Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3677673 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1972
Filing dateAug 25, 1970
Priority dateAug 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3677673 A, US 3677673A, US-A-3677673, US3677673 A, US3677673A
InventorsShapiro Leonard
Original AssigneePennwalt Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary press
US 3677673 A
Abstract
A press has a table which rotates about a vertical axis. Within the table is mounted a plurality of molds which are symmetrically distributed about the vertical axis, each mold having a cavity extending therethrough, the axis of each cavity being parallel to the vertical axis. A plurality of anvils are mounted for radial sliding movement across the upper surface of the table, and a plurality of punches are mounted below the table, there being one anvil and one punch associated with each mold. As the table, anvils, and punches rotate as a unit, stationary cams effect movement of each anvil and punch in a coordinated manner: (1) the punch enters the cavity from below and presses powdered material against the anvil; (2) the anvil moves radially inwardly from over the cavity; (3) the punch moves further upwardly to eject the manufactured article onto the table; (4) the punch moves downwardly; and (5) the anvil moves radially outwardly to clear the table of excess powder, and move the article into a receptacle mounted to the table, there being a separate receptable associated with each mold. Also, a core rod extends through the punch and into the cavity, the punch being mounted for lateral movement so that it is centered upon entering a counterbore at the lower end of the cavity.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Shapiro [451 July 18, 1972 ROTARY PRESS Leonard Shapiro, Upper Darby, Pa.

[73] Assignee: Pennwalt Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa.

[22] Filed: Aug. 25, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 66,774

[72] Inventor:

Primary Examiner-Robert L. Spicer, Jr. Attorney-Carl A. l-lechmer, Jr. and Earl T. Reichert l ABSTRACT A press has a table which rotates about a vertical axis. Within the table is mounted a plurality of molds which are symmetrically distributed about the vertical axis, each mold having a cavity extending therethrough, the axis of each cavity being parallel to the vertical axis. A plurality of anvils are mounted for radial sliding movement across the upper surface of the table, and a plurality of punches are mounted below the table, there being one anvil and one punch associated with each mold. As the table, anvils, and punches rotate as a unit, stationary cams efiect movement of each anvil and punch in a coordinated manner: (1) the punch enters the cavity from below and presses powdered material against the anvil; (2) the anvil moves radially inwardly from over the cavity; (3) the punch moves further upwardly to eject the manufactured article onto the table; (4) the punch moves downwardly; and (5) the anvil moves radially outwardly to clear the table of excess powder, and move the article into a receptacle mounted to the table, there being a separate receptable associated with each mold. Also, a core rod extends through the punch and into the cavity, the punch being mounted for lateral movement so that it is centered upon entering a counterbore at the lower end of the cavity.

27 Claims, 26 Drawing figures Patented July 18, 1972 7 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR.

Leonard Shapiro Q r f- ATTORNEY.

Patented July 18, 1972 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

Leonard Shapiro ATTORNEY.

Patented July 18, 1972 7 Sheets-Sheet I3 INVENTOR. Leonard Shapiro 61 f ATTORNEY.

Patented July 18, 1972 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. Leonard Shapiro '7 ZZZ vwmf ATTORNEY.

Patented July 18, 1972 3,677,673

'7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

Leonard Shapiro AT ORNEY.

Patented July 18, 1972 3,677,673

7 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR.

Leonard Shapiro QTM ATTORNEY Patented July 18, 1972 3,677,673

7 Sheets-Sheet '7' Fig. [3/ Fig.l3m Fig.13n

INVENTOR. Leonard Shapiro ATTORNEY.

ROTARY PRESS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates in general to a press for manufacturing articles from powdered material, but more particularly to a rotary press, utilizing a plurality of sliding anvils, for making ferrite memory cores of extremely small size.

For the past several years, ferrite memory cores have been manufactured for computer memory systems utilizing several different principles. The original memory core sizes were ap proximately 0.060 of an inch outside diameter, and produced in relatively conventional single punch presses. As the need for better response time of the core developed, the sizes of the cores have been progressively reduced, so that now, cores whose outside diameter is as low as 0.0l4 inch are made on various presses. As the size of the core was reduced, the complexity of making satisfactorily accurate presses and rigid tools has resulted in very high costs per acceptable core.

Generally, there are two commercial ways of making cores. The first uses a mold filled with powder, and then having an upper punch enter the mold cavity, and pressing the loose powder against a fixed lower punch. The upper punch is withdrawn with the lower punch then ejecting the core from the mold cavity. This technique has been used on single presses and rotary presses. The other technique is to close off the top of the mold cavity with an anvil or plate, and press the loose powder with the upward stroke of the lower punch. The anvil is removed and the compact ejected with the same lower punch. This process has been successfully done on single punch presses.

On rotary presses, this technique (pressing against a plate) has been used by attaching the anvil to an upper holder which lifts the anvil from the surface of the press table. The difficulty of operating a rotary press in which the anvil is attached to this upper holder is in cleaning the die face of loose powder. The literature shows several systems in which small pellets are manufactured on a rotary press in which the lower punch presses the compact against an anvil or anvils attached to what was the upper punch holder, and shows elaborate systems to clean the mold face of loose material. Obviously, if any granular material remains on the mold face, the anvil will not close off the cavity with metal to metal contact, and flash" will result on the core. As the size of the compact approaches the sizes now required by memory cores, satisfactory cleaning becomes very difficult.

In producing memory cores or other articles from powdered material, the material is usually delivered to mold cavities from a hopper or other supply means. As the supply of material decreases, the pressure head of this supply within the hopper changes. This in turn varies the quantity of material delivered to each mold cavity which makes it extremely difficult to maintain uniform density in the articles throughout the manufacturing operation.

Also, in many presses having a plurality of manufacturing stations, all of the manufactured articles are collected at one point. Thus, if it is discovered that there are a number of defective articles being collected, it cannot be determined without inspection, which of the many stations is producing the defective articles.

