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Publication numberUS3675616 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1972
Filing dateAug 18, 1971
Priority dateAug 18, 1971
Publication numberUS 3675616 A, US 3675616A, US-A-3675616, US3675616 A, US3675616A
InventorsGeorge L Mcinnis
Original AssigneeGeorge L Mcinnis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flag storage and display device
US 3675616 A
Abstract
A mechanism for extending a shaft with a flag furled thereon from a stored position and unfurling the flag for display and alternatively for furling the flag and retracting the shaft to place the flag in a protected position.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I Unlted States Patent 1 ,675,616

Mclnnis [451 July 11, 1972 s41 FLAG STORAGE AND DISPLAY 2.299.785 10/1942 Barrett ..343/903 DEVICE 2.391.202 12/1945 Tellander et ..343/903 X 2.953.934 9/1960 Sundt ....343/903 X [72] Inventor: George L. Mclnnh, 29l Brighton 51.. 3,l 17,549 1/1964 Ripepe 16/28 Belmont, Mass. 02178 3,602,188 8/1971 Penaflor ..116/132 1 Filed: s- I971 FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS [21} App1.No.: 172,630 16,997 2/1913 16/173 Primary Examiner-unis J. Capozi [52] US. Cl ..1 16/173, 52/149, 343/901, A"omy ]seph weinganen ct 343/903 [51] Int. Cl. ..G09l 17/00 [57] ABSTRACT of ..l A for exending a shah a s faded thereon 343/900 903; 52/ I I l from a stored position and unfurling the flag for display and a1- 74/424-3; 248/38, 4 1 43 temah'vely for furling the flag and retracting the shah to place the flag in a protected position. [56] Relennces Cited 17 China, 7 Drawing Figurs UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,321,837 11/1919 Mader ..l16/l73 PATENTEuJuL 1 1 m2 SHEU 2 OF 2 mvsm'on. GEORGE L. McINNIS FLAG STORAGE AND DISPLAY DEVICE FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to flag display devices and more particularly concerns a novel mechanism for automatically displaying a flag and for retracting it to a protected position.

DISCUSSION OF THE PRIOR ART Several attempts have been made to devise a practical apparatus to transport a flag from a furled or stored position to a position of display. These devices have generally described a hollow flag pole or a hollow portion thereof into which or from which a flag is dragged by means of an appropriately rigged halyard, either for protection from the elements or as an alternative to the customary lowering or raising of a flag at evening or morning. Some other devices provide a separate enclosure through which the halyard runs so that the flag may be brought within the enclosure for torage and protection. Still other devices have provided a slot in the side of a flag pole and an internal shafi upon which the flag may be rolled; by rotating the shaft, the flag is drawn in through the slot and is thus protected.

Many of the prior art devices have not been practical in that they either tend to bind or, by subjecting the flag to frequent frictional contact with an aperture, tend to appreciably shorten its useful life. Others are cumbersome. expensive or otherwise impractical for the homeowner who may wish to display his flag but finds it an inconvenience to go outdoors or open a window to put the flag out and take it in. The inconvenience is proportionately greater in flag display on large buildings or in public institutions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Broadly speaking, this invention discloses a mechanized device for furling a flag around a shaft and retracting the shaft into a protective tube and alternatively extending this shaft from the protective tube and unfurling the flag. Several embodiments are disclosed, one of which combines the furling and retracting motions, while others separate the two motions so that the furling is done before the retracting is accomplished. The mechanism generally comprises a housing for a motor and appropriate gearing, a tubular section extending from the housing and a longitudinally movable shaft extending from and rotatably mounted within the tubular section. The flag is attached to the outer end of this shaft.

