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Publication numberUS3675763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1972
Filing dateSep 22, 1969
Priority dateSep 22, 1969
Publication numberUS 3675763 A, US 3675763A, US-A-3675763, US3675763 A, US3675763A
InventorsSandel Herbert N
Original AssigneeSandel Herbert N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Box for holding tape cartridges
US 3675763 A
Abstract
Cartons for holding and displaying large and small tape cartridges in a manner that permits unrestricted browsing while resisting theft. The cartons being too wide for insertion into a man's vest pocket and too long for concealment under a man's arm. Bottom retainers being positioned within the cartons, supporting the cartridges at the upper ends of the cartons in alignment with display apertures. Side retainers being formed within the cartons allowing a carton to be used which is wider than the smaller cartridges. The side retainers allowing cartons of the same width to be used both for the larger cartridges and the smaller cartridges, so that they fit well into the same size display stand.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Sandel 1451 July 1 1, 1972 [54] BOX FOR HOLDING TAPE 3,057,466 10/1962 Blonder et al. ..206/45. 19

CARTRIDGES 3,111,222 11/1963 Mueller, Jr. 3,116,825 1 1964 Thomas... [72] Inventor: Herbert N. Sande], 200 N. Bnstol Avenue, 3,298,504 H1967 Caner L98 M89198, Cahfi 9049 3,302,779 2/1967 Sparks 221 Filed: Sept. 22, 1969 3,033,356 5/1962 Meyerson ..206/45.31 3,587,837 6 1971 Smith et al ..206/45.14 21 Appl. No.: 859,787

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 52 US. (:1. ..206/45.14, 206/45.31, 206/DIG. 36, 27004 30 11 1930 Australia ..206 45.31

229 27 [5 l Int. Cl ..B65d 5/50 Primary Examiner-Joseph R. Leclair [58] Field of Search ..206/45. 14, 45.16, 45.17, 45.31, Assistant in r-Steven E- Lipman 206/52, 38; 229/27, 37, 39 B Attorney-Lindenberg, Freilich & Wasserman [56] References Cited ABSTRACT Cartons for holding and displaying large and small tape car- UNITED STATES PATENTS tridges in a manner that permits unrestricted browsing while 1,673,535 6/1928 Sheehy ..206/45.l6 resisting theft. The cartons being too wide for insertion into a 1,899,547 2/1933 Addis et a1. 206/45. 14 man's vest pocket and too long for concealment under a man's 2,314,721 3/1943 Lowenstein... ..35/1 m- Bottom retainers being positioned within the n 2,643,811 6/1953 Bolding 206/45.19 x qpp s h cerlrldges at the upper 94 9f thqwtons 111 2,654,470 10/1953 Borucki ....206/45. 14 ahgnment with display aperturesslde retamers 9 8 formed 2,71 1,819 6 1955 Vander Lugt, Jr... ....206 45. 14 Within the cartons allowing a carton to he used which is Wider 2,738,056 3/1956 Heller ....206/45.31 than the Smaller camdges- The Side retainers allowing 2,755,982 6/1956 Vander Lugt, Jr... ..229/19 tons Ofthe Same width to he used both for the larger cartridges. 2,937,743 5/1960 Buttery et al. ....206/45.14 and the small" cartridges that they fit the Same 2,946,433 6/1960 Hennessey.... ....206/45. 19 W dtsPlaY Stand- Brown 6 4.40

32M 68) 7 5 --5z 64J 66 c 62 BOX FOR HOLDING TAPE CARTRIDGES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to boxes.

2. Description of the Prior Art Tape records, particularly those in the form of small cartridges, have gained wide acceptance as substitutes for disctype records. Currently, two types of cartridges are especially popular, the larger one being referred to as a cartridge and the smaller one often being referred to as a cassette. These cartridges are often merchandised in self-service record stores or departments in the same way as disc-type records, by stacking them in a manner to encourage unrestricted customer browsing. However, the small size of these cartriges allows them to be easily slipped into a pocket or purse, and theft losses can become very high. The cartridges could be displayed in locked cases for removal only by sales personnel, but this can greatly reduce sales.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is to provide means for merchandising tape cartridges in a manner that permits unrestricted browsing while resisting theft.

Another object is to provide an economical yet attractive holder for tape cartridges which displays both sides of the cartridge, yet which reduces the possibility of theft.