Also, a primary cost to the user of a memory core press lies in the cost of replacing the tools, i.e., the core rod and the punch, and since the cost of these items is a function of the length as well as the accuracy of the tools, this can be quite high if these parts must be manufactured to be absolutely concentric with each other.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a rotary press having a rotary table which supports a plurality of molds which are distributed about a vertical axis of rotation. Special geometric relationships and sizes have resulted from a design which is easier to build at a reasonable cost. This design has permitted the incorporation of a plurality of anvils which never leave the face of the table. Each anvil is associated with a particular mold cavity, and slides radially outwardly across the face of the rotary table to cover its respective cavity to permit compression of powdered material against the anvil by a lower punch. The anvil then moves radially inwardly and the compressed or manufactured article is ejected from the cavity onto the upper surface of the table by the punch. The anvil then moves radially outwardly to remove excess powdered material, and direct the article into a receptacle. There is a separate receptacle associated with each mold cavity, and thus all articles manufactured in a particular mold cavity will be directed to its respective receptacle. A single manufacturing station includes a mold, and the anvil and die means associated with that mold. Since there are a plurality of manufacturing stations arranged about the axis of rotation, it is important to separately collect articles manufactured at each station to easily locate a station that might be producing defectivc articles or cores. In the prior art, articles produced by a plurality of stations were all collected at a common point. However, in the present invention, articles or cores produced at each station are individually collected.

Entering each mold cavity from beneath the rotary table is a core rod, and a reciprocably mounted punch surrounding the core rod for compressing the powdered material. To reduce the necessity for holding the core rod and punch concentric with each other as much as possible, the cavity is designed with a counterbore at the lower end thereof to allow the shank of the punch to easily enter the cavity. The punch is held onto a punch holder by means of a cap which surrounds a shoulder on the punch, and allows a slight lateral movement of the punch to center the same as it is aligned with the mold cavity during installation. The core rod is located by the inside diameter of the punch. This construction thus reduces the replacement costs of the tools for the press since the core rod and punch do not have to be manufactured with the same degree of accuracy as would otherwise be the case.

The quantity of powdered material entering each cavity from above the table is controlled by having a feed means which maintains a constant pressure head on the supply of such material. This is accomplished by having a primary hopper, and a secondary hopper. Each hopper is in the form of an inverted generally cone-shaped member having a discharge opening at the bottom thereof. The secondary hopper is mounted within the primary hopper, and is of such a size that its discharge opening is disposed somewhere between the top and bottom of the primary hopper depending on the head of supply material desired within the primary hopper. Thus, material poured into the secondary hopper will descend into the primary hopper only until the level within the primary hopper reaches the discharge opening of the secondary hopper. Therefore, a constant head of powdered material will be maintained within the primary hopper, assuring uniform density in the articles or cores manufactured at each station.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top view of the press showing the overall arrangement of some of the principal elements.

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through line 22 of FIG. I, showing the major elements, and how they are mounted for relative rotation.

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view taken through line 33 of FIG. 2, showing the slide arrangement for moving the anvils of the press.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken through line 4-4 of FIG. 2, showing a lower cam assembly for reciprocating the punches of the press.

FIG. 5 is a detailed view of the feed assembly used for delivering powdered material to the mold cavities.

FIG. 6 is a transverse sectional view taken through line 66 of FIG. 5 showing a lower arcuate portion of the feed assembly.

FIG. 7 is a view taken along line 77 of FIG. 6, showing details of channel structure, and a scraper blade.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken through line 8-8 of FIG. 7, showing means for holding the scraper blade against the rotary table.

FIG. 9 is a detailed view in section, showing the die means, and a receptacle for receiving manufactured articles from an individual station.

FIG. I is a view taken along line 10-10 of FIG. 9 showing the die means.

FIG. I] is a detailed view in section, showing a cam as sembly for locking an anvil in place during compression of the powdered material against the anvil.

FIG. 12 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 12-12 of FIG. 11, showing a portion of the slide assembly.

FIGS. 130 through l3n illustrate the successive relative positions of various elements during one cycle of the manufacturing operation.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the major elements of the press are shown. The press, designated generally by the numeral 10, includes base structure 12, the base structure including a fixed vertical shaft 14. This base structure supports some of the major elements of the press for relative rotation about a vertical axis 16. About fixed shaft 14, an extremely accurate rotor I8 is rotatably supported by pre-loaded annular contact bearings 20, the rotor being rotatably driven by a worm 22, and worm gear 24. Since the size of memory cores is so small, rotor 18 must be precisely located. Face run-out as well as concentricity must be held to within one ten thousandths of an inch in order to insure uniformity of density of compact as well as size in the memory cores.

To provide adequate lubrication, oil is pumped into the lower end of passageway 26 where it is directed upwardly into sight glass 28, from where it descends via passageways 30 around upper bearings 20, and into annular space 32. To pump, the oil drive gear is arranged to dip into an oil bath. As worm gear 24 rotates, a series of gears (not shown) will actu ate a positive displacement pump (not shown) mounted in base structure 12 which will pump oil into passageway 26. The oil is mechanically and magnetically filtered to insure excellent lubrication. A clipper seal 34 is provided near the top of the press to prevent oil from splashing onto the exterior surfaces of the press. The oil then passes around lower bearings 20, and exits through the lower end of annular space 32 from which it is returned to the source (not shown).

Onto the precision rotor 81 is mounted rotary table structure designated generally by the numeral 36 having an upper surface 38 and a lower surface 40. Mounted within machined holes in the rotary table structure is a plurality of molds l6 in the present embodiment), designated generally by the numeral 42, these molds being distributed about vertical axis 16. Each mold has a cavity extending therethrough, the mold being mounted within rotary table 36 such that this cavity extends from upper surface 38 to the lower surface 40. This par ticular construction will be described in more detail later.

Slidably disposed on upper surface 38 is a plurality of anvilslide structures designated generally by the numeral 44, there being one anvil-slide structure associated with each mold, each anvil-slide structure being adapted to slide radially over upper surface 38. The means for effecting radial sliding movement of the anvils is a first stationary cam structure in the form of a cam plate 46, mounted to vertical shaft 14, and having a recessed cam track 48 located on the underside thereof, cam track 48 being disposed about vertical axis 14. Feed means 50 is mounted to cam plate 46 for the purpose of delivering powdered material into the mold cavities as the rotary table 36 rotates about vertical axis 16.

Located beneath rotary table 36, and distributed about the vertical axis I6 is a plurality of die means designated generally by the numeral 52, there being a single die means associated with each mold. Each die means will be discussed in more detail below, but each includes a punch which is adapted to enter its respective mold cavity to compress powdered material against an anvil disposed on upper surface 38. A second cam structure disposed about vertical axis [6, and designated generally by the numeral 54 (see FIGS. 2 and 4), effects reciprocating movement of each punch within its respective mold cavity. As can be seen in FIG. 2, cam structure 54 is stationarily mounted to the base structure 12. Adjustment means, designated generally by the numeral 56, are provided for adjusting the height of the various cam surfaces of cum structure 54 (see FIGS. 1,2, and 4).

