spring is used to bias the movable wall 200 toward the central web 30 of the frame 20. Wall 200 is shaped to fit in the opening defined by arms 104 and main portion 102 of gate 100. Additionally, an ear 204 is adapted to be disposed under the upper of arms 104, and a bottom edge 206 is adapted to be disposed under the lower of arms 104 ofgate 100. Wall 200 is provided with a longitudinally extending slot 208. The leading, free edge 210 of wall 200 is provided with an upstanding ledge 212 above slot 208, and a pair of upstanding ledges 214 below slot 208. Ledges 212 and 214 act as baffles which are provided to keep coins from slipping into the space between the outer surface of the movable wall 200 and the inner surface of the gate 100 whenever the gate 100 is moved away from the central web 30 of the frame 20. If the coins tend to follow the gate 100, the forward edges of these coins will strike the edges of baffles 212 and 214 and will be kept from slipping to the outer surface of the movable wall 200. Adjacent ledge 212 is a first adjustable magnet means 216 and adjacent ledge 214 is a second adjustable magnet means 218. These adjustable magnet means 216 and 218 will be described in greater detail in F IG. 7.

A spacer pedestal 36 is provided on the central web 30 of the frame 20. This spacer pedestal 36 is suitably dimensioned to abut the opposed face of movable wall 200 at the region of ear 204, thereby to hold the leading free edge 210 of the movable wall 200 away from the central web 30 of the frame 20 a distance just slightly greater than the thickness of acceptable coins. Thus, the spacer pedestal 36 assures the maintenance of the proper spacing between the leading free edge 210 of the movable wall 200 and the central web 30 of the frame 20 to accept genuine coins, but to reject, by jamming, coins or slugs which are too thick.

Slot 208 which is formed in the movable wall 200 accommodates a runway 112 on the gate 100, the slot permitting runway 112 to move, when gate 100 moves, into engagement with the central web 30 of the frame 20. Generally above the runway 112 is a pair of upper downwardly sloping parallel depressed channels 38 and 40 formed in central web 30. Coins rolling down runway 112 will be guided by means of channels 38 and 40 to move past the zone of magnetic flux of the first magnet means 216, between the central web 30 of frame 20 and the opposed face of wall 200, i.e., in quarter" passageway 113. The gate 100 carries a second runway 114 which extends to and engages the central web 30 of the frame 20. Coins rolling along runway 114 will be guided by means of a pair of lower downwardly sloping parallel depressed channels 42 and 44 and will then pass the zone of magnetic flux of the second magnet means 218 between the central zone of the frame 20 and the opposed face of wall 200, ie in nickel" passageway 115.

The upper edge of main portion 102 of gate 100 includes a guide 116 defining, between it and central web 30, an en trance coin passageway 118. A coin funnel 120 of generally hollow inverted pyramidal shape is secured, by one of its walls, to guide 1 16 by screw 122. The width of the coin passageway is provided by upstanding, spaced apart pedestal walls 46 on central web 30. A pivot 124 is secured to the main portion 102 of gate at a point below the guide wall 116 and that pivot 124 supports a first coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126. This coinsizing gauge or cradle 126 is provided with a first angular projection 128 which extends through a slot 130 in gate 100 and into a depressed channel 48 in central web 30. This projection thus extends into the coin passageway 118 defined by the gate 100 and the frame 20, and will intercept coins introduced into that passageway. The other end of coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126 is provided with an adjustable magnetic cradle 132 including a magnet 134, a pole piece 136, a magnet strength adjusting plate 138 and a pole piece extension rod 140 extending into the quarter" coin passageway 113 to intercept coins introduced into that passageway. The adjustable magnetic cradle 132 will be described in greater detail in FIG. 6.

A stop 142 is provided on the gate 100, and it holds the coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126 in the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 during normal conditions of operation. A counterweight 144 is provided on the coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126 to maintain it in a position against stop 142, Le. to rotate it in a counterclockwise direction against the stop 142. When a coin of the proper size and proper weight enters the passageway 118 and engages the projections 128 and 140 on the coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126, the weight of that com will cause the gauge or cradle 126 to rotate in a clockwise direction away from the stop 142. The coinsizing gauge or cradle 126 will continue to rotate with the coin until the coin can fall freely from the projections 128 and 140 thereof, whereupon the weight of the gauge or cradle 126 provided by weight 144 will rotate it in a counterclockwise direction. The runway 112 which is provided on the gate 100 will receive coins from the first sizing gauge or cradle 126. A more detailed description of the operation of adjustable magnetic cradle 132 and of the first adjustable magnet means 116 according to aspects of this invention will be provided hereinafter with reference to FIG. 9.