In accordance with the present invention, an attractive and low-cost container is provided for the merchandising of tape cartridges or other small but valuable merchandise. The container is constructed of a sheet of cardboard or the like which is bent into a box having an aperture for displaying the merchandise, the box being much larger than the merchandise to hamper concealment and therefore reduce the possibility of theft.

In one embodiment of the invention, a container is provided which is useful for holding especially small cartridges, or cassettes. The container is in the form of a long, thin box with a pair of apertures for displaying both sides of a cassette, both apertures being formed so as to leave a pair of flaps at each aperture. One pair of flaps holds the cassette at the end of the box where the apertures are located, while the other pair of flaps serve as side retainers to hold the cassette away from the edges of the box. The side retainers allow a box to be used which is wider than the cassettes. This allows boxes of the same width to be used both for the larger cartridges and the smaller cassettes, so that they both fit well into the same size display stand.

The novel features of the invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention will be best understood from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevation view of a cartridge container constructed in accordance with the present invention, shown with a cartridge therein;

FIG. 2 is a rear elevation view of the cartridge container of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of the cartridge container of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the cartridge container of FIG. 1, shown in an open configuration and without a cartridge therein;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a sheet of cardboard cut into a shape for folding into the cartridge container of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a cartridge container similar to that of FIG. I, but for a larger size cartridge;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a sheet of cardboard for forming a cartridge container in accordance with another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a side elevation view of a container of the type which can be formed by the sheet of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken on the line 10l0 of FIG.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a sheet of cardboard for forming a cartridge container in accordance with still another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 12 is a sectional view of a container of the type which can be formed by the sheet of FIG. 11.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIGS. 1-5 illustrate a cartridge container 10 suitable for holding a small cartridge or cassette 12 to reduce the possibility of theft. The cassette l2 typically measures about 4 X 2 74 X V4 inch, which allows them to be easily slipped into a pocket or purse or concealed under the arm, by a shop lifter. The cartridge container 10 has a length L of about 12 inches which hampers its concealment in a pocket or purse or under the arm, thereby reducing the temptation of theft. Generally a length of at least about 10 inches is sufficient to make concealment very difficult for a man or woman who is not especially prepared for such theft. In some cases, a man can slip even a l2 inch box into a vest pocket and conceal it. However, while vest pockets are typically about 5 inches in width, they can easily receive a la-inch thick box only if the box is less than 4 inches in width. The container 10 has a width of slightly more than 4 inches to prevent rapid insertion in an ordinary vest pocket.

The container allows effective display of the cassette to facilitate merchandising, by the provision of apertures 14 and 16 at its front and rear faces, to display the title and list of the contents and other descriptive material generally contained on the faces of the cassette. The cartridge container, which provides an effective display of the cassette while reducing the likelihood of theft, is constructed so as to enable production at low cost.

The cartridge container is constructed of a single main sheet of cardboard having the form illustrated in FIG. 5. After folding the sheet and pasting together a pair of edges to form the container of FIG. 4, a cassette is inserted, and the container is closed. The cassette 12 has a thickness which is nearly equal to the thickness T of the container, but it has a width W and height H which are less than those of the container. In order to hold the cassette firmly in place against sideward and endward shifting, the container is provided with three retainers 26, 28 and 30 which abut the opposite sides and the bottom of the cassette. In addition, a top retainer 32 is provided which hampers removal of the cassette through the top even when the top flap is open, to reduce the likelihood of a person slipping out the cassette from the container to steal it.

The main sheet illustrated in FIG. 5 comprises a rear face or face wall 24, a front wall 22, and three sides or side walls 34, 36 and 38 each of which is in the form of a sheet. The inner surfaces of the walls are shown in FIG. 5. When the sheet is folded to form the container, the folds form the edges E of the container which defines the edges of the faces and sides. The side walls 34 and 38 are designed to overlap each other and to be held together by an adhesive applied between them. Upper and lower closing flaps 40 and 42 and side tabs 44 are provided for closing the ends of the container. The apertures 14 and 16 in the front and rear walls are formed by slitting the sheet so as to leave flaps which can form the retainers 26, 28, 30 and 32. When the retainer flaps are folded to the positions shown in FIG. 4, they leave apertures 14 and 16 through which the faces of the cassette are displayed.

The rear aperture 16 is formed by slits 46, 48 and 50 at the top, the bottom, and vertically along the middle of the aperture. This leaves the two side retainers 26, and 28. In addition, four vertically extending perforation lines 52, 54, 56 and 58 are formed to facilitate folding. When the side retainers are folded to the configuration shown in FIG. 4, the inner portions 26I and 28I of the side retainers lie at a position to abut the sides of the cartridge while the outer portions 260 and 280 extend along the front wall 22 to the sides 34 and 36 of the container. The outer portions 260 and 280 do not have to be glued or otherwise attached to the front wall.