Referring to FIGS. l and 4, it can be seen that the construction of the press on opposite sides of center line 0-0 is symmetrical. The recessed cam track 48 is symmetrical on each side of center line a-a, and two identical feed means 50 are located l apart; the lower cam structure 54 is also symmetrical on each side. Thus, as can be seen in FIGS. I and 2, rota tion of rotor 18 about vertical axis 16, effects rotation of rotary table 36, anvil-slide structures 44, and die means 52 as a unit. Upper cam plate 46 and lower cam structure 54 being mounted to the base structure, remain stationary. Therefore, as the anvil-slide structures and die means rotate about vertical axis 16 they are actuated by their respective cam means in a coordinated manner. There being l6 work stations in the present embodiment, each of the two feed means 50 delivers one half the total amount of powdered material necessary for all I6 mold cavities. As stated above, cam track 48 (see FIG. 1), is composed of two identical portions spaced apart, and lower cam structure 54 (see FIG. 4) also has duplicate portions I80 apart. Thus, within each mold, a memory core is manufactured every 180, or in other words, for every revolution of the table 36, two memory cores are produced or manufactured within each mold. It can also be seen that there are duplicate third stationary or locking earns 58 spaced 180 apart for clamping an anvil against upper surface 38 of table 36 during the compression stroke of the associated punch. Thus, although the present embodiment is arranged to repeat itself each 180, it is within the scope of the present invention to arrange the structure so that only one article is manufactured per revolution of the table, or 3, 4, etc. are manufactured per revolution as desired.

Referring to FIG. 3, it can be seen that during operation of the press each anvil-slide structure on one side of the press as sumes a different position depending upon the particular stage that the manufacturing process is in at that particular work station. It will be noted that each anvil-slide structure is in the same radial position, and moving in the same direction as its counterpart 180 away. Also shown in FIG. 3 is a vacuum means 60, again there being two such vacuum means spaced 180 apart. These vacuum means are circumferentially located adjacent to locking earns 58, and are utilized to remove excess powdered material from upper surface 38. As will be more fully explained below, the reason for locating each vacuum means 60 circumferentially adjacent to a locking cam 58, is that at that point the anvil associated with the work ing station under the locking cam has already covered the cavity opening, thus eliminating the possibility of vacuum means 60 removing powdered material from the cavity itself.

Referring to FIG. 4, each half of lower cam structure 58 includes three sections, each section having a cam surface thereon to accomplish a particular phase of the manufacturing operation; these sections are shown as 62, 64 and 66. As can be seen from FIGS. 2 and 4, each adjustment means 56 includes separate control associated with each cam section. As can be seen, these controls, indicated by numerals 57, 59, and 61, are associated with cam sections 62, 64, and 66 respectively. Thus, through a suitable gearing arrangement, each of these controls effects vertical adjustment of its respective cam section to adjust the stroke of a punch within its mold cavity.

Referring to FIGS. 5 through 8, feed means 50 will be described in more detail. Feed means 50 is stationarily supported on upper cam plate 46 by a mounting plate 68 which extends over the ends of cam plate 46. This mounting plate 68 is secured to cam plate 46 by a central screw '70 which extends through a washer 72, the screw being threadably connected to the upper cam plate. A spring 74 biases the mounting plate in a downward direction toward the top surface of cam plate 46. To provide for accurate vertical adjustment of the feed means, three adjusting screws 76 are provided which extend through mounting plate 68, and contact the upper surface of cam plate 46. These adjusting screws are arranged in a triangular fashion (see FIG. 1) so that the feed means 50 can be vertically adjusted very accurately. Feed means 50 includes a primary hopper 78 having a primary discharge opening 80 at the lower end thereof. Supported within primary hopper 78 is a secondary hopper 82 having a secondary discharge opening 84 at the lower end thereof. Each of these hoppers is illustrated as being of a generally conical shape, but may assume any desired form in which the side of the hopper slants inwardly toward the bottom discharge opening. A venting passage 86 is provided near the top of the primary hopper.

Extending between primary hopper 78 and rotary table 36 is a delivery means 88 for delivering powdered material from the primary hopper to each mold cavity. This delivery means terminates at its lower end with an arcuate portion 90 (See FIG. 6), the bottom of the arcuate portion being in sliding contact with the upper surface 38 of the rotary table. Located on the bottom of the arcuate portion 90 is arcuate channel structure having a first portion 92 which communicates with the passageway 89 which extends from primary hopper 78. A second portion 94 of the channel structure is utilized for directing excess powder (as will be more fully explained below) toward a scraper blade 96, which scraper blade directs the excess powder to a location where it can be picked up by vacuum means 60 heretofore described. As can be seen, scraper blade 96 is held in contact with upper surface 38 of the rotary table by a spring 98. The bottom of the arcuate portion 90 includes a carbide wear insert to reduce the level of friction and wear during the relative rotation between the rotary table 36 and this arcuate portion. Reducing friction is important because it reduces generated heat which may affect the characteristics of the powdered material, and thereby affect the quality of the manufactured core. Reducing wear maintains uniformity of core production over longer periods of operation.

Referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, the details of the rotary table 36 and die means will be described. Rotary table 36 is comprised of an outer member 100, and an inner member 102, the outer member 100 supporting a plurality 45 of receptacles (see FIG. 2), and the inner portion supporting the plurality 42 of molds. Each of these molds assumes the form of a member 104 which is pressed into member 102. Each mold has a cavity 106 extending therethrough, the cavity having a counter bore 108 at the lower end thereof. Disposed below each mold is a punch holder 110 having an upper horizontal surface 112 for supporting a punch 114, the punch having a shank portion 116 which is adapted to enter the cavity to compress the powdered material. Extending through the center of the punch is a core rod 118 which extends into cavity 106. It is extremely important that the installation of the lower punch and core rod be as simple as possible as these parts are extremely fragile and require delicate handling. Although the diameters of the mold 104, punch I14, and core rod 118 must be held within close tolerances, with minimum clearances maintained, it is also desirable that the necessity for holding these components concentric to each other be reduced as much as possible. To achieve this, punch 114 has an annular shoulder 120 for holding the punch against surface 112 of the punch holder 110. Extending over this annular shoulder is a cap 122 held onto the punch holder by means of screws 124. This cap does not clamp onto the upper shoulder of the punch; it leaves a clearance of less than 0.0001 inch between the clamping face of the cap and the upper face of the shoulder 120 of the punch. The radial clearance between cap 122 and shoulder 120 is approximately 0.010 inch. Core rod 118 is located by the inside diameter of the punch through which it extends. With this construction the punch is piloted by the inside diameter of the mold cavity. Counterbore 108 in the bottom of the mold cavity serves to allow shank 116 of the punch to enter into the upper portion of the mold cavity during installation.

