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Publication numberUS3673609 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1972
Filing dateJan 27, 1971
Priority dateJan 27, 1971
Publication numberUS 3673609 A, US 3673609A, US-A-3673609, US3673609 A, US3673609A
InventorsDavid N De Simone
Original AssigneeUs Navy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective helmet
US 3673609 A
Abstract
A protective helmet having pads disposed therein for distributing and cushioning the head of a wearer from impacts to the outside of the helmet. The pads are formed from spacer cloth arranged in layers having resilient properties for energy absorption of the impact, each pad having segments of nylon fastener tape attached to one side and an open weave cloth covering on the other side allowing free permeability of air. The nylon fastener tape attaches to felt strips contiguously attached within the helmet, by which the pads are mounted in the helmet, allowing for easy replacement.
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United States Patent De Simone July 4, 1972 [54] PROTECTIVE HELMET 3,518,657 12/1968 Lastnik et'al. ..2/6 [72] Inventor: mm". De Simone, Philadelphia Pa 3,609,764 10/1971 Morgan ..2/3 R [73] Assignee: The United States of America a Primary Examiner-James R. Boler represented by the Secretary of the Navy Attorney-R. Sciucia and Henry Hansen 22 Pl d: 27 1971 l l l 57 ABSTRACT [21] App1.No.: 110,198

A protective helmet havlng pads disposed therem for distributing and cushioning the head of a wearer t'rom impacts to :5 the outside of the helmet. The pads are formed from spacer cloth arranged in layers having resilient properties for energy [58] Field Of Search"; ..2I3, 5, 6 absorption f the impact. each Pad having segments f ny|n fastener tape attached to one side and an open weave cloth [56] m Cited covering on the other side allowing free permeability of air. UNITED STATES PATENTS The nylon fastener tape attaches 10 felt strips contiguously attached within the helmet, by which the pads are mounted in 1 Stapenhtll "2/3 R thc helmet allowin: for easy replacement 1,483,881 2/1924 Hart 2,619,639 12/1952 l-lendler ..2/6 8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures )I/ll/IIIIII/IIIIIIII/I/II/[I/IIIIIIII I, l'lfl I |6 z 2la g 2", l3 '(V I! s\\\\\\\\\ 1\\\\\\\\\\\' 2 I40 5b 14b STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to protective head gear, and more particularly to a helmet liner in combination with a helmet to form an impact absorbing device.

In present and past helmet designs leather-covered urethane or other type of foam material was typically used as a means of adjusting the size and providing load distribution between the head of the wearer and the outside helmet shell. These foam pads cover a major portion of the head and, since they are good insulators, heat generated by the wearer builds up in the area in contact with his head causing discomfort. In addition, due to continuous contact with the wearer's head and continuous saturation with perspiration, thefoarn padding disposed within the helmet deteriorates, becomes soiled, and loses much of its energy absorption capabilities. In order to alleviate these problems, some helmets provide holes through the pads thereby allowing for circulation and partly alleviating the heat build-up; however, since the function of the pad is to distribute load at impact a major portion of head area is still necessarily in contact with the leather-covered foam and deterioration of the foam still occurs. Accordingly, it is necessary that the padding be periodically changed. This adds to field supply problems so convenience often takes precedence resulting in a condition where the pads are worn beyond their useful life.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is the general purpose and object of this invention to provide a protective helmet having a padded lining which allows free flow of air at contact areas of the head for preventing heat build-up. Other objects of the invention are to provide helmet liner pads which have an unlimited service life, and which are easily removable and launderable.

These and other objects are accomplished according to the present invention by providing removable liner pads disposed within the helmet wherein the pads are constructed of multiple layers of plastic spacer-cloth, the number of layers determining the thickness of the pad and therefore the required size accommodation. The pads are disposed within the helmet by nylon fastener tapes, such as Velcro (tradename) tape, allowing for easy removal and exchange. Since the pad is to provide both comfort and impact force distribution the use of the nylon fastener tape is adequate as the pads primarily function in compression. The spacer fabric layers are of an open-weave type allowing for free flow of air thereby avoiding heat buildup and the attendant deterioration of the pad. Also the pad area is no longer restricted by consideration of air circulation thus full protection of the head can be accommodated. The spacer fabric layers themselves are constructed in such a manner as to elastically resist deforming forces and recover to their original thickness when the force is removed, thus providing shock attenuation by elastic deformation and at the same time distributing the attenuated shock load over a wide area of the head.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 represents an angular view of a helmet having lining pads disposed therein constructed according to the invention;