A second coin-sizing gauge or cradle 146 is secured to the gate 100 by being mounted on a pivot 148. This coin-sizing gauge 146 has angular projections 150 and 152 thereon which extend through slots 154 and 156 respectively in the gate 100 and are guided in depressed channels 50 and 52 provided in the central web 30 of the frame 20. The second coin-sizing gauge or cradle 146 is disposed below and to the left of the first coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126, and it will receive and test coins which are too small in diameter to be intercepted and momentarily held by the projections 128, 140 on the first coin-testing gauge or cradle 126 and then delivered to the runway 112. The second gauge or cradle 146 has a counterweight 158 thereon that normally holds the gauge in the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Whenever a coin of proper size and proper weight engages and is held by the projections 150 and 152 of the gauge or cradle 146, that coin will cause gauge or cradle 146 to rotate in a clockwise direction. The gauge or cradle 146 will continue to rotate in a clockwise direction until the coin held by the projections 150, 152 of gauge or cra' dle 146 can fall free onto a runway to be described hereinafter and permit the counterweight 158 of the gauge 146 to rotate the gauge 146 back to the position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Coins which fall free are delivered to runway 114.

A bracket plate 160 is secured to the gate 100 at a point almost immediately below the second gauge or cradle 146. A feeler wire 162 is pivotally secured beneath plate 160. A weight 164 is secured to the feeler wire 162, and that weight, which is adapted to be disposed in a depressed channel 166 in the gate 100, biases the upper end 168 of the feeler wire 162 into a coin passageway 170 between the gate 100 and the central web 30 of the frame 20 adjacent the second gauge or cradle 146. The feeler wire 162 is intended to intercept and hold coins or washers which have openings therethrough or which have abnormal surface deformations. The operation of these elements is described with reference to FIG. 10.

An ear 172 on the free edge of the gate 100 carries a generally V-shaped deflector 174 by means of a pivot pin 176, the deflector 174 being provided with a weight 178 on one of the legs thereof. The deflector 174 is therefore free to pivot relative to the ear 172 and is thus free to pivot relative to the gate 100 and the central web 30 of the frame 20. The weight 178 on the one leg of the deflector 174 will bias the other leg of that deflector into a coin passageway 180 defined by the gate 100 and the central web 30 of the frame 20.

An opening 54 is provided in the central web 30 of the frame to permit other coins, such as United States or Canadian ten-cent coins (dimes) to pass from the coin passageway 180 between the gate 100 and the central web of the frame 20 and preferably also to any desirable conventional other testing mechanisms (not shown). This opening 54 will be just large enough to accommodate coins such as the United States or Canadian one-cent coins (pennies) which are to be detected and rejected by mechanisms on the central web 30 of the frame 20 adjacent flange 24. Included in those detecting mechanisms for the pennies" is a coin-intercepting plate 56 secured to the central web 30 of the frame 20 adjacent flange 24. The arcuate portion 58 of the plate 56 is spaced above and to the left of the upper portion of the opening 54, thus exposing an arcuate area of the central web 30 of the frame 20. This arcuate area will be narrow and will reflect the difference in diameter between a penny and a dime.

Dimes moving past second coin-sizing gauge 146 and passing through opening 54 will strike V-shaped deflector 174 with insufficient momentum to be deflected out of the coin passageway 180, and will be permitted to enter a coin passageway 182 between central web 30 and movable wall 410. On the other hand, pennies moving past second coin-sizing gauge 146 and passing opening 54 will strike V-shaped deflector 174 with such momentum as to be deflected out of the coin passageway 180v Thus, the penny will be deflected over the bottom, flat edge 60 of opening 54 to the rejected coin chute 62 formed in part by flange 24 and central web 30 of frame 20, thereby preventing the blocking of the accepted coin chute 182 with pennies.

A small centering opening 64 is provided in the central web 30 of the frame 20, and a coin-intercepting element 184 is mounted on the gate 100 in registry with the opening 64. Element 184 is loosely secured to gate 100 by means ofa pivot (not shown). A centering pin 186 in the form of a cone is carried by the free end of the element [84, pin 186 being in registry with the opening 64. Pin 186 extends through an opening (not shown) in gate 100, which is large enough to permit the free end of the element 184 to move vertically a slight distance. When the gate 100 is spaced from the central web 30 of the frame 20, the free end of the element 184 will move downwardly under the influence of gravity until the shoulder that surrounds the pin 186 rests on the bottom edge of the opening into which it extends. At this time, the pin 186 will still be in registry with the opening 64, but the point of the pin 186 will not be precisely in registry with the geometric center of the opening 64. As the gate 100 moves toward the central web 30 of the frame 20, the conical face on the pin 186 will co-act with the edge of the opening 64 to raise the free end of the element 184 and thus place the upper surface of that element in precisely spaced relation to the stationary coin-intercepting element 56. Variations in the position of the free edge of the gate 100, due to manufacturing tolerances and wear, will be less than the centering made possible by the opening in the gate 100, the pin 186 and the opening 64. As a result, the coin-intercepting element 182 will always be restored to a precisely spaced relationship with the coin-intercepting element 56 whenever the gate 100 is parallel to and adjacent the central web 30 of the frame 20.

The operation of these elements is described in greater detail in FIG. 11.