Rotary table 36 further includes an annular member 126 having a plurality (16 in the present embodiment) of holes extending therethrough to contain each of the sixteen die means 52 (see HO. 2 also). Member 128 is secured to member 126 by means of screws 130. Core rod 118 includes a shoulder 119, shoulder 119 resting on the top surface of the head of screw 132. A plurality of radially extending holes 121 are arranged within the head of screw 132, these holes being utilized to insert adjustment tool to vertically adjust screw 132, and thereby adjust the vertical position of core rod 118 within its respective mold cavity. Core rod 118 and member 128 are contained within a vertical slot 133 (see FIG. 10) within punch holder so that core rod 118 remains stationary with respect to punch holder 110 while the latter reciprocates within its respective mold cavity during the manufacturing operation. Because it is desirable that punch holder 110 he kept as small and lightweight as possible in order to reduce the inertia of the latter, the slot also serves to eliminate a portion of the mass thereof. Slot 133 also permits easy installation of core rod 118 through punch 114 and into its respective mold cavity, after which it is vertically adjusted so that the top of the core rod is flush with the top of mold 104, or as otherwise desired. This core rod adjustment is accomplished by resting shoulder 119 of core rod on the head of screw 132, and insert ing the proper adjustment tool into holes 121 to vertically adjust screw 132. After this, screw 135 is moved inwardly against screw 132 to lock the latter in place. Next, clamp 134 is placed over shoulder 119 to clamp down core rod 118 against the top of screw 132, after which clamp 134 is secured in place by nut 137.

Thus, since all core rods are individually adjustable, their lengths need not be the same. A spring 139 serves to bias punch holder 110 against the upper cam surfaces of lower cam assembly 54 (See FIG. 2 also).

Connected to the underside of lower surface of member 100 of rotary table 36, is an open ended receptacle 136 which is secured in place by means of screw 138, and retaining members 140 and 141. Each receptacle 136 being constructed of a flexible plastic, each can be removed from the rotary table by squeezing inwardly near the top thereof to allow annular lip 143 to move out of retaining member 141. As stated above, a plurality of these open-ended receptacles is disposed about vertical axis 16, there being a single receptacle 136 associated with each of the 16 molds. Articles manufactured in each mold cavity are directed across the upper surface 38 through an opening 142, and into receptacle 136. Thus, all articles produced at an individual work station are collected in a single receptacle associated with that particular work station, thus enabling a defective work station to be easily located.

Referring to FIGS. 11 and 12, the details of the anvil-slide structures 44, locking earns 58, and vacuum means 60 will be described in more detail. Each anvil 144 is mounted within a slide 146, the anvil being biased toward upper surface 38 of the rotary table 36 by a light spring 148. This spring serves only to assure positive contact between the anvil and the table during the operation of the press. Each slide 146 is mounted within an annular member 150 such that during rotation of this anvil-slide structure, about vertical axis 16 cam follower 152 effects radially sliding movement of the anvil over the upper surface of the rotary table 36. Mounted within slide 146 is a plunger rod 154. Locking cam 58 only comes into operation during the compression phase. As can be seen, a spring 156 biases a cam plunger 158 in a downward direction, but downward movement of cam plunger 158 is limited by a snap ring 160 on the top thereof. This snap ring 160 abuts against member 162, member 162 having a shim 164 located between it and the top surface of cam plate 46. Spring 156 abuts against an upper plunger 166 secured with a cover 168 via a pin 170. The distance from upper surface 38 of rotary table 36 to the bottom of cam plunger 158 is fixed, and in order to have mechanical interference for clamping present, the height of anvil I44 plus the height of the rod 154 must be greater than this distance.

In the present embodiment, this interference has been set at approximately 0.003 inch with a variation of length of rod I54 and anvil 144 to 0.0002 of an inch, so that it can be insured that the anvil is always clamped against mold 104 during compression. Also, with this arrangement, motion of anvil 144 is kept to a minimum, and therefore noise and shock are kept to a minimum. Thus, as each anvil 144, and therefore each rod 154, rotates to a position beneath locking cam 58, it is compressed with a load equal to the pre-compression of spring 156, and the stroke produced by the mechanical interference. The amount of stroke is determined by the thickness of shim 164 at setup. The load must be greater than the maximum compression load to be encountered in pressing the cores; otherwise, the anvil will be lifted off mold 104, and will result in flash."

Vacuum means 60 includes a collector 172 mounted to the underside of cam plate 46 by means of a screw 174, the lower end of collector 172 being located adjacent to the upper surface 38 of the rotary table. A conduit 176 connected to a suitable vacuum producing source conducts away the excess powdered material collected from the upper surface 38 of the rotary table.

Referring to FIGS. 130 through 13n, one cycle of the manufacturing operation will be described with respect to a single manufacturing station of the press. All the standard techniques of overfill, underfill, pre-compression, and compression that are associated with commercial rotary presses can be used.

Before beginning the manufacturing operation, the powdered material is first poured into secondary hopper 82 (See FIG. the material then passing through discharge openings 84 and 80, and descending through passageway 89 to the first portion 92 of the arcuate channel structure. The supply of powdered material accumulates within distributing means 88 and primary hopper 78 until reaching the level of the secondary discharge opening 84. As long as a supply of powdered material is maintained within secondary hopper 82, the head of material contained within primary hopper 78 and distributing means 88 remains constant. Whenever the level of materi al within hopper 78 begins to drop below the level of the discharge opening 84, this level is restored by material contained within hopper 82. Thus, a constant head or level is maintained on the supply of powdered material contained within hopper 78, thereby assuring that a uniform quantity of material is deposited within each mold cavity as rotary table 36 (See FIG. 2) rotates about vertical axis 16. The press is now set for operation.

With reference to FIGS. 130 through l3n, and FIG. 9, it can be seen that FIGS. 130 through I3n are mere schematic representations, i.e., all of the detailed parts of the press are not shown in these figures. For example, only a cavity is shown within table member I02, the details of the mold member 104 being deleted.

In FIG. 13a, shank I16 of the punch, and core rod 118 are both flush with the top of table member 102, and anvil 144 is located radially inwardly of the mold cavity. As member 102 of rotary table 36 rotates about vertical axis 16 (See FIG. 2), the mold cavity rotates beneath first portion 92 of the channel structure which is in communication with passageway 89 (See FIGS. 5-7), thereby depositing a quantity of powdered materiall within the mold cavity. Referring to FIG. 13b, it can be seen that during this feeding operation, shank 116 of the punch is lowered within the mold cavity to allow the powdered material to be drawn into the mold cavity.