FIG. 2 represents a typical lining pad as viewed from within the helmet of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 represents an edge view of the pad as mounted in the helmet of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of the pad taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

2 DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIG. 1 a protective helmet assembly 10 is illustrated as comprising a helmet shell 11 and liner pads 12 disposed at critical'pressure points therein for protecting the head of the wearer. Pads 12 form a resiliently deformable interface between shell 11 and the head of the wearer attenuating any impacts by maximizing local load distribution. Thus pads 12 are constructed according to the invention in a manner described hereinfor allowing maximum air circulation while providing the necessary resiliency against impact load.

As shown in more detail in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, each pad 12 comprises inner and outer coverings 15a and 15b shaped to conform to a desired pad configuration as determined by the head area to be protected and the helmet design. Covering 15a is preferrably of a porous weave type for allowing free permeability of air. The peripheral edges of coverings 15a and 15b are respectively joined to opposite parallel edges of a continuous nylon tape 16, whereby an external enclosure is formed. Tape 16 is perforated by a number of vent holes 13 along its length allowing for free circulation of air within the pad 12. Between coverings 15a and 15b are disposed layers of spacer cloth 21a, 21b and 21c which can be in the form of continuous undulated filament matting or of a coarse weave type such as Uniroyal Style No. 60 l 2. A layer of spacer cloth 22 of a fine weave type, such as Uniroyal Style No. 6009, is disposed intermediate cloth 21a and inner covering 15a for providing a fine grid interface for distributing the load to the head. All materials comprising pad 12 are preferrably of a relatively inert group, such as nylon, retaining their properties afier extensive exposure to body heat and perspiration.

Each pad 12 is attached to shell 11 by segments of nylon fastener tape 14 contiguously attached to the outer surface of covering 15b and disposed to align with mating strips of fastener pile 23, contiguously attached within helmet shell 11, when the respective pads 12 are placed in their desired positron.

Accordingly easy removal and replacement of pads 12 is accommodated with the attendant facility of adjusting for variations in head size by selecting an appropriate combination of pad 12 thicknesses.

As described above a typical pad 12 is shown including three layers of coarse spacer cloth 21a, 21b and 21c, and one layer of fine cloth 22, these being shown for descriptive purposes only as it is contemplated within this invention that various pad thicknesses be made available by variously combining fine cloth layers with coarse cloth layers. It is further contemplated that the various pad thicknesses be so designated thus providing a repeatable head fitting upon pad exchange.

In operation the wearer initially selects the appropriate combination of pads 12 resulting in a best fit, and attaches the pads 12 by fastener tape 14 to corresponding strips of pile 23 disposed within shell 11. Upon any accumulation of dirt, pads 12 can be replaced according to their designators with cleans pads while they are laundered. The selection of inert materials allows for easily cleaning of the pads and the construction thereof allows for free circulation of air thus they are not restricted in their maximum size by the heat build-up constraint that such an appropriate fit can be obtained within the whole helmet shell 1 1.

Some of the many advantages of the invention should now be readily apparent. The invention provides a means of distributing impact loads between the helmet shell and a wearer's head which is both comfortable and clenable. At the same time the invention provides load distribution pads which are highly permeable to air allowing for large area coverage. All various accommodations of head shape are contemplated this invention by selecting pad thicknesses pen'nitting maximum comfort.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teaching. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

. What is claimed is:

l: A protective device for attenuating impacts to the wearer comprising, in combination:

protective shell means formed to surround vulnerable areas of the wearer for distributing a concentrated impact;

resilient attenuation means disposed Within said shell means intermediate said shell means and the wearer for attenuating said impact and including a plurality of resilient cloth layers the areas thereof formed to cover the desired area, each layer formed of continuous undulated fila- 5. A resilient force attenuation pad for attenuating force ap- 5 plied to a wearer comprising, in combination:

a plurality of resilient cloth layers the areas thereof formed to cover the desired area, each layer fonned of continuous undulated filaments and in combination with the other layers forming a compliant area, first and second memsgand m combination other iayers for-miflg coverings respectively adjacent the uppermost and lowercoinpham area first and second covenngs respecnve ly most surfaces of said layers, an endless tape joined at the adjacent the uppermost F lowermost surfacizs of Sam respective edges thereof to the respective peripheries of layers an endless J0me?! at respecuve egges said coverings and fastener tape attached on the outside thineof to resPecuve penphenes of said covenngs surface of said second covering formed to attach to any said second covering fonned to be attached on the outfibrous materiaL side thereof to said fastener tape; and separable attachment means affixed to said attenuation means and operatively connected to said shell means. 2. A protective device according to claim 1, further comprising:

said first covering forming a porous weave permeable to air. 3. A protective device according to claim 2, further com- 6. A resilient pad according to claim 5, further comprising:

said first covering forming a porous weave penneable to air.