This device may be attached to the wall of a building and extend generally horizontally therefrom. Appropriate controls and switches may be provided inside the building for operation of the device. The motor would generally be reversible so that through appropriate switching it may operate to extend the pole and unfurl the flag and alternatively to furl the flag and retract the pole. It is readily apparent that this device enables one to easily display the flag whenever he wishes without inconvenience and without the possible dangers involved in leaning out of windows or climbing as is sometimes necessary.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a partial sectional view of an extended flag pole constructed in accordance with one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 shows the flag pole of FIG. 1 with the flag furled and the pole retracted;

FIG. 3 is a partial sectional view of an extended flag pole constructed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing the flag pole retracted;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged detailed sectional view of a portion of the flag pole of FIGS. 3 and 4, showing the mechanism which provides separate rotational and longitudinal movement thereof;

FIG. 6 is a partial sectional view of a flag pole constructed in accordance with a third embodiment of the invention showing the flag pole retracted and the flag furled;

FIG. 7 is a view of the embodiment of FIG. 6, showing the flag pole extended and the flag unfurled.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION With reference now to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, there is shown a flag pole generally designated by reference numeral 11 having a housing 12 for attachment to a suitable mounting such as wall 13, a tubular section 14 and a generally round pole I5 extending therethrough and projecting therefrom at times. Within housing 12 is shown motor 16 which is a reversible electric motor operated by a conventional control 17 which may be located at any convenient place, most likely on the other side of wall 13. Splined shaft 21 extends from motor 16 into exteriorly threaded shaft 22, and mates with corresponding splines therein, providing means to rotate shaft 22 while simultaneously allowing free longitudinal motion thereof. At the proximal end of shaft 22 is stop 23 and at the distal end, mounted to pole I5, is stop 24. Located within tube 14 is threaded bearing 25 to which is mounted microswitch 26. The movable element of microswitch 26 is adapted to be engaged by stop 23. Similarly located within tube 14, but further from motor 16 than bearing 25, is threaded bearing 27 to which is mounted micro switch 28. The movable element of microswitch 28 is adapted to be engaged by stop 24. Secured to the outer end of shah 22 is pole 15 having a generally spherical end 31. A flag 32 may be attached to pole 15 by appropriate securing means 33. At the distal end of tube 14 is a collar 34 preferably made of resilient material, the purpose of which will become apparent presently.

From the position as shown in FIG. I pole 15 may be retracted to the position shown in FIG. 2 in the following manner. An appropriate switch of control 17 may be operated to actuate motor 16. The motor rotates shaft 21, and consequently shaft 22 engaged thereby, in the direction shown by arrow 35. This rotation of shaft 22 causes pole 15 to rotate and thereby immediately start furling flag 32 about the pole. At the same time, by means of the engagement and cooperation of the threads of shaft 22 with the threads of bearings 25 and 27, the shafi and pole commence longitudinal motion to the right toward motor 16. By the time the rearward edge of flag 32 reaches collar 34, the flag will be completely furled and, as the longitudinal motion continues, the flag is retracted into tube 14. The rotating and retracting motion continues until stop 24 engages microswitch 28, turning motor 16 off. At the same time, spherical end 31 will have become fully seated within collar 34, providing a weather tight seal between the interior of the tube 14 and the elements.

To operate the invention to extend pole I5 and unfurl flag 32, another appropriate switch of control 17 is operated to actuate motor 16 which in turn rotates shaft 21 in the reverse direction shown by arrow 36 in FIG. 2. Shaft 22 and pole 15 thereby commence both rotation and longitudinal motion to the left, away from motor 16. Such leftward longitudinal motion will extend pole 15 along with flag 32 out of tube 14. This motion continues until the flag is completely extricated from tube 14 whereupon it is unfurled. Directly thereafter, stop 23 actuates switch 26 to turn off motor 16.