In FIG. 13c, shank 116 moves upwardly, discharging excess powdered material onto the upper surface of rotary table member I02. This excess powdered material is received within the second portion 94 of the arcuate channel structure (See FIG. 6), and as table member 102 rotates, this excess powdered material is carried along within the second portion 94 of the channel structure until reaching scraper blade 96. It is noted that the arcuate portion extends generally along a path generated by the rotation of mold 104 about vertical axis I6, while the first portion 92 and second portion 94 of the ar cuate channel structure extends generally along a path generated by the rotation of the mold cavity about the same axis (See FIG. 6).

Referring to FIG. 13d, as table member I02 continues to rotate, excess powder contained within the second portion 94 of the channel structure is directed against the scraper blade 96 (See FIG. 6 also), scraper blade 96 moving the excess material away from the mold cavity and toward the vacuum means to be later described. Continuing to rotate about verti cal axis 16, shank 116 of the punch descends within the mold cavity thereby dropping the charge of powdered material contained therein below the upper surface of table member I02 (See FIG. 13c). While the shank 116 is being lowered within the mold cavity, anvil I44 moves radially outwardly to cover the mold cavity. As stated previously, the rotary table, the anvil-slide structures, and the die means, all rotate as a unit about vertical axis 16 (See FIG. 2). Thus, in describing the operation of the manufacturing process occurring in FIGS. 13a through I3n, members 102, shank 116, core rod 118, and anvil I44 rotate as a unit.

It can be seen in FIG. 13f, that after anvil 144 has closed the mold cavity, vacuum means 60 sucks up excess powdered material directed thereto by scraper blade 96. As stated previously, vacuum means 60 is disposed adjacent to a circumferential path extending generally through the mold cavity and having the axis of rotation 16 as its center of curvature. It has also been previously noted that vacuum means 60 is circumferentially located adjacent to the locking cam 58 (FIG. 13g). This is because immediately prior to anvil 144 being locked against the upper surface of the rotary table member 102 (FIG. 13g), anvil 144 has already covered the mold cavity, thus preventing vacuum means 60 from sucking away any of the powdered charge contained within the mold cavity (FIG. 13]).

Thus, it can be seen in FIG. 13g, while anvil 144 is locked against the upper surface of member 102, member 102, shank I16, core rod 119, and anvil I44 continue to rotate beneath the locking cam 58. Shank 116 is moved upwardly by lower cam structure 54 (See FIG. 2) to compress the powdered charge against anvil 144 (Fig. 13h).

As these members continue to rotate, anvil 144 passes from beneath the locking cam 58 while at the same time shank 116 of the punch is lowered within the mold cavity (FIG. 131'). Continued rotation effects movement of anvil 144 radially inwardly from over the mold cavity (FIG. I3j). While anvil 144 remains inwardly of the mold cavity, shank 116 of the punch moves upwardly above the upper surface of table member I02, thereby ejecting the manufactured article onto the upper surface of the table member 102 (FIG. 13k). It is to be noted that once the manufactured article moves above the upper surface of table member 102, the article expands to a diameter which is slightly greater than that of the mold cavity. Thus, as shank 116 descends within the mold cavity, the manufactured article is deposited on the upper surface of table member 102 (FIG. I31).

As the members continue to rotate about the vertical axis of rotation, anvil 144 is once again moved radially outwardly to cover the mold cavity, and move the manufactured article radially outwardly from its associated mold cavity (FIG. I3m As can be seen more clearly in FIGS. 2 and 9, the manufactured article is directed outwardly by anvil 144 through an opening 142 associated with the mold cavity, and into its respective receptacle 136. As stated previously, each mold cavity has a separate open-ended receptacle associated therewith, whereby all of the manufactured articles produced within an individual mold cavity are collected in a separate receptacle associated with that particular mold cavity. Thus, if any one of the 16 manufacturing stations has a mold or other part associated therewith, which is producing defective articles or cores, this station is easily located because all of the defective articles will be contained within its respective receptacle. This eliminates the need to examine each manufacturing station to determine which is defective as was heretofore the case, because previously all of the manufactured articles produced were collected in a single collecting means. After moving or directing the manufactured article into its receptacle, anvil 144 is again moved radially inwardly, while shank 116 is moved upwardly within the mold cavity to a point flush with the upper surface of table member 102 (FIG. 13h), and the operation repeats itself.

It is to be noted that the sizes of mold member 104, and the cavity [06 extending therethrough (See FIG. 9), have been greatly exaggerated in relation to the size of other parts of the press so that the operation and construction of the press could be clearly described herein.

Although I have described my invention with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure has been made only by way of example, and that numerous changes in the details of construction and combination and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed. For example, although the present embodiment illustrates the compaction of one toroid shaped article per station, it is within the scope of the present invention to produce a plurality of articles at each station, the articles being either toroid shaped or solid. To produce a solid article the core rod is eliminated from the die means, there being only a solid punch. To produce a plurality of articles at each station, each mold would have a plurality of cavities extending therethrough, and each die means would have a plurality of punches, or punches and core rods, to mate with each cavity. Thus, a single stroke of each die means would produce a plurality of articles at each station.

Also, although as stated above, counterbore 108 and the means for permitting lateral movement of punch 114 serve to allow shank 116 of the punch to enter the upper portion of mold cavity 106 during installation, counterbore 108 also has a second function; it permits shank 116 to be shorter than would otherwise be the case. Shorter shanks are important when pressing small cores or articles in order to reduce the column buckling effect on the punches. Only a relatively short length of the upper portion of cavity 106 is needed to produce each core or article. During operation of the press, the top of shank 116 never descends into counterbore 108, but always remains within the upper portion of cavity 106. The reason why the upper portion of cavity 106 is much longer than the stroke of the punch is to pennit regrinds of mold 104. After continued operation of the press, it becomes necessary to regrind the upper face of each mold 104, after which the mold is mounted upwardly from its previous position so that the reground upper face is once again flush with the top of the table structure.

What is claimed is:

l. A press for manufacturing articles from powdered material comprising:

a. base structure;

b. table structure supported on said base structure, and disposed about a vertical axis, said table structure having an upper surface and a lower surface;

c. a mold stationarily mounted within said table structure, said mold having a cavity extending therethrough in a generally vertical direction;

d. an anvil slidably disposed on one of said surfaces, and adapted to be radially movable with respect to said axis over said one of said surfaces, said anvil being adapted to close one end of said mold cavity;

e. first cam means disposed about said axis in driving relation to said anvil for effecting said radial sliding movement of said anvil;

f. die means operatively associated with said mold, said die means including a punch adapted to enter the other end of said cavity for pressing said powdered material against said anvil;

g. second cam means disposed about said axis in driving relation to at least a portion of said dic means for reciprocating said punch within said cavity; and

h. means for effecting relative rotation about said vertical axis of said table structure, said anvil, and said die means with respect to said first cam means and said second cam means.

