Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3673052 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1972
Filing dateSep 18, 1968
Priority dateSep 18, 1968
Publication numberUS 3673052 A, US 3673052A, US-A-3673052, US3673052 A, US3673052A
InventorsBradley John J, Sanders Charles J, Slawny Howard J, Small Rudolph E
Original AssigneePaper Converting Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of manufacturing a disposable product
US 3673052 A
Abstract
A disposable product such as paper toweling made up of united sheets, at least one of which is of cellulose material, the adhesive joining the sheets being provided on areas which outstand from one of the sheets by virtue of being provided therein by a plate cylinder in a press arrangement.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Small et a1.

[ June 27, 1972 [54] METHOD OF MANUFACTURING A DISPOSABLE PRODUCT [72] inventors: Rudolph E. Small; John J. Bradley, both of Green Bay; Charles J. Sanders, De Pere; Howard J. Sllwny, Green Bay, all of Wis.

Paper Converting Machine Company, lne., Green Bay, Wis.

22 Filed: Sept. 18,1968

[21] Appl. No.: 760,600

[73] Assignee:

[52] [1.8. CI ..l56/164, 156/209, 156/229, 156/277, 156/291, 156/292, 162/132 [51] Int. Cl. "B311 1118, B32b 7/14 [58] Field oi'Search ..162/124, 132, 123,116,197, 162/362, 117; 156/290, 291, 206, 209, 199, 164,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,547,723 12/1970 Gresham ..156 /2 29 3,026,231 Chavannes 156/210 2,572,716 10/1951 George 156/291 1,999,283 4/1935 Clemens 156/291 2,262,493 11/1941 Guinzburg 156/290 2,621,139 12/1952 Messing ....l56/290 3,244,571 4/1966 Weisman 156/290 3,327,708 6/1967 Sokolowski 156/290 3,377,224 4/1968 Greshem et a1 ...l56/209 3,466,212 9/1969 Clayton et a1 156/199 Primary Examiner-Carl D. Quarforth Assistant Examiner-E. E. Lehmann Attorney-Fitch, Even, Tobin & Luedeka [57] ABSTRACT A disposable product such as paper toweling made up of united sheets, at least one of which is of cellulose material, the adhesive joining the sheets being provided on areas which outstand from one of the sheets by virtue of being provided therein by a plate cylinder in a press arrangement.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUMZH YZ- v u 3573052 v INVENTORS: RUDOLPH E. SMALL JOHN J. BRADLEY J CHARLES J. SANDERS HOWARD J. SLAWNY ATT'YS METHOD OF MANUFACTURING A DISPOSABLE PRODUCT BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF INVENTION Heretofore paper toweling has been provided utilizing two sheets which have been adhered together. One form of this product makes use of peg-to-peg embossing so as to develop a pillow type construction. The areas between opposed embossments are relatively small and therefore do not provide the most efficient structure as well as appearance for home use. Also because of the type of embossing, the speed of production is seriously limited, also limited is the use of various adhesives. It will be appreciated that the adhesive between the male-embossed sheets must set prior to the time the contacted sheets leave the nip of the embossing rolls. Thus, limitations of speed and adhesive are present.

According to the present invention, at least one of the sheets is caused to travel with and partially wrapped on a plate cylinder, and with the adhesive being provided on the surface of the sheet remote from the cylinder. The cylinder advantageously is equipped with an outstanding pattern of an open perimetric configuration, i.e., diamonds, squares, etc. Further, we find that such a sheet can be embossed so as to achieve the advantages of the previously known toweling without the disadvantages and limitations'heretofore pointed out. The adhesive-equipped sheet is thereafter integrated or united in the adhesive-equipped areas with a second sheet or web. In the instance where toweling is desired, the second web is paper, i.e., of fibrous or cellulose construction. Where the disposable product is to be a placemat or similar product, the

- second web may be plastic, i.e., polyethylene. Still further, in

some instances three or more plies may be employed.

We further have found that the second sheet may be embossed but that an extremely advantageous product such as toweling resulting from the two embossed sheets can be achieved without having the embossments aligned, i.e., in register, as was the case with preceding products.

Still further, we find it extremely advantageous to tension one of the webs, preferably the unprinted web (with adhesive) during the time it is integrated with the other web or webs. This then results in a product wherein the previously tensioned web puckers or contracts when relieved of tensioning stress so as to develop an extremely desirable quality in the resultant product both from the standpoint of appearance and structure. The product has an essentially quilted" appearance which not only is attractive but also provides pockets for the take up of the moisture important where, for example, the product is used as toweling.

The invention is described in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which FIG. 1 is a schematic, essentially elevational, view of apparatus employed in the production of the disposable product according to the teachings of this invention; FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along the sight line 2'2 applied to FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view, partially in section, of the product resulting from the use of the apparatus of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is another schematic, essentially elevational, view of apparatus for practicing the invention so as to develop a threeply sheet as contrasted to the two-ply sheet resulting from the apparatus of FIG. I.