A careful study reveals that in order for the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 to operate properly, length A of the pole 15 must substantially equal length A, the length between stop 24 and bearing 27 when the pole is fully extended, and must also substantially equal A", the length between bearing 25 and the distal end of housing 12. The distance between bearings 25 and 27 is arbitrary and need be only that distance which is necessary to support shaft 22. Stop 24, however, could be made into a conventional rotating bearing secured to shaft 22 which makes contact with the inner surface of tube I4 so that only a single threaded bearing similar to 25 or 27 would be necessary. In that event, switch 26 could extend from one side thereof and switch 28 from the other side. Other equally effective arrangements of bearings, stops and switches could be used as desired. It is understood that appropriate wiring connects switches 26 and 28 to the motor.

With reference now to FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, there appears a second embodiment of the invention. This embodiment also includes a housing 12, mounted to wall 13, having a reversible motor 16 operated by appropriate controls 17 positioned at a convenient location. Gear 41 is coupled to motor 16 and engages gear 42. Threaded shaft 43 is coupled to gear 42 for rotation therewith and is stabilized by a suitable bearing 44. While a particular coupling is shown here, it will be understood that this is not a limiting description of the invention, as any desirable coupling means may be employed. Also within housing 12 is microswitch 45 which is adapted to be actuated by stop member 46 mounted to the proximal end of pole 47. Pole 47 is hollow for a portion of its distance from its proximal end to allow the distal end of shaft 43 to enter. As shown in FlG. 5, the proximal end of pole 47 includes a sleeve 51 having relatively fine threads as compared to the threads of shaft 43. Tube 53 extends from housing 12 and encloses shaft 43 and part or all of pole 47, depending upon whether the pole is extended or retracted. Bearing 52 is mounted within tube 53 and has a generally smooth opening therethrough. Microswitch 54 is secured to bearing 52 in such a manner that it is actuated by stop member 46 at the end of its outward travel. Also mounted within bearing 52 and biased inwardly by compression spring 55 is a thread engaging member 56 having projections or teeth adapted to engage the threaded portion of sleeve With further reference to the detail of FIG. 5, there is shown rocker arm 57 pivotally mounted within stop member 46 and spring biased as indicated by means of compression spring 61. One end of this rocker arm has a single tooth 62 adapted to engage the threads of shaft 43 and the other end is formed with a knife edge 63 adapted to engage the splines of the relatively short splined end 64 of shaft 43. Operation of this mechanism will be discussed in detail hereinbelow.

in order to furl flag 32 and retract pole 47 from the position shown in FIG. 3, the appropriate switch of control 17 is actuated to commence operation of motor 16 thereby in turn causing rotation of shaft 43 in the direction shown by arrow 65. At this point, tooth 62 is beyond the end of the threads of shaft 43 and knife edge 63 engages the splined portion 64 of shaft 43 near its distal end. Shaft 43 is thus coupled to pole 47 causing the pole to rotate, thereby winding flag 32 onto the end thereof. During this initial rotation of shaft and pole to furl the flag, member 56 within bearing 52 engages the threads of sleeve 51 causing a small amount of longitudinal retracting motion of pole 47. The rotational motion of shaft 43 and pole 47 is thus adapted to perform optimum furling motion precedent to the retraction of pole 47 within tube 53. When pole 47 has retracted sufficiently so that member 56 is disen gaged from the threads on sleeve 51 and rides up in the side of pole 47, the flag will be completely furled and tooth 62 of rocker arm 57 will have reached the threaded portion of shaft 43. When tooth 62 first drops into engagement with the threads of shaft 43 due to the action of spring 61, knife edge 63 becomes disengaged from the splined portion 64 of the shaft. The furling motion then being complete, pole 47 commences much more rapid rightward longitudinal motion due to the greater pitch of the threads on shaft 43 than on the threads on sleeve 51, and becomes retracted and housed within tube 53. When full retraction is accomplished. as shown in FIG. 4, and end cap 66 closes over and seals the end of the tube, stop member 46 will have engaged switch 45 to stop operation of motor 16. It should be noted that once knife edge 63 is disengaged from the splined end of shaft 43, pole 47 no longer rotates but merely traveis longitudinally. This is because the friction between pole 47 and bearing 52 is normally greater than the friction between tooth 62 of rocker arm 57 and the threads of shaft 43.

