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Publication numberUS3677483 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1972
Filing dateFeb 4, 1970
Priority dateSep 12, 1969
Also published asDE1946220A1, DE1946220B2, DE1946220C3
Publication numberUS 3677483 A, US 3677483A, US-A-3677483, US3677483 A, US3677483A
InventorsWerner Henrich
Original AssigneeWerner Henrich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for winding wire and the like
US 3677483 A
Abstract
A wire winding apparatus reciprocates a wire along the length of a drum so that wire is wound around the drum in uniform layers. The limits of reciprocation of the wire are controlled by limit switches whose positions are adjusted in response to the tension of the wire just before it is reciprocated. Before being reciprocated, the wire passes over a pivotally mounted counterbalanced pulley with the pivotal movement of the pulley, in response to the tension of the wire, controlling a mechanism for adjusting the limit switches to obtain uniform layers of wire around the drum.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I United States Patent [151 3,677,483 Henrich [45] July 18, 1972 [s41 APPARATUS FOR WINDING WIRE AND 3,289,956 12/1966 Sjogren ..242/1ss.4 x THE LIKE 3,413,834 12/1968 Kovaleski... ..242/25 X 3,097,815 7/1963 Smith et a1. ....242/158.4 R [72] Inventor: Werner Hennch, 6349 l-lorbach (Dlllkres), am wachtglpfel, Germany Primary Examiner-Stanley N. Gilreath [22] Filed; Feb. 4 1970 Assistant ExaminerMilton Gerstein Attorney-Edmund M. Jaskiewicz [21] Appl. No.: 8,523

ABS (ACT [30] Foreign Application Priority Data A wire winding apparatus reciprocates a wire along the length of a drum so that wire is wound around the drum in uniform Sept. 12, 1969 Germany ..P 19 46 220.5 layers. The limits of reciprocation of the wire are controlled by limit switches whose positions are adjusted in response to g the tension of the wire just before it is reciprocated. Before being reciprocated, the wire passes over a pivotally mounted [58] Field of Search ..242/25 A, 25 R, 157.1, 158.4 counterbalanced p y with the pivotal movement of the p ley, in response to the tension of the wire, controlling a [56] References Cited mechanism for adjusting the limit switches to obtain uniform UNITED STATES PATENTS layers of wire around the drum 3,038,674 6/1962 Wahl ..242/25 R 6 Clairm, 5 Drawing Figures Patented July18, 1972 3,677,483

3 Sheets-Sheet l Fig.1

WERNER HENRxCH ATTORNEY Patented July 18, 1972 3,677,483

3 Sheets-She s? 2 mvai'wzp WERNER HENRICH Patented July 18, 1972 3 Sheets-Sheet (5 REGULATOR SPEED MOTOR I FIG. 5

INVENTOR WERNER HENRICH ATTORN EY APPARATUS FOR WINDING WIRE AND THE LIKE The present invention relates to an apparatus for winding wire and the like, more particularly, to a mechanism for winding wire in uniform layers around a drum.

In order to wind wire uniformly around a drum, wire winding machines have been provided with a mechanism to reciprocate the wire back and forth along the length of the drum so that the wire is wound in uniform layers thereon. The limits of reciprocation of the wire, or the points at which the reciprocating movement of the wire must be reversed, must be established precisely with respect to the flanges of the drum. If the wire does not shift direction at a point exactly at a flange of the drum there will result either an accumulation of wire adjacent this flange or the wire will be wound short of the flange so as to form a gap or recess therewith. These recesses or accumulations at the flanges are undesirable and various arrangements have been proposed to regulate the reciprocating movement of the wire. A common arrangement comprised stops or limit switches which were adjusted manually to limit the range of the shifting movement of the wire and to bring a reversal of direction of the shifting movement precisely when the wire reaches a flange.

The manual adjustment of such stop or limit switches was disadvantageous in the high-speed production of wire since such adjustment is time-consuming and requires considerable skill on the part of the operator.

It is therefore the principal object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved apparatus for accurately and automatically reversing the direction of movement of a wire being shifted along the length of a drum upon which it is being wound.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a simplified mechanism for automatically displacing limit switches which reverse the direction of movement of the shifting wire in response to the tension of the wire as it is being wound around the drum.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved apparatus for uniformly winding wire and the like around a drum.

According to one aspect of the present invention an apparatus for winding wire and the like may comprise means reciprocating or shifting the wire in directions parallel to the drum in order to wind the wire in uniform layers between the flanges of the drum. Means areprovided for indicating the tension of the wire during the winding operation. A control apparatus is responsive to the tension indicated on the wire and controls the limits of the shifting movement of the wire by displacing limit switches in suitable directions so that the limit switches reverse the shifting movement of the wire precisely at the flanges of the drum.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent upon reference to the accompanying description when taken in conjunction with the following drawings, which are exemplary, wherein;

FIG. I is a view of the winding mechanism of a wire winding apparatus according to the present invention with the drum being shown in section;

FIG. 2 is a view of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken in the direction of the line llll;

FIG. 3 is a schematic view showing the limit and control switches in greater detail;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to that of FIG. 3 but showing the contact arms of the switches as actuated by the pulley; and

FIG. 5 is an electrical circuit diagram showing diagrammatically the control system of the apparatus of the present invention.