In the illustration given, and with particular reference to FIG. 1, the numeral designates generally a fibrous web which is seen to pass between embossing rolls l1 and 12. The embossing rolls may be engraved steel rolls with patterns of embossments provided therein. For example, the pattern may be a repeat type having from 10 to 200 projections or protuberances per square inch, each raised to a height of from about 0.01 to about 0.05 inch whereby the sheet 10, when subjected to such action results in having an embossed surface of from 10 to 75 percent of its total area. The web 10 then passes over an idler roll 13 and about a plate cylinder generally designated 14. The plate cylinder 14, as can be seen in FIG. 2, includes a rubber covering 14a which overlies the steel interior roll 14b. The web 14 is seen to be in partial wrapping engagement for travel with the roll 14 and, in the course of so traveling, picks up a layer of adhesive 15. This occurs on the portions of the web which are in contact with the raised portions 16 provided on the rubber covering 14a of the plate cylinder 14. The adhesive is derived from a glue bath 17 (see the extreme left-hand portion of FIG. 1) and is picked up therefrom by means of a rubber covered roller 18. The roller 18 (which constitutes a fountain roll) transfers the adhesive from the bath 17 to a transfer roll 19 from which it is applied to selected portions of web 10.

The web 10, now equipped with adhesive in preselected portions (based upon the configuration of the rubber printing plate portions 16), is integrated with a second web 20. The web is seen to have passed between embossing rolls 21 and 22 which are optional though advantageous depending upon end usage. Whether surfaced for embossment or not, the rolls 21 and 22 are run at a slower speed than succeeding rolls engaging the web 20 so that the web 20 is tensioned. The webs l0 and 20 are integrated in the nip defined by the cylinders 14 and 23. The united webs after traveling a portion of the arcuate length of the roll 23 are caused to pass between a nip 24 defined by rolls 23 and 25. Thereafter the multi-ply web 26 is directed to other structure (not shown) for reeling, perforation, etc. In some instances we structure the roll 25 with a plate identical to that of 14a and registered to contact the webs only where glue has been applied by 14 a. This insures a good glue bond without crushing of the embossing where glue has not been applied.

A number of distinct advantages arise from the manner of glue application just described. For one thing, the glue does not come in contact with the plate cylinder 14 so there is no problem of cleaning. Further, in previous arrangements, glue had been applied to the so-called plate cylinder and tended to attack the sticky-back" which was employed to adhere the plate 14a to the steel roll 14b, For example, sticky-back is used here at the inner facedesignated 14c in FIG. 2 (between the plate 14a and the cylinder 14b).

The product can be seen by reference to FIG. 3 wherein there is a distinct pufiiness or quilted appearance in the resulted multi-ply sheet 26. In FIG. 3, it will be seen that the upper ply or web 10 is caused to puff or quilt by virtue of the contracted nature of the under ply 20. Further, it is seen that the web 20 has fewer fibers per unit area in contact with the adhesive as at 15 than the web 10, this resulting from the fact that the web 20 was stretched at the time the bond (via the adhesive) was made between the sheets 10 and 20.

A modified form of the invention is seen and can be practiced by the showing in FIG. 4. In FIG. 4 two webs are embossed and united to a third unembossed or plain web. Thus, the showing in FIG. 4 is essentially a duplication of portions of the showing in FIG. 1. In FIG. 4, the numeral 1 l0 designates a first embossed web (as by the rolls 111 and 112). This web is passed around a plate cylinder 114. Simultaneously with all the foregoing, a second web 1 10 is embossed by virtue of having passed between embossing rolls 111 and 112 and adhesive equipped by virtue of being in partial wrapping engagement with a plate cylinder 1l4' The plate cylinders 114 and 114 may be be substantially identical to the plate cylinder 14 of FIG. 1. The web 120 which ultimately is interposed between the webs 1 10 and 1 10 in the resultant product 128 is seen to have been tensioned by being fed into the nip provided by the rolls 114 and 114 at a slower speed than the webs and l 10.

As pointed out previously, the inventive arrangement avoids speed limitation characteristic of prior embossed toweling and similar products. Additionally, there are substantial savings in operational costs and there is a distinct simplicity in design and layout. There is no longer the requirement of the accuracy of aligned embossments and the practice of the invention permits a variety of product options. In the case of toweling, the

typical paper webbing may have a basis weight of from ten to 50 pounds per ream, i.e., per 3,000 square feet. Also other webs such as film, foil, etc. may be employed.

While in the foregoing specification a detailed description of the invention has been set down for the purpose of explanation, many variations of the details hereingiven may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a process for manufacturing a multi-ply absorptive paper product, the steps comprising: continuously embossing a pair of webs of cellulosic material to fonn a plurality of closely spaced embossments, continuously printing an adhesive on selected minor portions of one of said webs by passing said one web through a nip including a patterned roll having corresponding selected minor portions raised thereon and a back-up roll which carries said adhesive to thereby apply adhesive to said web in the area of said nip where said raised portions bear against said back-up roll and on the side of said web opposite that contacted by said raised portions, the remainder of said web being substantially free of adhesive, said minor raised portions being arranged in an open pattern leaving large areas relative to the size of the embossments free of adhesive, continuously traveling said other web towards said one web for engagement with the adhesive printed thereon and selectively uniting said webs in the areas carrying adhesive.