The aperture 14 in the front wall is formed by a pair of slits 60, 62 on either side of the aperture and a pair of horizontally extending slits 64 and 66, the space between slits 64 and 66 being discarded during manufacturing. In addition, seven perforation lines 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 74 and 76 are provided to facilitate folding of the retainers. The lower retainer 30 is placed in the configuration of FIG. 4 by merely folding it so that portion 301 extends down along the front wall 22, portion 30M extends to the rear wall, portion 30C extends up the rear wall, and portion 300 extends like a flap over the rear wall. The upper retainer 32 is folded up to the position of FIG. 4 prior to insertion of a cassette into the container. After a cassette is inserted, the portion 32M is folded over the top of the cassette and the portion 320 is tucked down between the rear wall 24 and the rear face of the cassette. The side tabs 44 and upper flap 40 may then be closed.

Accordingly, the cassette container 10 is constructed from a single sheet of cardboard and it can be manufactured in a simple manner. The use of the long, wide, container reduces the likelihood of theft, since it is hard to conceal. Although a person can open the container to remove the cassette, and then steal the cassette, the fact that he could be observed opening it and the more deliberate act involved in opening it reduces the impulse to pilfer.

FIG. 7 illustrates a cartridge container 90 which is designed to hold a larger, S-track tape cartridge 92. The cartridge 92 typically measures about inches x 4 inches x /8 inch, which is larger than the cassette. However, the container 90 has a width X and a length L which are identical to those of the cassette container 10 of FIG. 1. Thus, both kinds of containers can be stored in the same size storage rack where the containers are held in rows, one behind the other. The width X of both containers is chosen which is only slightly greater than the width (generally 4 inches) of the large cartridge so that the container 90 does not require any side retainers comparable to retainers 26, 28 which are used for the cassette container. The cartridge container 90 does, however, utilize and retainers similar to retainers 30, 32 of the cassette container. As mentioned above, a 4-inch box width is generally sufficient to prevent a person from slipping the box in a vest so it is not necessary to provide a container much wider than the larger cartridge.

FIGS. 8-10 illustrate a container for cassettes which is constructed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. In this container 100, the front aperture 102 is cut so as to remove the cardboard panel, instead of using the cardboard panel to form end retainers. In order to support the lower end of a cassette, a separate non-integral end retainer 104 is used. The end retainer 104 is formed by a panel of cardboard with several perforation lines that form a portion 104A that is glued to the front wall 106, a portion 104D that is glued to the side wall 108, and portions 10413 and 104C in between them. The retainer 104 is initially flat, but it assumes a zig-zag shape, as shown in FIG. 10, when the cardboard sheet forming the container is folded into a box shape. Then the retainer l04.abuts the bottom edge of a cassette 100 to hold it in position at the top of the container.

The container 100 has side retainers 110, 112 formed from the rear aperture 114 in the same way as the retainers of the container of FIG. 1. No top retainer corresponding to retainer 32 is used, but the container M0 is otherwise similar to that of FIG. 1. It is sometimes easier to apply the separate end retainer 104 than to fold over an integral retainer, and the separate retainer also eliminates a flap portion, such as portion 300 at the back of the package. The lack of a retainer does, however, make it somewhat easier to open the package to remove the cassette, which, as pointed out above, is undesirable. A similar container can be used for the larger cartridge, such a container being thicker and having no side retainers, but being of the same width and length.

FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate a container for the larger cartridge, constructed in accordance with still another embodiment of the invention. In this container, an end retainer section 120 is used which is integral with the panel 122 of cardboard that forms the rest of the container. The panel includes rear and front walls 124, I26 and side walls 128, 130. The retainer section includes an inner portion 132 that is glued to the rear wall 124, a middle portion 134 that extends between the rear and front walls, and an outer portion 136 that is glued to the front wall. The middle portion 134, which serves as an end retainer to keep the cartridge at the upper end of the container, extends from a position near the apertures to nearly the bottom of the container. The middle portion serves to brace the container to prevent its empty bottom portion from being pushed in. However, the container can be collapsed prior to receiving a cartridge, for more compact storage.