2. A press according to claim 1 and further including feed means for delivering said powdered material to said cavity, said feed means and said mold being adapted to rotate with respect to each other about said vertical axis.

3. A press according to claim 2 wherein said anvil is disposed upon said upper surface, said feed means is disposed above said upper surface, and said die means is disposed below said upper surface, and further including vacuum means disposed adjacent to said upper surface and adapted to rotate with respect to said mold about said axis, said vacuum means being located adjacent to a circumferential path extending through said cavity and having said axis as the center of curvature.

4. A press according to claim 3 and further including third cam means disposed in driving relation to said anvil for periodically clamping said anvil against said upper surface during the compression of said powdered material, said third cam means being adapted to rotate with respect to said mold about said axis, whereby said anvil is periodically clamped against said upper surface.

5. A press according to claim 4 including an open-ended receptacle for receiving the manufactured articles, said receptacle being disposed radially outward of said cavity, said receptacle being mounted to said table structure, the open end of said receptacle being disposed below said upper surface and facing in an upward direction, whereby upon ejection of each article by said punch, said anvil slides radially outward to move said article into said receptacle.

6. A press according to claim 5 wherein said table structure includes an opening disposed radially outward of said cavity, and extending from said upper surface to said lower surface, the open end of said receptacle being mounted to said lower surface and surrounding the lower end of said opening.

7. A press according to claim 6 wherein said table structure, said anvil, and said die means are mounted for rotation as a unit about said vertical axis, said first cam means being disposed above said upper surface, and stationarily supported by said base structure, said second cam means being disposed below said die means and stationarily supported by said base structure, and said third cam means being stationarily disposed above said anvil.

8. A press according to claim 7 wherein said first cam means comprises a cam plate disposed above said rotary table structure, said cam plate having a recessed cam track disposed on the underside thereof, said cam track being disposed about said vertical axis, and further including slide means mounted to said anvil, said slide means having follower means disposed within said cam track whereby upon rotation of said anvil, movement of said follower means within said stationary cam track effects radial sliding movement of said anvil across said upper surface.

9. A press according to claim 8 wherein said cam track includes surface means for effecting movement of said anvil over said upper surface (a) radially inwardly from said cavity to permit said powdered material to be fed into said cavity, (b) radially outwardly over said cavity for compression of said powdered material, (c) radially inwardly to permit ejectment of the manufactured article onto said upper surface, and (d) radially outwardly over said cavity to direct the article through said opening.

10. A press according to claim 9 wherein said second cam means is disposed about said vertical axis, said second cam means including surface means for effecting movement of said punch (a) downwardly within said cavity to permit said powdered material to be fed into said cavity, (b) upwardly within said cavity to effect compression of said powdered material against said anvil, (c) further upward movement of said punch within said cavity to at least said upper surface to eject the manufactured article, and (d) downwardly within said cavity.

1]. A press according to claim wherein said anvil is disposed under said cam track, and said third cam means is mounted to the top of said cam plate, and disposed over said cam track, said third cam means extending through said cam plate and into said cam track, whereby upon rotation about said vertical axis said anvil is periodically clamped against said upper surface.

12. A press according to claim 11 wherein said vacuum means is circumferentially located adjacent to said third cam means,

13, A press according to claim 12 wherein said first cam means, said second cam means, and said third cam means are so disposed with respect to each other that the movements and clamping of said anvil, and the movements of said punch occur in timed relation.

M. A press according to claim 2 wherein said anvil is disposed upon said upper surface, said first cam means is disposed above said upper surface and stationarily supported by said base structure, said die means is disposed below said upper surface, said second cam means is disposed below said die means and stationarily supported by said base structure, said table structure, said anvil, and said die means are mounted for rotation as a unit about said vertical axis, and said feed means is stationarily disposed above said upper surface comprising a primary hopper for containing a supply of said powdered material, and means for a constant head on said supply.

15. A press according to claim 14 wherein said means for maintaining a constant head comprises a secondary hopper, said primary hopper having a primary discharge opening disposed in the bottom thereof, said secondary hopper having a secondary discharge opening disposed in the bottom thereof, each of said hoppers tapering inwardly toward said openings, said secondary hopper being disposed within said primary hopper, and said secondary discharge opening being located between the top and bottom of said primary hopper.

16. A press according to claim 14 wherein said feed means further includes delivery means extending between the bottom of said primary hopper and said table structure, said delivery means having an arcuate portion extending generally over a circumferential path generated by the rotation of said mold about said vertical axis, the bottom of said arcuate portion contacting said upper surface and having arcuate channel structure disposed therein, said channel structure having a first portion and a second portion extending generally over a path generated by the rotation of said cavity about said axis, said delivery means having a passageway disposed therein ex tending between said primary discharge opening and said first portion.

[7. A press according to claim 16 wherein said first portion is disposed adjacent to one end of said arcuate portion, said first portion being closed at the ends thereof, said second portion beginning at the other end of said arcuate portion and ending adjacent to said first portion, said second portion being adapted to collect excess powder ejected from said cavity.

18. A press according to claim 17, including vacuum means stationarily disposed adjacent to said upper surface, said vacuum means being located adjacent to said circumferential path generated by the rotation of said cavity about said vertical axis, and further including a scraper blade mounted to said arcuate portion at said other end thereof, said scraper blade contacting said upper surface, and adapted to direct said excess powdered material from said second portion toward a path generated by the relative rotation between said table structure and said vacuum means.

19. A press according to claim [8 including three adjustable screws operatively connected to said feed means, and disposed in a triangular arrangement for supporting said feed means, on the top surface of said cam plate, and spring means biasing said feed means toward said top surface of said cam plate.