A plate-like partition 300 is spaced from central web 30 at the lower portion of the frame 20 to define two coin passageways 302 and 304. Coin passageway 302 joins coin passageway 118 and is for coins which are intercepted and sized by the first coin-sizing gauge or cradle 126. Coin passageway 304 joins coin passageway 182 and is for coins intercepted and sized by the second coin-sizing gauge 146. The partition 300 has an opening 306 therein. This opening is slightly above and slightly to the left of the geometric center of the partition 300, and an inclined projection 308 extends through opening 306 and rests in a recess 66 in the central web 30 of the frame 20. This inclined projection 308 acts as an inclined plane and will intercept and deflect rejected coins out of the passageways defined by the partition 300 and the central web 30 of the frame 20.

A notch 310 is provided in the upper edge of the partition 300, the notch being located generally to the left of the opening 306 in the partition 300. The notch 310 is generally V- shaped in configuration and has the apex 312 thereof spaced inwardly from the upper edge 314 of partition 300. A bifurcated gate 316 is rotatably mounted on a pivot 318 which is secured to the partition 300. Coin-engaging annular projections 320, 322 are formed on the ends of the arms of the gate 316. Projection 320 extends into coin passageways 302 and 304 and travels in recess 68 in central web 30. Projection 322 also projects into coin passageways 302 and 304 and travels in recess 70 in central web 30. Projections 320 and 322 are spaced apart to define a coin-receiving opening for the gate 316 which is large enough to receive and pass the coins which are intercepted and sized by the second gauge 146. but which is too small to receive and pass the coins which are intercepted and sized by the first gauge 126. This gate, therefore, as one of its functions, verifies the action of gauge or cradle 126. The coins that do leave through the opening 306 in the gate 300 do so freely and without interception and and momentary holding provided by the coin-testing gauges 126 and 146. The lefthand edge of the notch 310 will act as the upper stop for the gate 316 and the bottom of the opening 306 will act as the lower stop for the gate 316. These stops will act to define the bounds of the virtual opening provided by the gate 316. The gate 316 will normally rest against the lower stop but it will be able to rotate upwardly with rapidity and ease.

An anvil 72 is secured by a screw 76 in a slot 74 in central web 30 adjacent flange 23 and is disposed below and to the right of the lower end of the runway l 12.

A second partition 400 is secured to the frame 20 and spaced from central web 30 so that the partition 300 and the partition 400 are oppositely disposed of the frame 20 (see FIG. 1). Partition 400 and frame 20 define several coin passageways. In addition, partition 400 includes, as an integral member thereof, a portion to which is secured an adjustable magnetic means 402 of an aspect of this invention, which will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

The magnetic means 402 is disposed in a coin passageway 404 defined partly by a pair of indented channels (not shown) in partition 400, a pair of indented channels (not shown) in the frame 20 and facing the channels in the partition 400, and a runway 407 secured by screws 406, 408 to a movable wall 410. Movable plate 410 is pivoted by shaft 412 between upstanding lug 414 and flange 416. A hold-down plate 418, biased by spring 420, retains wall 410 in proper position. Secured to wall 410 is a coin-testing gauge provided by wire 422 pivotally secured beneath a post and retaining plate 424 by screw 426. The other end of the wire 422 is provided with a counterweight 428 to bias the wire 422 to project through slot 430 in wall 410.

Partition 400 is also provided with additional coin-verifying devices. An anvil 432 is secured by screw 434 in a slot 436. Also secured thereto is a plate 438, by screw 440, the plate being provided with a momentum-absorbing lever 442 pivoted at 448 and including an angular projection 450 into the coin chute.

Secured to the rear face of frame 20 adjacent but below slot 74 is an L-shaped plate 448, by means of screw 450. A mo mentLun-absorbing lever 452 is pivoted by pivot 454 on lever 448 and includes an angular projection 456 projecting into the coin passageway through opening or slot 78.

A stripping plate 500 is also pivoted on the pivot pin 28, and a spring 502 is provided to urge the stripping plate toward the central web 30 of the frame 20. The spring 502 encircles the pivot pin 28 and has one end projecting through aperture 34 in the central web 30 and has the other end bearing against a lug 504 on the stripper plate 500. The stripper plate 500 has three angularly disposed stripping projections 506, 508 and 510,formed at the free edge thereof. Stripping projections 506 and $08 extend through a slot 188 in the gate 100, one on the upstream end and the other on the downstream end of magnet means 132 while stripping projection 510 extends through slot 154 in the gate 100. The stripping projections 506, 508 and 510 are normally spaced outwardly of the slots 188 and 154 in the gate 100, being held away from those openings by the magnet means 216. However, whenever the gate 100 is moved outwardly and away from the center wall of the frame 20, as when a slug is to be stripped" from the coin chute, the slots 188 and 154 will be telescoped over the stripping projections 506, 508 and 510 and thus, such projections will strip away any coins which tend to move with the gate adjacent the slots 188 and 154.