Thus the invention provides containers for tape cartridges which facilitates stacking and display for easy customer browsing in self service stores, yet which hampers theft. The containers are of low cost, and they enable two sizes of cartridge commonly distinguished by the terms cassettes" and cartridges", to be displayed in the same racks.

It may be noted that in all of the embodiments of the invention described above, the lower end retainer is not formed from any portion of the front, back or side walls that are located below the region where the cartridge is located. It would be possible to fold in portions of the front walls just below the cartridge to provide an end retainer, but this would weaken the container. Instead, separate end retainers are used so that the container has front and back wall portions, and side wall portions below the cartridge, which extend the full width and thickness, respectively, of the container.

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated herein, it is recognized that modifications and variations may readily occur to those skilled in the art, and consequently, it is intended that the claims be interpreted to cover such modifications and equivalents.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for displaying a tape cartridge of predetermined length, width and thickness, said width being substantially less than 4 inches, comprising:

an elongated box having a width of at least 4 inches and a thickness approximately equal to that of the cartridge, said cartridge being received in said box, said box having an aperture for displaying a face of said cartridge; and at least one side retainer extending to a position spaced from a side wall of the box and located within said box for confining said cartridge to a position within said box wherein a face of said cartridge is displayed through said aperture and for preventing substantial sideward shifting of said cartridge within said box, whereby to prevent ready insertion of said box in a vest pocket while enabling efficient storage.

2. The apparatus described in claim 1 wherein:

said box is longer than said cartridge and has walls with inner surfaces; and including an end retainer for holding said cartridge against downward shifting, said end retainer comprising a sheet like portion of material extending across the width of said box and oriented with an edge against the bottom of the cartridge, said end retainer attached to the inner surfaces of opposite walls of said box.

3. Apparatus for resisting the theft of a tape cartridge of predetermined width, height, and length, while enabling its prominent display comprising:

an elongated container with upper and lower ends, opposite faces, and opposite sides, said faces and sides having inner and outer surfaces, and having a length at least twice as great as the length of said tape cartridge and a width approximately equal to the width of said cartridge, said container having an end retainer of sheet like form located therewithin with an upper edge at a distance from the upper end approximately equal to the length of said cartridge, to hold said cartridge at the upper end of said container so the lower end of said container is void of said cartridge, said end retainer extending from an inner surface of said container so that it does not leave a gap in the outer walls of said container at a position below said tape cartridge, and said container having an aperture formed in at least a first of said faces at a location between said end retainer and said upper end for displaying said cartridge.

at a location between said end retainer and said upper end for displaying said cartridge; and

said end retainer comprising a section of material which is integral with one of said sides, said section including an inner portion attached to the inside surface of the first of said faces, a middle portion extending across the inside of said container so that only its upper edge contacts said cartridge, and an outer portion attached to the inside surface of a second of said faces.

6. Apparatus for resisting the theft of a tape cartridge of predetermined width, height, and length, while enabling its prominent display comprising:

an elongated container with upper and lower ends, opposite faces, and opposite sides and having a length at least twice as great as the length of said tape cartridge, said said end retainer prior to folding said main sheet into a box shape, and to cause said end retainer to automatically assume a position to retain the tape cartridge at the upper end of the container when the main sheet is folded.

container having a lower end retainer located therewithin at a distance from the upper end approximately equal to the length of said cartridge, to hold said cartridge at the upper end of said container so the lower end of said box is 5. Apparatus for resisting the theft of a tape cartridge of predetermined width, height, and length, while enabling its prominent display comprising:

an elongated container with upper and lower ends, said convoid of said cartridge, said end retainer extending from the inner surface of said container so that it does not leave a gap in the outer walls of said container at a position below said tape cartridge, and said container having tainer including an integral main sheet having portions forming opposite faces, and opposite sides and having a length at least twice as great as the length of said tape cartridge, said container having an end retainer located therewith at a distance from the upper end approximately equal to the length of said cartridge, to hold said cartridge at the upper end of said container so the lower end of said container is void of said cartridge, said end retainer extending from the inner surface of said container so that it does not leave a gap in the outer walls of said container at a position below said tape cartridge, and said container having an aperture formed in at least a first of said faces an aperture formed in at least a first of said faces at a location between said lower end retainer and said upper end for displaying said cartridge;

said container also having a top end retainer portion in-

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/387.11, 229/120.38, 206/775, 229/120.15
International ClassificationB65D5/50, B65D5/42
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/42, B65D5/4204, B65D5/5007
European ClassificationB65D5/50A2, B65D5/42B, B65D5/42