20. A press for manufacturing articles from powdered material comprising:

a. base structure;

b, table structure rotatably supported on said base structure, and disposed about a vertical axis of rotation, said table structure having an upper surface, and a lower surface;

. a plurality of molds stationarily mounted within said table structure and disposed about said vertical axis, each mold having a cavity extending therethrough, the axis of each cavity being parallel to said vertical axis;

d. feed means for delivering said powdered material to each cavity, said feed means being stationarily disposed above said upper surface;

. a plurality of anvils slidably disposed on said upper surface, there being one anvil associated with each mold, each anvil adapted to be radially movable over said upper surface and adapted to close one end of its respective cavity;

f. first cam means disposed in driving relation to each anvil, said first cam means being stationarily mounted to said base structure, and disposed about said vertical axis and above said upper surface;

g. a plurality ofdie means disposed below said upper surface and about said vertical axis, there being one die means associated with each mold, each die means including a punch adapted to enter the other end of its respective cavity for pressing said powdered material against said anvil;

h. second cam means disposed about said vertical axis in driving relation to at least a portion of each die means for reciprocating each punch within its respective cavity, said second cam means being disposed below said die means and stationarily mounted to said base structure.

21. A press according to claim 20 further including a plurality of open-ended receptacles disposed about said vertical axis, there being one receptacle associated with each cavity for receiving the manufactured articles therefrom, each receptacle being disposed radially outwardly from its respective cavity and mounted to said table structure, the open end of each receptacle being disposed below said upper surface and facing in an upward direction.

22. A press according to claim 21 wherein said table structure includes a plurality of openings disposed about said vertical axis and extending from said upper surface to said lower surface, there being a single opening associated with each cavity and receptacle, each opening being located radially outwardly of its respective cavity, the open end of each receptacle being mounted to said lower surface and surrounding the lower end of its respective opening,

23. A press according to claim 22 wherein said first cam means includes surface means for elTecting sliding movement of each anvil over said upper surface (a) radially inwardly from said cavity to permit said powdered material to be fed into said cavity (b) radially outwardly over said cavity for compression of said powdered material against said anvil (c) radially inwardly to permit ejection of the manufactured article by said punch onto said upper surface and (d) radially outwardly over said cavity to direct the article through the respective opening into its respective receptacle.

24. A press according to claim 23 wherein said second cam means includes surface means for effecting movement of each punch (a) downwardly within its respective cavity to permit said powdered material to be fed into said cavity, (b) upwardly within its respective cavity to press said powdered material against said anvil, (c) further upwardly to at least said upper surface to eject the manufactured article onto said upper surface, and (d) downwardly to pennit said anvil to direct said article into the respective receptacle 25. A press according to claim 24 wherein said molds, said feed means, said anvils, said first cam means, said die means, and said second cam means, are so disposed with respect to each other that said feeding of said powdered material and structure, and operativcly associated with said mold, said die means including a punch adapted to enter the lower end of said cavity for pressing said powdered malcrial against said anvil;

f. means for effecting radial sliding movement of said anvil over said upper surface, while at the same time maintaining constant and positive contact between said anvil and said table structure, during rotation of said table structure.

27. A press according to claim 26 wherein said anvil moving means comprises cam and slide structure for effecting said radial sliding movement, and biasing means for effecting said constant and positive contact.