7. A resilient pad according to claim 6, further comprising:

said endless tape including a multiplicity of vent openings for permitting air to permeate therethrough.

8. A resilient pad according to claim 7, further comprising:

the one of said layers adjacent to said first covering being prising:

said endless tape including a multiplicity of vent openings for permitting air to permeate therethrough. 4. A protective device according to claim 1 wherein: the one of said layers adjacent to said first covering being formed of continuous undulated filaments woven in a tight weave relative to the other of said layers for providing a fine grid interface.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1483881 *Jan 11, 1922Feb 19, 1924Ridgeway Hart HenryFootball helmet
US2619639 *Dec 1, 1949Dec 2, 1952Edwin HendlerProtective helmet for high-speed aircraft
US3344433 *Aug 30, 1965Oct 3, 1967Sierra Eng CoCrash helmet
US3418657 *May 31, 1966Dec 31, 1968Army UsaRetention device for protective helmet
US3609764 *Mar 20, 1969Oct 5, 1971RiddellEnergy absorbing and sizing means for helmets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3843970 *Mar 19, 1973Oct 29, 1974M MariettaProtective headgear
US3859666 *Mar 19, 1973Jan 14, 1975Michael T MariettaCrown cushion member
US4024586 *Aug 5, 1976May 24, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyHeadgear suspension system
US4259747 *Jun 27, 1979Apr 7, 1981The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyProtective communications helmet
US4627114 *Aug 23, 1984Dec 9, 1986Figgie International, Inc.Shock attenuation structure
US5035009 *Sep 27, 1990Jul 30, 1991Riddell, Inc.Protective helmet and liner
US5101517 *Jul 6, 1990Apr 7, 1992Willie DouglasSports helmet with transparent windows in the side walls
US6438762 *Jun 14, 2001Aug 27, 2002David L. JenkinsCover for helmet padding
US6883181 *Jul 8, 2003Apr 26, 2005Gentex CorporationAdjustable padset for protective helmet
US6952839 *Jan 14, 2005Oct 11, 2005Gentex CorporationPadset for protective helmet
US6986162 *Jan 5, 2004Jan 17, 2006Norotos, Inc.Facemask assembly for night vision goggles
US7316036 *Apr 22, 2005Jan 8, 2008Gentex CorporationPadset for protective helmet
US7676854Apr 7, 2005Mar 16, 2010Crescendo AsHelmet, helmet liner and method for manufacturing the same
US8726424Jun 3, 2010May 20, 2014Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcEnergy management structure
US9320311Mar 14, 2013Apr 26, 2016Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcHelmet impact liner system
US20040181858 *Jan 5, 2004Sep 23, 2004Soto Ronald R.Facemask assembly for night vision goggles
US20050015856 *Jul 8, 2003Jan 27, 2005Long Richard J.Adjustable padset for protective helmet
US20050125882 *Jan 14, 2005Jun 16, 2005Gentex CorporationPadset for protective helmet
US20050183188 *Apr 22, 2005Aug 25, 2005Gentex CorporationPadset for protective helmet
US20050246824 *Apr 7, 2005Nov 10, 2005Crescendo AsHelmet, helmet liner and method for manufacturing the same
USD679058Mar 26, 2013Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcHelmet liner
USD683079May 21, 2013Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcHelmet liner
USD733972Sep 12, 2013Jul 7, 2015Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcHelmet
EP0954993A2 *May 3, 1999Nov 10, 1999New Max S.R.L.Motorcyclist helmet
EP1219188A2 *Dec 4, 2001Jul 3, 2002Lucky Bell Plastic Factory LtdSafety helmets with cellular textile composite structure as energy absorber
WO1986001380A1 *Jul 31, 1985Mar 13, 1986Figgie International Inc.Shock attenuation structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/414
International ClassificationA42B3/04, A42B3/12, A42B3/28
Cooperative ClassificationA42B3/28, A42B3/127
European ClassificationA42B3/28, A42B3/12D2