Proceeding next to the drawings wherein like reference symbols indicate the same parts throughout the various views a specific embodiment of the present invention will be described in detail.

As may be seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, a motor 1 rotates adrum 2 upon which a wire 3 is wound. The wire 3 is shifted or rcciprocatcd by means of a pulley or roller 4 in directions parallel to the rotary axis of the drum as indicated by a doubleended arrow 5. The pulley 4 is repeatedly shifted within a range by means of a known shifting mechanism 30. By shifting the wire in this manner it is wound in successive uniform layers around a core 8 of the drum 2 and between flanges 6 and 7.

The points at which the shifting movement of the pulley 4 are reversed are determined by limit switches 9 and [0 which actuate the shifting mechanism 30. When the limit switches 9 and 10 are not properly positioned a recess 11 as indicated adjacent the flange 6 or an accumulation 12 adjacent the flange 7 may occur. In order to guide the wire 3 to fill the recess I1 and to prevent subsequent formation of such recesses the limit switch 9 must be displaced slightly in the lefthand direction as viewed in FIG. I. In a similar manner, in order to remove the accumulation I2 and to prevent subsequent formation of such accumulations the limit switch 10 must be also displaced a short distance in the Iefthand direction.

The wire 3 is delivered to the shifting pulley 4 over a counterbalanced pulley I3 pivotable about a shaft 14 against the force of a counterweight 13A or a spring. Wire tension indicating devices of various forms have been generally provided in wire drawing machines in order to prevent breaking of the wire, particularly when the wire is very thin, when the winding speed of the drum becomes too high and the tension on the wire becomes too great. 0n the other hand, when the rotary speed of the winding drum is too slow there is a danger of the wire being loosely wound upon the drum. In a conventional apparatus, the wire was thus fed to a winding drum over a compensating or counterbalanced pulley which is mounted for angular or linear movement. The magnitude of deflection of the pulley or the magnitude of linear movement of the pulley in one or the other direction thus constitutes an indication of the tension exerted upon the wire. The magnitude of deflection of such a pulley was thus employed for continuously regulating the rotary speed of the winding drum. Such a compensating pulley may be employed in the present invention for establishing the points at which the wire shifting pulley is to reverse direction. This use of the pulley is possible since it has been discovered that where a recess, such as I1, is formed near a flange of the drum the tension of the wire in such an area is reduced. Conversely, the tension on the wire is increased when wire accumulates adjacent a flange such as at 12 in FIG. I. As discussed above, these recesses or accumulations are formed when the change of direction of the wire shifting device occurs either too soon or too late with respect to a flange of the drum. Since the tension on the wire is an indication of whether or not the wire is being wound precisely with respect to a flange of the drum and since this tension is indicated by a compensating pulley as described above, such a pulley arrangement may be employed in the present invention to adjust the shifting points of the wire shifting mechanism.

As shown in FIG. 2, the pulley 13 has an electric contact I5 mounted on its pulley arm. When tension of the wire increases as a result of the formation of an accumulation 12 the speed of the wire will increase and the pulley 13 will be pivoted downwardly as indicated in FIG. 2. The contact 15 will then engage a stationary contact 16 which causes the energization of an electric motor 18 which operates for a short period of time and displaces the limit switch 10 to the left during this period of operation.

Should the wire form a recess 11 as shown in FIG. 1 the speed of the wire will decrease and the tension on the wire will be reduced so that the compensating pulley 13 will pivot upwardly to enable its contact 15 to engage contact 17. The engagement of contacts 15 and 17 will bring about an energization of an electric motor 19 which operates to displace the limit switch 9 a short distance to the left. The positions of the limit switches 9 and 10 are thus established from the reciprocation of the wire 3.

The control arrangement of FIG. 2 may be modified by replacing contacts 16 and 17 with a rheostat or variable resistance 20 which is also indicated in FIG. 2. The rheostat 20 is connected into a control circuit for electric motors 18 and 19 so that movement of the pulley contact over the rheostat will vary the voltages supplied to these electric motors and thus control their speeds and the displacement of the limit switches 9 and 10. For example, when the voltage is decreased the motor 19 will move the limit switch 9 to the left so that the recess 11 will become filled with wire. Where there is an overcontrol or the limit switch 9 is moved too far to the left then an accumulation of wire may occur in the recess 11. This accumulation would then be removed during the next control operation.