In addition, a connecting arrn 530 is also guided by pin 520 along an arcuate slot (not shown) in frame 20. A cam surface 532 of the arm 530 engages a roller 458 mounted on shafi 460. This causes movable wall 410 to be rotated slightly, thereby increasing the thickness of any coin passageway defined between frame 20 and wall 410.

A link arm 534, spring biased by means of spring 536, transmits movement of arm 530 to a second wiper arm 538, which is pivoted at 540, through pin 542. Thus, as wall 410 is rotated, the wiper arm sweeps the coin passageway clean.

4. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 6

Turning now to FIG. 6 (and referring also to FIGS. 2 and 3) the first adjustable magnet means 132 includes a magnet 134 disposed between magnetic pole piece 136 and non-magnetic jaw 137. The pole piece 136 is provided with a pole piece extension rod 140 extending through pole piece 136 and one arm of first cradle 126, and provided with a head 139. As seen in FIG. 6, pole piece extension rod 140 is adapted to move in the arcuate depression 51 in the central web 30. A rotatably movable adjusting plate 138 is secured to the magnet means 132 by means of a screw 141 extending through plate 138 and into jaw 137. In effect, screw 141 acts as a fulcrum around which plate 138 pivots to control the magnitude of the magnetic flux at pole 136 and extension rod 140. Once the magnitude of the magnetic flux is adjusted to the necessary value, as will be described later, the screw 141 is tightened to prevent further undesired rotation of the plate 138.

5. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 7

As seen in FIG. 7, the first adjustable magnet means 216 and the second adjustable magnet means 218 are each mounted on the movable wall 200 and have a portion which projects into the respective coin passages. The portion projecting inwardly into the passage faces central web 30 of the frame 20. The first adjustable magnet means 216 includes a housing or support 220 formed of a non-magnetic or non-magnetizable material, for example, brass, bronze or the like. The housing 220 is secured, in any convenient manner, to the movable wall 200, for example, by brazing, or alternatively, may be detachably secured as, for example, by suitable bracket assemblies. The wall member 200 similarly is made of non-magnetic or non-magnetizable material. As illustrated in FIG. 7, the housing 220 is an annular bushing having an internally threaded bore 230 and is clamped to the wall 200 by a member that threads into the bore. The magnetic means 216 includes a portion 222 which is referred to herein as a sensor and which projects into the passage (or chute) a coin follows. The sensor 222 is made of magnetic or magnetizable material and in the embodiment illustrated includes a threaded spigot 223 having an outer diameter smaller than the remainder thereof. The threaded spigot 223 passes through an aperture 226 in the wall 200 and is threaded into the bore 230 of the housing or support 220, detachably mounting the magnetic means 216 on the movable wall 200. The threaded spigot 223 has an axial bore 224 which receives, in friction fit, a rod magnet 234 projecting therefrom into the threaded bore 230 of the support 220. An externally threaded sleeve 236, having an axial bore 238, is threaded into the internally threaded bore 230 with the magnet 234 projecting into the central bore 238. The externally threaded sleeve 236 is referred to in the specification as a grub screw and has a transverse end slot 239 to receive a Stanley screwdriver for turning the sleeve in the threaded bore. The threaded sleeve 236 is made of magnetic or magnetizable material, and by being threaded into and out of the bore 230, an air gap 2400 between the adjacent ends of members 236 and 223 is varied. By varying the air gap 2400, the strength of the magnet is varied and by strength herein, what is meant is the magnetic attractive force of the sensor 222.

In the foregoing description, sensor 222 is described as being made of a magnetic or magnetizable material. It is obvious the portion 222, which projects into the passage, may be integrally formed with the rod magnet 234 or any other type of magnet. Alternatively, the adjusting sleeve 236 may be the magnet with the sensor and rod projecting into the magnet being made of a magnetizable material. Also, in the foregoing, it is noted various means may be utilized to mount the housing 220on movable wall 200. In a further alternative embodiment, the housing 220 may be threaded externally adjacent one end and, accordingly, threaded into a corresponding threaded aperture in the wall 200. If desired, a lock nut may be utilized to variously position the sensor portion at the right spacing for the amount it must project into the passage. As previously indicated, the sensor 222 is positioned in the path of a coin such that it will make direct physical contact with the coin. By utilizing the latter embodiment, means is provided whereby the space allotted for the coin to bypass may be readily varied.

The second or "nickel" adjustable magnet means 218 is identical in structure to the first adjustable magnet means, and consequently, the same reference numerals are used. The only difference is that second adjustable magnet means 218 is mounted in a second aperture 244 in the wall 200.

6. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 8

Turning now to FIG. 8, the third or dime" adjustable magnet means 402 is identical in structure to the first and second adjustable magnet means 216 and 218 respectively. However, it is mounted on partition 400 as follows: an L-shaped bracket 460 including a horizontal leg 462 and a vertical leg 464 are mounted on mounting bracket 466 of partition 400. The mounting is by means of screw 468, aided by washer 470, passing through slot 472 in bracket 466 and into a tapped aperture (not shown) in vertical leg 464; horizontal leg 462 is provided with an aperture 474 in which circumferential slot 226 of mounting stud 222 is seated.

7. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF FIGS. 9 l l The operation of a coin chute according to the various aspects of this invention is clearly indicated in FIGS. 9, 10 and 11. As seen in FIG. 9, a coil A1 is first placed in the coin funnel and if it is of small enough size, it may pass through the coin passageway 118 defined by central web 30, guide wall 116 of gate 100 and inwardly sloping pedestal wall 46.

The coin then passes to position A2 where it passes in the yoke defined by first projection 128 of first coin cradle 126 and the pole piece extension rod of adjustable magnet cradle 132. The magnitude of the magnetic flux at pole piece extension rod 140 has previously been adjusted by means of adjusting plate 138 to be such that it: (a) engages and retains all coins of high magnetic permeability (i.e. iron or steel or similar magnetic or magnetizable material); (b) engages and retards but does not stop the movement of coins of medium magnetic permeability (i.e. nickel or similar material); and (c) engages but has no effect on coins made of other metals (e.g., silver). If the coin is of sufficient weight, it tips the first coin cradle 126 against the inertia of counterweight 144 and is discharged into coin passageway 113, running off runway 112 and subjected to the magnetic flux of first adjustable magnet means 216 while it is in sliding contact therewith (at position A3).

The magnetic flux of magnet means 216 has been adjusted by grub screw 236 so that: (a) it engages and retains all coins of high magnetic permeability; (b) it engages and retains those coins of medium magnetic permeability which have a smooth face; and (c) it engages and retards but does not retain those coins of medium magnetic permeability having an imprinted face. Those coins which are accepted by 126 and 216 will then fall downwardly towards the momentum-absorbing lever 452 which extends through an opening 78 in the central web 30 of frame 20 and through an opening 324 in the partition 300. This lever spans the passageway between the partition 300 and the central web 30 of the frame 20 and coins falling from the runway 112 will strike lever 452. The lever 452 may be provided with a weight (not shown) and the momentum of the coins which strike the lever would then be absorbed to some extent by the raising of the weight. Thereafter, the coins will, if they are authentic coins, fall downwardly and strike an inclined surface 326 which is formed on the partition 300 (see position A5). This inclined surface extends through an opening 80 which is formed in the central web 30 and it directs coins through that opening. Any such coins will pass through and be guided by the accepted coin chute between the partition 300 and the wall 476. If the coins which strike the lever 452 are not authentic, they will bounce to the left and will fall against the inclined plane 308 and be directed to a rejected coin chute.

Slugs or spurious coins which may pass the tests at 126 and 216 roll along the runway 112 and may strike anvil 72 and rebound to the left past the lever 452 (see FIG. 5).

This anvil 72 will cause those coins moving through along runway 112 to rebound in a direction towards gate 316. Ifthe coins happen to follow a path which enables them to pass between the coin-receiving projections 320, 322 of gate 316, those coins will then follow the path of an accepted coin. However, if the coins are authentic but follow a path which does not take them neatly between the coin-engaging projections 320, 322 and the gate 316, those coins will strike the projections and force the bifurcated gate 316 to rotate until they can pass between the projections 320, 322 of gate 316. Thereafter, these coins will follow the path of an accepted coin. The slight variations in weight, thickness and resilience of coins of the same type is great enough to cause those coins to rebound from the anvil 72 at slightly different angles. Ac cordingly, if the gate 316 were held stationary or if the entrance to the accepted coin chute was made just slightly larger than the diameter of the coins intercepted and held by the gauge 146, many authentic coins would be unable to enter the accepted coin chute but instead would be reflected backwardly therefrom. Such backwardly reflected coins will fall downwardly against the inclined projection 308 and be directed towards a rejected coin chute. Accordingly, to receive and pass substantially all authentic coins, it is necessary that the gate 316 rotate and that it rotate freely enough that the coins can move that gate into coin-accepting position, as described abovev The bifurcated gate 316 also serves to reflect nickel slugs and quarter slugs to fall downwardly against the inclined projection 308 and thus be directed to the rejected coin chute.

Whether the coins rebound from the anvil 72 or from the lever 452, those coins would pass through a portion of the passageway through which coins gauged by the second coin cradle 146 must pass. In fact, the coins which rebound from the anvil 72 or the lever 452 can move sufi'iciently far to the left in that passageway as to attempt to enter an accepted coin duct. Ifthose coins were to enter that duct, they could not pass completely through that duct because its width is smaller than the diameter of such coins. Instead, those coins would lodge in that passageway and interfere with proper operation of the coin separator. It is to keep such coins out of the accepted coin duct that the bifurcated gate 316 is provided. If the coin rebounds from the anvil 72 or from the momentumabsorbing lever 452 and attempts to enter an accepted coin duct, that coil will engage and be held by the projections 320, 322 on the gate 316 because those projections define an opening which is smaller than the diameter of such slugs or coins. In fact, the opening defined by the projections 320, 322 on the gate 316 is so small that the slugs or spurious coins cannot enter that opening sufficiently to lodge within it. Instead, they can enter only part way and must then fall backwardly toward the inclined plane 308. This plane will then direct the slugs or spurious coins to a rejected coin duct.