In order to extend pole 47 and display flag 32 from its position of storage as shown in FIG. 4, the appropriate switch of control 17 is actuated causing motor 16 to commence operating and, in turn, to rotate shaft 43 within pole 47 in the direction as shown by arrow 67. This causes a direct reversal of the action above described; pole 47 extends outward without rotating until sleeve 51 is engaged by toothed member 56 within bearing 52. At this point, tooth 62 of rocker arm 57 rides out of the threads on shah 43, causing knife edge 63 to engage the splines of end 64 of the shafi. Pole 47 then commences to rotate in the same direction as shaft 43 and opposite to that in which it rotated previously, thus unfurling the flag for display. At the end of the travel of sleeve 51 through bearing 52, stop member 46 will engage switch 54 stopping operation of motor 16. Resilient gasket members 68 are provided on either end of sleeve 51 to absorb any tolerances which might be necessary at the start and stop of motion of the flagpole in the longitudinal direction.

With reference now to F I08. 6 and 7, there appears another embodiment of the invention. This embodiment also includes a housing 12 mounted to wall 13, the housing normally containing a reversible motor (not shown) operated by appropriate controls (not shown) of the type previously described. FIG. 6 shows the invention in the retracted position. in this position, flag 32 is furled around pole 71, and the pole is completely retracted into cylinder 72. Shaft 73 extends longitudinally outwardly from housing 12, coaxially with pole 71 and cylinder 72, and is appropriately coupled to the motor for rotation thereby. At the distal end of the shaft is located shaft bearing 74 while sleeve 75 is slidably mounted rearwardly thereof on the shaft. This sleeve is disposed rearwardly of bearing 74 and is separated therefrom by anti-jam spring 76. Drive key 77 is welded into a longitudinal slot in sleeve 75, and protrudes inwardly into a keyway cut in shaft 73, thereby permitting forward or rearward longitudinal motion on shaft 73 while ensuring that the sleeve and shaft rotate together. Most of the length of shaft 73 is threaded but a relatively short portion rearward of bearing 74 is smooth and is somewhat smaller in diameter than the threaded portion. Sleeve 75 is prevented from rearward movement by the shoulder formed at the transition between smaller and larger diameter.

Traveling support bearing 81 is located within cylinder 72 mounted on pole 71 forward of the distal end of switch rod 82. Fixed pole support bearing 83 is mounted within cylinder 72 rearward of bearing 81, and has appropriate openings to allow pole 71 and switch rod 82 to pass freely therethrough. Guide tube 84 extends between housing 12 and bearing 83 within the cylinder. Switch rod 82 is mounted for longitudinal movement within guide tube 84, extends from the forward side of support bearing 83 into housing 12 and is connected to the controls for switching thereof. Rod 82 has a loop 93 which extends radially through a longitudinal slot in tube 84 and a forward end which extends through bearing 83. Switch rod 82 is connected to appropriate switches for control of the motor. Longitudinal movement of the rod in either direction stops the motor and performs switching operations in the controls so that when the motor is reactivated it will rotate shaft 73 in the opposite direction. A yoke portion 86 which straddles guide tube 84 while the threaded portion of the plate is engaged by the threads of shafl 73. Furling drive lug 87 is located within pole 71, affixed to the inside surface thereof. The lug is adapted to be engaged by drive key 77 when the pole approaches the limit of its extension.