The motor 18 will operate in a corresponding manner to displace the limit switch 10 to the left or to the right depending upon the accumulation of wire or formation of a recess at flange 7. A limit switch 9 or 10 is thus, in effect, oscillated into position by the successive reciprocating movements of the wire 3 as it passes over the compensating pulley 13.

Since the control contacts 16, 17 or rheostat act upon both motors l8 and 19 and since motor 18 is actuated only when the wire is being wound near flange 7 and motor 19 actuated only where wire is being wound near flange 6, it is desirable to provide a control structure to assure this operation. This control structure may comprise a switch 21 which is closed when the oscillating pulley 4 is being moved toward the left and approaches flange 6. In its closed position, the switch 21 will close a circuit which connects the motor 19 to a source of electrical energy. As the pulley 4 reverses its direction and moves toward the right the switch 21 will be opened and a flow of current to the motor 19 will be interrupted. In a similar manner, as the pulley 4 approaches flange 7 a switch 22 will be closed so as to close a circuit permitting the flow of current to the motor 18. When both switches 21 and 22 are open which will always be the situation when the pulley is not in the region of either flange, the rotary speed of the winding motor 1 will be regulated by a control system actuated by contacts l5, 16, 17 or by the rheostat 20.

The switches 21 and 22 are of the type having resilient contact arms extending into the path of movement of the pulley 4 so that the switches are opened or closed as the pulley 4 moves past the switch. Switches 21 and 22 together with switches 9 and 10 are shown in greater detail in FIGS. 3 and 4. As the pulley 4 moves towards the left as indicated by the doubleended arrow 5 in FIG. 1, the pulley will contact the longer contact arm 21a of switch 21 as well as the longer contact arm 9b of switch 9. As the pulley 4 continues its movement to the left it can be seen in FIG. 4 that the pulley will deflect the arms 21a and 9b to bring the electrical contacts into engagement to close the electrical circuit.

The switch 21 thus provides for control of the motor 19 as the winding wire moves into the region of flange 6 and, similarily, switch 22 provides for control of the motor 18 as the wire enters the region of flange 7. In the region of the drum between these two flange regions the rotational speed of motor 1 and hence the speed with which the wire is wound upon the drum 2 may be controlled as pointed out above.

A control system showing the relationship between the switches 21 and 22, motors 18 and 19, and the rheostat 20 is shown in the electrical circuit diagram of FIG. 5. The switch 22 is connected to a source of electrical energy R and acts upon a relay R, which is also energized from the source R. The energization or non-energization of relay R, connects either of its poles P, or P in circuit. Pole P, is connected to a speed regulating device 31 which is connected to regulate the speed of motor 1. The pole P is connected to apply current to the pulley arm of the compensating pulley 13. Depending upon the direction of movement of compensating pulley 13, an electrical connection is established between pole P of the pulley arm and one of the contacts 15, 16 or 17. The contact 15 is a neutral contact in that nothing occurs when the pole P is connected to contact 15.

The contact 16 is connected to the motor 18 through switch 10, to the motor 19 through switch 9, and to the speed regulator 31. The contact 16 controls a forward movement (a) and contact 17, which is connected to the same elements as contact 16, controls reverse movement (b).

At the same time the switch 21 is connected to the current source R and acts upon relay R in the same manner as switch 22 acts upon relay R, described above.

In operation, when electric current is applied to the contact 15 on the compensating pulley arm nothing will occur independently of the switches 21 and 22. This condition will occur when the tension on the wire 3 is uniform resulting from uniforms winding of the wire on the drum 2.

Should the tension on the wire decrease, the compensating pulley will then establish contact between pole P and contact 17. This connection will immediately affect the speed regulator 31 and, depending on the position of switches 9 or 10, the displacement of the switches by the respective motors 18 or 19.

When the tension on the wire increases, the motors will rotate in the reverse direction through an electrical connection established by the contact 16.

Should the switch 22 be opened, current will then flow from source R over pole P, to the speed regulator 31. This will also occur when switch 21 is open. Should either switch 22 or 21 be closed, the motors 18 and 19 are controlled by means of the compensating pulley 13.

It is thus apparent that the compensating pulley 13 which provides a measure of the tension upon the wire 3 has three functions according to the present invention: first, to establish the point at which the wire shifting device reverses direction in the region of one flange of the drum; second, to establish a second reversal point in the region of the other flange of the drum; and third, to regulate the rotational speed of the winding drum. To accomplish these functions the present invention employs a control device which employs the wire tension measuring means to displace the limit switches when the wire is in the region of either flange of the drum but the winding speed of the drum is regulated in the conventional manner by the wire tension indicating means when the shifting wire is in the intermediate space between the two flange regions.