Accepted coins pass through an accepted coin duct at position A6. As presently constituted, such coin would be a Canadian or United States new or old "quarter," although the components may be altered to accept Canadian or United States 50 coins or dollar coins.

As seen in FIG. 10, if the coin is too small to engage the arms 128, 140 of first magnetic cradle 126, it passes through the B2 position to engage the arms 150, 152 of the second coin cradle 146 at position B3. If the coin is of the proper diameter to engage both arms 150, 152 and is of sufiicient weight to offset the inertia of counterweight 156, and if the feeler wire 162 does not sense, intercept and hold coins or washers which have openings therethrough or which have abnormal surface deformations, that coin will cause cradle 146 to rotate in a clockwise direction. The clockwise rotation of cradle 146 will continue until the coins are discharged from projections 150, 152 to fall free on runway 114 and permit cradle 146 to rotate to its initial position. The coin at the B4 position is subjected to the magnetic flux of second adjustable magnet means 218.

The magnetic flux of magnet 218 has been adjusted: (a) to engage and retain all ferromagnetic coins; (b) to engage and retain paramagnetic coins having a smooth face; and (c) to engage and retard but not retain paramagnetic coins having an imprinted face.

Coins accepted by 218 roll off the edge of runway 114 and pass downwardly past projection 320 of gate 316 and through opening 316 in partition 300 (at position B5) and deflect off inclined surface 308 to engage runway 328 (at position B6). The coin rolls down runway 328 past position B7 and off the edge of runway 328 to be discharged at position B8 at an accepted coin duct.

As presently constituted, coins emerging at position B8 will be Canadian or United States nickels.

As seen in FlG. 11, a coin too small to be engaged by 126 passes downwardly and, at position C2, engages the rim of arcuate depressed channel 51 and is guided downwardly to the left. The coin, too small to be engaged by 146, instead engages the rim of depressed channel 52 and is guided towards opening 54 and coin-intercepting plate 56. As those coins reach the upper end of intercepting plate 56, they will be in registry with the opening 54; they will also be in engagement with V-shaped deflector 174 (see FIGS. 2 and 3). The deflector 174 will urge those coins toward the opening 54. If they are no larger than a dime," they will fall through opening 54 (see position C4). Any coins which are larger than a dime will be unable to pass through the opening 54 because the distance between the upper left-hand portion of that opening and the upper surface of the intercepting plate 56 is carefully gauged to be just larger than the diameter of a United States or Canadian dime.

The coin then passes by wire 422 which projects through slot 430 in wall 410. The wire determines whether there is an aperture in the coin, or whether there are any abnormal surface deformities. Also if the coin is too light, it will deflect off wire 422 and through opening in central web 30 to a reject chute. Accepted coins pass to third adjustable magnet 402, at position C5, on runway 407.

Magnet 402 has been adjusted: (a) to engage and retain all ferromagnetic coins, (b) to engage and retain those paramagnetic coins having a smooth face; and (c) to engage and retard but not retain those paramagnetic coins having an embossed or imprinted face.

Those coins passing tests as described above pass through accepted coin chute at positions C6 and C7. If the coin is of silver or other non-magnetic or non-magnetizable metal, its speed will be such that it deflects off anvil 432 (see FIG. 1) to be deflected away from the accepted coin chute. On the GU16! hand, if the coin is of nickel, it will have been slowed down to such an extent that it falls directly onto lever 442, to be discharged at position C8.

As presently constituted, the coins emerging at position C8 will be old or new Canadian or United States dimes."

Coins which pass through opening 54 with sufficient momentum to urge V-shaped deflector 174 out of the way against the inertia of counterweight 178 are caused to spill over bevelled edge 60 of aperture 54 to pass to a rejected coin chute 62. As presently constituted, the coins in the rejected coin chute will be Canadian or United States pennies."

If the coins are slightly larger than Canadian or United States pennies," they will be retained by elements 54 and 56, thereby jamming the chute. Such coins, as well as any other coins retained at walls 46, first cradle 126, first adjustable magnet means 216, second cradle 146, second adjustable magnet means 218 and by third adjustable magnet means 402 are released and carried to enter a discharge chute by actuating the wiping mechanism with lever 516, as previously described.