In order to extend pole 7 1 from the position shown in FIG. 6 and unfurl flag 32 for display, a timing device (such as a photoelectric cell or clock-actuated mechanism) or other suitable means may be used to actuate the controls to energize the motor when desired. The motor will then in turn rotate shaft 73 in the proper direction as shown by arrow 91. The pole is caused to move in a leftward or forward longitudinal direction as shown in the drawing by means of the engagement of the threaded portion of shaft 73 with the threaded portion of nut assembly plate 85. The pole is at this point prevented from rotating due to the straddling engagement of yoke portion 86 of the nut assembly plate with guide tube 84. As the pole nears the end of its leftward travel (at which point flag 32 will have cleared the end of cylinder 72), furling lug 87 engages drive key 77 causing the pole to rotate. The drive key up to this point had been freely rotating along with the shaft within the pole. Flag 32 thereby unfurls while the pole continues its outward extension. Spring 76 located between shaft end bearing 74 and sleeve 75 comprises an anti-jam mechanism for this structure. if, for example, the proximal end of drive key 77 should initially contact lug 87 the key will override the lug by sliding longitudinally leftward against spring 76. As the shaft and key continue rotating, the spring causes the key to return to its normal position against the rearward shoulder on the shaft so that it engages lug 87 on the next revolution. As the pole nears the completion of its outward extension, the yoke portion 86 of nut assembly plate 85 contacts loop 93 of switch rod 82. Such contact will activate a switch to cease operation of the motor and shift the direction of the motor operation so that upon reactivation it will operate in the opposite direction.

Upon a recall signal from the timer or other activation means, the motor begins operating to rotate shaft 73 in the direction shown by arrow 92 in FIG. 7. Key 77, which is at this point still engaged with lug 87, will in turn rotate, causing pole 71 to rotate and thereby furl flag 32 before the pole has retracted far enough to carry any portion of the flag into cylinder 72. When flag 32 is completely furled, lug 87 will, by virtue of its rightward longitudinal path, become disengaged from key 77 and thereby the pole will cease rotation and merely continue its longitudinal retraction. As the pole nears the completion of its inward extension, traveling support bearing 81 comes into contact with the distal end of switch rod 82 and moves it longitudinally, thereby ceasing operation of the motor and also actuating appropriate switches so that the motor next operates in the reverse. At this point end cap 66 engages the end of cylinder 72 and protects the flag against the weather.

It is apparent that there are many alternatives possible in the location and relative positions of many elements of this invention. In FIGS. 6 and 7 particularly, switch rod 82 may be arranged to only stop the motor and separate control switches may be employed for operating the motor in the proper direction. Other modifications will likely occur to those skilled in the art which are within the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A flag storage and display device comprising:

a housing adapted to be mounted to a support structure;

a hollow tubular member extending outwardly from said housing;

a reversible motor within said housing;

a shaft means, a portion of which is threaded, extending outwardly from said housing within said tubular member and coupled to said reversible motor for rotation thereby;

a pole member coaxially supported within said tubular member and adapted for extension and retraction therefrom and thereinto, said pole member being further adapted to retain a flag removably secured adjacent the outward end thereof;

means for engaging the threaded portion of said shaft means to cause longitudinal motion of said pole member; and

means for coupling said pole member and said shaft means to provide rotation of said pole member thereby.

2. A flag storage and display device according to claim I wherein said shaft means includes:

a first shaft having exterior splines extending outwardly from and coupled to said reversible motor for rotation thereby;

said threaded portion of said shaft being an exteriorly threaded sleeve secured to the inward end of said pole member and having interior splines configured to mate with said exterior splines of said shaft.

3. A flag storage and display device according to claim 2 wherein said means for causing longitudinal motion of said pole member includes support bearing means mounted within said tubular member, said support bearing means being interiorly threaded such that it is adapted to engage the threads of said threaded sleeve.

4. A flag storage and display device according to claim 3 5 and furtherincluding:

control means for controlling the operation of said motor, said control means including switch means mounted to said tubular member; and

means for actuation of said switch means when said pole member reaches the end of its longitudinal extension movement and when said pole member reaches the end of its longitudinal retraction movement, said actuation means being normally mounted to said pole member.

5. A flag storage and display device according to claim 2 and further including:

a generally spherical member on the outward end of said pole member; and

a resilient collar on the outward end of said tubular member, wherein said spherical member is adapted to seat itself into said resilient collar to four: a weatherproof seal when said pole member is fully retracted.