i i i i

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1719542 *Mar 10, 1928Jul 2, 1929Gathmann EmilApparatus for molding ingots
US2218456 *Feb 12, 1938Oct 15, 1940Owens Illinois Glass CoApparatus for molding plastic materials
US2748424 *May 28, 1954Jun 5, 1956Fay Bernard FRotary pelleting press modification
US2967613 *Apr 28, 1955Jan 10, 1961134 Woodworth CorpMetal forming apparatus
US3020589 *Jul 28, 1960Feb 13, 1962Olivetti & Co SpaDevice for molding articles by compacting powder material
US3029470 *Jul 13, 1959Apr 17, 1962Stokes F J CorpTablet making machine
US3430532 *Jul 13, 1967Mar 4, 1969Usm CorpMeans for making pellets,particularly explosive pellets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3957408 *Oct 7, 1974May 18, 1976Binney & Smith Inc.Automated molding machine
US4035128 *Sep 30, 1974Jul 12, 1977Frede Hilmar DrostholmBrick press and associated equipment for making bricks
US4080128 *Jan 13, 1977Mar 21, 1978Siemens AktiengesellschaftApparatus for the production of compacts of layerwise different composition, for heavy duty electric contacts
US4292017 *Jul 9, 1980Sep 29, 1981Doepel Wallace AApparatus for compressing tablets
US4362494 *Oct 13, 1981Dec 7, 1982Siemens AktiengesellschaftAutomatic press
US4385880 *Sep 10, 1979May 31, 1983Lemelson Jerome HShock wave processing apparatus
US4390335 *Feb 23, 1982Jun 28, 1983Ptx-Pentronix, Inc.Die, punch and core rod assembly for compacting powder material
US4403935 *Mar 26, 1981Sep 13, 1983Manesty Machines LimitedTabletting machines
US4443171 *Apr 14, 1982Apr 17, 1984Wesjay, Inc.Multi-motion mechanical press
US4475880 *Jun 30, 1983Oct 9, 1984Manesty Machines LimitedTabletting machines
US4570229 *Sep 19, 1983Feb 11, 1986Pennwalt CorporationTablet press controller and method
US4575328 *Mar 6, 1984Mar 11, 1986Asm Fico Tooling, B.V.Automatic continuously cycleable molding apparatus
US4735761 *Sep 5, 1985Apr 5, 1988H. Obrist & Co. AgProcess and apparatus for producing a shaped body of plastics material
US4789323 *Jun 11, 1987Dec 6, 1988Hudson William RRing making apparatus
US4943227 *Dec 19, 1988Jul 24, 1990I.M.A. Industria Macchine Automatiche S.P.A.Compressing machine for making tablets
US5004413 *Aug 22, 1989Apr 2, 1991Manesty Machines LimitedTablet making machines
US5213818 *May 17, 1991May 25, 1993I.M.A. Industria Machine Automatiche S.P.A.Device for taking and conveying tablets coming out of a rotary tabletting machine
US5256046 *Aug 7, 1991Oct 26, 1993Korsch Ohg MaschinenfabrikPress for producing coated-core tablets
US5686118 *Jul 7, 1995Nov 11, 1997Tris Inc.Apparatus for compressing-forming powder
US5762978 *Jul 31, 1995Jun 9, 1998I.M.A. Industria Macchine Automatiche S.P.A.Batching device for tablets making compression machine
US5928590 *Dec 9, 1994Jul 27, 1999I.M.A. Industria Macchine Automatiche S.P.A.Compression method for powder of granular material
US7018194 *Dec 4, 2001Mar 28, 2006Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Powder supplying apparatus and powder molding apparatus
US7056111 *Dec 4, 2001Jun 6, 2006Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Powder press forming apparatus and method of powder press forming
US7323129 *Dec 11, 2003Jan 29, 2008Omj Ireland LimitedSystems, methods and apparatuses for manufacturing dosage forms
US7361006 *Dec 22, 2003Apr 22, 2008Mcneil-Ppc, Inc.Systems, methods and apparatuses for manufacturing dosage forms
US7451676Jul 20, 2004Nov 18, 2008PrecisionsmedsApparatus and methods for dividing medicinal tablets and for packaging and distributing tablet portions
US7625622Sep 24, 2004Dec 1, 2009Bioprogress Technology LimitedPowder compaction and enrobing
US7654814 *Oct 19, 2005Feb 2, 2010Fette GmbhRotary press
US7713455 *Nov 11, 2004May 11, 2010Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co., Ltd.Method of manufacturing a molding with a core
US7749053 *Dec 19, 2006Jul 6, 2010Fette GmbhDevice for generating a negative pressure in the sealed room of a tablet press and/or of an isolator
US7785089Mar 24, 2005Aug 31, 2010Bioprogress Technology LimitedAdditional improvements in powder compaction and enrobing
US7901200 *Jan 19, 2007Mar 8, 2011Tdk CorporationMolding apparatus
US8376726 *Aug 20, 2009Feb 19, 2013General Electric CompanyDevice and method for hot isostatic pressing container having adjustable volume and corner
US20020068107 *Dec 4, 2001Jun 6, 2002Makoto KitamuraPowder press forming apparatus and method of powder press forming
US20020090412 *Dec 4, 2001Jul 11, 2002Makoto KitamuraPowder supplying apparatus and powder molding apparatus
US20030227108 *Mar 6, 2003Dec 11, 2003Okerson C. AlbertThick composite continuous molding process
US20040126425 *Dec 11, 2003Jul 1, 2004Sowden Harry S.Systems, methods and apparatuses for manufacturing dosage forms
US20040137057 *Dec 22, 2003Jul 15, 2004Sowden Harry S.Systems, methods and apparatuses for manufacturing dosage forms
US20050147710 *Sep 24, 2004Jul 7, 2005Jason TeckoePowder compaction and enrobing
US20050238750 *Apr 13, 2005Oct 27, 2005Brown Paul RBricketting machines
US20050266116 *Mar 24, 2005Dec 1, 2005Jason TeckoeAdditional improvements in powder compaction and enrobing
US20060016157 *Jul 20, 2004Jan 26, 2006Thurston John EApparatus and methods for dividing medicinal tablets and for packaging and distributing tablet portions
US20060083804 *Oct 19, 2005Apr 20, 2006Jurgen SchikowskiRotary press
US20070149108 *Dec 19, 2006Jun 28, 2007Fette GmbhDevice for generating a negative pressure in the sealed room of a tablet press and/or of an isolator
US20070231420 *Jan 19, 2007Oct 4, 2007Tdk CorporationMolding apparatus
US20080116606 *Nov 11, 2004May 22, 2008Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co., Ltd.Method Of Manufacturing A Molding With A Core
US20090049968 *Oct 10, 2008Feb 26, 2009PrecisionmedsApparatus and methods for dividing medicinal tablets and for packaging and distributing tablet portions
US20100213229 *Apr 22, 2010Aug 26, 2010Precision MedsApparatus and Methods for Dividing Medicinal Tablets and for Packaging and Distributing Tablet Portions
US20110044839 *Aug 20, 2009Feb 24, 2011General Electric Companydevice and method for hot isostatic pressing container having adjustable volume and corner
US20110091591 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 21, 2011Jason TeckoeImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
CN103009055A *Aug 17, 2012Apr 3, 2013成都易态科技有限公司Assembling production line of isostatic pressing filter element forming die
CN103009055B *Aug 17, 2012Feb 24, 2016成都易态科技有限公司等静压滤芯成型模具的组装流水线
DE10058934A1 *Nov 28, 2000Jun 6, 2002Trw Airbag Sys Gmbh & Co KgPowder or granular material pressing comprises using tablet press which has die and upper and lower stampers that can be raised and lowered
DE10159194B4 *Dec 4, 2001Oct 7, 2010Murata Mfg. Co., Ltd., Nagaokakyo-shiPulverzuführvorrichtung und Pulverformvorrichtung
EP0458764A2 *May 21, 1991Nov 27, 1991I.M.A. INDUSTRIA MACCHINE AUTOMATICHE S.p.A.Device for taking and conveying tablets coming out of a rotary tabletting machine
EP0458764A3 *May 21, 1991May 27, 1992I.M.A. Industria Macchine Automatiche S.P.A.Device for taking and conveying tablets coming out of a rotary tabletting machine
EP1600285A1May 25, 2005Nov 30, 2005EurotabApparatus for manufacturing tablets by compression
EP1600285B1 *May 25, 2005Apr 22, 2015EurotabApparatus for manufacturing tablets by compression
EP1908444A1 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 9, 2008BioProgress Technology LimitedImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
EP1908445A1 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 9, 2008BioProgress Technology LimitedImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
EP1908446A1 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 9, 2008BioProgress Technology LimitedImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
EP1908447A3 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 16, 2008BioProgress Technology LimitedImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
EP1908448A1 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 9, 2008BioProgress Technology LimitedImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
WO2005030116A1 *Sep 24, 2004Apr 7, 2005Bioprogress Technology LimitedImprovements in powder compaction and enrobing
WO2009030515A1 *Mar 18, 2008Mar 12, 2009Henkel Ag & Co. KgaaMethod and device for producing tablets
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/78, 425/261, 425/216, 425/107, 425/350, 425/193, 425/345
International ClassificationB30B11/02, B30B15/30, B30B11/08
Cooperative ClassificationB30B15/302, B30B11/08
European ClassificationB30B11/08, B30B15/30B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 23, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: STOKES-MERRILL CORPORATION, PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:S-M ACQUISITION, INC.;REEL/FRAME:007153/0053
Effective date: 19940113
Sep 23, 1994AS01Change of name
Owner name: S-M ACQUISITION, INC.
Owner name: STOKES-MERRILL CORPORATION 2 PEARL BUCK COURT BRIS
Effective date: 19940113
Apr 20, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: S-M ACQUISITION, INC., PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ALFA LAVAL AB;REEL/FRAME:006950/0340
Effective date: 19940113
Apr 20, 1994AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ALFA LAVAL AB
Owner name: S-M ACQUISITION, INC. 2 PEARL BUCK COURT BRISTOL,
Effective date: 19940113
Mar 20, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: ALFA-LAVAL AB, GUSTAVSLUNDSVAGEN-147, ALVIK, STOCK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PENNWALT CORPORATION, A PA CORP.;REEL/FRAME:005060/0780
Effective date: 19890130