In the foregoing description, it is clearly evident coins follow various passages through the coin chute dependent upon their denomination. The coins, in travelling down the inclined passages, gain a certain amount of momentum and this momentum may be utilized to select, dependent upon kickers and separators used individually or in combination in one or more of the passages. By utilizing the magnetically adjustable sensors, there is provided means for controlling the momentum which a coin may gain, and accordingly, separation may be based upon the momentum gathered. This change in momentum may be used to select coins depending upon desired characteristics based on magnetic acceptance or rejection, that is, the magnetic characteristics. For example, in the cradle 132, the magnetic extension 140 may be adjusted to separate serratededged coins from those which are not ser rated by applying different magnetic attractive forces and thereby controlling the speed with which the coin will travel. By travelling at different speeds, the kickers or separators will appropriately direct the coin to chutes or passages provided to receive them according to the selected features. It will be apparent that the magnets may be adjusted to the point where coins are retarded or allowed to travel at a speed where they cannot enter the accept chute. Nickel coins, for example, may be retarded to the point that their trajectory is correct to allow them to go into the accept chute. Silver and non-magnetics are not retarded and their trajectory is such that they may be caused to either accept or reject, depending on the setting of member 79, for example, in 25 coins; member 432, for example, in 10 coins; and arm 320 of member 360 with regards to nickels.

The adjustability of the sensing means changing the sensitivity may be set such as to control the rate of descent of a coin down the inclined passageway so that the momentum will cause the coin to be accepted or rejected or directed to the passage desired dependent upon the magnetic characteristics of the coin. It is thus evident from the foregoing, the adjustable magnetic sensors may be utilized to effect sorting of the coins and also the separation of spurious coins from those which are proper and may be accepted. The sensitivity of the magnetic sensor is applicable to edge engagement, as well as face engagement. The adjustable magnetic means which has been previously described in detail may be supplied as a separate element and installed on existing coin-handling mechanisms by simply appropriately mounting the sensors to have a portion projecting into the path followed by a coin and also including the adjustable feature. It will be realized, however, that the magnetic sensors must be mounted on a portion of the device which is non-magnetic or non-magnetizable. It will be also be evident from the foregoing, the magnetic sensors, for example 216 and 218, may be mounted on a plate 200 as indicated in the drawings, which combination of the sensors and plate may be utilized in existing coin-handling devices to replace a plate normally used to form a guide or one wall of a passage followed by the coins. Existing coin-handling devices, accordingly, may be converted simply by substituting the foregoing disclosed plate 200 with magnetizing elements 216 and 218 attached thereto for a corresponding plate in the existing machines.

Similarly, the cradles in existing coin-handling devices may be replaced by the cradle 126 which includes one arm of magnetic or magnetizable material with means to vary the strength of such magnet. As disclosed in the foregoing, such adjusting means consists of member 138 which is movably mounted and providing a path of low resistance for the flux and which is movable toward and away from the end pole piece 139 to vary the air gap therebetween.

From the foregoing description, one skilled in the art can easily ascertain the essential characteristics of this invention, and without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, can make various changes and modifications of the invention to adapt it to various usages and conditions. Consequently, such changes and modifications are properly, equitably, and "intended" to be, within the full range of equivalence of the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a coin-sorting apparatus wherein a coin is caused to move down a chute defined by an inclined runway and a pair of substantially parallel plates, the improvement comprising: a magnet positioned in the chute; a slide face physically and magnetically coupled to said magnet, and projecting into said chute so that a coin moving in the chute is in direct, sliding, face-to-face contact therewith; a magnetic flux adjusting means directly contacting, and magnetically coupled to, said magnet; and a casing, formed of non-magnetic or non-magnetizable material, physically uniting said magnet, said slide face and said magnetic flux adjusting means and serving to secure the same to one of said plates; the strength of the magnet having been adjusted by said magnetic flux adjusting means in the following manner: (a) to attract and hold all coins made of iron or steel or other ferromagnetic metals and those coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal having a smooth face; and (b) to attract and retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal and having an imprinted face.

2. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1, wherein the casing is secured to said slide face, wherein said magnetic flux adjusting means is threadedly secured, within said casing, and wherein said magnet is relatively slidably concentrically disposed within said magnetic flux adjusting means, thereby holding the magnet and securing it adjacent said chute.

3. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1 wherein the casing is formed of brass or copper.

4. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1 wherein the slide face is formed of steel.

5. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1 wherein the slide face is in direct contact with the pole of a bar or rod magnet.

6. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1 wherein the magnetic flux controller is movable axially with respect to the casing and with respect to the pole of a bar or rod magnet.

7. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1 including such magnet means for testing coins of two different denominations.

8. The coin sorting apparatus of claim 1, including such magnet means for testing coins of three different denominations.

9. The improved coin-sorting apparatus of claim 1 further including a cradle in the coin chute, the cradle being pivotally mounted with respect to the coin chute and having one arm thereof provided with a magnet, an extension of one pole of the magnet projecting into the coin chute, the magnet including said magnetic flux adjusting means, the strength of the magnet having been adjusted: (a) to attract and hold by the rim thereof all coins made of iron or steel or other ferromagnetic metals; and (b) to attract and retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal.

10. The improved coin-sorting apparatus of claim 9, including such magnet means for testing coins of two diiferent denominations, said cradle dividing said chute into two chutes for conveying and testing for genuineness coins of said two different denominations.

11. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 9 wherein said cradle divides the chute into at least two chutes for conveying and testing for genuineness coins of at least two different denominations.

l2. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 9 wherein said pivotally mounted cradle is adapted to be engaged by a coin, and wherein a coin having a predetermined size and weight is adapted to pivot the cradle and be automatically discharged down one predetermined coin chute.

13. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 10 wherein said pivotally mounted cradle is adapted to be engaged by a coin, wherein a coin having a predetermined size and weight is adapted to pivot the cradle and to be automatically discharged down one said predetermined coin chute, and wherein coins not having said predetermined size and weight are adapted to engage a second pivotally mounted cradle, and wherein a coin having said second predetermined size and weight is adapted to pivot the cradle and to be automatically discharged down said second predetermined coin chute.

14. The coin-sorting apparatus of claim 8, further including a cradle in the coin chute, the cradle being pivotally mounted with respect to the coin chute and having one arm thereof provided with a magnet, an extension of one pole of the magnet projecting into the coin chute, the magnet including said magnetic flux adjusting means, the strength of the magnet having been adjusted: (a) to attract and hold by the rim thereof all coins made of iron or steel or other ferromagnetic metals; and (b) to attract and retard the speed of movement of coins made of nickel or other paramagnetic metal; wherein said pivotally mounted cradle divides such chute into three chutes for conveying and testing for genuineness coins of said three different denominations; wherein said pivotally mounted cradle is adapted to be engaged by a coin, and wherein a coin having said predetermined size and weight is adapted to pivot the cradle and to be automatically discharged down one said predetermined coin chute; wherein coins not having said first predetermined size and weight are adapted to engage said second pivotally mounted cradle, wherein a coin having said second predetermined size and weight is adapted to pivot the cradle and to be automatically discharged down said second predetemiined coin chute; wherein coins not having said second predetermined size and weight but having a third predetermined minimum and maximum size are adapted to engage a counter-weighted pivotally mounted gate; and further wherein coins having a first predetennined minimum momentum pivotally open the gate and are automatically discharged to a third predetermined coin chute, and wherein coins having less than said first predetermined momentum but more than said second predetermined momentum are deflected to a fourth predetermined coin chute.

15. [n coin-handling devices, the improvement comprising: magnetic sensing means comprising a magnet, and a slide face, physically and magnetically coupled to said magnet and located in the path the coin follows to ensure physical face-toface contact with the coin and further including means selectively to vary the magnetic attractive force of said portion projecting into the path, said means comprising a casing, formed of non-magnetic or non-magnetizable material, a magnetic flux adjusting means mounted within said casing, said magnet being relatively slidably concentrically disposed within said ma etic flux ad'usting means.

6. The comandling device of claim 15 wherein a com 15 caused to move and be guided along a selected path inclined downwardly, including a cradle located in said path to intercept the coin during movement along said path, said cradle being pivotally mounted and in one position receiving the coin and by the weight of the coin received therein to be pivoted to another position to discharge the coin therefrom, said cradle having one arm consisting of magnetic material or magnetizable material with means to magnetize the same and means associated therewith selectively to vary the magnetic flux in said one arm.

17. A coin-handling device as defined in claim 16 wherein the coins are guided and roll edgewise along downwardly inclined chutes.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4315567 *Jul 1, 1980Feb 16, 1982Societe de Recherches et de Perfectionnements Industriels et Etablissements H. Morin-SecretanApparatus and method for selecting from coins or tokens
US5507379 *Nov 9, 1993Apr 16, 1996Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin handling system with coin sensor discriminator
US5542880 *Feb 24, 1994Aug 6, 1996Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin handling system with shunting mechanism
US5630494 *Mar 7, 1995May 20, 1997Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin discrimination sensor and coin handling system
US5743373 *Nov 7, 1996Apr 28, 1998Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin discrimination sensor and coin handling system
US5782686 *Dec 4, 1995Jul 21, 1998Cummins-Allison Corp.Disc coin sorter with slotted exit channels
US5865673 *Jan 11, 1996Feb 2, 1999Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin sorter
US5997395 *Mar 17, 1998Dec 7, 1999Cummins-Allison Corp.High speed coin sorter having a reduced size
US6039644 *Apr 18, 1997Mar 21, 2000Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin sorter
US6042470 *Apr 18, 1997Mar 28, 2000Cummins-Allison Corp.Coin sorter
US6139418 *Oct 26, 1999Oct 31, 2000Cummins-Allison Corp.High speed coin sorter having a reduced size
US6425471 *Aug 18, 2000Jul 30, 2002Jofemar, S.A.Coin selector
US6612921Aug 29, 2001Sep 2, 2003Cummins-Allison Corp.High speed coin sorter having a reduced size
US7635059Feb 2, 2000Dec 22, 2009Imonex Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for rejecting jammed coins
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Classifications
U.S. Classification194/323, 194/325, 194/339
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/00