2. A process in accordance with claim 1 wherein the selective uniting of said webs is effected by passing said webs through a pressing nip having an upstanding pattern which is similar to and in register with said printed adhesive pattern for pressing said webs together at the adhesive printed minor portions thereof while maintaining other areas free of compression thereby avoiding subjecting other portions of said web to compressive forces which would crush said united web between the adhesive printed portions.

3. A process in accordance with claim 1 including the further steps of longitudinally tensioning one of said webs relative to the other prior to uniting said webs and relieving said tensioned web of tension thereafter whereby the united webs have a generally quilted configuration.

4. In a process for manufacturing a multi-ply absorptive paper product, the steps comprising: continuously embossing a pair of webs of cellulosic material to form a plurality of closely spaced embossments, continuously printing an adhesive on selected minor portions of one of said webs by passing said one web through a nip including a patterned roll having corresponding selected minor portions raised thereon and a back-up roll carrying adhesive to thereby apply adhesive to said web in the area of said nip where said raised portions bear against said back-up roll, the remainder of said web being substantially free of adhesive, said minor raised portions being arranged in an open pattern leaving large areas relative to the size of the embossments free of adhesive, continuously traveling said other web towards said one web for engagement with the adhesive printed thereon, then passing said webs through a pressing nip having an upstanding pattern which is similar to and in register with said printed adhesive pattern for pressing said webs together at the adhesive printed minor portions thereof while maintaining other areas free of compression thereby avoiding subjecting other portions of said web to compressive forces which would crush said united web between the adhesive printed portions and longitudinally tensioning one of said webs relative to the other prior to uniting said webs and relieving said tensioned web of tension thereafter whereby the united webs have a generally quilted configuration.

v UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 7 CERTIFICATE OF COBBBC'HON PatentNo. 3,673,052 Dated June 27, 1972 Rudolph E. Small; John J. Bradley, Charles J. Sanders, v Invent0r(s) Howard J. Slawnv It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Change Item 72 in the heading to read Inventors: Rudolph E. Small; John J. Bradley, both of Green Bay; Charles J. Sanders, De Pere; Howard J. Slawny, Green Bay, all of Wisconsin; Stirling R. Brown, Oxnard, California Change Item 73 of the patent heading to read Assignee: Stirling R. Brown to International Paper Company, New York, New York; other inventors to Paper Converting Machine Company, Inc. Green Bay, Wisconsin i Signed and sealed this 3rd day of April 1973.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLBTCHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-105O (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 1* us. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1959 o36e-33A.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1999283 *Jul 11, 1933Apr 30, 1935Ludwig ClemensProcess of manufacturing wrapper pads
US2262493 *Jul 15, 1938Nov 11, 1941Kleinert I B Rubber CoMethod of and means for making quilted rubber sheeting
US2572716 *Jun 27, 1949Oct 23, 1951Gaylord Container CorpApparatus for and process of forming single-faced corrugated board
US2621139 *Aug 12, 1947Dec 9, 1952Benjamin MessingLaminated sheet material and methods of making such material
US3026231 *Dec 23, 1957Mar 20, 1962Sealed Air CorpMethod of making an embossed laminated structure
US3244571 *May 2, 1963Apr 5, 1966Weisman MoreyProcess for dielectrically embossing polyurethane foam assemblies
US3327708 *Jun 21, 1965Jun 27, 1967Kimberly Clark CoLaminated non-woven fabric
US3377224 *Mar 11, 1966Apr 9, 1968Kimberly Clark CoMethod of embossing differentially creped tissue paper
US3466212 *Mar 24, 1965Sep 9, 1969Mobil Oil CorpQuilted film process
US3547723 *Apr 19, 1967Dec 15, 1970Kimberly Clark CoMethod of making paper toweling material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4588457 *Aug 2, 1985May 13, 1986The Procter & Gamble CompanyTwo-ply nonwoven fabric laminate
US4610915 *Mar 11, 1983Sep 9, 1986The Procter & Gamble CompanyTwo-ply nonwoven fabric laminate
US5091032 *Jul 10, 1989Feb 25, 1992James River Corporation Of VirginiaMulti-nip high-speed paper converting
US5712012 *Feb 22, 1996Jan 27, 1998Forman; David S.For baby tray
US6589634Mar 13, 2001Jul 8, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Embossing and laminating irregular bonding patterns
US6783831 *Feb 4, 2002Aug 31, 2004Henry ChoSanitary, liquid resistant, disposable, adhesive sided, folded placemat
US6944963 *Jan 13, 2004Sep 20, 2005Lily Marie AmaruPattern-profile measuring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/164, 162/132, 156/209, 156/292, 156/291, 156/229, 156/277
International ClassificationA47K10/00, B31F1/07, A47K10/16, B31F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47K10/16, B31F2201/0728, B31F2201/0787, B31F2201/073, B31F2201/0761, B31F2201/0738, B31F1/07, B31F2201/0756, B31F2201/0733, B31F2201/0797
European ClassificationA47K10/16, B31F1/07