It is also within the scope of this invention to modify the control arrangement so that a series of timed pulses are delivered to each of the displacing electric motors. By actuating the motors in this manner the respective limit switches will be displaced gradually and will thus result in a gradual fillingup of a recess by the wire or in a gradual reduction of an accumulation of wire.

It is understood that this invention is susceptible to modification in order to adapt it to different usages and conditions and, accordingly, it is desired to comprehend such modifications within the invention as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In an apparatus for winding wire and the like in uniform layers upon a drum so that the layers terminate at the drum flanges, the combination of means reciprocating the wire in directions parallel to the drum along the length thereof for winding wire in uniform layers between the flanges of a drum, means for indicating the tension on a wire as it is being wound on a drum, means responsive to said tension indicating means for controlling the limits of movement of said reciprocating means so that wire is wound uniformly upon the drum along the length thereof between the drum flanges, limit switch means responsive to the reciprocating wire for actuating said reciprocating means to reverse the direction of reciprocation of the wire, means responsive to said control means for displacing said limit switch means to adjust the range of reciprocation of said reciprocating means to obtain uniform winding of the wire, and first and second means in the regions of the first and second flanges respectively of the drum for rendering operative said limit switch displacing means.

2. In an apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein said tension indicating means comprises a pivotally mounted pulley over which the wire is passed before being reciprocated, means for counterbalancing said pulley against the tension of the wire thereon, said control means being actuated in response to the pivotal movement of said pulley.

3. In an apparatus as claimed in claim 2 wherein said control means comprises first and second contacts spaced oppositely from each other in the pivoting path of said pulley, said limit switch displacing means being advanced in one direction in response to one contact position of said pulley and being reversed in the other direction in response to the other contact position.

4. In an apparatus as claimed in claim I and comprising means responsive to said control means between said two regions for regulating the winding speed of the drum.

5. In an apparatus as claimed in claim 4 wherein said means for displacing the limit switch means comprises electric motors.

6. In an apparatus as claimed in claim I wherein said tension indicating means comprises a pivotally mounted pulley over which the wire is passed before being reciprocated, means for compensating said pulley against the tension of the wire thereon, said control means being actuated in response to the pivotal movement of said pulley, and said control means comprises a rheostat actuated in response to the movement of the pivotable pulley to regulate the speeds of the electric motors operatively connected to said limit switch means so as to adjust the positions of said limit switch means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3038674 *Dec 30, 1960Jun 12, 1962Western Electric CoApparatus for winding strands
US3097815 *Nov 29, 1961Jul 16, 1963Sylvania Electric ProdApparatus for spooling filamentary material
US3289956 *Jan 18, 1965Dec 6, 1966Sjogren Tool & Machine Co IncApparatus for spooling
US3413834 *Apr 2, 1965Dec 3, 1968Advanced Wyrepak Company IncStrand working and spooling apparatus and method
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3768751 *Aug 14, 1972Oct 30, 1973Western Electric CoMethods of and apparatus for continuously reeling strand material
US3876167 *Jun 27, 1973Apr 8, 1975Siemens AgApparatus for controlling the drive of a laying device in a winding machine
US3967787 *Nov 5, 1974Jul 6, 1976N.V. Bekaert S.A.Wire winding apparatus
US4004744 *Mar 21, 1975Jan 25, 1977N.V. Bekaert S.A.Winding apparatus
US4050640 *Aug 26, 1975Sep 27, 1977Firma Henrich KgApparatus for winding wire and the like
US4050641 *Sep 4, 1975Sep 27, 1977Firma Henrich KgApparatus for winding wire
US4083506 *Mar 24, 1976Apr 11, 1978Babcock Wire Equipment LimitedWire spooler
US4156509 *Aug 25, 1977May 29, 1979Babcock Wire Equipment LimitedWire spooler
US4235070 *Sep 20, 1978Nov 25, 1980Dynamex CorporationWire stranding machine and control means therefor
US4236373 *Jul 2, 1979Dec 2, 1980Dynamex CorporationTraverse control system
US4480799 *Dec 7, 1979Nov 6, 1984Hitachi, Ltd.Apparatus for controlling tension applied onto an electric wire in a winding machine
US4485978 *Dec 19, 1983Dec 4, 1984Essex Group, Inc.Method and apparatus for winding strand upon spools having tapered end flanges
US5485972 *Nov 19, 1993Jan 23, 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyCable recovery winder
US6536700Jul 12, 2001Mar 25, 2003Corning IncorporatedVariable tension fiber winding
EP1171372A1 *Dec 14, 1999Jan 16, 2002Corning IncorporatedSystem and methods for automatically adjusting turnaround position in spool winders
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/478.2
International ClassificationB65H54/38, B65H59/38, B65H54/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2515/31, B65H59/38, B65H2701/31, B65H2511/222, B65H54/2878
European ClassificationB65H54/28L10C6, B65H59/38