6. A flag storage and display device according to claim I wherein said shaft means includes a shaft having exterior splines extending longitudinally rearwardly from its forward end for a relatively short portion of its length and being exteriorly threaded over substantially the remaining portion of its length.

7. A flag storage and display menas according to claim 6 wherein said means for causing longitudinal motion of said pole member and said means for causing rotational motion of said pole member include:

a stop member mounted to the inward end of said pole member; and rocker arm pivotally mounted within said stop member having a tooth on one side of said pivot and a knife edge on the other side of said pivot, said tooth being adapted to engage said threads on said shaft to provide longitudinal motion of said pole member during rotation of said shaft, said rocker arm being normally biased for engagement of said tooth with said threads;

said knife edge being adapted to engage said splines on said shaft to provide rotational motion of said pole member during rotation of said shaft when said pole member is near its full outward extension.

8. A flag storage and display device according to claim 7 and further including:

a support bearing mounted to the inside surface of said tubular member;

a thread engaging member mounted within said support bearing and biased inwardly to contact the exterior surface of said pole member;

a threaded sleeve disposed adjacent the inward end of said pole member outwardly of said stop member and adapted to be engaged by said thread engaging member when said pole member is near its full outward extension and sub stantially at the same time said knife edge engages said splines on said shaft.

9. A flag storage and display device according to claim 6 and further including a cap mounted to the outward end of said pole member and adapted to seal the outward end of said tubular member when said pole member is fully retracted.

10. A flag storage and display device according to claim 8 and further including:

control means for controlling the operation of said motor, said control means including switch means mounted to said tubular member;

means for actuation of said switch means when said pole member reaches the end of its longitudinal movement, said actuation means normally being mounted to said pole member.

11. A flag storage and display device according to claim 1 wherein said shaft means includes a shah externally threaded over a substantial portion of its length, a shaft end bearing on its outward end and a radially projecting drive key mounted to said shaft for limited longitudinal motion thereon and rotational motion therewith adjacent said shaft end and rearward of said end bearing.

12. A flag storage and display device according to claim 11 wherein said means for causing longitudinal motion of said pole member include:

a nut assembly plate having an interiorly threaded portion for engaging the threaded portion of said shaft, and a yoke portion; and

a guide tube longitudinally mounted within said tubular member and adapted to be engaged by a straddling fit thereon of said yoke portion.

13. A flag storage and display device according to claim 11 wherein said means to provide rotation of said pole member includes a furling lug mounted to the inner surface of said tubular member and adapted to engage said drive key to provide rotation of said pole member when said pole member is near its full outward extension.

14. A flag storage and display device according to claim 11 and further including:

control means for controlling the operation of said motor, said control means including switch means mounted to said tubular member; and

means for actuation of said switch means when said pole member reaches the end of its longitudinal movement, said actuation means normally being mounted to said pole member.

is. A flag storage and display device comprising:

a housing adapted to be mounted to a support structure;

a hollow tubular member extending outwardly from said housing;

a reversible motor within said housing;

a pole member coaxially supported within said tubular member and adapted for extension and retraction therefrom and thereinto, and also adapted to retain a flag removably secured adjacent the outward end thereof;

first and second interiorly threaded shaft support bearings mounted within said tubular member;

a first shaft extending outwardly from and coupled to said motor for rotation thereby, said shaft having exterior longitudinal splines;

an exteriorly threaded hollow second shaft coupled to said pole member and having interior splines configured to mate with those of said first shaft for rotation thereby, said exterior threads adapted to engage the interior threads of said support bearings to provide longitudinal motion of said pole member;

first and second sto members mounted respectively to the rearward end of said pole member and the rearward end of said threaded shaft;

means for controlling operation of said motor, said control means including first and second microswitches mounted to said first and second support bearings respectively, one of said microswitches being adapted to be actuated by one of said stop members at the termination of said outward extension of said pole member, the other of said microswitches being adapted to be actuated by the other of said stop members at the termination of said inward retraction of said pole member, actuation of said microswitches causing said motor to stop;

a generally spherical member on the outward end of said pole member; and

a resilient collar on the outward end of said tubular member into which said spherical member is adapted to seat itself at the full retraction of said pole member to provide a weathertight seal.

16. A flag storage and display device comprising:

a housing adapted to be mounted to a support structure;

a hollow tubular member extending outwardly from said housing;

a reversible motor within said housing;

Lil

a pole member coaxially supported within said tubular member and adapted for extension and retraction therefrom and thereinto, and also adapted to retain a flag removably secured adjacent the outward end thereof;

first and second shaft support bearings mounted within said tubular member, said first bearing having an inwardly projecting spring-biased toothed member within it;

a stop member mounted on the rearward end of said pole member having within it a pivotally mounted springbiased rocker arm, said rocker arm having a toothed end and a knife-edged end;

an exteriorly threaded sleeve located on said pole member forwardly adjacent said stop member, said threads adapted for engagement with said spring-biased toothed member;

a shaft, a relatively short forward portion of its length having exterior splines adapted for engagement by said knifeedged end of said rocker arm to provide rotation of said pole member thereby, a substantial portion of said shaft being exteriorly threaded for engagement with the toothed member of of said first rocker arm, said shaft ex tending outwardly from said motor and coupled thereto for rotation thereby;

means for controlling operation of said motor, said control means including first and second microswitches mounted to said first and second support bearings respectively. one of said microswitches being adapted to be actuated by said stop member at the termination of said outward extension of said pole member, the other of said microswitches being adapted to be actuated by said stop member at the termination of said inward retraction of said pole member, said actuation of said microswitches causing said motor to stop; and

a cap member located at the outward end of said pole member and adapted to seal the outward end of said tubular member at the termination of the inward retraction of said pole member to provide a weathertight seal [7. A flag storage and display device comprising:

a housing adapted to be mounted to a support structure;

a hollow tubular member extending outwardly from said housing;

a reversible motor within said housing;

a pole member coaxially supported within said tubular member and adapted for extension and retraction therefrom and thereinto, and also adapted to retain a flag removably secured adjacent the outward end thereof;

a first support bearing mounted within said tubular member;

control means to operate said motor;

a guide tube mounted within said tubular member between said support bearing and said housing;

an elongated switch rod housed within said guide tube having an end portion which protrudes through the forward surface of said support bearing and a loop portion which extends through a slot in the outer surface of said guide tube, said switch rod being coupled to said control means for actuation thereof;

a second support bearing mounted to said pole member outward of said first support bearing and adapted to engage the end portion of said switch rod when said pole member reaches the end of its retraction motion;

a nut assembly plate mounted to the inward end of said pole member, said plate having interior threads and having a yoke portion adaptable for straddling engagement of said guide tube during extension and retraction of said pole member, said yoke portion being adapted also to engage said loop portion of said switch rod at the end of said pole member's outward extension;

a shaft, a substantial portion of which is exteriorly threaded, extending outwardly from and coupled to said motor for rotation thereby, said shaft being adapted to engage the threads of said nut assembly plate to provide longitudinal motion of said pole member upon rotation of said shaft, said shaft also having an end bearing disposed on the for- 9 1o ward end thereof. a spring rearwardly adjacent said end near its full outward extension; and bearing and a dnve y Pmjccting from said shah a cap member located at the outward end of said pole for rotation therewith and for limited longitudinal motion member and adapted to seal the outward end of said thereon;

a furling lug mounted to the inner surface of said pole 5 member and adapted to engage said drive key to provide rotation of said pole member when said pole member is bular member at the termination of said inward retraction of said pole member to provide a weathertight seal.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification116/173, 343/901, 52/149, 343/903
International ClassificationG09F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F17/00, G09F17/0091, G09F2017/0008
European ClassificationG09F17/00